The Pennsylvania State University IT Assessment Executive Summary

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1 The Pennsylvania State University IT Assessment Executive Summary Final Summary of Recommendations June 16, 2011 Goldstein & Associates, LLC

2 Contents Section Page Introduction 3 Summary Recommendations 6 Strategic Context 10 IT Snapshot 12 IT Service Improvements 18 IT Governance 28 Attachment A IT Snapshot Methodology and Glossary 35 Attachment B IT Snapshot Data Charts 40 Attachment C Discussion of IT Improvement Opportunities 59 Attachment D Proposed IT Governance Committee Charges 81 2

3 3 Introduction

4 Introduction This report is the culmination of a University-wide assessment of information technology that has its origins in goal 6 of the University strategic plan. The IT Assessment has three broad goals: To quantify and understand the University s current level of investment in technology. To recommend changes to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of IT services with particular focus on optimizing the balance between distributed and common services. To recommend changes to IT governance (planning, prioritization, assessment and decision-making) to improve the University s collective ability to manage its investment in technology. The IT Assessment is a University-led, consultant facilitated project. An Executive Committee of administrative and academic leaders were the recipients of the consultant s recommendations. An Advisory Committee of IT leaders from colleges, campuses, administrative and academic leaders helped interpret the analysis and develop the recommendations. A project work team from ITS and the Controller s office helped design and execute the data collection and analytical work of the project. The project consultant facilitated the analysis, provided independent, objective judgment and formulated the recommendations contained in this report. To the extent possible, the consensus support of the Advisory was sought for each recommendation. 4

5 Introduction The IT assessment included extensive interviews with budget executives and IT leaders from campuses, colleges, academic and administrative units. Data was collected from all areas of the University to quantify IT related personnel activities, non-personnel IT expenditures and IT service offerings. A detailed description of the data collection effort and a glossary of terms is included as an attachment to this report. The Advisory Committee had extensive discussion of the data collection findings and met several times to provide input to the design of revised governance processes. Informational briefings were held to review project progress and findings with the ITLC, the IAS and AIS Steering Committees, the ITS leadership team and the ITS staff. 5

6 6 Summary Recommendations

7 Summary Recommendations Information technology is a sizeable investment and a strategic asset. To maximize its effectiveness in a time of growing demand, constrained resources, and rapid technological change requires consistent, proactive management. Penn State has and will continue to require distributed and central IT organizations and common and unique services. However, the current alignment of IT services and IT organizations is not optimal. To improve the effectiveness of technology and better balance common and distributed IT services, the University should: Deploy a common and calendaring solution for faculty and staff. Create a new University service to meet the shared needs for long-term data storage and archiving. Expand ITS server co-location and virtualization services in a manner that is cost competitive with units providing the service on their own. Commit first to increasing the utilization of this service for administrative applications that require high availability and redundancy. Extend the ITS computer lab management service to all campuses and colleges and begin to develop a similar solution to manage administrative desktops. 7

8 Summary Recommendations To improve the effectiveness of technology and achieve more optimal balance of common and distributed IT services, the University should (continued): Reduce the cost of software purchases by extending the use of shared, server based software licenses instead of licensing software for every individual computer. Implement a common help desk system and knowledge base to improve the productivity of IT staff and the quality of user support services. Make wireless networking at University Park a common service to achieve greater network coverage and a more consistent experience for faculty, students and staff as they move about the campus. To oversee the implementation of these changes and provide on-going, proactive management of IT at Penn State, the University should implement a revised IT governance model. Key aspects include: Designate the Provost, Senior Vice President for Finance and Business and the Vice Provost and Chief Information Officer as the final decision-makers for IT. Appoint an IT Board comprised of representative deans, chancellors, vice presidents and senior IT leaders to approve strategic directions, approve IT policies, designate common IT services and prioritize the most significant IT investments. Empower the IT Board to oversee the development of a strategic IT plan for Penn State. 8

