President s Report Supplement

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1 President s Report Supplement Program Listing and View of IOM Finances 2012 EDITION

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3 TABLE OF CONTENTS 1 Contents Letter from the President 2 Degrees of Impact 11 President s Office and Executive Office Staff 13 Recent Publications 15 Program Listing 19 IOM Finances 63 Donors and Sponsors 69 In Memoriam 89

4 2 PRESIDENT S REPORT SUPPLEMENT 15 October 2012 Dear Friends, Shortly before I began my service as the Institute of Medicine (IOM) president 10 years ago, I had an opportunity to visit with senior staff, including our deputy executive officer, Clyde Behney. I asked Clyde, as part of my orientation, if he could confer with the board directors and put together a list of what they deemed to be the best studies the IOM had produced to date. Happy to do it, said Clyde. A while later, he came back to the office I was using. I have a question, Clyde began, with a slight smile. What exactly do you mean by best? Oh, I replied hesitantly. What do you mean by What do you mean? Well, said Clyde, do you mean the studies that were the most scientifically sound, well grounded in evidence, and methodologically correct? He took a breath. Or do you mean those studies that were widely and favorably received, whose recommendations were adopted, and that made a real difference to health? Of course, I responded, I meant both. A few days later, Clyde shared with me two lists, one for each meaning of best. I am pleased to report that there was some overlap, but certainly not all, and I took from that a key lesson. The reason it is important to do scientifically and analytically excellent work is not that this guarantees that a study will have an effect. Rather, the reason is that in case a study does result in deeper understanding, new policy, and altered practice, you want the study to have pointed in the right direction. I also learned that even important and accurate studies are seldom self-effecting to produce change for the better in policy, practice, or health. One has to focus expressly, and as much, on making a study known, understood, absorbed, and acted upon as on making it technically excellent. Through discussions with the IOM Council and others, we came to think of this as requiring a combination of strategic communication, a willingness to create new partnerships and try novel modes of outreach, and a constant focus on making a positive difference in the world. We adopted increasing the impact of what we do as an overarching objective. Although we have made progress in documenting, measuring, and increasing our impact over the past decade, there is much more to be accomplished. One of the key inhibitors of greater impact is a lack of flexible resources to apply to the communication, adoption, and implementation phases of our work. With some notable exceptions, sponsors typically consider the physical (or electronic) report as their final product, but we have learned that we instead need to think of a positive effect on policy, practice, and health as our final product. For this reason, the IOM Council is planning a concerted effort to secure new, dedicated resources to enhance the impact of what we do. You will be hearing much more about this in the months ahead, and, when the time comes, I hope you will be as generous as you can to make this targeted fundraising effort a huge success. Since our last IOM Annual Meeting, we enjoyed good fellowship and intellectual stimulation at three regional gatherings of IOM members and guests. Larry Jameson of the University of Pennsylvania hosted a regional meeting last November in Philadelphia that focused on Alzheimer s disease. In March, we gathered at the Sanford Consortium in La Jolla, led by Ed Holmes, for a fascinating session on advances in stem cell medicine, and Bill Brody graciously hosted us for dinner at the Salk Institute. Also in March, Jeff Balser, Bill Stead, and Ellen Wright Clayton of Vanderbilt

5 LETTER FROM THE PRESIDENT 3 organized a marvelous program in Nashville on the potential and pitfalls of gene and omics-based treatment for cancer. We are looking forward to the next regional meeting in December at the University of Washington in Seattle, where Paul Ramsey will host a session on the global burden of disease and its implications for the United States. The variety of topics covered in these regional meetings is suggestive of the scope of work undertaken by the IOM. This past year was an exceptionally productive one, with more than 70 IOM reports and workshop summaries released over the past 12 months. Some studies, such as the report on chimpanzees in biomedical and behavioral research, had virtually immediate impact on policy. In other instances, we observed a direct connection between earlier reports, such as our studies on access to dental care, and new legislative proposals, in this case for dental reform. Our study and workshop topics included a number of foundational efforts that promise to have a lasting influence. These included studies of under-appreciated disease problems, such as epilepsy; risk factors, such as food safety and obesity; posttraumatic stress disorder and environmental exposures in theaters of war that threaten the health of our veterans; principles to guide omics-based research that may lead to clinical interventions; public private partnerships to advance public health and promote healthy nutrition; priorities for vaccine development; methods of monitoring HIV care in the United States.; strategies to assess the safety of approved drugs and the safety of medication for children; and the integration of primary care and public health. A number of other foundational studies in health care and policy gained special salience in a year when the Supreme Court reaffirmed the essence of the Affordable Care Act. These reports covered geographic adjustment in Medicare payments, adequacy of the workforce to meet mental health needs of older adults, and an examination of how our nation can obtain the best care at lower cost. New partnerships and modes of outreach bore fruit over the past year. This spring marked the broadcast of the Emmy-nominated HBO documentary series The Weight of the Nation. Produced as a partnership between HBO and the IOM, and enlisting the expertise of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and numerous university faculty, this project aimed to reverse the rise in obesity in America. Kaiser Permanente and the Michael & Susan Dell Foundation generously supported this project, which continues with outreach to schools and communities. New infographics that convey key messages from reports, such as accelerating progress in obesity prevention and achieving the best care at lower cost, proved to be a very popular innovation this year. We increased reliance on social media, such as Facebook and Twitter, to more actively engage our audiences. The Kellogg Fund enabled us to take on new community programs based on IOM reports to promote healthy food choices and appropriate weight gain during pregnancy. And in June, the third annual Health Datapalooza conference, a partnership among IOM, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), and many others, attracted more than 1,400 attendees, more than double the previous year. A number of IOM studies, activities, and other examples of our reach and effect are described below. As you will see, the IOM demonstrated its worth in numerous ways over the past year. At the end of this letter, you will find a visual representation of the Degrees of Impact of our work, a gauge we find helpful in assessing the difference we are making, as well as an organization chart and complete listing of IOM reports and workshop summaries from the past 12 months. This supplement also describes briefly the striking array of activities and new initiatives of IOM boards, a summary of financial information, a listing of sponsors and donors whose support we gratefully

6 4 PRESIDENT S REPORT SUPPLEMENT acknowledge, and a roster of members who died this past year, yet whose example, achievements, friendship, guidance, and lasting distinctions remain very much alive with us. Making immediate impact Following the release of Accelerating Progress in Obesity Prevention: Solving the Weight of the Nation, the Hawaii State Department of Health (DOH) and the University of Hawaii issued a joint statement of support for the report. The director of the DOH referred to the IOM report as an invaluable resource for Hawaii s new Childhood Obesity Prevention Task Force. In June 2012, the DOH organized a symposium to review the IOM s recommendations and their evidence base. A special supplement published by the American Journal of Preventive Medicine and the American Journal of Public Health was released in June 2012 to complement Primary Care and Public Health: Exploring Integration to Improve Population Health. The articles included in the supplement identified the intersections between primary care and public health and the next steps for realizing integration. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued draft guidance related to evaluating and marketing modified risk tobacco products (MRTPs) in March The guidance drew on the IOM report Scientific Standards for Studies on Modified Risk Tobacco Products, which recommended what scientific evidence the FDA should require from companies sponsoring MRTPs. The FDA is considering public comments received, the IOM report, and feedback from a public FDA workshop before issuing its final guidance. Walmart rolled out a new icon in February 2012 to help its customers identify healthier foods. The Great for You symbol will appear on packaging for foods that meet nutritional criteria established by the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, the FDA, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the IOM, beginning with Walmart s Great Value brand foods, Marketside items, fruits, and vegetables. Andrea Thomas, Walmart s Senior Vice President of Sustainability, said the chain made sure its effort was aligned with the IOM s report on Front-of-Package Nutrition Rating Systems and Symbols: Promoting Healthier Choices, which recommended a simple, standard front-of-package system to help consumers make healthier choices more easily. The IOM s 2002 report on dietary reference intakes is cited as the basis for the limit on added sugars. The National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) credited the work of the IOM Roundtable on Translating Genomic-Based Research for Health and cited the workshop summary Integrating Large-Scale Genomic Information into Clinical Practice for identifying the need for a database of genetic variants with annotated information about potential clinical impact. NHGRI has presented a concept clearance to their advisory council to support a request for application to develop such a database. Duke University released a statement in support of Evolution of Translational Omics: Lessons Learned and the Path Forward. They pledged to incorporate the IOM s recommendations into their ongoing efforts to strengthen the rigor of [Duke s] research enterprise.

7 LETTER FROM THE PRESIDENT 5 In May 2012, HHS Secretary Kathleen Sebelius directed HHS operating divisions to develop metrics for charting the progress of the National HIV/AIDS Strategy that are consistent with the core indicator domains recommended in Monitoring HIV Care in the United States: Indicators and Data Systems. On July 24, 2012, Secretary Sebelius approved a set of seven common core indicators for monitoring HHS-funded HIV services aligned with the IOM recommendations as well as with indicators from the National Quality Forum and the National Committee for Quality Assurance. Beginning July 1, 2012, authors submitting manuscripts for publication in Endocrinology are now required to specify the sex of experimental animals in both the title and the methods section of the paper. Authors must also specify the sex of the animal from which any primary cells or cultures were derived; reporting the sex of cell lines will be encouraged but not required. As part of the justification for the new policy, editor Jeffrey Blaustein referenced the discussions at the 2011 IOM workshop Sex-Specific Reporting of Scientific Research whose summary by the same title was issued in Dr. Blaustein presented at the workshop on the implications of sex-specific reporting policies for journals. On the day of the release of Chimpanzees in Biomedical and Behavioral Research: Assessing the Necessity, NIH Director Francis Collins announced that the agency would not issue any new awards for research involving chimpanzees until processes for implementing the [IOM] recommendations are in place (December 15, 2011). Dr. Collins also indicated his full support for the IOM report and that he would convene a working group within the NIH Council of Councils to provide advice on the implementation of the recommendations. Chimpanzees in Biomedical and Behavioral Research: Assessing the Necessity also has the potential to guide research in the private sector. For example, the New Iberia Research Center Chimpanzee Advisory Committee, which conducts chimpanzee research supported by industry at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette, drafted a policy with de-selection criteria for chimpanzees that reflects the de-selection criteria and recommendations from the IOM s report. After the release of Safe and Effective Medicines for Children: Pediatric Studies Conducted Under BPCA and PREA, the Best Pharmaceuticals for Children Act (BPCA) and the Pediatric Research Equity Act (PREA) were permanently reauthorized under the FDA Safety and Innovation Act of Several of the law s provisions are consistent with the IOM s recommendations, in particular the new requirement for the FDA s Pediatric Review Committee and the Office of Pediatric Therapeutics to include expertise in neonatology. In addition, the FDA is to report on progress made on the recommendations in the IOM report by The PSO Services Group, one of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality s (AHRQ) listed National Patient Safety Organizations, has established a multidisciplinary National Medical Safety Board (NMSB) to conduct safety investigations. The group s action is based on a recommendation from Health IT and Patient Safety: Building Safer Systems for Better Care. When invited by health care providers, the NMSB will put

8 6 PRESIDENT S REPORT SUPPLEMENT together Go-Teams to conduct independent, on-site, nonpunitive safety investigations. Any findings and recommendations will be submitted to the providers under the protection of the Patient Safety and Quality Improvement Act of Speaking on topics of national importance Many reports issued this year deserve the attention of policy makers, practitioners, researchers, industry, and the public. Among these: Best Care at Lower Cost: The Path to Continuously Learning Health Care in America noted that emerging tools like computing power, connectivity, team-based care, and systems engineering can support the transition to a continuously learning health system Ranking Vaccines: A Prioritization Framework Phase I: Demonstration of Concept and a Software Blueprint described a decision-support model and the blueprint of software called the Strategic Multi-Attribute Ranking Tool for Vaccines, or SMART Vaccines, that should help decision makers prioritize new vaccines. Geographic Adjustment in Medicare Payment: Phase II Implications for Access, Quality, and Efficiency evaluated how suggested changes to the Medicare payment system would affect hospitals and clinical practitioners. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has already adjusted some payment to providers in line with the IOM s first report in the series, Geographic Adjustment in Medicare Payment: Phase I Improving Accuracy. CMS is continuing to evaluate all of the IOM s recommendations. The Mental Health and Substance Use Workforce for Older Adults: In Whose Hands? examined the type of care patients in the United States are currently receiving, and how to improve it. Ensuring Safe Foods and Medical Products Through Stronger Regulatory Systems Abroad, along with For the Public s Health: Investing in a Healthier Future; Living Well with Chronic Illness: A Call for Public Health Action; Breast Cancer and the Environment: A Life Course Approach; and Crisis Standards of Care: A Systems Framework for Catastrophic Disaster Response presented measures to improve and protect public health. Ethical and Scientific Issues in Studying the Safety of Approved Drugs recommended implementing a life cycle approach to drug safety oversight that could allow the FDA to better anticipate post-approval research needs and improve drug safety for all Americans. IOM guidance for federal agency research included A Review of NASA s Human Research Program s Scientific Merit Assessment Process Letter Report. Reports on military health included this year s Long-Term Health Consequences of Exposure to Burn Pits in Iraq and Afghanistan; Treatment for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in Military and Veteran Populations: Initial Assessment; and 2011 s Cognitive Rehabilitation Therapy for Traumatic Brain Injury: Evaluating the Evidence. In these and other reports, the IOM extends its decades-long record of attending to the health needs of our active-duty military and veterans. Following the release of the IOM report Epilepsy Across the Spectrum: Promoting Health and Understanding, a number of organizations released statements in support of the report, including five epilepsy health care provider groups, the American Academy of Neurology, Vision 20/20, and the Epilepsy Foundation.

