A comparison of complaints by mild brain injury claimants and other claimants describing subjective experiences immediately following their injury

Save this PDF as:
 WORD  PNG  TXT  JPG

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "A comparison of complaints by mild brain injury claimants and other claimants describing subjective experiences immediately following their injury"

Transcription

1 Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology 16 (2001) A comparison of complaints by mild brain injury claimants and other claimants describing subjective experiences immediately following their injury Paul R. Lees-Haley a, *, David D. Fox b, John C. Courtney c a Lees-Haley Psychological Corporation, Costanso Street, Woodland Hills, CA, USA b Consultants in Psychological Assessment, Glendale, CA, USA c Clinical Neuropsychology, P.C., Mishawaka, IN, USA Accepted 8 September 2000 Abstract This study compares the rate of postconcussive (PCS) symptoms at the time of injury for mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI; N = 24) claimants and claimants reporting other forms of injury (OI; N = 66). On checklists surveying their complaints immediately after their injury, MTBI and OI claimants reported similar levels of many PCS complaints, e.g., dazed, confused, dizzy, disoriented, trouble concentrating, numbness or loss of sensation, and loss of memory for some of what happened. One in four of the OI samples reported partial loss of consciousness (LOC), and one-third reported loss of memory for some of what happened. About 67% of the MTBI sample reported being confused and 71% dazed, but so did many of the OI sample (52% dazed, 65% confused). The authors suggest that classical PCS complaints experienced immediately after an injury are so nonspecific that they have little diagnostic specificity. D 2001 National Academy of Neuropsychology. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. Keywords: Mild traumatic brain injury; Postconcussive symptoms 1. Introduction In 1993, the Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (MTBI) Committee of the Head Injury Interdisciplinary Special Interest Group of the American Congress of Rehabilitation * Corresponding author. Tel.: ; fax: address: (P.R. Lees-Haley) /01/$ see front matter D 2001 National Academy of Neuropsychology. PII: S (00)

2 690 P.R. Lees-Haley et al. / Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology 16 (2001) Medicine (Special Interest Group) proposed a definition of MTBI that some experts are mentioning in forensic neuropsychology cases (Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Committee, 1993). They proposed that MTBI be defined as a traumatically induced physiological disruption of brain function manifested by any one or more of the following criteria: Any period of loss of consciousness (LOC) of 30 min or less, Any loss of memory for events immediately before or after the accident, so long as the post-traumatic amnesia does not exceed 24 h, Any alteration in mental state at the time of the accident (e.g., feeling dazed, disoriented, or confused), Focal neurological deficit(s) that may or may not be transient. If the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score is less than 13 after 30 min, this definition is not applied. The Special Interest Group noted that MTBI could occur without direct trauma to the head through an acceleration/deceleration movement. They also noted that these diagnostic criteria might not always be documented in the acute stage. Given the Special Interest Group s specification that MTBI may occur without a blow to the head, the generality of the expression traumatically induced, and the lack of any requirement for objective findings or documented subjective complaints at the time of injury, it is not clear what limits are presumed. We are concerned that less experienced clinicians may consider subjective complaints of cognitive problems to be sufficient for diagnosis in vague circumstances that might be interpreted as whiplash or contact between the head and another object. For example, the Special Interest Group s position could be misconstrued to suggest that virtually any motor vehicle accident or slip and fall followed by undocumented, retrospectively reported subjective complaints of any alteration in mental state qualifies as having caused a brain injury. There is a potential risk that those attempting to apply this definition may not be able to differentiate effects of a brain injury from other effects of an event suspected of possibly causing an injury. We argue that a reasonable interpretation of the Special Interest Group s definition is to treat these symptomatic complaints as indications of a need to review the history and objective findings carefully from a neuropsychological perspective, and in some cases of a need for a comprehensive neuropsychological evaluation. However, it is an overinterpretation of the Special Interest Group s contribution to treat their descriptors as criteria for a diagnosis. The need for the present study arises from the nonspecific nature of these criteria and the fact that such criteria are applied to persons who have had potentially upsetting experiences that often present an alternative explanation for alterations in mental state. In the course of clinical contact with a diverse trauma population, we have repeatedly heard reports from trauma victims suggesting that altered mental states occur in connection with a wide variety of upsetting experiences besides brain injuries. This anecdotal evidence suggests that alterations of mental states can be associated with experiences that reasonably may be characterized as annoying, insulting, offensive, discourteous, shocking, surprising, disconcerting, unexpected, or in other terms without physiological trauma in