9 Summary Recommendations 9 To oversee the implementation of these changes and provide on-going, proactive management of IT at Penn State, the University should implement a revised IT governance model (continued). Appoint domain specific governance committees comprised of faculty, staff and IT providers to identify emerging needs, recommend annual work priorities, recommend standards, and sponsor university-wide improvement initiatives. Appoint University-wide coordinating committees for IT architecture, security and services to recommend standards, develop solutions and monitor the effectiveness of the IT environment. Establish the ITLC and the ITLC Board as a sounding board for major ITS decisions and a coordinating body to foster collaboration among all IT units. The planning and governance frameworks should be used to establish long-range plans for several strategic issues. The University should modernize its enterprise information systems and associated business processes. More extensive research computing services delivered by ITS and distributed IT groups should be created in alignment with the University s research growth and the recommendations of the Cyber-science task force. Additional capabilities should be developed by ITS and distributed IT groups to support anticipated growth in the use of instructional technology as course content becomes more digital and interactive.

10 10 Context

11 Strategic Context Technology is critical to multiple University strategies. Growth in on-line learning programs depends on increasingly sophisticated technology to market, develop, deliver and support on-line programs Global expansion and collaboration requires technologies that enable the University to deliver its intellectual assets and expertise seamlessly to faculty, students, and staff anywhere they learn and work. Research relies on computing capacity to perform complex calculations at incredible speeds, tools that collect, organize and visualize data in ways that promote understanding and infrastructure that enables researchers to organize and share their work products. Effective teaching and learning is increasingly enabled by technology in all disciplines. Simulations, interactive content, e-books and mobile devices are becoming integrated components of learning inside and outside the traditional classroom. IT at Penn State has evolved without an overall blueprint to drive its effectiveness. It is appropriate and necessary for Penn State to have both distributed and central IT groups. However, their activities must be well-coordinated to preserve a unique focus for each, leverage on-going technology change, and ensure common solutions continue to meet the institution s need. Today, PSU s IT units have areas of overlapping capabilities and services, priorities for investment are difficult to set and align with institutional goals, and there are too few mechanisms to manage the quality of technology services. Achieving a better balance of distributed and common services will save money, create additional capacity to invest in strategic technologies, and enable distributed IT units to focus on the unique needs of the faculty, students and staff they support. Improving IT governance will provide the mechanisms necessary to allocate resources effectively, set priorities that are aligned with strategic goals, and foster accountability. 11

12 12 IT Snapshot

13 IT Snapshot Penn State invests nearly $250 million annually in personnel and non-personnel expenditures to provide and support information technology. There are more than 1,600 FTE providing IT support distributed across more than 52 organizations. Estimated Personnel Costs (salary and benefits) $129,360,000 Non Personnel Expenditures $119,013,799 Total Expenditures (FY10) $248,373,799 There is an opportunity to direct more IT support towards strategic and unique IT services. Significant effort is required to sustain the foundational technologies of the University. Support for administrative applications (441 FTE), user support (388 FTE,), and networks, servers and desktop hardware support (356 FTE) consume the majority of staff time. Comparatively fewer resources are providing direct support to research computing (67 FTE) and academic technology (133 FTE). Across all colleges, 53% of staff effort is allocated to the installation and support of desktop hardware, software, networks, servers, troubleshooting and support. Comparatively less effort is available for consulting with faculty, supporting courseware and learning management systems (14%), or providing direct support to research grants (12%). Across all campuses, 62% of staff effort is allocated to the installation and support of desktop hardware, software, networks, servers, troubleshooting and support. to the installation and support of desktop hardware, software. 13

14 IT Effort By Area and Function 100% 90% % % 60% 50% 40% Other (224) Support (371) Security (49) Research Computing (64) Infrastructure (351) Applications (438) 30% Academic Technology (121) 20% % 0% Academic Support Units Administrative Support Units Campuses Colleges Penn State Hershey - Hospital