9 LETTER FROM THE PRESIDENT 7 Shaping health policy The impact of some IOM reports on contemporary policy debate is often felt many years after their initial publication. Below is a brief summary of several instances where past reports were particularly influential this year: Government agencies Three NIH program announcements were released in February 2012 for research on the health of LGBTI (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and intersex) populations. The background information for each announcement cites The Health of LGBT People: Building a Foundation for Better Understanding and the IOM committee s finding that the evidence related to the health of these populations is thin. In August 2012, the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) proposed substituting early-onset peripheral neuropathy for acute and subacute neuropathy on its list of diseases presumed to be connected to service-related Agent Orange exposure. The change would eliminate the requirement for compensation that symptoms must have resolved themselves 2 years after they initially appeared. The VA is receiving public comments on the proposal through October Veterans and Agent Orange: Update 2010 found limited or suggestive evidence of association between Agent Orange exposure and persistent, early-onset peripheral neuropathy. Sparked by the release of three 2006 IOM reports Emergency Care for Children: Growing Pains; Hospital-Based Emergency Care: At the Breaking Point; and Emergency Medical Services at the Crossroads the NIH began an effort to examine its research activities in emergency medicine and to hear from investigators and stakeholders in the field. The IOM reports found the emergency medical system to be overburdened, underfunded, and highly fragmented. The NIH effort led to the creation in 2012 of the Office of Emergency Care Research (OECR), a division within the NIH s National Institute of General Medical Sciences. OECR coordinates and fosters research across the NIH related to the emergency care setting. The National Prevention Council released a national prevention strategy report in which Mental and Emotional Well-Being is included as a priority area, with Preventing Mental, Emotional, and Behavioral Disorders Among Young People listed as one of the two key resources for that section, the other being the Surgeon General s mental health report. Congress The Senate HELP Subcommittee on Primary Health and Aging held a hearing on the dental crisis in the United States on February 29, IOM committee member Shelly Gehshan participated in the hearing and described the findings and recommendations from Advancing Oral Health in America and Improving Access to Oral Health Care for Vulnerable and Underserved Populations. Senator Bernard Sanders, chairman of the subcommittee, released a report in conjunction with the hearing that cited both IOM reports. Senator Bernard Sanders introduced the Comprehensive Dental Reform Act of 2012 on June 7, The bill would expand access to dental care and is directly aligned with recommendations from the IOM reports Improving Access to Oral Health Care for Vulnerable and Underserved Populations and Advancing Oral Health in America. Both IOM reports are cited in the bill s findings section.

10 8 PRESIDENT S REPORT SUPPLEMENT Professional societies and the professions The American Cancer Society (ACS) revised its methods for developing and communicating cancer screening guidelines according to the IOM s recommendations in both Clinical Practice Guidelines We Can Trust and Finding What Works in Health Care. In 2010, an ACS workgroup was convened to evaluate the process for developing cancer screening guidelines, and after the IOM reports were released in March 2011, the workgroup refined its recommendations so the ACS process would be consistent with the latest standards for clinical practice guideline development, states a December 14, 2011, JAMA article. The article includes a side-by-side comparison of the IOM s recommendations and the new ACS process, which aligns with IOM principles by creating a single generalist group for writing the guidelines, commissioning independent systematic evidence reviews, and clearly articulating the benefits, limitations, and harms associated with a screening test. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) endorsed Dietary Reference Intakes for Calcium and Vitamin D and retired its two existing statements related to calcium and vitamin D and infants, children, and adolescents (from 2006 and 2008). The AAP s endorsement of the IOM report will apply for 5 years unless retired or revised by the IOM before then. The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation s Future of Nursing: Campaign for Action has continued to make strides in implementing the recommendations from The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health. Action coalitions groups of nurses and other health care providers, employers, patients, and others have been formed in 49 states. Most coalitions have focused on, and already made progress toward, the IOM s recommendation that 80 percent of the nursing workforce have a BSN degree by Global models The Peace Corps announced a new Global Health Service Partnership (GHSP) on March 13, 2012, which will deploy physicians and nurses to serve as medical and nursing faculty members in developing countries. The new faculty members are meant to help developing countries overcome shortages of health care professionals by adding capacity and support. GHSP, funded through the President s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), is expected to begin in 2013, placing approximately 30 faculty members in Tanzania, Malawi, and Uganda. A similar concept for a global health service corps was recommended in the 2005 IOM report Healers Abroad: Americans Responding to the Human Resource Crisis in HIV/AIDS and has been advocated by many others. Vanessa Kerry, who has become executive director of the new Global Health Service Corps, which will assist the Peace Corps with program administration, worked to develop the program with Fitzhugh Mullan, who chaired the IOM report committee. Participants from an international workshop of the Forum on Drug Discovery, Development, and Translation on drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) were inspired to develop a new virtual community called The Sentinel Project on Pediatric Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis. The network is a project of Dr. Mercedes Becerra, Harvard Medical School, and Dr. Soumya Swaminathan, National Institute for Research in Tuberculosis in Chennai, India, who were introduced to each other when they co-chaired a session on pediatric drug-resistant TB at the forum s workshop in New Delhi, India, in April The aim of the network is to develop and deploy evidence-based strategies to prevent child deaths from drug-resistant TB by con-

11 LETTER FROM THE PRESIDENT 9 vening a research and learning community that will generate and disseminate knowledge and data for immediate action. As of early November 2011, more than 40 individuals from 15 countries had already joined the network. Reaching out more effectively The IOM continues to extend its reach using social media. Since last year, our Twitter followers have grown four-fold to more than 8,000 followers, and after launching the IOM s Facebook page at last year s annual meeting, we have more than 3,000 likes. More importantly, we are interacting with both influencers and the public in a two-way conversation, which we rarely are able to do outside meetings and workshops. We have been key players in the online conversation taking place alongside the real conversation during popular events such as the Health Datapalooza, the IOM Workshop on the Health Impact Assessment of New Energy Sources: Shale Gas Extraction, and the airing of the Weight of the Nation series. Social media is just one of the new media the IOM has further embraced this past year. As we work to reach a broader audience, we are increasing our use of data visualization to augment public understanding of both the evidence base and the findings of our reports. An IOM infographic explains visually, for example, the five essential areas that need improvement if the nation is to accelerate obesity prevention, as laid out in the IOM report Accelerating Progress in Obesity Prevention: Solving the Weight of the Nation (available at That infographic was published as a poster in both English and Spanish and are available for purchase. More than 5,000 copies have been distributed. This summer, the IOM released Geographic Adjustment in Medicare Payment: Phase II Implications for Access, Quality, and Efficiency, a follow-up to a 2011 report. The report provides multitudes of data, but the data are available only as a spreadsheet, requiring complicated searches to access specific data points. But this fall, we will provide a new reporting function to allow users to run their own reports to see how the IOM s recommendations would change Medicare payment in various geographic areas. And to extend the reach of the IOM report Primary Care and Public Health: Exploring Integration to Improve Population Health, we developed a slide set and video that offer a case study to make more clear how the integration of these areas can improve health. The video (available at is on YouTube as well as the IOM website, and the slides can be downloaded and presented at meetings or other venues. These new tools are important and valuable, and we continue to seek opportunities to develop them. Finally, 2012 has been a breakthrough year for the IOM s Kellogg Health of the Public Fund. Endowed by the W.K. Kellogg Foundation in 2003, the Kellogg Fund was designed to spread our messages to the public and community leaders, particularly in vulnerable or disadvantaged communities. We use the funds to develop innovative communications activities that can better reach these audiences. This year, we have embarked on two large-scale projects: the expansion of the IOM s Smart Bites program, which is a community-based program designed to provide youth and families with nutrition information to help them make informed, healthy decisions when dining out, and a campaign to reach Latina women with pregnancy weight gain recommendations. The Smart Bites program was piloted in Bowling Green, Kentucky, in , and this year we are expanding it to three new communities. The first Howard County, Maryland has been selected, and we continue to search for two others to begin in In addition, we have launched the IOM s

12 10 PRESIDENT S REPORT SUPPLEMENT first public health campaign aimed at Latina women. We have developed exciting new partnerships and materials to help spread the IOM s pregnancy weight guidelines from the 2009 report Weight Gain During Pregnancy: Reexamining the Guidelines to Mexican American women, a population at high risk for obesity and complications during pregnancy. The interest among partners has been high, and we hope that targeting a specific audience will help us have a greater impact. In addition to these activities, we will identify new Kellogg Fund projects for The IOM has a new product for the public its Perspectives. These articles offer observations and opinions of leading experts on a variety of innovations and challenges in health and health care. Designed to expand knowledge about health, IOM Perspectives comprise two forms discussion papers and commentaries. In either format, these publications provide outside experts the opportunity to reflect on current challenges in the health system and to foster insightful discussion, and they are a new means of furthering the IOM s mission. Some have already had an impact. For example, the strategies for improving quality and reducing costs outlined in A CEO Checklist for High-Value Care, an IOM discussion paper authored by CEOs from 11 health care institutions, were picked up and referenced by several news outlets following the paper s release in June The American College of Physician Executives announced support for the checklist in a June press release. Supporting new fellows Once again, we have had the privilege of enlarging our Anniversary Fellows Program this year. Since the initiation of the program in 2005, nine fellowships have been awarded. The latest fellowship to be added is sponsored by the American College of Clinical Pharmacy and the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy, and this new fellow will join us in October. We also launched the new FDA Tobacco Regulatory Science Fellowship, which is designed for mid-career professionals to gain experience and expertise to further define and develop the field of regulatory science as it relates to the regulation of tobacco products and the FDA s new authorities under the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act. The IOM could not function without its talented and dedicated staff, and every facet of our work depends on the generosity and active participation of our donors, members, and other volunteers. It is gratifying to note that member financial support increased last year, and you willingly stepped forward to serve on our commmittees, review panels, workshops, forums, and roundtables time and time again. From the bottom of my heart, I thank you for your service. Truly, the success and impact of the IOM depend utterly on you. Sincerely, Harvey V. Fineberg, M.D., Ph.D.

13 DEGREES OF IMPACT 11 Institute of Medicine Degrees of Impact Effecting Change Improved Health Outcomes Legislation Enacted Designation of Funding/Appropriations Policy Change, Including Organizational Policy Development/Revision of Guidelines Inspiring Action Legislation Introduced Development of Action Group/Task Force Advocacy Initiatives Research Initiative Implemented Basis of RFA/RFP Informing the Field Educational Efforts Subject of a Professional Meeting Subject of a Congressional Hearing/Investigation Receiving Recognition Formal Response (Agency, Sponsor, Stakeholder) Awards Spreading the Message Noteworthy Media Coverage Published Article in Journal

14 12 PRESIDENT S REPORT SUPPLEMENT Institute of Medicine Organizational Chart President Harvey V. Fineberg Home Secretary Stephen J. Ryan Foreign Secretary Jo Ivey Boufford Executive Office The Leonard D. Schaeffer Executive Officer Judith A. Salerno Deputy Executive Officer Clyde J. Behney Office of Finance and Administration Janet A. Stoll Director Office of Council and Membership Services Judith Shamir Director Office of Development Clare Flanagan Director of Development Office of Communications Lauren Tobias Director of Communications Boards Population Health and Public Health Practice Rose Marie Martinez Director Health Sciences Policy Andrew M. Pope Director Health Care Services Roger C. Herdman Director Global Health Patrick W. Kelley Director Food and Nutrition Linda D. Meyers Director Children, Youth, and Families Kimber Bogard Director African Science Academy Development Patrick W. Kelley Director Health of Select Populations Rick Erdtmann Director Health Policy Educational Programs and Fellowships Marie Michnich Director Roundtables, Forums, and Other Select Activities Food Forum Forum on Aging, Disability, and Independence Forum on Drug Discovery, Development, and Translation Forum on Global Violence Prevention Forum on Medical and Public Health Preparedness for Catastrophic Events Forum on Microbial Threats Forum on Neuroscience and Nervous System Disorders Global Forum on Innovation in Health Professional Education Health Data Initiative Health Literacy Roundtable Medical Follow-Up Agency National Cancer Policy Forum Roundtable on Environmental Health Sciences, Research, and Medicine Roundtable on the Promotion of Health Equity and the Elimination of Health Disparities Roundtable on Translating Genomic- Based Research for Health Roundtable on Value & Science-Driven Health Care

15 PRESIDENT S OFFICE AND EXECUTIVE OFFICE STAFF 13 Institute of Medicine Office of the President Harvey V. Fineberg, President Sherla Allen, Executive Assistant Morgan Heller, Assistant to the President for Special Projects Executive Office Judith A. Salerno, Leonard D. Schaeffer Executive Officer Jody Evans, Executive Assistant Clyde J. Behney, Deputy Executive Officer Sarah Ziegenhorn, Senior Program Assistant Office of the Home Secretary Stephen J. Ryan Office of the Foreign Secretary Jo Ivey Boufford Office of Council and Membership Services Judith Shamir, Director Donna D. Duncan, Deputy Director Office of Reports and Communications Lauren Tobias, Director Abbey Meltzer, Deputy Director Office of Finance and Administration Janet A. Stoll, Director Gary Walker, Deputy Director Office of Development Clare Flanagan, Director

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17 RECENT PUBLICATIONS 15 Recent Publications Digital Data Improvement Priorities for Continuous Learning in Health and Health Care Workshop Summary (September 28, 2012) Fitness Measures and Health Outcomes in Youth (September 27, 2012) Substance Use Disorders in the U.S. Armed Forces (September 17, 2012) How Far Have We Come in Reducing Health Disparities Workshop Summary (September 12, 2012) Improving Food Safety Through a One Health Approach Workshop Summary (September 10, 2012) From Neurons to Neighborhoods: An Update Workshop Summary (September 7, 2012) Best Care at Lower Cost: The Path to Continuously Learning Health Care in America (September 6, 2012) Genome-Based Therapeutics: Targeted Drug Discovery and Development Workshop Summary (September 5, 2012) Accelerating the Development of New Drugs and Diagnostics: Maximizing the Impact of the Cures Acceleration Network Workshop Summary (August 22, 2012) Post-Incident Recovery Considerations of the Health Care Service Delivery Infrastructure Workshop Summary (July 31, 2012) A Review of NASA s Human Research Program s Scientific Merit Assessment Processes Letter Report (July 26, 2012) How Can Health Care Organizations Become More Health Literate? Workshop Summary (July 18, 2012) Geographic Adjustment in Medicare Payment: Phase II Implications for Access, Quality, and Efficiency (July 17, 2012) Informatics Needs and Challenges in Cancer Research Workshop Summary (July 16, 2012) Treatment for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in Military and Veteran Populations: Initial Assessment (July 13, 2012) The Mental Health and Substance Use Workforce for Older Adults: In Whose Hands? (July 10, 2012)