3 P.R. Lees-Haley et al. / Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology 16 (2001) any generally accepted sense. Individuals who have suffered orthopedic injuries, lacerations, sexual assault, burns, muscle strains, and many other injuries not associated with MTBI often describe their experiences in terms indicative of an altered mental state. A motor vehicle accident or slip and fall may be upsetting or startling even if the event causes no injury. Many events in life besides traumatic brain injury may cause one to feel dazed or confused, e.g., experiences that are shocking or frightening or disconcerting. As Satz et al. (1999, p. 621) noted,... orthopedic injury, chronic pain, and other factors may alter cognitive and/or psychosocial functioning (e.g., attention, memory, and depression) in a manner similar to that of PPCS. Thus, failure to consider the prior probabilities of general stress symptoms when formulating diagnostic impressions may lead to misleading and erroneous diagnoses where no brain injury exists. Paniak, MacDonald, Toller-Lobe, Durand, and Nagy (1998) have emphasized the need for research on experiences immediately after MTBI, particularly among non-referred patients. These authors noted that Mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) is the most common and controversial category of traumatic brain injury... One of many possible reasons for the controversy is that there are no published base rate data showing how diagnostic criteria for MTBI present in a large, non-referred MTBI sample. Normative data from such a sample would allow one to assess whether a suspected case of MTBI presents typically or atypically, providing information for differential diagnosis (Paniak et al., 1998, p. 853). These authors provide an important step in this direction by describing some of the experiences of such patients. Further complicating differential diagnosis of MTBI, postconcussive (PCS) symptoms tend to have high base rates in populations besides traumatic brain injury patients, including normals, psychiatric and neurological patients, plaintiffs, students, and others (e.g., see Dunn, Lees-Haley, Brown, Williams, & English, 1995; Fox, Lees-Haley, Earnest, & Dolezal-Wood, 1995a; Fox, Lees-Haley, Earnest, & Dolezal-Wood, 1995b; Gouvier, Cubic, Jones, Brantley, & Cutlip, 1992; Gouvier, Uddo-Crane, & Brown, 1988; Lees-Haley and Brown, 1993). For example, headaches, fatigue, irritability, and concentration problems are among the most common complaints of asymptomatic normals (Fox et al., 1995b). Previous studies of base rates of PCS symptoms have reported on the frequencies of PCS complaints at times well after the accident, e.g., months or years later; but aside from the Paniak et al. s (1998) work, no comparisons of the type presented herein have been reported. There is a need for systematic study of the phenomenology of traumatic events at the time of injury, whether MTBI is suspected or not. The purpose of this study is to begin determining the incidence of certain subjective experiences similar to those following MTBI in persons making claims for other forms of injury besides brain injury. Specifically, claimants not alleging brain injuries were surveyed for experiences that possibly suggested alterations in consciousness, loss of memory for portions of an experience, and related symptoms. By learning more about the incidence of such experiences following events unlikely to cause traumatic brain injury, it may be possible to clarify which complaints are more specific to brain injury and to identify those that are common to numerous stressful experiences. Therefore, this study also reports complaint rates for a comparison group of MTBI claimants.

4 692 P.R. Lees-Haley et al. / Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology 16 (2001) Method 2.1. Participants Two samples of claimants were studied. The primary focus of attention in this study was the Other Injury (OI) group, i.e., those without brain injury claims. A sample of MTBI claimants was studied as a comparison group. The OI group included N = 66 (22 men and 44 women) personal-injury claimants with no history of head injury or toxic exposure. The MTBI group was N = 24 (14 men and 10 women) claimants reporting brain injury due to the traumatic event leading to their claim. There was no objective confirmation as to the actual brain status of each of these claimants; they were persisting PCS symptom claimants. For purposes of this study, MTBI was defined as: 1. LOC < 60 min. 2. Post-traumatic amnesia < 24 h. 3. No focal neurological deficits. 4. No intracranial surgical treatment. 5. Glasgow Coma Scale of lowest first day score. 6. No objective evidence of intracranial lesion on CT or MRI. OI was defined as any allegation of injury or multiple injuries that did not include head injury. These injuries included an array of stressors such as emotionally distressing motor vehicle accidents, sexual harassment, wrongful termination, various forms of discrimination, and exposure to horrifying incidents. They also included orthopedic injuries, lacerations, bruises, strains, various pain complaints, and other medical and psychological injuries. The OI sample had a mean age = (range = 17 62, S.D. = 11.59) and mean education = (range = 1 20, S.D. = 3.32). The MTBI sample had a mean age = (range = 13 63, S.D. = 14.64) and mean education = (range = 7 18, S.D. = 2.75). All members of both groups presented for a comprehensive psychological or neuropsychological evaluation associated with their claims. Data were obtained from two neuropsychological private practices in southern California Measurement and procedure After not locating a relevant standardized survey focusing on experiences immediately following a stressful event that would include LOC, amnesia, and a range of items potentially defining the Special Interest Group s expression, any alteration in mental state, a checklist was developed for this study. This checklist included items relevant to the Special Interest Group s definition of MTBI. Items were derived from previous instruments used to collect base rate data on subjective experiences of brain-injured individuals (Axelrod, Fox, Lees-Haley, Earnest, & Dolezal-Wood, 1998; Axelrod et al., 1996; Fox et al., 1995a; Fox et al., 1995b; Gouvier et al., 1992; Gouvier et al., 1988; Lees- Haley, 1992; Lees-Haley & Brown, 1993). Each examinee was administered the checklist

5 P.R. Lees-Haley et al. / Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology 16 (2001) during a comprehensive forensic psychological or neuropsychological evaluation. Brain injury and OI examinees received the same instructions Results There was no significant difference in the total number of items endorsed by the two samples. The two samples endorsed an equal number of complaints. The OI mean number of items endorsed was (range = 4 34, S.D. = 8.04), and the MTBI mean = 17.5 (range = 2 35, S.D. = 10.5). Specific endorsement rates per item for each group are shown in Table 1. Complaints are rank-ordered by frequency of reporting in the OI sample. There was no significant difference between genders in total number of complaints (male mean = 17.08; female mean = 17.61), and age was not significantly correlated with total number of complaints (r =.02, P =.87). The MTBI group endorsed short-term memory loss, reading problems, and partial LOC more frequently. The OI group endorsed trembling, depression, and anxiety more frequently. Loss of memory for some of what happened at the time of their injury was reported at similar rates, and both groups reported headaches at approximately the same rate. One in four of the OI samples reported partial LOC, and one-third reported loss of memory for some of what happened. About 71% of the MTBI sample reported complaints Table 1 Complaint OI (%), N = 66 MTBI (%), N = 24 Chi-square P < Shocked Anxiety Depression Headache Aches and pain Concentration Confused Irritability, anger Trembling Paying attention Dazed Feelings of unreality Nausea Dizzy Disoriented Short-term memory Balance Numbness Memory loss Visual problems Word finding Partial LOC Reading Coordination PTA