15 IT Snapshot IT units in colleges and campuses vary significantly in scale. Variability is a by-product of differences in mission, differing levels of adoption of ITS services, and management decisions regarding the resources invested in technology. Campus IT groups range in size from 4 to 19 FTE with an average size of 7. College IT groups rang from 8 to 50 FTE, with an average of 22. Some IT groups further sub-divide within a college or administrative division into smaller, departmental IT groups. The overall structure for IT leaves some organizations sized below an optimal and efficient scale. It requires staff to be broad generalists sustaining many fragmented duties. It also makes it difficult to harness and redeploy productivity gains that accrue from improving a service as they are fragmented across many FTE. Ratio Colleges Campuses Academic and Admin Support High Avg. Low High Avg. Low High Avg. Low Faculty, Student and Staff per IT FTE IT Expenditures as % of Total Expenditures Student Credit Hours Per IT FTE* NA NA NA 9.5% 5.3% 2.9% 10.3% 6.0% 2.9% 20.0% 7.9% 1.1% 13,001 5, ,078 6,683 1,705 NA NA NA

16 IT Snapshot The opportunity to optimize the alignment of services also exists among academic and administrative support units (see chart on following page). Excluding ITS, University Park academic and administrative support units had 448 FTE devoted to IT support in FY10. These FTE resided in 15 different budget exec areas many of which further sub-divide into smaller IT groups attached to particular departments. Application support is among the largest categories of activity with 184 FTE outside of ITS devoted to designing, developing and maintaining databases, custom and commercial administrative applications, web sites and reports. Providing user support to the staffs working in academic and administrative organizations requires an additional 96 FTE. These application and support activities complement and in some cases overlap with ITS services. The data also reveals areas that warrant investment in efficiency and productivity improvements because they consume a significant portion of the total IT effort. Activity Total FTE Troubleshoot issues Maintain servers Maintain desktops 88.6 Answer user question 87.0 Design, develop and support web sites Develop custom administrative applications 76.4

17 Academic Suport Admin Support Application and User Support FTE University Relations Student Affairs Office of the President Intercollegiate Athletics Finance and Business Educational Equity Development and Alumni Relations University Libraries Undergraduate Education Schreyer's Honors College Research World Campus/Outreach Graduate School Global Programs ITS FTE Applications User support User Support Application Development and Maintenance

18 18 Priority Improvement Opportunities

19 Improvement Opportunities In consultation with the Advisory Committee, seven opportunities to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of IT services were identified. Opportunities were identified based on their potential to reduce costs, create significant productivity gains that would enable IT staff members to focus on higher priorities, reduce risk, and improve support for a strategic University objective. Other factors considered included the degree of technical and organizational readiness to implement the changes required and the importance of a proposed change to realizing future opportunities to improve IT services. These opportunities are a starting point. Long-term, the University needs to build on these changes to address a strategic technology agenda that includes the modernization of its administrative systems, a comprehensive data center strategy and enhanced support for teaching and research. However, these opportunities are an important foundation for collaboration and represent significant opportunities to enhance highly utilized IT services. The table on the following page identifies the seven opportunities and briefly establishes the rationale for change. On the following pages, a set of criteria are introduced that have been used to evaluate the potential of each opportunity. A detailed discussion of each opportunity can be found in Attachment C. 19

20 Improvement Opportunities Opportunity Adopt a single solution for faculty and staff . Shared solution for data archiving Expand support for virtualization and colocation Expand client management for labs, classrooms and desktop computers. Expand software license management. Shared service desk software Wireless as common good. Rationale Reduces expenditures to maintain separate solutions. Demonstrates will to collaborate. More economical and feasible to create Universitywide. Important to research compliance. Leverage economies of scale and expertise. Reduce risk for systems requiring high availability and security. Significant productivity gains. Improved energy utilization. Reduced cost to license software for labs and individual computers. Improved productivity for 200 FTE providing support. Better service. Close gaps in wireless coverage at UP Provide consistent user experience. 20