18 16 PRESIDENT S REPORT SUPPLEMENT Research Methods to Assess Dietary Intake and Program Participation in Child Day Care: Application to the Child and Adult Care Food Program Workshop Summary (June 25, 2012) Communications and Technology for Violence Prevention Workshop Summary (June 13, 2012) Building Public Private Partnerships in Food and Nutrition Workshop Summary (June 5, 2012) International Animal Research Regulations: Impact on Neuroscience Research Workshop Summary (May 29, 2012) Public Engagement on Facilitating Access to Antiviral Medications and Information in an Influenza Pandemic Workshop Series Summary (May 17, 2012) Alliances for Obesity Prevention: Finding Common Ground Workshop Summary (May 11, 2012) Ranking Vaccines: A Prioritization Framework Phase I: Demonstration of Concept and a Software Blueprint (May 10, 2012) Accelerating Progress in Obesity Prevention: Solving the Weight of the Nation (May 8, 2012) Ethical and Scientific Issues in Studying the Safety of Approved Drugs (May 1, 2012) Facing the Reality of Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis in India: Challenges and Potential Solutions Summary of a Joint Workshop by the Institute of Medicine, the Indian National Science Academy, and the Indian Council of Medical Research (April 27, 2012) Envisioning a Transformed Clinical Trials Enterprise in the United States: Establishing an Agenda for 2020 Workshop Summary (April 13, 2012) For the Public s Health: Investing in a Healthier Future (April 10, 2012) Building a Resilient Workforce: Opportunities for the Department of Homeland Security Workshop Summary (April 9, 2012) Child Maltreatment Research, Policy, and Practice for the Next Decade Workshop Summary (April 5, 2012) Ensuring Safe Foods and Medical Products Through Stronger Regulatory Systems Abroad (April 4, 2012) The Role of Obesity in Cancer Survival and Recurrence Workshop Summary (April 3, 2012) Country-Level Decision Making for Control of Chronic Diseases Workshop Summary (April 2, 2012)

19 RECENT PUBLICATIONS 17 Epilepsy Across the Spectrum: Promoting Health and Understanding (March 30, 2012) Primary Care and Public Health: Exploring Integration to Improve Population Health (March 28, 2012) Evolution of Translational Omics: Lessons Learned and the Path Forward (March 23, 2012) Crisis Standards of Care: A Systems Framework for Catastrophic Disaster Response (March 21, 2012) Genome-Based Diagnostics: Clarifying Pathways to Clinical Use Workshop Summary (March 20, 2012) Nutrition and Healthy Aging in the Community Workshop Summary (March 20, 2012) Monitoring HIV Care in the United States: Indicators and Data Systems (March 15, 2012) Safe and Effective Medicines for Children: Pediatric Studies Conducted Under BPCA and PREA (February 29, 2012) Measuring Progress in Obesity Prevention Workshop Report (February 23, 2012) Alzheimer s Diagnostic Guideline Validation: Exploration of Next Steps Workshop Summary (February 16, 2012) Facilitating State Health Exchange Communication Through the Use of Health Literate Practices Workshop Summary (February 14, 2012) Living Well with Chronic Illness: A Call for Public Health Action (January 31, 2012) Barriers to Integrating Crisis Standards of Care Principles into International Disaster Response Plans Workshop Summary (January 23, 2012) Sex-Specific Reporting of Scientific Research Workshop Summary (January 13, 2012) Strengthening a Workforce for Innovative Regulatory Science in Therapeutics Development Workshop Summary (December 21, 2011) Chimpanzees in Biomedical and Behavioral Research: Assessing the Necessity (December 15, 2011) Scientific Standards for Studies on Modified Risk Tobacco Products (December 14, 2011) Allied Health Workforce and Services Workshop Summary (December 8, 2011)

20 18 PRESIDENT S REPORT SUPPLEMENT Breast Cancer and the Environment: A Life Course Approach (December 7, 2011) Information Sharing and Collaboration: Applications to Integrated Biosurveillance Workshop Summary (November 30, 2011) The Science and Applications of Synthetic and Systems Biology Workshop Summary (November 23, 2011) The Early Childhood Care and Education Workforce: Challenges and Opportunities A Workshop Report (November 15, 2011) Improving Health Literacy Within a State Workshop Summary (November 14, 2011) Integrating Large-Scale Genomic Information into Clinical Practice Workshop Summary (November 11, 2011) Health IT and Patient Safety: Building Safer Systems for Better Care (November 8, 2011) Promoting Health Literacy to Encourage Prevention and Wellness Workshop Summary (November 1, 2011) Long-Term Health Consequences of Exposure to Burn Pits in Iraq and Afghanistan (October 31, 2011) Facilitating Collaborations to Develop Combination Investigational Cancer Therapies Workshop Summary (October 31, 2011) Social and Economic Costs of Violence Workshop Summary (October 25, 2011) Front-of-Package Nutrition Rating Systems and Symbols: Promoting Healthier Choices (October 20, 2011) Public Engagement and Clinical Trials: New Models and Disruptive Technologies Workshop Summary (October 14, 2011) Cognitive Rehabilitation Therapy for Traumatic Brain Injury: Evaluating the Evidence (October 11, 2011) Essential Health Benefits: Balancing Coverage and Cost (October 6, 2011) The Richard and Hinda Rosenthal Lecture 2011: New Frontiers in Patient Safety (October 5, 2011) Patients Charting the Course: Citizen Engagement in the Learning Health System Workshop Summary (October 3, 2011)

21 PROGRAM LISTING 19 Board on African Science Academy Development Initiative Patrick W. Kelley, M.D., Director Organized: 2004 The principal goal of the African Science Academy Development Initiative (ASADI) is to advance the ability of nations in Africa to address their most serious health challenges by (1) enhancing the capacity of African academies of science to provide independent, evidence-based policy advice to their governments, and (2) building African governments appreciation of and demand for advice from these academies. This 10-year effort engages nationally-based science academies in Cameroon, Ghana, Kenya, Nigeria, Senegal, South Africa, Uganda, and, most recently, Ethiopia. The African regional science academy, the African Academy of Sciences (AAS), and the Network of African Science Academies (NASAC) are also engaged. The specific objectives of this initiative include the following: Select African academies of science with the greatest promise to provide evidence-based health policy advice; Provide training for staff members from each participating academy to prepare them to support the conduct of policy advisory activities and manage finances; Promote continuous discussion and debate of evidence-based policy development in crosscutting areas of health and sustainable development; Strengthen academy policy advisory capacity through mentored policy advisory activities; Strengthen substantive, managerial, and fiscal independence of academies of science through support of independent policy advisory activities and financially matched activities; Develop human, material, and organizational infrastructure in each academy to support the contribution of science to policy advisory work in the future; Build a regional alliance through annual symposia and learning collaboratives to enable participating academies and leading scientists in non-participating countries to learn from and support each other as they develop their roles; Develop demand from African governments and civil society organizations for evidencebased policy advice from African academies of science; and Externally evaluate project outcomes and the effectiveness of the processes used to achieve project outcomes.

22 20 PRESIDENT S REPORT SUPPLEMENT Recent Activities Cameroon Academy of Sciences (CAS) The Cameroon Academy of Sciences undertook a consensus study on onchocheriasis control and a dissemination activity on the IOM report: Promoting Cardiovascular Health in the Developing World: A Critical Challenge to Achieve Global Health during this reporting period. CAS currently receives a subvention from their government and also participates in monthly mentoring sessions via Skype with ASADI staff. Ethiopian Academy of Sciences (EAS) The Ethiopian Academy of Sciences convened three convening activities during the reporting period: A science congress organized under the theme Science and Technology Survival of a Nation Workshop on Engineering and Technology in Ethiopia: Challenges and Prospects National workshop on the Status of Agricultural Science & Technology in Ethiopia With the ASADI grant, the EAS staff strength has grown from one person to six with the recent hire of an Executive Director. Also, the EAS recently moved into an office building donated by the Ethiopian government and is currently working with the government to institute a government subvention. Furthermore, monthly mentoring sessions were conducted via video conference technology. Nigerian Academy of Science (NAS) The Nigerian Academy of Science held two workshops in execution of its PREVIEW project. PREVIEW is a contract with the Nigerian Ministry of Health to focus on the use of evidence-based research and other information in health policy making and has the ultimate goal of strengthening health care systems in Nigeria. This activity was funded by the World Health Organization. Furthermore, the NAS published a report in coordination with the 2012 ASADI Annual Meeting on the topic of climate change in Africa. As hosts of the 2012 ASADI Annual Meeting, the NAS conducted three planning meetings, including a 3-day international retreat held at the Rockefeller Foundation Bellagio Center in Italy in February 2012 to shape the meeting agenda. Uganda National Academy of Science (UNAS) UNAS undertook the following policy advisory activities: Establishment of a standing committee on malaria vaccines; Conduct of Workshop on A Long-Term Strategy for HIV/AIDS in Uganda: A Call to Action;

23 PROGRAM LISTING 21 Dissemination activities for the nutritionalization of agriculture study published in 2010; and Host for the 2011 ASADI Annual Meeting and release of the publication Informing Strategies, Improving Results: The Role of Civil Society Organisations in Managing for Results in Africa s Health Sector Academy of Science of South Africa (ASSAf) As reported last year, South African participation in the ASADI program ended in 2011 after ASSAf attained its developmental goal of self-sustainability. However, ASSAf continues to play a leadership role in helping to develop academies in the South Africa Development Community (SADC), namely those in Namibia, Mozambique, Mauritius, and Zimbabwe Annual Meeting The seventh annual ASADI meeting, Aid Effectiveness in Africa s Health Sector, was hosted by the Uganda National Academy of Sciences on November, 13-16, 2011 in Kampala, Uganda. The conference illuminated the role of civil society organizations in addressing government and donor concerns in aid and development effectiveness. The report Informing Strategies, Improving Results: The Role of Civil Society Organisations in Managing for Results in Africa s Health Sector was launched Annual Meeting Planning is currently under way for Annual Meeting of the African Science Academies (AMASA, or A8), formerly known as the Annual International Meeting of the African Science Academy Development Initiative (ASADI 8), as the African academies gradually embrace a more independent, post-asadi context. AMASA will be hosted by the Nigerian Academy of Sciences in Lagos on November 11-14, The focus of this year s meeting is climate change and its impact on health and food security in Africa. As part of the preparations, a 3-day international retreat was held at the Rockefeller Foundation Bellagio Center in Italy in February This groundbreaking initiative of the African science academies explored a common vision and opportunities related to climate change effects in Africa among international experts, donors, and vested stakeholders. The outcome of this retreat established the key themes of the upcoming annual meeting. Board Roster Enriqueta C. Bond (Chair), Marshall, VA Jo Ivey Boufford (Ex Officio, Foreign Secretary, IOM), New York Academy of Medicine, New York, NY Michael Clegg (Ex Officio, Foreign Secretary, NAS), Department of Botany and Plant Sciences, University of California, Riverside, CA

24 22 PRESIDENT S REPORT SUPPLEMENT Venkatesh Narayanamurti (Ex Officio, Foreign Secretary, NAE), Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Boston, MA Princeton Lyman, Council on Foreign Relations, Washington, DC Narciso Matos, Foundation for Community Development, Maputo, Mozambique Cheikh Mbacké, William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, Dakar, Senegal Romain Murenzi, TWAS The Academy of Sciences for the Developing World, Trieste, Italy Board on Children, Youth, and Families Kimber Bogard, Ph.D., Director Organized: 1993 The Board on Children, Youth, and Families (BCYF) is a non-governmental, scientific unit within the National Academy of Sciences that convenes top experts from across multiple disciplines to analyze the best available evidence on critical issues facing children, youth, and families today. Our ability to evaluate research simultaneously from the perspectives of health, education, and the social and behavioral sciences allows us to shed light on innovative and influential solutions to inform the nation. Our range of methods from rapidly convened workshops to consensus reports allows us to respond with the timeliness and depth required to make the largest possible impact on the health and well-being of children, youth, and their families throughout the entire life cycle. BCYF reports are independent analyses of the science that go through a rigorous external peer review process. Therefore, our recommendations are trusted and implemented at every level, from policy makers to practitioners. Recent Reports 2012 From Neurons to Neighborhoods: An Update Workshop Summary Child Maltreatment Research, Policy, and Practice for the Next Decade Workshop Summary The Early Childhood Care and Education Workforce: Challenges and Opportunities A Workshop Report 2011 Toward an Integrated Science of Research on Families Workshop Report Child and Adolescent Health and Health Care Quality: Measuring What Matters

25 PROGRAM LISTING 23 Advancing Oral Health in America (with Board on Health Care Services) Improving Access to Oral Health Care for Vulnerable and Underserved Populations 2010 The Science of Adolescent Risk-Taking Workshop Report Current Activities/Studies in Progress IOM report on pregnancy weight gain guidelines: dissemination workshops and related activities (with Food and Nutrition Board) Commercial Sexual Exploitation and Sex Trafficking of Minors in the United States Child Maltreatment Research, Policy, and Practice for the Next Generation: Phase Two Follow-up to the 1982 IOM study Research Issues in the Assessment of Birth Settings: A Workshop Investing in Young Children Globally: A Planning Meeting Strengthening the Workforce from the Early Years to the Early Grades: A Planning Meeting Forum on Global Violence Prevention (with Board on Global Health) Outcome and Impact Evaluation of Global HIV/AIDS Programs Implemented Under the Lantos-Hyde Act of 2008 (with Board on Global Health) Projects in Development Sports-Related Concussions in Youth Improving the Health, Safety and Well-being of Young Adults, a Hidden Population: A Workshop Fostering Early School Success for English Learners: Toward New Directions in Policy, Practice, and Research Promoting Children s Cognitive, Affective, and Behavioral Health Forum Consensus Standards for Benefit-Cost Analysis of Preventive Interventions for Children, Youth, and Families Promoting Health and Chronic Illness Management for Adolescents Transitioning to Adulthood Neurocognitive and Neurodevelopmental Effects of Complex Illness in Young Children A Developmental Approach to Childhood Obesity: The Fetal and Early Childhood Years Community Programs to Promote Youth Development: Moving the Agenda Forward Multi-Generational Families under One Roof: Health, Economics, and Overall Well-Being Promoting Positive School Contexts to Reduce Bullying Behaviors and Promote Learning

26 24 PRESIDENT S REPORT SUPPLEMENT Board Roster Bernard Guyer (Chair), Bloomberg School of Public Health, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD Shari Barkin, Department of Pediatrics, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN Thomas F. Boat, Health Center, College of Medicine, University of Cincinnati, OH David A. Brent, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, PA B. J. Casey, Departments of Psychiatry, Neurology, and Neuroscience, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, NY Debbie I. Chang, Nemours Health and Prevention Services, Newark, DE Janet M. Currie, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton University, NJ Patrick H. DeLeon, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD Angela Diaz, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY Gary W. Evans, Department of Design & Environmental Analysis and Department of Human Development, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY Elena Fuentes-Afflick, University of California, San Francisco, and San Francisco General Hospital, CA Eugene E. Garcia, Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College, Arizona State University J. David Hawkins, School of Social Work, University of Washington, Seattle Nancy S. Landale, Department of Sociology, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park Jens Ludwig, Harris School of Public Policy Studies, University of Chicago, IL Ann S. Masten, Institute of Child Development, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis Susan E. Mayer, Harris Graduate School of Public Policy Studies, University of Chicago Bruce S. McEwen, Harold and Margaret Milliken Hatch Laboratory of Neuroendocrinology, The Rockefeller University, New York, NY Andrew Meltzoff, Department of Psychology, University of Washington, Seattle Pamela Morris, Department of Applied Psychology, The Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development, New York University, New York Velma McBride Murry, Peabody College, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN

27 PROGRAM LISTING 25 Food and Nutrition Board Linda D. Meyers, Ph.D., Director Organized: 1940 The Food and Nutrition Board (FNB) is a focal point for activities of the IOM concerned with food, nutrition, obesity prevention, and food safety. The primary goals are To provide visionary leadership in the effective application of the full range of nutrition and food sciences to improve human health; To contribute at national and global levels to the enhancement of child growth and development; prevention of diet-related deficiencies and chronic diseases; and improvement of physical and cognitive function, health, and well-being; To decrease the incidence of foodborne diseases to improve human health nationally and globally; and To apply scientific knowledge to advise on policies and approaches to eliminate, reduce, or control the natural, inadvertent, or intentional contamination of the food supply. Food Forum Laura Pillsbury, Director In 2013, the Food Forum will be celebrating its 20th anniversary. The forum was established in 1993 to allow leaders from the food industry, government, consumer interest groups, and academia to openly discuss food-related issues in a neutral setting. Most recently, the Food Forum has facilitated discussions to promote multisectoral cooperation and innovation around the following topics: Is Healthy Food Sustainable and Secure? The Future of Performance Standards in Food Safety: Innovation Ahead? The Human Microbiome, Diet, and Health Building Public Private Partnerships in Food and Nutrition Informing Health and Food Policy Through Systematic Reviews The Impact of Food Safety on Global Trade: Supply Chain and Policy/Regulatory Approaches to Import Safety Recent Reports 2012 Research Methods to Assess Dietary Intake and Program Participation in Child Day Care Application to the Child and Adult Care Food Program Workshop Summary

28 26 PRESIDENT S REPORT SUPPLEMENT Building Public-Private Partnerships in Food and Nutrition Workshop Summary Alliances for Obesity Prevention: Finding Common Ground Workshop Summary Accelerating Progress in Obesity Prevention: Solving the Weight of the Nation Ensuring Safe Foods and Drugs Through Stronger Regulatory Systems Abroad Nutrition and Healthy Aging in the Community Workshop Summary Measuring Progress in Obesity Prevention Workshop Report 2011 Front-of-Package Nutrition Rating Systems and Symbols: Promoting Healthier Choices Updating the USDA National Breastfeeding Campaign Workshop Summary Legal Strategies in Childhood Obesity Prevention Workshop Summary Leveraging Food Technology for Obesity Prevention and Reduction Efforts Workshop Summary Early Childhood Obesity Prevention Policies Nutrition and Traumatic Brain Injury: Improving Acute and Subacute Health Outcomes in Military Personnel Hunger and Obesity: Understanding a Food Insecurity Paradigm Workshop Summary Perspectives on Biomarker and Surrogate Endpoint Evaluation Discussion Forum Summary 2010 Dietary Reference Intakes for Calcium and Vitamin D Planning a WIC Research Agenda Workshop Summary Child and Adult Care Food Program: Aligning Dietary Guidance for All Providing Healthy and Safe Foods As We Age Workshop Summary Examination of Front-of-Package Nutrition Rating Systems and Symbols: Phase I Report Enhancing Food Safety: The Role of the Food and Drug Administration (with Division of Earth and Life Studies) Evaluation of Biomarkers and Surrogate Endpoints in Chronic Disease (with Board on Health Care Services and Board on Health Sciences Policy) Bridging the Evidence Gap in Obesity Prevention: A Framework to Inform Decision Making Strategies to Reduce Sodium Intake in the United States Perspectives from the United Kingdom and United States Policy Makers on Obesity Prevention Workshop Summary

29 PROGRAM LISTING 27 Current Activities/Studies in Progress Adequacy of Food Resources and SNAP Allotments Food Forum Evaluating Progress of Obesity Prevention Efforts Fitness Measures and Health Outcomes in Youth Physical Activity and Physical Education in Schools Standing Committee on Military Nutrition Research Standing Committee on Childhood Obesity Prevention The Human Microbiome, Diet, and Health: A Food Forum Workshop True Cost of Food: A Workshop Content coordination for HBO s The Weight of the Nation for Kids Pregnancy weight gain guidelines: enhanced dissemination and derivative products (with Board on Children, Youth, and Families) Projects in Development Dietary Reference Intakes future plans Assessment of Recent Evidence on Sodium Reduction and Health Outcomes (with Board on Population Health and Public Health Practice) Human Health and Antibiotic Use in Agriculture (with Board on Agriculture and Natural Resources) Nutrition and Food Sciences: Opportunities for Health Nutrition, Trauma and the Brain Phase II True Cost of Food (consensus study) (with Board on Agriculture and Natural Resources) Chemical Contaminants in Food Workshop on a Developmental Approach to Childhood Obesity: The Fetal and Early Childhood Years (with Board on Children, Youth, and Families) A Food Forum workshop on Nutrition, Health, and Sustainability (working title) (with Roundtable on Environmental Health Sciences, Research and Medicine) A Standing Committee on Childhood Obesity Prevention workshop on Emerging Issues in Food and Beverage Marketing to Children and Youth Board Roster Suzanne R. Murphy (Chair), Researcher (Professor) Emeritus, University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu, HI

30 28 PRESIDENT S REPORT SUPPLEMENT Cheryl A. M. Anderson, Assistant Scientist, Department of Epidemiology, The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD Patsy M. Brannon, Professor, Division of Nutritional Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY Fergus M. Clydesdale, Department of Food Science, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA Richard J. Deckelbaum, Institute of Food and Nutrition, Columbia University, New York, NY Sharon M. Donovan, Professor and Melissa M. Noel Endowed Chair in Nutrition and Health, Department of Food Science and Health, University of Illinois, Urbana Lee-Ann Jaykus, Professor, Department of Food, Bioprocessing, and Nutritional Sciences, North Carolina State University, Raleigh Gordon Jensen, Department of Nutritional Sciences, Pennsylvania State University, University Park Joanne R. Lupton, Distinguished Professor, Regents Professor and University Faculty Fellow, William W. Allen Endowed Chair in Nutrition, Texas A&M University, College Station Susan T. Mayne, Division of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT James M. Ntambi, Professor of Biochemistry, Steenbock Professor and Chair, Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Wisconsin, Madison Rafael Pérez-Escamilla, Professor of Epidemiology and Public Health, Director, Office of Community Health, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT Martin A. Philbert, Dean and Professor, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor Mary T. Story, Professor, Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis Patrick J. Stover, Division of Nutritional Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY Connie M. Weaver, Distinguished Professor and Head, Department of Food and Nutrition, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN Board on Global Health Patrick W. Kelley, M.D., Director Organized: 1985 Established in 1985, the Board on Global Health (BGH) is concerned with advancing the health of populations worldwide. This involves addressing developing country health issues, enhancing the United States role in global health, and addressing health issues that have implications for

31 PROGRAM LISTING 29 U.S. health policy. The board identifies priority issues in these areas and facilitates provision of evidence-based guidance and recommendations to the U.S. government, international organizations, foundations, and non-governmental organizations. The board also collaborates with medical academies in other countries, developed and developing, on health issues of mutual concern. Board members have broad expertise in international health and experience in a range of countries. The board focuses on public health programs for prevention and control of disease and disability. This includes assessment of biomedical knowledge, research, and opportunities; reduction of behavioral, socioeconomic, and environmental risks to public health; recognition and guidance on ethical issues in public health; and recognition of opportunities to apply scientific knowledge to public policy making. These activities frequently include addressing the adequacy of the scientific base to support improvements in health and health care, along with the availability of trained personnel, institutional capacity, and supportive partnerships and collaborations. Forum on Microbial Threats Eileen Choffnes, Director The Forum on Microbial Threats was established by the IOM in 1996 to provide a structured opportunity for discussion of topics related to basic and applied research on the prevention, detection, and management of emerging, re-emerging, and novel infectious diseases of humans, plants, and animals and to examine critical and possibly contentious scientific and policy issues of shared concern among forum members and the global public health communities. The forum s work is broadly categorized in the following interest areas: infectious disease surveillance and response; diagnosis and treatment; research directions and priorities; education and training; and public communication. Since its creation, the issues and challenges of emerging, reemerging, and novel infectious diseases being explored by the forum continue to be of major global public health importance. The summary reports of forum workshops have highlighted and often anticipated some of the most important infectious disease issues of the last decade. These activities have resulted in many workshop summary reports that are highly relevant to the issue of antimicrobial resistance. Forum on Global Violence Prevention Deepali Patel, Director The Forum on Global Violence Prevention was established by the IOM and the NRC in July 2010 to explore cross-cutting topics related to the prevention of child and elder abuse, sexual and intimate partner violence, youth and collective violence, and self-directed violence. Since its launch in 2010, the forum and its 30 formally appointed members have promoted multidisciplinary prevention through public workshops on cross-cutting issues in the prevention of violence: Preventing Violence Against Women and Children Social and Economic Costs of Violence: The Value of Prevention

32 30 PRESIDENT S REPORT SUPPLEMENT Communications and Technology for Violence Prevention The Contagion of Violence The forum has a global scope, with a special emphasis on low- and middle-income countries that highlights bidirectional learning opportunities and emphasizes an evidence-based prevention approach. Global Forum on Innovation in Health Professional Education Patricia Cuff, Director The Global Forum on Innovation in Health Professional Education was formally launched in March 2012 to meet the challenges of the 21st century. Many of these ideas (and the inspiration for this forum) were drawn from the RWJF-IOM Future of Nursing report and the Lancet Commission report Health Professionals for a New Century: Transforming Education to Strengthen Health Systems in an Interdependent World. The first forum workshop, Educating for Practice: Improving Health by Linking Education to Practice Using Interprofessional Education took place July 29 30, The forum s mission is to apply an ongoing, multinational, multidisciplinary approach to illuminate promising innovations for achieving reforms in the instructional and institutional spheres. The Forum aims to have appointed members including academic experts. It is co-chaired by two IOM members, a physician and a nurse. The Forum will initially sponsor two major workshops per year whose topics will be selected by the Forum membership. Regional Innovation Clusters In parallel with its convening function of the forum, the education forum has four affiliated, university-based innovation clusters, one in Canada, two in Africa, and one in India. These innovation clusters each represent formal partnerships among at least three institutions: a medical school, a nursing school, and a public health school. Approximately 2 hours of each 2-day forum workshop will be set aside to report on and discuss the ongoing work of the four innovation clusters. This will allow the regional clusters to share what they are learning, connect with partners around the world, and receive assistance from the entire forum community. They will be connected to the workshops through a videoconference link. If funds are sufficient, the workshops will also be webcast for the benefit of a global audience. Recent Reports 2012 Improving Food Safety Through a One Health Approach Workshop Summary Communications and Technology for Violence Prevention Workshop Summary Ensuring Safe Foods and Medical Products Through Stronger Regulatory Systems Abroad Country-Level Decision Making for Control of Chronic Diseases Workshop Summary

33 PROGRAM LISTING The Science and Applications of Synthetic and Systems Biology Workshop Summary Social and Economic Costs of Violence Workshop Summary Preventing Violence against Women and Children Workshop Summary Fungal Diseases: An Emerging Threat to Human, Animal, and Plant Health Workshop Summary The Causes and Impacts of Neglected Tropical and Zoonotic Diseases: Opportunities for Integrated Intervention Strategies Workshop Summary 2010 Preparing for the Future of HIV/AIDS in Africa: A Shared Responsibility Antibiotic Resistance: Implications for Global Health and Novel Intervention Strategies Workshop Summary Strategic Approach to the Evaluation of Programs Implemented Under the Tom Lantos and Henry J. Hyde U.S. Global Leadership Against HIV/AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria Reauthorization Act of 2008 Promoting Cardiovascular Health in the Developing World: A Critical Challenge to Achieve Global Health Infectious Disease Movement in a Borderless World: The Impact of Global Governance Workshop Summary Current Activities/Studies in Progress Global cardiovascular disease dissemination activities Forum on Microbial Threats Forum on Global Violence Prevention Global Forum on Innovation in Health Professional Education HIV/AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria Reauthorization Act of 2008 PEPFAR II Evaluation Strengthening Core Elements of Food and Drug Regulatory Systems in Developing Countries Dissemination Activities Ongoing activities of the Global Forum on Health Professional Education Understanding the Global Public Health Implications of Substandard, Falsified, and Counterfeit Medical Products

34 32 PRESIDENT S REPORT SUPPLEMENT Projects in Development Global Roundtable on Non-Communicable Disease Control Forum on Public Private Partnerships for Global Health Standing Committee on the Economic Transition of Health Board Roster Richard Guerrant (Chair), University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville Jo Ivey Boufford (IOM Foreign Secretary), New York Academy of Medicine, New York Claire V. Broome, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, GA Jacquelyn C. Campbell, Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing, Baltimore, MD Thomas J. Coates, University of California Global Health Institute, Los Angeles Valentin Fuster, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY Jacob A. Gayle, Medtronic Foundation, Minneapolis, MN Glenda E. Gray, Chris Hani Baragwanath Hospital, Witwatersrand, South Africa Stephen W. Hargarten, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee Olufunmilayo F. Olopade, University of Chicago, IL James Hospedales, Pan American Health Organization/World Health Organziation, Washington, DC Peter J. Hotez, Sabin Vaccine Institute, Houston, TX Clarion Johnson, Exxon Mobil, Fairfax, VA Fitzhugh Mullan, George Washington University, Washington, DC Guy H. Palmer, Washington State University, Pullman Thomas C. Quinn, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD Jennifer Prah Ruger, Yale University, New Haven, CT Board on Health Care Services Roger C. Herdman, M.D., Director Organized: 1981 The Board on Health Care Services (HCS) oversees activities of the IOM concerned with the quality, effectiveness, organization, financing, and delivery of health care services. The board identifies high-priority health issues and provides guidance on the conduct of studies and other projects. Most of the board s studies are conducted by committees appointed by the IOM and comprise a mix