6 694 P.R. Lees-Haley et al. / Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology 16 (2001) of feeling dazed and 67% confused, but so did many of the OI sample (52% dazed, 65% confused). About half of both samples said they felt dizzy. Approximately 20% more of the MTBI sample endorsed post-traumatic amnesia, problems with coordination, and wordfinding problems. 3. Discussion and conclusion Findings in this study suggest that personal injury claimants with no reported history of head injury or toxic exposure endorsed MTBI complaints at rates often similar to MTBI claimants. The endorsement of some of these symptoms by MTBI examinees is consistent with expectations for a brain injury. However, the rate of endorsement of MTBI symptoms by the OI sample illustrates the need for further research to differentiate specific and nonspecific complaints. These data suggest the need for special caution in drawing causal inferences from potentially upsetting events with no objective evidence of brain injury to the conclusion that the experience caused MTBI. The definition proposed by the Special Interest Group provides signals for concern that do not yet possess sufficient specificity to use as a basis for a diagnosis because they do not differentiate mild brain injury from certain other bothersome, stressful, or annoying experiences that may or may not have caused a MTBI. There are number of limitations to consider in this study. One is that these data are drawn from forensic cases and may not generalize to clinical neuropsychology cases. Future research should address the rates of these complaints in non-litigating patients. Another is the absence of contemporaneous data concerning alcohol and drug use. Substance use at the time of injury could have affected subjective complaints. A third concern is the use of retrospective data. Retrospective reports of subjective experiences have notoriously problematic reliability, and these problems are worsened in confounding settings such as those where compensation is a factor. However, these data suggest that it is interesting and worthwhile to investigate in more detail the phenomenology of traumatic experiences, and to compare and contrast brain injuries and OI. References Axelrod, B. N., Fox, D. D., Lees-Haley, P. R., Earnest, K., & Dolezal-Wood, S. (1998). Application of the postconcussive syndrome questionnaire with medical and psychiatric outpatients. Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, 13, Axelrod, B. N., Fox, D. D., Lees-Haley, P. R., Earnest, K., Dolezal-Wood, S., & Goldman, R. S. (1996). Latent structure of the postconcussion syndrome questionnaire. Psychological Assessment, 8 (4), Dunn, J. T., Lees-Haley, P. R., Brown, R. S., Williams, C. W., & English, L. T. (1995). Neurotoxic complaint base rates of personal injury claimants: implications for neuropsychological assessment. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 51 (4), Fox, D. D., Lees-Haley, P. R., Earnest, K., & Dolezal-Wood, S. (1995a). Base rates of post-concussive symptoms in HMO patients and controls. Neuropsychology, 9, Fox, D. D., Lees-Haley, P. R., Earnest, K., & Dolezal-Wood, S. (1995b). Post-concussive symptoms: base rates and etiology in psychiatric patients. The Clinical Neuropsychologist, 9 (1),

7 P.R. Lees-Haley et al. / Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology 16 (2001) Gouvier, W. D., Cubic, B., Jones, G., Brantley, P., & Cutlip, Q. (1992). Postconcussion symptoms and daily stress in normal and head-injured college populations. Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, 7, Gouvier, W. D., Uddo-Crane, M., & Brown, L. M. (1988). Base rates of post-concussional symptoms. Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, 3, Lees-Haley, P. R. (1992). Neuropsychological complaint base rates of personal injury claimants. Forensic Reports, 5, Lees-Haley, P. R., & Brown, R. S. (1993). Neuropsychological complaint base rates of 170 personal injury claimants. Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, 8, Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Committee of the Head Injury Interdisciplinary Special Interest Group of the American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. (1993). Definition of mild traumatic brain injury. Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation, 8, Paniak, C., MacDonald, J., Toller-Lobe, G., Durand, A., & Nagy, J. (1998). A preliminary normative profile of mild traumatic brain injury diagnostic criteria. Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology, 20, Satz, P., Alfano, M. S., Light, R., Morgenstern, H., Zaucha, K., Asarnow, R. F., & Newton, S. (1999). Persistent post-concussive syndrome: a proposed methodology and literature review to determine the effects, if any, of mild head and other bodily injury. Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology, 21,

NEW TRENDS AND ISSUES IN NEUROPSYCHOLOGY: Mild Traumatic Brain Injury and Postconcussive Syndrome Cases

NEW TRENDS AND ISSUES IN NEUROPSYCHOLOGY: Mild Traumatic Brain Injury and Postconcussive Syndrome Cases NEW TRENDS AND ISSUES IN NEUROPSYCHOLOGY: Mild Traumatic Brain Injury and Postconcussive Syndrome Cases Carl F. Mariano Barry H. Uhrman Introduction to Neuropsychology As many of you are aware, clinical

More information

CPEP Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) Examination

CPEP Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) Examination CPEP Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) Examination Please read each question carefully and click on the circle next to the correct answer. When you have finished all the questions, click the Submit button at

More information

A PEEK INSIDE A CLOSED HEAD INJURY CLAIM... 1

A PEEK INSIDE A CLOSED HEAD INJURY CLAIM... 1 A PEEK INSIDE A CLOSED HEAD INJURY CLAIM By: Douglas Fletcher Fernando Fred Arias Dr. Jim Hom April 11, 2014 CONTENTS A PEEK INSIDE A CLOSED HEAD INJURY CLAIM... 1 SYMPTOMATOLOGY... 2 CRITICAL INFORMATION...