21 Improvement Opportunities Analytical Framework Criteria Rating Description Cost Savings/Cost Avoidance Productivity Risk 21 Recurring savings or cost avoidance of approximately $250,000 or less. Recurring savings or cost avoidance of $250,000 to $1,000,000. Recurring savings or cost avoidance over $1 million. Small gains in individual productivity. Large gains in productivity that enable portions of time to be focused on higher priorities. Substantial gains in productivity that enable positions to be focused on higher priorities. Risk is managed more efficiently. Risk is reduced. Required to protect a strategic asset or compliance with mandatory regulations

22 Improvement Opportunities Summary Assessment Opportunity Cost Savings Cost Avoidance / Calendar Storage/Archivi ng Virtualization/c o-location Client management labs and desktops License management NA NA Improved Productivity Service desk NA NA Wireless NA Reduced Risk NA 22

23 Implementation Considerations These opportunities were selected because the Advisory Committee assessed there to be a high degree of readiness at the University. However, each will present its own challenges as changes are implemented. It will be important to keep the users and providers of these services well informed of how their service experience will be impacted by the proposed changes. The table on the following page presents a preliminary assessment of some of the cultural and organizational implementation challenges that lie ahead. The ITLC should work with ITS leadership to create strategies to manage these challenges. 23

24 Implementation Considerations Opportunity /Calendar Storage/Archiving Virtualization and co-location Client management License management Service desk Wireless 24 Implementation Considerations Highly personal application used by many. Will be an initial fear of loss of choice of preferred software as well as transition issues such as synching with multiple computers and devices. New service, so resistance should be low. Will be important to clarify that this does not limit choice of short-term storage for scientific data. Primarily impacts distributed IT staff. Will require service level agreements and metrics to build confidence in common service. Potentially broad impact on distributed IT staff, students and faculty. While there should be no loss of capability experienced by users of labs and classrooms, this will need to be well communicated. Will impact faculty and staff used to having all software resident on their hard drives. Will require communications and some training. Primarily impacts distributed IT staff. Will require service level agreements and metrics to build confidence in common service. Primarily impacts distributed IT staff. Will require service level agreements and metrics to build confidence in common service and clarify locally maintained control over wireless provisioning. Also, clear guidelines for sharing costs need to be established.

25 Improvement Opportunities Next Steps Working in concert with the ITLC, ITS should refine the investment requirements and implementation plans for the seven areas. The newly formed senior governance board (see next section) should review the final cost benefit analyses and prioritize the implementation of the first seven. For the Board s consideration, the following initial priorities are recommended: Begin by extending the CLM service to all campuses. Second, begin deployment of the common and calendar solution. Extend the CLM service to additional colleges and pilot a companion service for administrative desktops. Expand the license management program. Expand co-location and virtualization capabilities and consolidate administrative applications into ITS run data centers. Continue work on the design of a University-wide data archiving and storage solution. 25

26 Beyond the Initial Opportunities Once the implementation of the initial opportunities is underway, the University should build on this foundation for collaboration and the new mechanisms for planning created by the governance framework (see next section) to address several strategic technology issues. The IT assessment was not intended to establish a long-range IT plan for Penn State. That work must follow this project. However, the resource analysis and qualitative interviews conducted for the Assessment confirmed the importance of resolving several strategic issues. They are described briefly below. The University needs to establish a strategy to modernize its enterprise administrative systems (IBIS, ISIS) and expand its portfolio to include solutions for human resources and comprehensive research administration. The strategy must set priorities and timelines for systems replacement and should establish a preference for package applications or developed open source solutions. The strategy should seek to leverage recent developments in hosted applications to manage the cost of implementation and facilitate standardization of business processes. 26

27 Beyond the Initial Opportunities Priorities for expanding technology support for research and teaching should be developed. The IT Assessment confirmed that the University has an opportunity to increase its investment in direct support for the use of technology in teaching and research as it changes its approach to providing common IT services. Long-term, the University must weigh additional investments that must be made in academic and research technologies to support institutional strategies to increase their utilization in order to support institutional growth. As services expand, IT governance groups must be engaged in planning the optimal organizational placement of responsibility for these services. 27