35 PROGRAM LISTING 33 of IOM members, an occasional board member, and outside experts. The board seeks to advance the well-being of people and communities by promoting independent, reliable scholarly analysis and advice to government, professionals, and other members of the health industry, patients, and the public in general. The board s priority areas for examination have varied slightly over the years but have been generally consistent within the current areas: Quality and safety of health care Health information technology Health care organization Health care workforce education, practice, and financing Insurance coverage, financing of services, and cost control Human behavior and communications Cancer care and policy National Cancer Policy Forum Sharyl Nass, Director The IOM established the National Cancer Policy Forum (NCPF) in 2005 to identify emerging highpriority policy issues in the nation s effort to combat cancer and to examine those issues by convening activities that promote discussion about potential opportunities for action. The NCPF provides a continual focus within the IOM on cancer research and care, addressing issues in science, clinical medicine, public health, and public policy relevant to the goal of reducing the cancer burden through prevention and by improving outcomes for those diagnosed with cancer. The NCPF includes 30 members representing a broad range of stakeholders in the National Cancer Program, including patient advocates, physicians, basic, translational, and clinical scientists, federal agencies, professional organizations, and the pharmaceutical industry, and has addressed a wide variety of topics, including Enhancing collaborations to accelerate research and development Improving the quality and value of cancer and survivorship care The role of obesity and tobacco use in cancer incidence and mortality Developing tools and technologies to enhance cancer research and care Recent Reports 2012 Geographic Adjustment in Medicare Payment: Phase II Implications for Access, Quality, and Efficiency Informatics Needs and Challenges in Cancer Research Workshop Summary

36 34 PRESIDENT S REPORT SUPPLEMENT The Mental Health and Substance Use Workforce for Older Adults: In Whose Hands? The Role of Obesity in Cancer Survival and Recurrence Workshop Summary Evolution of Translational Omics: Lessons Learned and the Path Forward 2011 Allied Health Workforce and Services Workshop Summary Breast Cancer and the Environment: A Life Course Approach (with Board on Health Sciences Policy) Health IT and Patient Safety: Building Safer Systems for Better Care Facilitating Collaborations to Develop Combination Investigational Cancer Therapies Workshop Summary Essential Health Benefits: Balancing Coverage and Cost Geographic Adjustment in Medicare Payment: Phase I Improving Accuracy, Second Edition Perspectives on Essential Health Benefits Workshop Report Implementing a National Cancer Clinical Trials System for the 21st Century Workshop Summary Improving Access to Oral Health Care for Vulnerable and Underserved Populations (with Board on Children, Youth, and Families) Patient-Centered Cancer Treatment Planning: Improving the Quality of Oncology Care Workshop Summary Child and Adolescent Health and Health Care Quality: Measuring What Matters Advancing Oral Health in America (with Board on Children, Youth, and Families) Finding What Works in Health Care: Standards for Systematic Reviews Clinical Practice Guidelines We Can Trust The National Cancer Policy Summit: Opportunities and Challenges in Cancer Research and Care Nanotechnology and Oncology - Workshop Summary Perspectives on Biomarker and Surrogate Endpoint Evaluation - Discussion Forum Summary 2010 Extending the Spectrum of Precompetitive Collaboration in Oncology Research - Workshop Summary Foundation for Evidence-Driven Practice: A Rapid Learning System in Cancer Care - Workshop Summary Evaluation of Biomarkers and Surrogate Endpoints in Chronic Disease (with Board on Health Sciences Policy and Food and Nutrition Board)

37 PROGRAM LISTING 35 A National Cancer Clinical Trials System for the 21st Century: Reinvigorating the NCI Cooperative Group Program Future Directions for the National Healthcare Quality and Disparities Reports Regionalizing Emergency Care Workshop Summary Policy Issues in the Development of Personalized Medicine in Oncology Workshop Summary Current Activities/Studies in Progress National Cancer Policy Forum Governance and Financing of Graduate Medical Education Improving the Quality of Cancer Care: Addressing the Challenges of an Aging Population Study on Geographic Variation in Health Care Spending and Promotion of High-Value Care The Role of Telehealth in an Evolving Health Care Environment: A Workshop Mental Health Workforce for Geriatric Populations Study on Geographic Adjustment Factors in Medicare Payment Projects in Development Study on Family Caregiving Consensus study on Policy Issues in the Clinical Development and Use of Biomarkers for Molecularly Targeted Therapies (with Board on Health Sciences Policy) Board Roster Gail R. Wilensky (Chair), Senior Fellow, Project Hope, Melwood, VA Joseph R. Baker, President, Medicare Rights Center, New York, NY Elisabeth Belmont, Corporate Counsel, MaineHealth, Portland Robert A. Berenson, Institute Fellow, The Urban Institute, Washington, DC Lisa Bero, Professor, Department of Clinical Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy and Institute for Health Policy Studies, School of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco David Blumenthal, Samuel O. Thier Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School; Professor of Health Care Policy, Massachusetts General Hospital, Mongan Institute for Health Policy, Boston Stuart Butler, Distinguished Fellow and Director, Center for Policy Innovation, The Heritage Foundation, Washington, DC

38 36 PRESIDENT S REPORT SUPPLEMENT Jon B. Christianson, James A. Hamilton Chair in Health Policy and Management Division of Health Policy and Management School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis Jack Ebeler, Principal, Health Policy Alternatives, Inc. Washington, DC Robert S. Galvin, Chief Executive Officer, Equity Healthcare; Executive Director, Corporate Private Equity, The Blackstone Group, New York, NY Rebekah E. Gee, Assistant Professor, Louisiana State University (LSU) Schools of Medicine and Public Health; Birth Outcomes Director, Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals, LSU School of Public Health, Baton Rouge Carmen R. Green, Professor of Anesthesiology, Obstetrics and Gynecology, and Health Management and Policy, Schools of Medicine and Public Health, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor Mareasa R. Isaacs, Executive Director, National Alliance Of Multi-Ethnic Behavioral Health Associations, Bethesda, MD Brent C. James, Vice President for Medical Research and Executive Director of Institute for Health Care Delivery Research, Intermountain Health Care, Salt Lake City, UT Charles N. Kahn III, President and Chief Executive Officer, Federation Of American Hospitals, Washington, DC Elizabeth A. McGlynn, Director, Kaiser Permanente Center for Effectiveness & Safety Research, Oakland, CA Cynthia D. Mulrow, Clinical Professor of Medicine, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, Senior Deputy Editor, Annals of Internal Medicine Mary D. Naylor, Director, NewCourtland Center for Transitions and Health, Marian S. Ware Professor in Gerontology, National Program Director, Interdisciplinary Nursing Quality Research Initiative, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia Alan Weil, Executive Director, National Academy for State Health Policy, Portland, ME Board on Health Sciences Policy Andrew Pope, Ph.D., Director Organized: 1977 The Board on Health Sciences Policy oversees and guides a program of activities that is intended to encourage and sustain the continuous vigor of the basic biomedical and clinical research enterprises needed to ensure and improve the health of the public. In conducting these activities, consideration is given to the ethical, legal, and social contexts of scientific and technologic advances and to the balance between scientific opportunities and public needs.

39 PROGRAM LISTING 37 The goals of the Board on Health Sciences Policy are to Foster the emerging fields of research in the health and biomedical sciences; Strengthen the role of science in policy and decision making; Promote and improve the education of health and research professionals and of the general public; Ensure an adequate workforce in biomedical and clinical research; and Address issues in biomedical ethics. To accomplish these goals, the board helps shape the portfolio of projects by continuously monitoring issues in health policy and identifying emerging problems. Board members oversee the implementation of ideas and proposals and assist in ensuring the focus and purpose of sponsored projects through periodic review of study progress at board meetings and as official members on board-sponsored studies. Board members also assist in the dissemination of study findings and monitor the impact of sponsored studies. Forum on Drug Discovery, Development, and Translation Anne Claiborne, J.D., M.P.H., Director The Forum on Drug Discovery, Development, and Translation brings together thought leaders and stakeholders in government, academia, industry, foundations, and patient advocacy with an interest in issues related to drug discovery, development, and translation. The forum convenes several times each year to identify and discuss key problems and strategies in the discovery, development, and translation of drugs. To supplement the perspectives and expertise of its members, the forum also holds public workshops and commissions and fosters papers to engage a wide range of experts, members of the public, and the policy community. The activities of the forum are determined by its members, focusing on five major themes: (1) the approach to drug development; (2) strengthening the scientific basis of drug regulation; (3) transforming research and fostering collaborative research; (4) developing drugs for rare and neglected diseases and addressing urgent global health problems; and (5) promoting public understanding of drug development. Over the past several years, the forum has been engaged in three major long-term initiatives: Advancing Regulatory Science; Transforming Clinical Trials; and Addressing the Global Neglected Disease Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis. Forum on Neuroscience and Nervous System Disorders Bruce Altevogt, Ph.D., Director The Forum on Neuroscience and Nervous System Disorders focuses on building partnerships to further understand the brain and nervous system disorders in their structure and function, as well as effective clinical prevention and treatment strategies. The forum concentrates on six themes: nervous system disorders, mental illness and addiction, genetics of nervous system disorders, cog-

40 38 PRESIDENT S REPORT SUPPLEMENT nition and behavior, modeling and imaging, and ethical and social issues. It serves to educate the public, press, and policy makers regarding these issues. The forum brings together leaders from private-sector sponsors of biomedical and clinical research, federal agencies sponsoring and regulating biomedical and clinical research, foundations, the academic community, and consumers. The forum sponsors workshops for members and the public to discuss approaches to resolving key challenges identified by forum members. It strives to enhance understanding of research and clinical issues associated with the nervous system among the scientific community and the general public, and provide a mechanism to foster partnerships among stakeholders. Roundtable on Translating Genomic-Based Research for Health Adam Berger, Ph.D., Director The Roundtable on Translating Genomic-Based Research for Health brings together leaders from academia, industry, government, foundations, associations, and patient and consumer representatives who have a mutual interest in addressing the issues surrounding the translation of genomicbased research. The purpose of the roundtable is to explore and implement strategies for improving health through the translation of genomic and genetic research findings into medicine, public health, education, and policy. Priorities and areas of emphasis for the roundtable include: (1) issues related to the translation of genomics into medicine and public health; (2) issues related to the evolving requirements for the health professional community and the need to be able to understand and responsibly apply genomics to medicine and public health; and (3) ethical, legal, and social issues such as the potential for misuse of genetic information, the medical implications for family members; and the rights of an individual, family, or community to control the use and dissemination of genetic information. To achieve its objectives, the roundtable conducts structured discussions, workshops, and symposia and publishes workshop summaries. The roundtable has developed several initiatives around the topics of clinical practice and public health, drug development informed by genomics and genetics, diagnostic applications for genomics, and emerging issues to guide the roundtable as it moves forward. Forum on Medical and Public Health Preparedness for Catastrophic Events Bruce Altevogt, Ph.D., Director The Forum on Medical and Public Health Preparedness for Catastrophic Events serves to foster dialogue among stakeholders and provide ongoing opportunities to confront and discuss issues of mutual interest and concern. The forum provides a neutral venue for broad-ranging policy discussions that serve to facilitate coordination and cooperation among public and private stakeholders in developing and enhancing the nation s medical and public health preparedness. More specifically, the forum provides a catalyst for voluntary public/private collaboration on topics where there is synergy among potential partners; helps define the scope of the field and thus sets the stage for future policy action; brings ongoing attention and visibility to important preparedness issues; explores new approaches for resolving problem areas; and elevates the general understanding and visibility of medical and public health preparedness in the broader research, public policy, and other appropriate communities.

41 PROGRAM LISTING 39 The forum is self-governing; i.e., the forum membership identifies the topics that it wishes to address, and with assistance from staff, develops meeting agendas and identifies workshop topics. As a result, topics span a broad range of issues in research, policy, and practice. Initial attention is being given to the following broad topic areas: medical surge capacity, disaster preparedness training, communication and distribution, psychological and community resilience, and research and evaluation. Forum on Aging, Independence and Disability Tracy A. Lustig, D.P.M., M.P.H., Director The IOM, in collaboration with the Division on Behavioral and Social Science and Education of the National Research Council, has formed a new Forum on Aging, Disability, and Independence that fosters dialogue and confronts issues of mutual interest and concern within the long-term services and supports system. The forum will highlight capacities in which aging and disability network coordination is strong; examine the historic challenges faced in aligning the aging and disability networks; define the scope of the challenges; explore new approaches for resolving problem areas; elevate the visibility and perspectives of the many stakeholders; and set the stage for future policy actions. The forum is self-governing. That is, the forum membership identifies the specific topics that it wishes to address, and with assistance from staff, develops meeting agendas, commissions papers, and identifies workshop topics. Topics will span a broad range of issues such as personcentered planning, self-direction, workforce education and training, health care and personal care workforces, quality measurement, health disparities, research, and assistive technologies. The forum s first workshop will be held in December 2012, and will focus on technologies that foster independence, participation, and healthy aging. Standing Committee on Health Threats Resilience Bruce Altevogt, Ph.D., Director The Standing Committee on Health Threats Resilience is sponsored by the Department of Homeland Security s Office of Health Affairs. The standing committee discusses issues related to shortand long-term strategic planning and includes experts in emergency management, emergency medical services, emergency preparedness and response, intelligence, public health and medicine, community resilience, economic development, and sociocultural sciences. The standing committee maintains surveillance of the field, discusses planning and program development efforts, and serves as a focal point within the IOM and National Academies for discussions and potential ad hoc studies related to (1) community resilience against health threats including issues relevant to preparedness, community engagement, and communications; (2) health security the interface with intelligence, infrastructure and security, and health resilience; (3) emergency response and recovery activities and support of operational medicine; and (4) capacity and gaps in the capability of federal, state, and local authorities to respond to catastrophic health events, including events related to food, agriculture, human health, and animal health issues. In this process, the stand-

42 40 PRESIDENT S REPORT SUPPLEMENT ing committee may provide a public venue for communication among government, the academic community, and the private sector, as well as other relevant stakeholders involved in emergency preparedness and emergency response services. Further, as needed, the standing committee will be involved in the planning, development, and oversight of related ad hoc activities undertaken by separately appointed committees operating under its auspices. Standing committee discussions have led to workshops that have explored topics related to workforce resilience and biosurveillance. Standing Committee on Credentialing Research in Nursing Cathy Liverman and Andrea Schultz, Co Study Directors The IOM will convene a standing committee for the American Nurses Credentialing Center. The standing committee will discuss issues related to research on credentialing of nurses and organizations, including short- and long-term strategic planning. The standing committee will maintain surveillance of the field, discuss planning and program development, and serve as a focal point for discussions and potential ad hoc studies requested by the sponsor and approved by the IOM and the National Academies. Topics that may be addressed by the standing committee or by sponsored workshops and future studies by IOM committees include emerging priorities for nursing credentialing research; research methodologies and measures relevant to nursing credentialing research; the impact of individual and organizational credentialing in nursing on improving healthcare performance, quality, and outcomes. Committee on Aerospace Medicine and the Medicine of Extreme Environments Cathy Liverman and Andrea Schultz, Co Study Directors The IOM standing Committee on Aerospace Medicine and the Medicine of Extreme Environments coordinates with National Aeronautics and Space Administration s Office of the Chief Health and Medical Officer to become informed about existing conditions and emerging issues related to medical care in space and define prospective activities (such as studies or analyses of medical needs and/or approaches to addressing those needs) to be conducted at the IOM. The standing committee serves as a focal point for consideration of issues related to the practice of medicine during space travel. The standing committee considers relevant scientific, technical, and policy issues, including the development of optimal aerospace medicine health care as an evolving multidisciplinary and international enterprise, health maintenance and care policies related to aerospace medicine, clinical research requirements and clinical strategies, and other relevant issues. Ad hoc committees are established to conduct studies as needed and as approved by the IOM and the National Academies.