More information

Attention & Memory Deficits in TBI Patients. An Overview

Attention & Memory Deficits in TBI Patients. An Overview Attention & Memory Deficits in TBI Patients An Overview References Chan, R., et.al.. (2003). Are there sub-types of attentional deficits in patients with persisting post- concussive symptoms? A cluster

More information

TBI TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY WITHIN THE MILITARY/VETERAN POPULATION

TBI TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY WITHIN THE MILITARY/VETERAN POPULATION TBI TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY WITHIN THE MILITARY/VETERAN POPULATION What is TBI? An external force that disrupts the normal function of the brain. Not all blows or jolts to the head result in a TBI. The

More information

Brain Injury Litigation. Peter W. Burg Burg Simpson Eldredge Hersh & Jardine, P.C. www.burgsimpson.com

Brain Injury Litigation. Peter W. Burg Burg Simpson Eldredge Hersh & Jardine, P.C. www.burgsimpson.com Brain Injury Litigation Peter W. Burg Burg Simpson Eldredge Hersh & Jardine, P.C. www.burgsimpson.com Some General Facts About Traumatic Brain Injury TBIs contribute to a substantial number of deaths and

More information

Brain Injury Litigation Today

Brain Injury Litigation Today MILD TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY PAPER 3.1 Brain Injury Litigation Today These materials were prepared by Joseph E. Murphy, QC, of Murphy Battista LLP, Vancouver, BC, for the Continuing Legal Education Society

More information

Traumatic Stress. and Substance Use Problems

Traumatic Stress. and Substance Use Problems Traumatic Stress and Substance Use Problems The relation between substance use and trauma Research demonstrates a strong link between exposure to traumatic events and substance use problems. Many people

More information

BINSA Information on Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

BINSA Information on Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Mild traumatic brain injuries (MTBI) occur through sporting, car and workplace accidents. Mild brain injury is not easily diagnosed. This fact sheet explains how it may be recognised and assessed, and

More information

Traumatic Stress and Substance Abuse Problems

Traumatic Stress and Substance Abuse Problems Traumatic Stress and Substance Abuse Problems The relation between substance use and trauma Research demonstrates a strong link between exposure to traumatic events and substance use problems. Many people

More information

The Indiana Trial Lawyer Association s Lifetime Achievement Seminar. Honoring Peter L. Obremsky. May 23-24, 2005

The Indiana Trial Lawyer Association s Lifetime Achievement Seminar. Honoring Peter L. Obremsky. May 23-24, 2005 The Indiana Trial Lawyer Association s Lifetime Achievement Seminar Honoring Peter L. Obremsky May 23-24, 2005 The Use of Medical Literature in the Brain Injury Case Thomas C. Doehrman Doehrman-Chamberlain

More information

Mild Traumatic Brain Injury and Malingered Cognitive Symptoms: Part I Elizabeth L. Leonard, PhD Neurocognitive Associates Scottsdale, AZ

Mild Traumatic Brain Injury and Malingered Cognitive Symptoms: Part I Elizabeth L. Leonard, PhD Neurocognitive Associates Scottsdale, AZ : Part I Elizabeth L. Leonard, PhD Neurocognitive Associates Scottsdale, AZ Dr. Leonard is a clinical and forensic neuropsychologist practicing in Scottsdale, AZ. She was formerly on the faculty at Harvard

More information

General Disclaimer (learned from Dr. Melhorn)

General Disclaimer (learned from Dr. Melhorn) Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: Postconcussion Syndrome, Persistent Posttraumatic Headache, etc. Robert J. Barth, Ph.D. Chattanooga, TN and Birmingham, AL General Disclaimer (learned from Dr. Melhorn) All

More information

Early Response Concussion Recovery

Early Response Concussion Recovery Early Response Concussion Recovery KRISTA MAILEY, BSW RSW, CONCUSSION RECOVERY CONSULTANT CAREY MINTZ, PH.D., C. PSYCH., PRACTICE IN CLINICAL NEUROPSYCHOLOGY FOR REFERRAL: Contact Krista Mailey at (204)

More information

Bodily Distress Syndrome (BDS)

Bodily Distress Syndrome (BDS) Bodily Distress Syndrome (BDS) Patient drawing of her symptoms (Fatigue, dizziness, memory impairment, concentration difficulty, headache, migraine, insomnia, vomiting, muscular pain, nausea, feeling seedy,

More information

EMOTIONAL AND BEHAVIOURAL CONSEQUENCES OF HEAD INJURY

EMOTIONAL AND BEHAVIOURAL CONSEQUENCES OF HEAD INJURY Traumatic brain injury EMOTIONAL AND BEHAVIOURAL CONSEQUENCES OF HEAD INJURY Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a common neurological condition that can have significant emotional and cognitive consequences.

More information

Management of Concussion/Mild Traumatic Brain Injury - Evidence Based Practice

Management of Concussion/Mild Traumatic Brain Injury - Evidence Based Practice Management of Concussion/Mild Traumatic Brain Injury - Evidence Based Practice Introduction 1) The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has estimated that each year, approximately Americans survive

More information

Mild head injury: How mild is it?

Mild head injury: How mild is it? Mild head injury: How mild is it? Carly Dutton; Gemma Foster & Stephen Spoors Sunderland and Gateshead Community Acquired Brain Injury Service (CABIS), Northumberland, Tyne and Wear NHS Foundation Trust

More information

Pragmatic Evidence Based Review Substance Abuse in moderate to severe TBI

Pragmatic Evidence Based Review Substance Abuse in moderate to severe TBI Pragmatic Evidence Based Review Substance Abuse in moderate to severe TBI Reviewer Emma Scheib Date Report Completed November 2011 Important Note: This report is not intended to replace clinical judgement,

More information

Recovering from a Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (MTBI)

Recovering from a Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (MTBI) Recovering from a Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (MTBI) What happened? You have a Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (MTBI), which is a very common injury. Some common ways people acquire this type of injury are

More information

Traumatic Brain Injury and Incarceration. Objectives. Traumatic Brain Injury. Which came first, the injury or the behavior?