28 28 IT Governance

29 Goals Penn State requires an improved IT governance structure to proactively manage its technology services and resources. Engaged governance structures and processes are required to implement the outcomes of the IT Assessment and make optimizing the University s investment in IT a continuous process. Engaged governance is also critical to building greater trust and stronger connections among the various IT units. Revised IT governance will direct IT planning, coordinate distributed and central IT services, identify project priorities and measure the effectiveness of IT at Penn State. Governance will: 29 Align IT priorities and investments with institutional strategies and objectives. Maximize the benefits the University realizes from its total investment in technology. Create clear decision paths for setting priorities, coordinating IT services and approving policies and standards. Promote accountability by incorporating structured planning, linking IT decisions to resource allocation decisions, empowering leaders to implement decisions and assessing results. Engage both IT and non-it leaders from campuses, colleges and support units in decisionmaking. Be transparent and consistent.

30 Goals 30 IT governance is not an attempt to centralize decision-making or eliminate the authority of distributed IT groups. An important role of IT governance is to specify and legitimize the need for distributed decision-making to maintain agility and support innovation. Governance committees can t possibly be sufficiently engaged to make all IT decisions. Operational decision-making and many small to moderate sized investment decisions will continue to be made by ITS, IT leaders, and their budget executives. The foundational priorities of IT governance are planning and coordination. In order to maintain an effective service portfolio and optimize the use of our IT resources, distributed IT groups and ITS need to more aware of each other s priorities and directions. The same is true among IT groups. Governance groups will be focused on recommending goals and strategies and prioritizing the most substantial investments that will have the broadest impact on Penn State. Where decisions have been made to adopt a common service, IT governance will serve as a mechanism to create accountability for both the effective use and provisioning of the service.

31 Principles To maximize governance s effectiveness Penn State should: Focus IT governance on the University s total IT investments and service portfolio, not only ITS. Create a representative, executive level IT governance group comprised of senior academic, administrative and IT leaders invested in understanding the complexities of IT issues and decisions. Charge governance structure with planning what needs to be done, prioritizing how to do it and assessing the effectiveness of strategies and services. Engage faculty, students and staff to determine the needs technology must meet and to evaluate its performance. Leverage the IT Leadership Council (ITLC) to bring together the University s IT community to share best practices, seek expertise and input to improve solutions, and foster communication among IT units. Empower the Vice Provost and CIO to facilitate the governance processes in a manner that is transparent, consistent and efficient. 31

32 Key Actions To improve IT governance, Penn State should adopt the model depicted on the following page. Actions required to create the revised governance structures and processes include: Designate the Provost, Senior Vice President for Finance and Business and the Vice Provost and Chief Information Officer as the final decision-makers for IT. Appoint an IT Board comprised of representative deans, chancellors, vice presidents and senior IT leaders to approve strategic directions, approve IT policies, designate common IT services and prioritize the most significant IT investments. Empower the IT Board to oversee the development of a strategic IT plan for Penn State. Appoint domain specific governance committees comprised of faculty, staff and IT providers to identify emerging needs, recommend annual work priorities, recommend standards, and sponsor university-wide improvement initiatives. Appoint University-wide coordinating committees for IT architecture, security and services to recommend standards, develop solutions and monitor the effectiveness of the IT environment. Establish the ITLC and the ITLC Board as a sounding board for major ITS decisions and a coordinating body to foster collaboration among all IT units. 32

33 Proposed IT Governance Model IT Board Instructional Technology Enterprise Systems Research Information Security IT Architecture 33 IT Services

34 IT Governance In Practice The IT Board will recommend long-range goals, endorse proposed IT strategies, recommend investment priorities, and sponsor the implementation of institutional policies and common services. The IT Board will make recommendations to the Provost, Vice Provost for Information Technology and the Senior Vice President for Business and Finance. The Board will invest sufficient time to understand the University s technology issues and opportunities. The Board will provide guidance to other governance committee s to help them set annual work plans and priorities for the systems and services within their scope (e.g., enterprise systems, research computing, etc.). The Board will be guided by analyses and recommendations developed by ITS leadership, ITLC working groups and other standing IT governance committees. Governance committees for research, enterprise systems and instructional technology will recommend annual project priorities for common systems and services within their domain. These domain specific governance committees will work with ITS to prioritize the use of existing resources to meet annual goals. The committees will recommend new projects to the ITS leadership or the IT Board (depending on scale) to meet new need that are beyond the capacity of existing resources. Committees will seek out opportunities to create new common services in areas where needs converge across the University. 34