43 PROGRAM LISTING 41 Committee on Personal Protective Equipment for Workplace Safety and Health Cathy Liverman and Andrea Schultz, Co-Study Directors The standing Committee on Personal Protective Equipment for Workplace Safety and Health addresses scientific and technical issues relevant to the development, certification, deployment, and use of personal protective equipment, standards, and related systems to ensure workplace safety and health. This standing committee is supported by the National Personal Protective Technology Laboratory at the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. Standing Committee on Family Planning Adrienne Stith Butler, Ph.D., Director The Standing Committee on Family Planning is sponsored by the Department of Health and Human Services Office of Family Planning (OFP). The standing committee has followed up on issues addressed in the 2009 IOM report, A Review of the HHS Family Planning Program: Mission, Management, and Measurement of Results, as well as identified emerging issues in this field. The standing committee provides a forum for discussion of scientific, workforce, health services, and education issues relevant to family planning. The committee maintains surveillance of the field, discusses planning and program development efforts, and serves as a focal point for discussions and potential ad hoc studies requested by OFP and approved by the IOM and the National Academies. Specific topics addressed at meetings of the standing committee have included workforce planning; the role of family planning/reproductive health in health care reform; improving data collection on program performance; communication and transparency; and strategic planning for moving the Title X Program forward. Recent Reports 2012 Genome-Based Therapeutics: Targeted Drug Discovery and Development Workshop Summary Accelerating the Development of New Drugs and Diagnostics: Maximizing the Impact of the Cures Acceleration Network Workshop Summary Post-Incident Recovery Considerations of the Health Care Service Delivery Infrastructure Workshop Summary A Review of NASA s Human Research Program s Scientific Merit Assessment Process Letter Report International Animal Research Regulations: Impact on Neuroscience Research Workshop Summary Public Engagement on Facilitating Access to Antiviral Medications and Information in an Influenza Pandemic Workshop Series Summary

44 42 PRESIDENT S REPORT SUPPLEMENT Facing the Reality of Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis: Challenges and Potential Solutions in India Summary of a Joint Workshop Envisioning a Transformed Clinical Trials Enterprise in the United States: Establishing an Agenda for 2020 Workshop Summary Building a Resilient Workforce: Opportunities for the Department of Homeland Security Workshop Summary Ensuring Safe Foods and Medical Products Through Stronger Regulatory Systems Abroad (with Board on Global Health) Epilepsy Across the Spectrum: Promoting Health and Understanding Crisis Standards of Care: A Systems Framework for Catastrophic Disaster Response Genome-Based Diagnostics: Clarifying Pathways to Clinical Use Workshop Summary Safe and Effective Medicines for Children: Pediatric Studies Conducted Under BPCA and PREA Alzheimer s Diagnostic Guideline Validation: Exploration of Next Steps Workshop Summary Barriers to Integrating Crisis Standards of Care Principles into International Disaster Response Plans Workshop Summary Sex-Specific Reporting of Scientific Research - Workshop Summary (with Board on Population Health and Public Health Practice) 2011 Strengthening a Workforce for Innovative Regulatory Science in Therapeutics Development Workshop Summary Chimpanzees in Biomedical and Behavioral Research: Assessing the Necessity Breast Cancer and the Environment: A Life Course Approach Information Sharing and Collaboration: Applications to Integrated Biosurveillance Workshop Summary Integrating Large-Scale Genomic Information into Clinical Practice Workshop Summary Public Engagement and Clinical Trials: New Models and Disruptive Technologies Workshop- Summary Incorporating Occupational Information in Electronic Health Records: Letter Report Prepositioning Antibiotics for Anthrax Occupational Health Nurses and Respiratory Protection: Improving Education and Training Letter Report Relieving Pain in America: A Blueprint for Transforming Prevention, Care, Education, and Research Advancing Regulatory Science for Medical Countermeasure Development Workshop Summary

45 PROGRAM LISTING 43 Glutamate-Related Biomarkers in Drug Development for Disorders of the Nervous System A Workshop Generating Evidence for Genomic Diagnostic Test Development Workshop Summary The New Profile of Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis in Russia: A Global and Local Perspective: Summary of a Joint Workshop The Emerging Threat of Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis in Southern Africa: Global and Local Challenges and Solutions Workshop Summary Preparedness and Response to a Rural Mass Casualty Incident Workshop Summary Preventing Transmission of Pandemic Influenza and Other Viral Respiratory Diseases: Personal Protective Equipment for Healthcare Personnel Update 2010 Perspectives on Biomarker and Surrogate Endpoint Evaluation Discussion Forum Summary (with Board on Health Care Services and Food and Nutrition Board) 2010 Establishing Precompetitive Collaborations to Stimulate Genomics-Driven Product Development Workshop Summary Transforming Clinical Research in the United States: Challenges and Opportunities Workshop Summary Building a National Framework for the Establishment of Regulatory Science for Drug Development Workshop Summary The Value of Genetic and Genomic Technologies Workshop Summary Challenges and Opportunities in Using Residual Newborn Screening Samples for Translational- Research Workshop Summary Future Opportunities to Leverage the Alzheimer s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative A Workshop Summary Sex Differences and Implications for Translational Neuroscience Research A Workshop Summary Mental, Neurological, and Substance Use Disorders in Sub-Saharan Africa: Reducing the Treatment Gap, Increasing Quality of Care Workshop Summary Certifying Personal Protective Technologies: Improving Worker Safety Medical Countermeasures Dispensing: Emergency Use Authorization and the Postal Model Workshop Summary The 2009 H1N1 Vaccination Campaign Summary of a Workshop Series Rare Diseases and Orphan Products: Accelerating Research and Development Evaluation of Biomarkers and Surrogate Endpoints in Chronic Disease CNS Clinical Trials: Suicidality and Data Collection Workshop Summary The Public Health Emergency Medical Countermeasures Enterprise: Innovative Strategies to Enhance Products from Discovery Through Approval Workshop Summary

46 44 PRESIDENT S REPORT SUPPLEMENT Medical Surge Capacity Workshop Summary BioWatch and Public Health Surveillance: Evaluating Systems for the Early Detection of Biological Threats (with Board on Life Sciences and Board on Chemical Sciences and Technology) Current Activities/Studies in Progress Review of California Institute for Regenerative Medicine Review of the Clinical and Translational Science Awards Program at the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences Committee on Department of Homeland Security Workforce Resilience Committee on Health and Medical Infrastructure Needs for the Department of Health and Human Services Forum on Drug Discovery, Development, and Translation Forum on Neuroscience and Nervous System Disorders Roundtable on Translating Genomic-Based Research for Health Forum on Medical and Public Health Preparedness for Catastrophic Events Forum on Aging, Independence and Disability Standing Committee on Health Threats Resilience Standing Committee on Credentialing Research in Nursing Committee on Aerospace Medicine and the Medicine of Extreme Environments Committee on Personal Protective Equipment for Workplace Safety and Health Standing Committee on Family Planning Projects in Development Treatment of Cardiac Arrest Cognitive Aging: Translating Science into Prevention and Care Prescription Drug Abuse Regenerative Medicine Forum Forum on Engineering and Biomedical Technology Personalized Medicine (Policy Issues in Clinical Development and Use of Biomarkers for Molecularly Targeted Therapies) Epilepsy Forum Mental and Behavioral Health Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences/Agriculture and Food Research Initiative Radiobiology (with Board on the Health of Select Populations)

47 PROGRAM LISTING 45 Board Roster C. Thomas Caskey (Chair), Baylor University, Waco, TX Eli Y. Adashi, Brown University, Providence, RI Robert M. Califf, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC Dennis Choi, The Simons Foundation, New York, NY Kathleen A. Dracup, University of California, San Francisco Michael Ehlers, Pfizer, Inc., Cambridge, MA Naomi Gerber, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA Linda C. Giudice, University of California, San Francisco Lewis R. Goldfrank, New York University School of Medicine, New York Lawrence O. Gostin, Georgetown University Law Center, Washington, DC Steven E. Hyman, The Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, Cambridge, MA Paul E. Jarris, Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, Arlington, VA Jeffrey Kahn, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD Harry T. Orr, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis Sharon Terry, Genetic Alliance, Washington, DC Reed V. Tuckson, UnitedHealth Group, Minnetonka, MN Keith A. Wailoo, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick Clyde Yancy, Baylor University Medical Center, Dallas, TX Board on the Health of Select Populations (Formerly the Board on Military and Veterans Health) Rick Erdtmann, M.D., M.P.H., Director Organized: 2006 The Board on the Health of Select Populations was established in February 2009 to examine health needs and health policies surrounding a broad range of discrete populations. The board concentrates on significant health concerns that may affect groups of individuals categorized and defined by common occupation, environment, health condition or characteristics, or a shared exposure to a unique health risk. The board continues to build on previous work on the health of members of the military and military veterans conducted by its predecessor, the Board on Military and Veterans Health, and the Medical Follow-Up Agency (MFUA). MFUA now operates under the Board on the Health of Select Populations.

48 46 PRESIDENT S REPORT SUPPLEMENT Recent Reports 2012 Substance Use Disorders in the U.S. Armed Forces Treatment of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in Military and Veteran Populations: Initial Assessment 2011 Long-term Health Consequences of Exposure to Burn Pits in Iraq and Afghanistan Cognitive Rehabilitation Therapy for Traumatic Brain Injury: Evaluating the Evidence Veterans and Agent Orange: Update 2010 Blue Water Navy Vietnam Veterans and Agent Orange Exposure The Health of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender People: Building a Foundation for Better Understanding 2010 HIV and Disability: Updating the Social Security Listings Cardiovascular Disability: Updating the Social Security Listings Gulf War and Health: Volume 8 Health Effects of Serving in the Gulf War Returning Home from Iraq and Afghanistan: Preliminary Assessment of Readjustment Needs of Veterans, Service Members, and Their Families Provision of Mental Health Counseling Services Under TRICARE The Utility and Proximity-Based Herbicide Exposure Assessment in Epidemiologic Studies of Vietnam Veterans Current Activities/Studies in Progress Assessment of Ongoing Efforts in the Treatment of PTSD Initial Assessment of Readjustment Needs of Military Personnel, Veterans, and Their Families: Phase 2 Health Effects in Vietnam Veterans of Exposure to Herbicides (Ninth Biennial Update) Prevention, Diagnosis, Treatment and Management of Substance Use Disorders in the U.S. Armed Forces Review of the Appropriate Use of AFIP s Tissue Repository Following its Transfer to the Joint Pathology Center Evaluation of the Lovell Federal Health Care Center Merger Gulf War and Health: Treatment of Chronic Multisymptom Illness

49 PROGRAM LISTING 47 Review of the Department of Labor s Site Exposure Matrix Database Gulf War and Health: Long-Term Effects of Blast Exposure Standing Committee of Medical Experts to Assist Social Security on Disability Issues Projects in Development The Assessment of Childhood Disability for the Social Security Administration Research Directions in Human Biological Effects of Low-Level Ionizing Radiation Prisoner Health and Its Implication for the Public s Health Standing Committee on Health and Medicine for the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs Military Health System Longitudinal Capacity Needs to Care for Wounded, Ill, or Injured Service members and Veterans Serving in Operation Enduring Freedom, Operation Iraqi Freedom, and Operation New Dawn Board Roster Robert B. Wallace (Chair), University of Iowa College of Public Health, Iowa City George K. Anderson, Association of Military Surgeons of the United States, Bethesda, MD Kathleen Brady, South Carolina Clinical and Translational Research Institute, Charleston John C. S. Breitner, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec Jonathan Davidson, Duke University, Durham, NC Walter R. Frontera, Puerto Rico Clinical and Translational Research Consortium, San Juan Timothy R. Gerrity, Alliance for Commercialization of Technology, Redlands, CA Gregory C. Gray, University of Florida, Gainesville Kurt Kroenke, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis Stanley M. Lemon, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill M. Jeanne Miranda, University of California, Los Angeles Frances Murphy, Health Care Independent Consultant, Silver Spring, MD Kenneth Olden, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC Jennifer D. Peck, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City Carol K. Redmond, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh George W. Rutherford, University of California, San Francisco

50 48 PRESIDENT S REPORT SUPPLEMENT Medical Follow-Up Agency David Butler, Ph.D., Director Organized: 1946 The Medical Follow-Up Agency (MFUA) is an organizational element of the IOM s Board on the Health of Select Populations. The Medical Follow-Up Agency was founded shortly after World War II at the urging of Dr. Michael DeBakey, then a colonel in the Office of the Army Surgeon General. In its early years, the program consisted predominantly of clinical follow-up studies in which veterans were examined for after-effects of World War II injuries and diseases. MFUA now conducts a variety of epidemiological research studies and collaborates with qualified researchers from diverse backgrounds to obtain and analyze records data. Recent Publications Long-Term Health Effects of Participation in Project SHAD I (Shipboard Hazard and Defense) Recent Journal Publications Rubio-Tapia, A., et al Increased prevalence and mortality in undiagnosed celiac disease. Gastroenterology 137(1): Trumbetta, S. L., et al Marriage and genetic variation across the lifespan: Not a steady relationship? Behavior Genetics 37(2): Miller, R. N., et al Patterns of health care seeking of Gulf War registry members prior to deployment. Military Medicine 171(5): MFUA s complete bibliography through 2009 may be found at: IOM/Leadership-Staff/Boards/Medical-Follow-Up-Agency.aspx Current Activities/Studies in Progress Air Force Health Study (Ranch Hand) Research Management Program Shipboard Hazard and Defense II Studies of U.S. Veteran Twins in the World War II Registry The Medical Follow-Up Agency Cohort Catalog Projects in Development Mortality Status of World War II Twins

51 PROGRAM LISTING 49 High-Density Alcohol Drinking and Long-Term Death Risk: A Twins Perspective Multiple Sclerosis in Vietnam and Gulf War Era Veterans Advisory Committee Roster Kenneth Olden (Chair), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC John C. S. Breitner, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec Gregory C. Gray, University of Florida, Gainesville Kurt Kroenke, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis Frances Murphy, Health Care Independent Consultant, Silver Spring, MD Jennifer D. Peck, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City Carol K. Redmond, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh Board on Population Health and Public Health Practice Rose Marie Martinez, Sc.D., Director Organized: 1981 The Board on Population Health and Public Health Practice is broadly concerned with promoting the health of the public physical, mental, and social particularly through population-based interventions. The board examines and develops strategies for disease prevention, taking into account the multiple factors affecting health genetic endowment, social and environmental conditions, individual behavior (including tobacco use, alcohol consumption, diet, and exercise) and personal preventive services. The board addresses the science base for such interventions, the public health infrastructure, and the education and supply of health professionals necessary for carrying them out. The board has an ongoing program of studies on public health infrastructure, women s and children s health, immunization, AIDS and sexually transmitted diseases, and environmental and occupational health. In particular, the board has identified three priority areas that fall within a broad focus covering both preventive services and public health functions to emphasize in its work: reexamining public health capacities and responsibilities to meet public health challenges at the federal, state, and local level; community interventions to promote healthful behavior; and occupational and environmental health issues.