Traumatic Brain Injury and Incarceration. Objectives. Traumatic Brain Injury. Which came first, the injury or the behavior? Traumatic Brain Injury and Incarceration Which came first, the injury or the behavior? Barbara Burchell Curtis RN, MSN Objectives Upon completion of discussion, participants should be able to Describe

More information

Neuropsychological Assessment in Sports- Related Concussion: Part of a Complex Puzzle

Neuropsychological Assessment in Sports- Related Concussion: Part of a Complex Puzzle Neuropsychological Assessment in Sports- Related Concussion: Part of a Complex Puzzle Jillian Schuh, PhD 1, 2, John Oestreicher, PhD 1, & Linda Steffen, PsyD 1 1 Catalpa Health 2 Department of Neurology,

More information

20 Questions (and answers) about Traumatic Brain Injury

20 Questions (and answers) about Traumatic Brain Injury 20 Questions (and answers) about Traumatic Brain Injury for insurance claims adjusters, case managers, attorneys, and health-care providers by Dennis P. Swiercinsky, Ph.D. 1. What is traumatic brain injury

More information

B U R T & D A V I E S PERSONAL INJURY LAWYERS

B U R T & D A V I E S PERSONAL INJURY LAWYERS TRANSPORT ACCIDENT LAW - TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY Traumatic Brain Injury ( TBI ) is a common injury in transport accidents. TBI s are probably the most commonly undiagnosed injuries in a hospital setting.

More information

Alice A. Gervasini, PhD, RN Nurse Director, Trauma & Emergency Surgical Services Massachusetts General Hospital Instructor in Surgery Harvard Medical

Alice A. Gervasini, PhD, RN Nurse Director, Trauma & Emergency Surgical Services Massachusetts General Hospital Instructor in Surgery Harvard Medical Alice A. Gervasini, PhD, RN Nurse Director, Trauma & Emergency Surgical Services Massachusetts General Hospital Instructor in Surgery Harvard Medical School None of the planners or presenters of this session

More information

SUMMARY OF THE WHO COLLABORATING CENTRE FOR NEUROTRAUMA TASK FORCE ON MILD TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY

SUMMARY OF THE WHO COLLABORATING CENTRE FOR NEUROTRAUMA TASK FORCE ON MILD TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY J Rehabil Med 2005; 37: 137 141 SPECIAL REPORT SUMMARY OF THE WHO COLLABORATING CENTRE FOR NEUROTRAUMA TASK FORCE ON MILD TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY Lena Holm, 1,2 J. David Cassidy, 3 Linda J. Carroll 4 and

More information

Neuropsychological Assessment in Sports-Related Concussion: Part of a Complex Puzzle

Neuropsychological Assessment in Sports-Related Concussion: Part of a Complex Puzzle Neuropsychological Assessment in Sports-Related Concussion: Part of a Complex Puzzle Jillian Schuh, PhD 1, 2, John Oestreicher, PhD 1, & Linda Steffen, PsyD 1 1 Catalpa Health 2 Department of Neurology,

More information

Head Injury. Dr Sally McCarthy Medical Director ECI

Head Injury. Dr Sally McCarthy Medical Director ECI Head Injury Dr Sally McCarthy Medical Director ECI Head injury in the emergency department A common presentation 80% Mild Head Injury = GCS 14 15 10% Moderate Head Injury = GCS 9 13 10% Severe Head Injury

More information

HANDLING NON-CATASTROPHIC BRAIN INJURY CASES

HANDLING NON-CATASTROPHIC BRAIN INJURY CASES HANDLING NON-CATASTROPHIC BRAIN INJURY CASES WE VE LEARNED THAT THE BRAIN IS MORE PLASTIC THAN WE ONCE THOUGHT AND THAT DAMAGE CAN COM FROM ITS MOVEMENT WITHIN THE SKULL AFTER A BLOW TO THE HEAD OR TO

More information

WHAT IS PTSD? A HANDOUT FROM THE NATIONAL CENTER FOR PTSD BY JESSICA HAMBLEN, PHD

WHAT IS PTSD? A HANDOUT FROM THE NATIONAL CENTER FOR PTSD BY JESSICA HAMBLEN, PHD WHAT IS PTSD? A HANDOUT FROM THE NATIONAL CENTER FOR PTSD BY JESSICA HAMBLEN, PHD Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is an anxiety disorder that can occur following the experience or witnessing of a

More information

Injury Law Center HEAD INJURY. Head injuries can be caused by car crashes, sports injuries, falls, workplace injuries and assaults.

Injury Law Center HEAD INJURY. Head injuries can be caused by car crashes, sports injuries, falls, workplace injuries and assaults. Injury Law Center Note: This information is provided to give you a basic understanding of the injury. It is not intended as medical advice. You should consult a qualified medical provider. Description

More information

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and TBI. Kyle Haggerty, Ph.D.

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and TBI. Kyle Haggerty, Ph.D. Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and TBI Kyle Haggerty, Ph.D. Learning Objects What is Brain Injury What is PTSD Statistics What to Rule Out PTSD and TBI Treatment Case Study What is Brain Injury

More information

Recommendations for Diagnosing a Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: A National Academy of Neuropsychology Education Paper

Recommendations for Diagnosing a Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: A National Academy of Neuropsychology Education Paper Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology 24 (2009) 3 10 Recommendations for Diagnosing a Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: A National Academy of Neuropsychology Education Paper Ronald M. Ruff a,b, *, Grant L. Iverson

More information

This is a published version of a paper published in Rehabilitation Research and Practice.

This is a published version of a paper published in Rehabilitation Research and Practice. Umeå University This is a published version of a paper published in Rehabilitation Research and Practice. Citation for the published paper: Stålnacke, B. (2012) "Postconcussion symptoms in patients with

More information

CHAPTER 6 Diagnosing and Identifying the Need for Trauma Treatment

CHAPTER 6 Diagnosing and Identifying the Need for Trauma Treatment CHAPTER 6 Diagnosing and Identifying the Need for Trauma Treatment This chapter offers mental health professionals: information on diagnosing and identifying the need for trauma treatment guidance in determining

More information

Expert Witness Services for Personal Injury Lawyers

Expert Witness Services for Personal Injury Lawyers Advanced Assessments Ltd Expert witnesses and Psychologists A Member of the Strategic Enterprise Group 180 Piccadilly, London, W1J 9HP T: 0845 130 5717 Expert Witness Services for Personal Injury Lawyers

More information

Traumatic Brain Injury Lawsuit

Traumatic Brain Injury Lawsuit Traumatic Brain Injury Lawsuit D Legal Guide Simple Step-By-Step Guide to Your Brain & Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) [Type text] Distributed By: www.downtownlalw.com A Simple Step-by-Step Guide to your

More information

IF IN DOUBT, SIT THEM OUT.