35 IT Governance in Practice The information security, IT architecture and IT services committees will focus on policies, standards and services that enable Penn State s technology. Committees will include both IT and non-it leaders and will be co-led by an ITS senior staff member and a distributed IT leader. The work of these committees will inform the development of policies and the adoption of technology standards. The services committee will advise ITS and other providers of common IT services on the establishment and management of service levels and the selection of technologies integral to IT service management. The services committee will also recommend priorities to enhance services for which IT leaders play the equivalent role of functional leaders such as , storage and server hosting and virtualization. For very significant decisions or changes, the committees will structure interactions with the ITLC to gain broader input from the Penn State IT community prior to making a final recommendation to ITS leadership. Policy recommendations, recommendations to establish new common services, proposals to change how services are funded or projects that require substantial new investments that emerge from these committees will be reviewed by the IT Board. 35

36 Proposed Roles of IT Governance Committees Group Membership Responsibility Executive Oversight IT Board IT Leadership Council (ITLC) ITLC Board 36 Provost, Senior VP F&B, CIO Academic and Administrative VPs, Deans, Chancellors and faculty representatives, ITLC representatives, CIO and Deputy CIO Campus and College IT directors, ITS leaders Elected by ITLC, CIO (ex-officio)and Deputy CIO (ex-officio)* *Requires amending ITLC by-laws. Approve major investments, IT policies and multi-year IT plans Commission strategic planning Recommend multi-year IT goals and strategies Assess risks and commission the development of mitigation strategies Approve and oversee the implementation of policy Approve prioritization of large projects Approve common services and recommend funding mechanisms Review annual progress towards strategic goals Evaluate the performance of IT services Sponsor ad-hoc communities of interest around IT topics Assist with the development of IT policies, standards and best practices Provide input to decisions impacting technology or services that need to be made quickly or don t require the input of all of ITLC Recommend ITLC members to serve on segment specific committees Commission ad-hoc communities to undertake special projects and analyses

37 Proposed Roles of IT Governance Committees Group Membership Responsibility Faculty and Student Advisory Committees Domain specific committees (enterprise systems, research computing, instructional technology, information security, technical architecture, IT services) Ad-hoc Communities 37 Faculty and Students Provide input to long range goals and strategies Advise on the development of policy Serve as a sounding board for any significant changes to services or service levels Assist with communications Faculty, administrative leaders, ITS staff, campus and college IT leaders (see individual charges for details) Appointed based on interest and expertise by the Office of the Vice Provost in consultation with ITLC, faculty and student advisory committees. Establish annual project priorities Recommend major projects and investments Develop policies, recommend standards and best practices Sponsor major projects Establish data definitions, standards Provide input on future directions. Consider issues at the request of ITLC or the Vice Provost. Research emerging needs or new technologies. Share successful practices.

38 Attachment A Description of the IT Snapshot Analysis and Glossary of Terms 38

39 Data Collection Method Data was collected from all budget areas of the University. The only excluded entity is the Pennsylvania College of Technology. Data was self-reported by individuals with knowledge of the IT operations and expenditures in each budget area. Data collection was coordinated by liaisons selected by the budget executive. Liaisons sub-divided their areas as necessary to facilitate data collection. Expenditure and staffing data is a snapshot as of the end of FY Staffing data was provided for any staff member that spends a quarter or more of their time managing technology or providing technology support. Data collection was not limited only to those staff in job family 11. The allocation of staff time by activity was captured in increments of.1 full time equivalents (FTE). 39