52 50 PRESIDENT S REPORT SUPPLEMENT Roundtable on Environmental Health Sciences, Research, and Medicine Christine Coussens, Director The Roundtable on Environmental Health Sciences, Research, and Medicine was established in 1998 as a convening mechanism for individuals from the academic, industrial, nongovernmental, and governmental perspectives to meet and discuss sensitive and difficult environmental health issues of mutual interest in a neutral setting. Since its inception, the roundtable has addressed current and emerging issues in environmental health through discussions related to the state of the science, research gaps, and policy implications. Current topics include the health implications of hydrofracking and energy policies; ecosystem services; agriculture; and sustainable development. The roundtable has a national focus, but recognizes global, regional, and local implications. Health Literacy Roundtable Lyla Hernandez, Director The Roundtable on Health Literacy was established in 2006 to discuss challenges facing health literacy research and practice and identify approaches to promote health literacy through mechanisms and partnerships in both the public and private sectors. Since its first workshop in 2006, the roundtable has held 14 workshops and published 11 reports on such topics as improved medication labeling, use of electronic health records, and integration of health literacy with disparities reduction and quality improvement. The roundtable has established working groups to explore and devvelop activities addressing health literacy and health linsurance reform, international health literacy, public health literacy, and what makes an organization health literate. Addressing health literacy is critical to transforming health care quality. Goals for safe, patient-centered, and equitable care cannot be achieved if consumers cannot access services or make informed health care decisions. Roundtable on the Promotion of Health Equity and the Elimination of Health Disparities Karen Anderson, Director The IOM convened the Roundtable on the Promotion of Health Equity and the Elimination of Health Disparities in 2007 to stimulate action, further the development of programs and strategies, promote health equity, and foster the emergence of leadership. With the publication of several seminal IOM reports documenting the problem of health disparities in the early 2000s (for exam-

53 PROGRAM LISTING 51 ple, Unequal Treatment in 2003 and In the Nation s Compelling Interest in 2004), the roundtable was created to continue the focus on eliminating health disparities. The roundtable, in its focus on underserved populations, focuses on understanding the social determinants of health that underlie health disparities. Recent Reports 2012 How Far Have We Come in Reducing Health Disparities? Progress Since 2000 Workshop Summary How Can Health Care Organizations Become More Health Literate? Workshop Summary Ranking Vaccines: A Prioritization Framework Phase I: Demonstration of Concept and a Software Blueprint Ethical and Scientific Issues in Studying the Safety of Approved Drugs For the Public s Health: Investing in a Healthier Future Primary Care and Public Health: Exploring Integration to Improve Population Health Monitoring HIV Care in the United States: Indicators and Data Systems. Facilitating State Health Exchange Communication Through the Use of Health Literate Practices Workshop Summary Living Well with Chronic Illness: A Call for Public Health Action Sex-Specific Reporting of Scientific Research Workshop Summary 2011 Scientific Standards for Studies on Modified Risk Tobacco Products Improving Health Literacy Within a State Workshop Summary Promoting Health Literacy to Encourage Prevention and Wellness Workshop Summary State and Local Policy Initiatives to Reduce Health Disparities Workshop Summary Adverse Effects of Vaccines: Evidence and Causality Medical Devices and the Public s Health: The FDA 510(k) Clearance Process at 35 Years A Nationwide Framework for Surveillance of Cardiovascular and Chronic Lung Diseases Clinical Preventive Services for Women: Closing the Gaps Health Literacy Implications for Health Care Reform Workshop Summary For the Public s Health: Revitalizing Law and Policy to Meet New Challenges Climate Change, the Indoor Environment, and Health Critical Needs and Gaps in Understanding Prevention, Amelioration, and Resolution of Lyme and Other Tick-Borne Diseases: The Short-Term and Long-Term Outcomes Workshop Report

54 52 PRESIDENT S REPORT SUPPLEMENT HIV Screening and Access to Care: Health Care System Capacity for Increased HIV Testing and Provision of Care Leading Health Indicators for Healthy People 2020 Letter Report Innovations in Health Literacy Research Workshop Summary HIV Screening and Access to Care: Exploring the Impact of Policies on Access to and Provision of HIV Care 2010 For the Public s Health: The Role of Measurement in Action and Accountability The Safe Use Initiative and Health Literacy A Workshop Summary Public Health Effectiveness of the FDA 510(k) Clearance Process: Measuring Postmarket Performance and Other Select Topics Workshop Report Research Priorities for Assessing Health Effects from the Gulf of Mexico Oil Spillm Letter Report Public Health Effectiveness of the FDA 510(k) Clearance Process: Balancing Patient Safety and Innovation Workshop Report Review of the Proposal for the Gulf Long-Term Follow-Up Study: Highlights from the September 2010 Workshop Workshop Report Women s Health Research: Progress, Pitfalls and Promise HIV Screening and Access to Care: Exploring Barriers and Facilitators to Expanded HIV Testing Ethical Issues in Studying the Safety of Approved Drugs Letter Report Demographic Changes, A View from California: Implications for Framing Health Disparities Workshop Summary A Population-Based Policy and Systems Change Approach to Prevent and Control Hypertension Hepatitis and Liver Cancer: A National Strategy for Prevention and Control of Hepatitis B and C Current Activities/Studies in Progress Assessment of Studies of Health Outcomes Related to the Recommended Childhood Immunization Schedule Environmental Decision Making Under Uncertainty Developing a Decision-Support Tool for Prioritizing New Vaccines Public Health Strategies to Improve Health Review of Data Systems for Monitoring HIV/AIDS Care

55 PROGRAM LISTING 53 Roundtable on Environmental Health Sciences, Research, and Medicine Health Literacy Roundtable Roundtable on the Promotion of Health Equity and the Elimination of Health Disparities Valuing Community-Based, Nonclinical Prevention Programs Projects in Development Roundtable on Population Health Improvement Electronic Health Record Meaningful Use Domains and Measures to Capture Social Determinants Infrastructure for Estimating Core Indicators of HIV Infection, Diagnosis, and Access to Care and Supportive Services Integrating Behavioral and Psychosocial Care into the Evolving Health Care System Board Roster Ellen Wright Clayton (Chair), Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN Margarita Alegría, Cambridge Health Alliance, Sommerville, MA Susan M. Allan, University of Washington, Seattle Georges C. Benjamin, American Public Health Association, Washington, DC Bobbie A. Berkowitz, Columbia University School of Nursing, New York, NY David R. Challoner, University of Florida, Gainesville R. Alta Charo, University of Wisconsin Madison Jose Julio Escarce, University of California, Los Angeles, Department of Medicine, Division of General Internal Medicine and Health Services Research Alvin D. Jackson, Ohio Department of Health, Fremont Matthew W. Kreuter, Washington University in Saint Louis, MO Howard Markel, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor Elena O. Nightingale, National Academies of Science (Emerita), Washington, DC Margaret E. O Kane, National Committee for Quality Assurance, Washington, DC Susan L. Santos, University of Medicine and Dentistry, New Jersey, Piscataway Martin Jose Sepulveda, International Business Machines Corporation, Sommers, NY Samuel So, Stanford University, CA Antonia M. Villarruel, University of Michigan School of Nursing, Ann Arbor Paul J. Wallace, The Lewin Group, Falls Church, VA

56 54 PRESIDENT S REPORT SUPPLEMENT Health Policy Educational Programs and Fellowships Marie E. Michnich, Dr.P.H., Director Organized: 1973 The Health Policy Educational Programs and Fellowships (HPEPF) office serves as the program office for four national health policy fellowship programs: the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Health Policy Fellows; the IOM/American Nurses Foundation (ANF)/American Academy of Nursing (AAN)/American Nurses Association (ANA) Distinguished Nurse Scholar in Residence; the IOM Anniversary Fellows; and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Tobacco Regulatory Science Fellowship. The first and the oldest program, the RWJF Health Policy Fellows, is now in its 39th year of operation. Exceptional midcareer health professional and behavioral and social scientists actively participate in and contribute to the policy process at the federal level during a 12-month residential experience in Washington, DC. These fellows remain in high demand and continue to receive the most prominent federal health policy placements in both Congress and presidential administrations. Since 1973, HPEPF has been responsible for the recruitment, selection, orientation, and placement of Health Policy Fellows and has overseen the fellowships of 245 recipients. IOM staff leadership, particularly the board directors, contributes to the orientation and placement and serves as a resource for the fellows throughout their experience. The priority areas of emphasis for this program are (1) to continue to seek out qualified minority applicants, (2) to maintain a high number of qualified applicants, and (3) to promote political balance in both recruitment and placement of the fellows. This office also hosts the Distinguished Nurse Scholar-in-Residence, initiated in 1992 and supported by the AAN, the ANF, and the ANA. This residential program is designed to assist nurse leaders in playing a more prominent role in health policy development at the national level through a 1-year program of orientation and study at the IOM. The scholar produces a report as a result of working on a current IOM initiative related to his/her area of expertise. The Distinguished Nurse Scholar-in Residence for is Marla Salmon, an IOM member and the immediate past dean of the University of Washington School of Nursing. She brings expertise to the IOM from her numerous leadership roles in nursing, public health, and domestic and global health workforce capacity building. Salmon s work will look specifically at three areas of policy and scholarship;: (1) global nursing workforce capacity building, (2) women s development aimed at enhanced educational and economic wellbeing, and (3) social impact investment and microfinance as mechanisms for reducing barriers to women s education and subsequent sustained economic engagement. The priority for this program is to increase funding to attract and support scholars in Washington, DC. The IOM Anniversary Fellows is a program created in 2005 to celebrate the 35th anniversary of the IOM. The purpose of the program is to bring exceptional early-career faculty and scholars to work on an IOM board and an IOM study, forum, or roundtable. Since the initiation of the program, a total of nine fellows have received the award. Three fellowships, the Norman F. Gant, M.D./ American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology, the James C. Puffer, MD/American Board of Family Medicine, and a Pharmacy Fellowship have or are in the process of being endowed in perpetuity. Two fellowships are currently being sponsored by outside organizations for a period of 2 years each.

57 PROGRAM LISTING 55 A new program was launched in 2012 that is a collaboration between the IOM and the FDA Center for Tobacco Products (CTP). The fellowship program aims to provide an opportunity for mid-career professionals to gain experience and expertise to further define and develop the field of regulatory science as it relates to the regulation of tobacco products and FDA s new authorities under the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act. This summer, three fellows were chosen in a national competition and will be assigned to one of three offices within CTP for the full fellowship year: the Office of Health Communication and Education, the Office of Policy, and the Office of Science. In following years, the number of fellows will increase to place fellows in all six CTP program offices. Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health Policy Fellows Advisory Board Roster Gail L. Warden (Chair), Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI Joseph Antos, American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research, Washington, DC Kenneth B. Chance, Sr., University of Kentucky, College of Dentistry, Lexington Linda Degutis, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA Susan Dentzer, Editor-in-Chief, Health Affairs, Bethesda, MD David Durenberger, Chair, National Health Policy Institute, University of St. Thomas, Minneapolis, MN James R. Gavin III, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, and Healing Our Village, Inc., Lanham, MD Katie B. Horton, George Washington University, Washington, DC Arthur L. Kellermann, Senior Principal Researcher, RAND Corporation, Arlington, VA Peter Neumann, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA Charles L. Rice, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Military Health Systems, Department of Defense, Bethesda, Maryland Sara Rosenbaum, George Washington University, Washington, DC Eduardo J. Sanchez, Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Texas, Richardson Kenneth B. Wells, Professor in Residence, University of California, Los Angeles, School of Public Health, Senior Scientist, RAND Executive Office Judith A. Salerno, M.D., M.S., Leonard D. Schaeffer Executive Officer From time to time, cross-cutting program activities are carried out within the IOM executive office, such as the Roundtable on Value & Science-Driven Health Care and the Robert Wood Johnson

58 56 PRESIDENT S REPORT SUPPLEMENT Foundation Initiative on the Future of Nursing, at the Institute of Medicine. Some activities require the expertise of IOM colleagues from several areas in the organization. This year, several activities were continued and new, exciting initiatives were launched from the executive office. Current Activities/Studies in Progress Vaccines: Cultural Representations in Art, Literature, Media and Public Health Gustav O. Lienhard Award The Rhoda and Bernard Sarnat International Prize in Mental Health Richard and Hinda Rosenthal Lecture Series End of Life Matters: Through the Eyes of Entertainment Arts The Weight of the Nation, with Home Box Office (HBO), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the National Institutes of Health, the Michael & Susan Dell Foundation, and Kaiser Permanente The Health Data Initiative Go Viral to Improve Health: IOM-NAE Health Data Collegiate Challenge Compassion in Caring: The Case for Transforming End-of-Life Care Roundtable on Value & Science-Driven Health Care Art Installation at the 2011 IOM Annual Meeting (October 2011) Literature, art, film, and mass media all influence the public s understanding of epidemics and the effectiveness of medicine s responses. During the 2011 IOM Annual Meeting, Vaccines: Cultural Representations in Arts and Literature was unveiled as a semiotic representation of how all types of representations affect public perception and, ultimately, pubic utilization of vaccines. The support of Janssen, a pharmaceutical company of Johnson & Johnson, made the installation possible. Copies of the installation were distributed to meeting attendees with their registration materials. The Weight of the Nation Project (May 2012) An opportunity to impact a national health epidemic through research, outreach, and print and visual media does not come along often. When the opportunity to move the needle related to overweight and obesity in the United States presented itself, the IOM, along with HBO Documentary Films, in association with the CDC and the NIH, and in partnership with the Michael & Susan Dell Foundation and Kaiser Permanente, came together to produce The Weight of the Nation. The project features a series of four, Emmy-nominated films, a three-part HBO family film series, 14 bonus short films, and an interactive social media campaign. A cornerstone of the project is the IOM Food and Nutrition Board report released in April 2012, Accelerating Progress in Obesity Prevention. Materials have been distributed around the country free of charge in an effort to drive outreach to community-based organizations. The films and the report have launched considerable discussion and ignited grassroots action around how individuals and communities can reverse the obesity trend in the nation.