IF IN DOUBT, SIT THEM OUT. IF IN DOUBT, SIT THEM OUT. Scottish Sports Concussion Guidance: Grassroots sport and general public Modified from World Rugby s Guidelines on Concussion Management for the General Public Introduction The

More information

Traumatic brain injury (TBI), caused either by blunt force or acceleration/

Traumatic brain injury (TBI), caused either by blunt force or acceleration/ Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) Carol A. Waldmann, MD Traumatic brain injury (TBI), caused either by blunt force or acceleration/ deceleration forces, is common in the general population. Homeless persons

More information

FACT SHEET. What is Trauma? TRAUMA-INFORMED CARE FOR WORKING WITH HOMELESS VETERANS

FACT SHEET. What is Trauma? TRAUMA-INFORMED CARE FOR WORKING WITH HOMELESS VETERANS FACT SHEET TRAUMA-INFORMED CARE FOR WORKING WITH HOMELESS VETERANS According to SAMHSA 1, trauma-informed care includes having a basic understanding of how trauma affects the life of individuals seeking

More information

Concussion Recovery and Prevention: Neuroplasticity, Normal Concussion Course vs. Complicated Course. Roger Hartl, M.D. Kenneth Perrine, Ph.D.

Concussion Recovery and Prevention: Neuroplasticity, Normal Concussion Course vs. Complicated Course. Roger Hartl, M.D. Kenneth Perrine, Ph.D. Concussion Recovery and Prevention: Neuroplasticity, Normal Concussion Course vs. Complicated Course Roger Hartl, M.D. Kenneth Perrine, Ph.D. Weill Cornell Medical College Financial Disclosures Dr. Hartl

More information

10/23/2011. Somatic Complaints

10/23/2011. Somatic Complaints Amy Garrigues, PT, DPT Orthopaedic Clinical Specialist Fellow, American Academy of Orthopaedic and Manual Physical Therapists 1.4 Million reported incidents of Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) in the US every

More information

PTSD IN PRIMARY CARE. Kari A. Stephens, PhD & Wayne Bentham, MD Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences University of Washington

PTSD IN PRIMARY CARE. Kari A. Stephens, PhD & Wayne Bentham, MD Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences University of Washington PTSD IN PRIMARY CARE Kari A. Stephens, PhD & Wayne Bentham, MD Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences University of Washington What to expect today? Defining and assessing PTSD Approach for doing differential

More information

Sport Concussion in New Zealand ACC National Guidelines

Sport Concussion in New Zealand ACC National Guidelines Sport Concussion in New Zealand ACC National Guidelines This guideline document has been produced to inform National Sports Organisations (NSOs), and recreation, education and health sectors in their development

More information

Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) as Screening tool for cognitive impairment in mtbi.

Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) as Screening tool for cognitive impairment in mtbi. Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) as Screening tool for cognitive impairment in mtbi. Suresh Kumar, M.D. AUTHOR Director of: Neurology & Headaches Center Inc. Neurocognitve &TBI Rehabilitation Center

More information

REPORTER. Decision of the Appeal Division

REPORTER. Decision of the Appeal Division WORKERS COMPENSATION REPORTER Decision of the Appeal Division Number: 00-1682 Date: October 26, 2000 Panel: Marguerite Mousseau Subject: Whether Worker Suffered Psychological Impairment Constituting a

More information

acbis Chapter 1: Overview of Brain Injury

acbis Chapter 1: Overview of Brain Injury acbis Academy for the Certification of Brain Injury Specialists Certification Exam Preparation Course Chapter 1: Overview of Brain Injury Module Objectives Describe the incidence, prevalence and epidemiology

More information

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for PTSD. Dr. Edna B. Foa

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for PTSD. Dr. Edna B. Foa Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for PTSD Presented by Dr. Edna B. Foa Center for the Treatment and Study of Anxiety University of Pennsylvania Ref # 3 Diagnosis of PTSD Definition of a Trauma The person has

More information

Concussion Management Program for Red Bank Catholic High School Athletic Department

Concussion Management Program for Red Bank Catholic High School Athletic Department Concussion Management Program for Red Bank Catholic High School Athletic Department *This document should be used as a framework for a successful concussion management program but is not intended to replace

More information

.org. Sports Concussion. Description. Cause

.org. Sports Concussion. Description. Cause Sports Concussion Page ( 1 ) According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about 200,000 people in the United States suffer concussions while playing sports every year. Concussions

More information

1695 N.W. 9th Avenue, Suite 3302H Miami, FL. 33136. Days and Hours: Monday Friday 8:30a.m. 6:00p.m. (305) 355 9028 (JMH, Downtown)

1695 N.W. 9th Avenue, Suite 3302H Miami, FL. 33136. Days and Hours: Monday Friday 8:30a.m. 6:00p.m. (305) 355 9028 (JMH, Downtown) UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI, LEONARD M. MILLER SCHOOL OF MEDICINE CLINICAL NEUROPSYCHOLOGY UHEALTH PSYCHIATRY AT MENTAL HEALTH HOSPITAL CENTER 1695 N.W. 9th Avenue, Suite 3302H Miami, FL. 33136 Days and Hours:

More information

Ronald G. Riechers, II, M.D. Medical Director, Polytrauma Team Cleveland VAMC Assistant Professor Department of Neurology Case Western Reserve

Ronald G. Riechers, II, M.D. Medical Director, Polytrauma Team Cleveland VAMC Assistant Professor Department of Neurology Case Western Reserve Ronald G. Riechers, II, M.D. Medical Director, Polytrauma Team Cleveland VAMC Assistant Professor Department of Neurology Case Western Reserve University The opinions or assertions contained herein are