40 Glossary Organizational Terms Colleges all University Park Colleges, Dickinson School of Law and the College of Medicine Campuses all Commonwealth campuses and Great Valley Academic Support Units include ITS, Library, Global Programs, Graduate School, World Campus, Research, Schreyer Honors College, Undergraduate Education Administrative Support Units include Development and Alumni Relations, Educational Equity, Student Affairs, Finance and Business, Intercollegiate Athletics, Office of the President, and University Relations 40

41 Glossary Activity Categories Academic Technology includes consulting with faculty, supporting courseware and supporting learning management systems Applications includes design, development and support of databases, web sites, reports and custom applications. Also includes operations and support of clinical management systems and custom and commercial administrative software packages. Finally, it includes support for communication and collaboration tools. This category excludes applications and databases directly in support of research projects. Infrastructure includes support for classroom technology, desktop and laptop computers, servers and portable media equipment. Also includes the provision and support of voice services, wired and wireless networks. Research Computing includes direct support provided to research grants. Activities include support to develop custom research applications and the support for hardware and software dedicated to one or more research grants. Security includes provisioning access, responding to security breaches, scanning systems and security related training. Support includes training, troubleshooting and responding to questions from end users. Also includes researching emerging technologies and needs as well as providing user support for clinical systems and university-wide applications (e.g., IBIS). Management includes time spent managing IT staff, obtaining professional development, managing IT budgets, project management and IT leadership and strategy. 41

42 Glossary Other Terms FTE full time equivalent staff NPE non-personnel expenditure - expenditures for technologies and services excluding personnel salaries and benefits Budget transfers internal reallocation of funds from one University budget to another as payment for services. 42

43 Attachment B Select Data Charts from IT Snapshot 43

44 Total Technology Expenditures Estimated Personnel Costs* (salary and benefits) $129,360,000 Non Personnel Expenditures $119,013,799 Total Expenditures** $248,373,799 *Assumes an average cost per FTE of $80,000 ** Includes expenditures from auxiliary funds, restricted funds and internal budget transfers 44

45 Non-Personnel Expenditures by Area Area Total NPE Including Transfers and Research Related Expenditures* Academic Support Units $47,960,007 Penn State Hershey Clinical Enterprise $27,705,741 Colleges $17,022,191 Administrative Support Units $14,278,067 Campuses $12,047,793 *FY Total $119,013,799

46 Non-Personnel Expenditures (less budget transfers) by Type Category *Expenditures Less Budget Transfers Hardware $32,552,932 Software $26,445,395 Other Expenditures $23,500,730 Services $15,168,726 Research Expenditures $11,532,569 Initiatives $8,519,206 Total $117,719,557 *Expenditures Less Budget Break-down of Other Transfers Depreciation $9,493,215 Services/contract labor $4,424,663 Networking and Telecom Equipment $3,231,609 Access/Network Connectivity $1,425,976 Hardware $1,406,162 Software $1,106,961 Other $900,000 Broadcast services/media $529,954 IT Operations and Supplies $233,890 Renovations/Facilities $207,415 Grad Assts $173,046 Course Development $158,150 Non IT Related $152,188 Video Equipt $57,500 *FY

47 IT Effort (FTE) Includes finance, management, HR, communications and professional development. Management 178 Support 388 Security 50 Research Computing 67 ITS: 126 Clinical enterprise: 56 Colleges: 48 Admin support:78 Other Academic Support:109 Infrastructure Applications Academic Technology

48 IT Effort by Area and Function 100% 90% % % 60% 50% 40% Other (224) Support (371) Security (49) Research Computing (64) Infrastructure (351) Applications (438) 30% Academic Technology (121) 20% % 0% Academic Support Units Administrative Support Units Campuses Colleges Penn State Hershey - Clinical Enterprise 48

49 IT Effort By Function and Area 100% 90% % % % 50% Penn State Hershey - Clinical Enterprise Colleges Campuses 40% 30% 20% Administrative Support Units Academic Support Units 10% 0% 49 Academic Technology (121) Applications (438) Infrastructure (351) Research Computing (64) Security (49) Support (371) Other (224)