59 PROGRAM LISTING 57 To extend the outreach to focus on the epidemic in children, the executive office will spearhead the development of children s publications on the overweight and obesity topic. Publications will be geared to school-aged children in grades 3-5 and grades 6-8 with a particular emphasis on Title I schools and underserved populations. The Health Data Initiative (June 2012) For the third consecutive year, the IOM, in collaboration with HHS and members of the Health Data Consortium, hosted the Health Data Initiative (HDI) Forum III: The Health Datapalooza on June 5 6, 2012, at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center in Washington, DC. Switching to a 2-day format to accommodate 16 breakout discussion panels, 75 exhibitors, and more than 30 apps demonstrations, the Datapalooza attracted more than 1,450 attendees enthused about innovative ways to use de-identified health information. The forum featured announcements, awards, demonstrations, meet-ups, and networking all focused on the potential to improve health by using data. The IOM has been integral in the formation of the Health Data Consortium, a collaboration among government, nonprofit, and private-sector organizations working to foster the availability and innovative use of data to improve health and health care. While still in its planning stage, the consortium advocates for best practices and information sharing in health data; and works with businesses, entrepreneurs, and academia to help them understand how to use data to develop new products, services, apps, and research insights. Go Viral to Improve Health (June 2012) The IOM and the NAE challenged college and university students to use health data to develop effective, innovative apps that take on the nation s pressing health issues in the 2012 Go Viral to Improve Health Data Collegiate Challenge. Working in interdisciplinary teams that brought together technological skills and health knowledge, the IOM and NAE challenged college students to generate exciting and powerful new products the next viral apps to improve health for communities and individuals. In this the second year of the challenge, twice as many submissions were received, and the products were of a high caliber. A team of students from Baylor College of Medicine, University of Texas School of Public Health, and Rice University earned the first-place award, while teams from Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology and Indiana University placed second and third, respectively. While the IOM and NAE contributed their resources to the challenge, Heritage Provider Network provided the $10,000 award to the first-place team. End-of-Life Care Activities in the Executive Office (Ongoing) Continuing the national dialogue on end-of-life issues and interest stemming from the publication of the report Approaching Death: Improving Care at the End of Life, the executive office will examine critical questions that individuals and families face at the end of life. Whether dealing with a long-term illness or an unforeseen medical life-threatening event, questions such as What are your care preferences? How would you like to live your remaining life? Where do you prefer to die? often go unanswered. The IOM will commence a study, Compassion in Caring: The Case

60 58 PRESIDENT S REPORT SUPPLEMENT for Transforming End-of-Life Care (working title), to examine the policies necessary to align endof-life care with individual values and preferences, and assess the challenges and opportunities in integrating end-of-life care into a patient- and family-centered, team-based framework of health and community care. The work of this study will stimulate a national conversation with individuals, families, and communities on improving the way we, as a nation, approach death. Roundtable on Value & Science-Driven Health Care J. Michael McGinnis, M.D., M.P.P., Executive Director The Roundtable on Value & Science-Driven Health Care provides a trusted venue for national leaders in health care to work cooperatively toward their common commitment to effective, innovative health care that consistently adds value to patients and society. Members include clinicians, patients, health care organizations, employers, manufacturers, insurers, members of the health information technology field, researchers, and policy makers. Together, they seek the development of a learning health care system that is designed to generate and apply the best evidence for the collaborative health care choices of each patient and provider; to drive the process of discovery as a natural outgrowth of patient care; and to ensure innovation, quality, safety, and value in health care. As leaders in their fields, roundtable members work with their colleagues to identify and engage the key challenges and opportunities for achieving better outcomes and greater value in health care. They then marshal the energy and resources of their respective sectors to work for sustained public private cooperation. The work of the roundtable is conducted through two types of activities: 1. Identification and discussion of priorities in achieving the vision of a continuously learning health system. 2. Fostering action through joint stakeholder projects stewarded through six Innovation Collaboratives focused on best clinical practices, communication of medical evidence, clinical effectiveness research, digital technology for health, incentives for value in health care, and systems reengineering for health ( jointly with the National Academy of Engineering). Recent Reports and Discussion Papers 2012 Digital Data Improvement Priorities for Continuous Learning in Health and Health Care Workshop Summary Best Care at Lower Cost: The Path to Continuously Learning Health Care in America A CEO Checklist for High-Value Health Care Discussion Paper Demanding Value from Our Health Care: Motivating Patient Action to Reduce Waste in Health Care Discussion Paper

61 PROGRAM LISTING Patient-Clinician Communication: Basic Principles and Expectations Discussion Paper The Common Rule and Continuous Improvement in Health Care: A Learning Health System Perspective Discussion Paper Commentaries George Halvorson, MBA Walking Our Way to Better Health Donna Shalala, PhD Free Employee Flu Shots Pay Prevention Dividends Sheri McCoy, MSc, MBA Innovating to Improve Care and Manage Costs Leonard Schaeffer and Dana Goldman, PhD Benefit Design Should Reflect Value Mark Chassin, MD, MPP, MPH - Taking Aim at the Right Targets Senator Tom Daschle Controlling Costs: A Distinction and Our Choice Robert Petzel, MD Surgical Complexity Initiative Rich Umbdenstock Continuous Adoption of Best Practices-The New Normal Bruce Bodaken, MPhil, A Path to Accountable Care David Feinberg, MD, Molly Coye, MD, and Eugene Washington, MD Healing Humankind One Patient at a Time Steven Schroeder, MD Trying to Practice What I Preached: Helping My Parents at the End of Their Lives William Bornstein, MD, PhD and Michael Johns, MD Care Transformation at Emory Healthcare Paul Grundy, MD, MPH Bringing Knowledge Home Farzad Mostashari, MD, ScM Applying Innovation to the Work of Government Janet Corrigan, PhD, and Thomas Valuck, MD, JD A Glide Path to High-Value Health Care John Halamka, MD, MS Our Learning Health Care System Journey Patrica Gabow, MD The Promise of Lean Processes Helen Darling, MA Improving ROI in Health Care Innovation Collaboratives Best Practices Innovation Collaborative: Health professionals working together for evidencebased best practices Clinical Effectiveness Research Innovation Collaborative: Developing innovative approaches to generate evidence for health care decisions

62 60 PRESIDENT S REPORT SUPPLEMENT Digital Learning Collaborative: Advancing progress on creating the digital infrastructure required for continuous improvement and innovation in health care Evidence Communication Innovation Collaborative: Exploring strategies for communicating with patients about health care decisionmaking Value Incentives Learning Collaborative: Designing and evaluating innovations that reward improved health outcomes while lowering costs Systems Engineering for Best Care: Applying lessons from engineering principles to lay the foundations for a continuously learning health system with better care at lower costs Projects in Development Workshop: Large Simple Trials and Knowledge Generation in a Learning System Workshop: Core Metrics for Better Care, Lower Costs, and Better Health Workshop: Driving Patient Demand for Informed Decisions, Better Value, and an Improving System Workshop Summary: Digital Data Priorities for Continuous Learning in Health and Health Care Commentaries Discussion Paper: Harmonizing Reporting on Potential Conflicts of Interest: A Common Disclosure Process for Health Care & Life Sciences Discussion Paper: Core Principles & Values of Effective Team-Based Health Care Discussion Paper: Communicating with Patients on Health Care Evidence Discussion Paper: Learning What Works Best in Health Care (2012 Update) Discussion Paper: Speeding the Movement of Successful Value Pilots to Effective Practice Discussion Paper: Institutional Return on Information from the Digital Infrastructure Discussion Paper: Making the Case to Stakeholders for Continuous Improvement from Routinely Collected Data Office of Reports and Communications Clyde Behney, Deputy Executive Officer Lauren Tobias, Communications Director The IOM Office of Reports and Communication (ORAC) is responsible for the IOM s report review function, communications strategies and activities, and other functions related to the report process and the administration of the IOM.

63 PROGRAM LISTING 61 The communications aspect of ORAC s role has two primary objectives: to increase public understanding about who the IOM is and what it does, and to communicate effectively the substantive messages of the IOM s studies and programs. ORAC provides leadership, coordination, counsel, and assistance in the development of strategies, products, and services that will enhance the communication and dissemination of IOM reports and collateral materials. ORAC also administers the Kellogg Health of the Public Fund, an endowment intended to better inform the public and local public health decision makers and to develop targeted health resources, intervention strategies, and communication activities that are responsive to the needs of local communities, especially underserved and disadvantaged communities. Additionally, ORAC manages the IOM s marketing including a monthly electronic newsletter that reaches more than 38,000 people and is responsible for Informing the Future: Critical Issues in Health, which provides an overview of the IOM and its impact. Ongoing Activities Kellogg Health of the Public Fund The Kellogg Health of the Public Fund is an endowed fund intended to increase the IOM s impact in its efforts to improve health by better informing the public and local public health decision makers about key health topics, as well as by developing targeted health resources and communication activities that are responsive to the needs of local communities particularly underserved and disadvantaged communities. Over the past 6 years, since the endowment began distributing funds, the IOM has undertaken numerous activities, extending the work of IOM reports including Health Literacy: A Prescription to End Confusion and Food Marketing to Children and Youth: Threat or Opportunity?. This year, the IOM has focused on a diverse set of topics and audiences to carry out the mission of this fund. To reach the general public with messages about the debilitating disease epilepsy, the IOM developed a short online quiz based on the IOM s March 2012 report Epilepsy Across the Spectrum. The quiz was posted on the IOM website and shared with the more than 20 sponsors of the report to help increase exposure and drive traffic to the report. As the IOM looks to reach new audiences, one project currently under way targets Hispanic women particularly Mexican American women with messages from the 2009 report Weight Gain During Pregnancy: Reexamining the Guidelines. The project goal is to ensure that Mexican American women understand the appropriate amount of weight to gain during pregnancy to be healthy and ensure a healthy baby. The IOM is working with a number of partners to help spread this message, as well as developing a number of user-friendly tools designed to highlight information from the report. The IOM also is extending a program it launched in 2008, called Smart Bites. This program provides incentives for youth to make healthier food choices when dining out by enlisting local restaurants to discount healthy food and beverage items and promote these discounts to students. Building on the success of the pilot program in Bowling Green, Kentucky, the IOM is poised to expand the program into new communities across the United States. These projects not only afford the IOM new opportunities to make an impact, they also grant us the ability to see how our work makes a difference at the community level.

64

65 IOM FINANCES 63 Institute of Medicine Finances A general overview of the IOM s finances is illustrated in the materials that follow. Chart 1 shows the IOM s program expenditures over the last several years. Direct program expenditures for fiscal year 2012 are estimated at just over $44 million, representing a decrease from fiscal year We have experienced a sizable increase in our flow-thru program expenditures due to a number of large subcontracts. Our ratio of general operation expenditures to total expenditures remains well below 20 percent. Table 1 presents the detailed dollar expenditures. Sources of funding for general operations and program expenditures for fiscal year 2011 are shown on Charts 2 and 3. The major sources of general operations support remain the indirect cost pool of the National Research Council and income earned from the IOM endowment funds. As in the past, the federal government continues as the main source of program support, providing 78 percent of the funds.

66 64 PRESIDENT S REPORT SUPPLEMENT $60,000,000 $50,000,000 $40,000,000 $30,000,000 $20,000,000 $10,000,000 $ Chart 1 Program Expenditures Fiscal Years 2008 through 2012 FY 2008 FY 2009 FY 2010 FY 2011 Est FY 2012 Flow Thru Program Direct Program

67 IOM FINANCES 65 Table 1 General Operations and Program Expenditures Fiscal Years 2008 through 2012 Actual Estimated FY 2008 FY 2009 FY 2010 FY 2011 FY 2012 GENERAL OPERATIONS NAS Indirect Cost Pool $ 4,531,785 $ 4,894,522 $ 5,179,449 $ 5,562,353 $ 5,852,583 IOM Independent Funds 1,666,887 1,842,435 1,588,773 1,001,726 1,663,947 TOTAL GENERAL OPERATIONS $ 6,198,672 $ 6,736,957 $ 6,768,222 $ 6,564,079 $ 7,516,530 Direct Program $ 29,919,694 $ 37,309,328 $ 41,556,245 $ 48,879,478 $ 44,019,508 Flow-Thru Program 2,176,118 1,519,565 1,890,722 2,691,475 12,540,969 PROGRAM EXPENDITURES $ 32,095,812 $ 38,828,893 $ 43,456,967 $ 55,597,325 $ 56,560,477 TOTAL IOM EXPENDITURES $ 38,294,484 $ 45,565,850 $ 50,225,189 $ 62,161,404 $ 64,077,007 % General Operations to Total 16% 15% 13% 11% 12% Actual Estimated FY 2008 FY 2009 FY 2010 FY 2011 FY 2012 STAFF DEC (FTE'S) General Operations Program TOTAL % General Operations to Total 19% 19% 17% 16% 16%

68 66 PRESIDENT S REPORT SUPPLEMENT Indirect Funds 85% Chart 2 General Operations Support Fiscal Year 2011 Total Budget $6,564,079 IOM Endowment Income 15%

69 IOM FINANCES 67 Private 21% IOM 1% Chart 3 Sources of Program Funding Fiscal Year 2011 Total $51,570,953 DHHS 52% Federal 78% DHS 1% DOD 10% VA 6% USDA 1% STATE 6% Other Federal 2%

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