More information

Concussion: Sideline Assessment

Concussion: Sideline Assessment Concussion: Sideline Assessment Damion A. Martins, MD Director, Orthopedics & Sports Medicine Program Director, Sports Medicine Fellowship - Atlantic Health System Director of Internal Medicine - New York

More information

MENTAL IMPAIRMENT RATING

MENTAL IMPAIRMENT RATING MENTAL IMPAIRMENT RATING Lev.II Curriculum Rev. 6/09 155 OBJECTIVES MENTAL AND BEHAVIORAL DISORDERS 1. Identify the axes used in the diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders - DSM. 2. Understand

More information

Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Mild Traumatic Brain Injury A Mind Numbing Experience Carolyn A. Rocchio Mild Traumatic Brain Injury A Mind Numbing Experience Carolyn A. Rocchio BRAIN INJURY ASSOCIATION OF FLORIDA, INC. 201 East Sample

More information

Boston College Sports Medicine

Boston College Sports Medicine Boston College Sports Medicine Guidelines for Care of the Concussed Student-Athlete This document is for use by Boston College Sports Medicine Clinicians when treating Student- Athletes (S-A s) who have

More information

TCHP Behavioral Health Psychological/Neuropsychological Testing Child/Adolescent Guidelines

TCHP Behavioral Health Psychological/Neuropsychological Testing Child/Adolescent Guidelines TCHP Behavioral Health Psychological/Neuropsychological Testing Child/Adolescent Guidelines Psychological testing involves the culturally and linguistically competent administration and interpretation

More information

Behavioral Health Psychological/Neuropsychological Testing Guidelines

Behavioral Health Psychological/Neuropsychological Testing Guidelines Behavioral Health Psychological/Neuropsychological Testing Guidelines Psychological testing (procedural code 96101) and Neuropsychological Testing (procedural code 96118) involve the culturally and linguistically

More information

RECOVERY IN THE FIRST YEAR AFTER MILD HEAD INJURY: DIVERGENCE OF SYMPTOM STATUS AND SELF-PERCEIVED QUALITY OF LIFE

RECOVERY IN THE FIRST YEAR AFTER MILD HEAD INJURY: DIVERGENCE OF SYMPTOM STATUS AND SELF-PERCEIVED QUALITY OF LIFE J Rehabil Med 2007 Preview ORIGINAL REPORT RECOVERY IN THE FIRST YEAR AFTER MILD HEAD INJURY: DIVERGENCE OF SYMPTOM STATUS AND SELF-PERCEIVED QUALITY OF LIFE Marcus H. Heitger 1,2, Richard D. Jones 1,2,

More information

Recognizing and Managing Concussion and Sports Concussion in the Collegiate Setting

Recognizing and Managing Concussion and Sports Concussion in the Collegiate Setting Recognizing and Managing Concussion and Sports Concussion in the Collegiate Setting Brian P Rieger, PhD Chief Psychologist & Clinical Assistant Professor Department of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation

More information

Challenges of Assessing and Rehabilitating the Mild Brain Injury

Challenges of Assessing and Rehabilitating the Mild Brain Injury Challenges of Assessing and Rehabilitating the Mild Brain Injury Chanth Seyone MD., FRCPC Director Acquired Brain Injury Clinic, Toronto Western Hospital, University Health Network Assistant Professor

More information

Coma. Post-Traumatic Amnesia (PTA)

Coma. Post-Traumatic Amnesia (PTA) Coma 1. When is a patient out of a Coma? A scale called the Glasgow Coma Scale is used to measure the level of consciousness, with the maximum score being 15, when a patient is fully alert and usually

More information

R ECOVERING F ROM M ILD B RAIN I NJURY/CONCUSSION A G UIDE FOR P ATIENTS

R ECOVERING F ROM M ILD B RAIN I NJURY/CONCUSSION A G UIDE FOR P ATIENTS R ECOVERING F ROM M ILD B RAIN I NJURY/CONCUSSION A G UIDE FOR P ATIENTS Mild brain injury (or concussion) is relatively common and typically occurs as a result of a blow to the head during sports, a motor

More information

What is a concussion? What are the symptoms of a concussion? What happens to the brain during a concussion?

What is a concussion? What are the symptoms of a concussion? What happens to the brain during a concussion? What is a concussion? The working definition used today for concussion is a complex pathophysiological process affecting the brain, induced by traumatic biomechanical forces (developed by the consensus

More information

Comprehensive Evaluation, Management and Treatment of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

Comprehensive Evaluation, Management and Treatment of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Comprehensive Evaluation, Management and Treatment of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Steven M. Erickson, MD Medical Director, Sports Medicine and Concussion Specialists Definition of MTBI A complex pathophysiological

More information

Concussion guidance. Introduction CONCUSSION FACTS

Concussion guidance. Introduction CONCUSSION FACTS Introduction This World Rugby Concussion Guidance document has been developed to provide guidance and information to persons involved in the Game of Rugby (including the general public) regarding concussion

More information

Closed Automobile Insurance Third Party Liability Bodily Injury Claim Study in Ontario

Closed Automobile Insurance Third Party Liability Bodily Injury Claim Study in Ontario Page 1 Closed Automobile Insurance Third Party Liability Bodily Injury Claim Study in Ontario Injury Descriptions Developed from Newfoundland claim study injury definitions No injury Death Psychological

More information

Guidelines for Documentation of a A. Learning Disability

Guidelines for Documentation of a A. Learning Disability Guidelines for Documentation of a Learning Disability A. Learning Disability B. Attention Deficit Disorder C. Psychiatric Disabilities D. Chronic Health Disabilities A. Learning Disability Students who

More information

Taking Care: Child and Youth Mental Health ANXIETY WHAT IS IT?