50 Total FTE % Division of Effort - Academic Technology 90% 80% 70% 69.0% 62.6% 66.4% 60% 50% 40% 30% ITS Effort 20% 10% 31.0% 37.4% 33.6% 0% Consult with faculty Support courseware Support learning management systems 50

51 FTE Academic Technology Area/Activity ITS Academic Support Without/ITS Administrative Support Units Campuses University Park Colleges Penn State Hershey - College of Medicine Penn State Hershey Clinical Enterprise Total - ALL Consult with faculty Support courseware Support learning management systems Other- academic Subtotal - Academic Technology

52 Total FTE % Division of Effort - Applications 90% 80% 37.9% 70% 60% 50% 69.9% 82.9% 69.0% 84.0% 98.9% 88.1% 78.7% 40% 30% 62.1% 20% 10% Total: % ITS: 13.7 Academic support: 13.6 Admin support: 5.7 UP colleges: % Design, develop and support databases 17.1% Design, develop and support websites 31.0% Develop custom applications [exclude instruction and research] 16.0% Develop custom reports and queries 1.1% Support area specific clinical management systems 11.9% Support area specific communication and collaboration tools 21.3% Support area specific package administrative applications Support centralized administrative applications within IBIS, ISIS, elion etc. 52 Total: 84.9 FTE

53 FTE - Applications Area/Activity ITS Academic Support Without/ITS Administrative Support Units Campuses University Park Colleges Penn State Hershey - College of Medicine Penn State Hershey Clinical Enterprise Total - ALL Design, develop and support databases Design, develop and support websites Develop custom applications [exclude instruction and research] Develop custom reports and queries Support area specific clinical management systems Support area specific communication and collaboration tools Support area specific package administrative applications Support centralized administrative applications within IBIS, ISIS, elion etc Other - Application Subtotal - Applications

54 Total FTE Total FTE: 63.7 ITS: 28 UP colleges: 8 Clinical Enterprise: 7.8 Campuses: % Division of Effort within IT - Infrastructure 90% 80% 70% 50.4% 46.6% 56.0% 60% 50% 95.4% 86.7% 96.3% 40% 30% 20% 49.6% 53.4% 44.0% 10% 0% 4.6% Maintain classroom technology 13.3% Maintain desktops, laptops and PDA's 3.7% Maintain Servers Support portable multi-media equipment Support voice service Support wired and wireless network connectivity 54 Total FTE 88.6 Total FTE: 129 ITS: 64 Acad support: 18.6 UP Colleges: 18.2 Admin support: 9.9 Commonwealth campuses 8.3

55 FTE - Infrastructure Area/Activity ITS Academic Support Without/ITS Administrative Support Units Campuses University Park Colleges Penn State Hershey - College of Medicine Penn State Hershey Clinical Enterprise Total - ALL Maintain classroom technology Maintain desktops, laptops and PDA's Maintain Servers Support portable multi-media equipment Support voice service Support wired and wireless network connectivity Other - Infrastructure Subtotal - Infrastructure

56 Total FTE % Division of Effort - Research Computing 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 95.2% 99.9% 90.7% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 4.8% Direct support for research grants - develop research computing applications 0.1% Direct support for research grants - hardware, IT equipment 9.3% Support research computing - general 56

57 FTE Research Computing Area/Activity ITS Academic Support Administrative Without/ITS Support Units Campuses University Park Colleges Penn State Hershey - College of Medicine Penn State Hershey Clinical Enterprise Total - ALL Direct support for research grants - develop research computing applications Direct support for research grants - hardware, IT equipment Support research computing - general Other research Subtotal - Research Computing

58 Total FTE: % Division of Effort - Security 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 90.8% 71.2% 77.8% 86.9% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 28.8% 22.2% 9.2% 13.1% Provisioning Access [e.g. ASRs] Respond to security breaches Scan vulnerabilities Training Total FTE 10.5 Total FTE: 13.9 UP Colleges: 3.9 Campuses: 2.1 Total FTE: 18.5 ITS: 4.1 UP colleges: 5.1 Campuses

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