Taking Care: Child and Youth Mental Health ANXIETY WHAT IS IT? Taking Care: Child and Youth Mental Health ANXIETY WHAT IS IT? Open Learning Agency 2004 WHAT IS IT? Anxiety is a normal human feeling characterized by worry, nervousness and fear. Not only does anxiety

More information

V OCATIONAL E CONOMICS, I NC.

V OCATIONAL E CONOMICS, I NC. V OCATIONAL E CONOMICS, I NC. This document was downloaded from Vocational Economics Inc. (www.vocecon.com). For more information on this document, visit: www.vocecon.com/articles/arttbi.htm Volume 2,

More information

DEPRESSION CODING FACT SHEET FOR PRIMARY CARE CLINICIANS

DEPRESSION CODING FACT SHEET FOR PRIMARY CARE CLINICIANS DEPRESSION CODING FACT SHEET FOR PRIMARY CARE CLINICIANS Current Procedural Terminology (CPT ) (Procedure) Codes Initial assessment usually involves a lot of time determining the differential diagnosis,

More information

Psychological and Neuropsychological Testing

Psychological and Neuropsychological Testing Psychological and Neuropsychological Testing I. Policy University Health Alliance (UHA) will reimburse for Psychological and Neuropsychological Testing (PT/NPT) when it is determined to be medically necessary

More information

Measuring Outcomes in Brain Injury Rehabilitation. By: Kyle Haggerty, Ph.D.

Measuring Outcomes in Brain Injury Rehabilitation. By: Kyle Haggerty, Ph.D. Measuring Outcomes in Brain Injury Rehabilitation By: Kyle Haggerty, Ph.D. Learning Objectives What is Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) Goals of Rehabilitation Measuring Outcomes in Brain Injury Rehabilitation

More information

Practice Protocol. Neuropsychological Evaluations

Practice Protocol. Neuropsychological Evaluations Practice Protocol Neuropsychological Evaluations Jointly Developed by the Arizona Department of Health Services/Division of Behavioral Health Services and AHCCCS/Health Plans Effective June 30, 2006 Revised

More information

DoD/VA CODE PROPOSAL FINAL 508 COMPLIANT

DoD/VA CODE PROPOSAL FINAL 508 COMPLIANT 1 A. DOD/VA COMMON DEFINITION OF TBI DoD/VA Definition and Symptomatic Taxonomy Working Group and other joint consensus panels developed a definition of traumatic brain injury (TBI) for use in the Departments

More information

Psychology Externship Program

Psychology Externship Program Psychology Externship Program The Washington VA Medical Center (VAMC) is a state-of-the-art facility located in Washington, D.C., N.W., and is accredited by the Joint Commission on the Accreditation of

More information

Non-epileptic seizures

Non-epileptic seizures Non-epileptic seizures a short guide for patients and families Information for patients Department of Neurology Royal Hallamshire Hospital What are non-epileptic seizures? In a seizure people lose control

More information

Annotations for Determining Non-Secondary Psychiatric Impairment

Annotations for Determining Non-Secondary Psychiatric Impairment Annotations for Determining Non-Secondary Psychiatric Impairment Dr Michael Epstein and Dr Nigel Strauss December 2005 Annotations for Determining Non-Secondary Psychiatric Impairment Page 1 of 12 Annotations

More information

Traumatic Brain Injury for VR Counselors Margaret A. Struchen, Ph.D. and Laura M. Ritter, Ph.D., M.P.H.

Traumatic Brain Injury for VR Counselors Margaret A. Struchen, Ph.D. and Laura M. Ritter, Ph.D., M.P.H. Training Session 1c: Understanding Recovery Courses and Outcomes after TBI What is the typical recovery course after a mild or moderate/severe TBI? What are the effects of personal and environmental factors,

More information

POST-TRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER PTSD Diagnostic Criteria PTSD Detection and Diagnosis PC-PTSD Screen PCL-C Screen PTSD Treatment Treatment Algorithm

POST-TRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER PTSD Diagnostic Criteria PTSD Detection and Diagnosis PC-PTSD Screen PCL-C Screen PTSD Treatment Treatment Algorithm E-Resource March, 2014 POST-TRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER PTSD Diagnostic Criteria PTSD Detection and Diagnosis PC-PTSD Screen PCL-C Screen PTSD Treatment Treatment Algorithm Post-traumatic Stress Disorder

More information

Objectives. Definition. Epidemiology. The journey of an athlete

Objectives. Definition. Epidemiology. The journey of an athlete Sport Concussion Chantel Debert MD MSc FRCPC CSCN Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Department of Clinical Neurosciences Hotchkiss Brain Institute, University of Calgary Objectives Definition Epidemiology

More information

Challenges to Detection and Management of PTSD in Primary Care

Challenges to Detection and Management of PTSD in Primary Care Challenges to Detection and Management of PTSD in Primary Care Karen H. Seal, MD, MPH University of California, San Francisco San Francisco VA Medical Center General Internal Medicine Section PTSD is Prevalent

More information

Practice Standards For The Psychological Assessment of Disability and Impairment

Practice Standards For The Psychological Assessment of Disability and Impairment Practice Standards For The Psychological Assessment of Disability and Impairment May 2004 52 Whitney Place, Thornhill, Ontario. L4J 6V8 Phone: (905) 738-6667/(905) 761-6306 Fax: (905) 738-6616/(905) 761-6182

More information

THE MANAGEMENT OF CONCUSSION IN AUSTRALIAN FOOTBALL

THE MANAGEMENT OF CONCUSSION IN AUSTRALIAN FOOTBALL THE MANAGEMENT OF CONCUSSION IN AUSTRALIAN FOOTBALL AFL Research board AFL MEDICAL OFFICERS' ASSOCIATION THE MANAGEMENT OF CONCUSSION IN AUSTRALIAN FOOTBALL This document has been published by the AFL

More information

WJCC Schools Athletics Concussions Procedures

WJCC Schools Athletics Concussions Procedures WJCC Schools Athletics Concussions Procedures Concussions sometimes occur among athletes in competitive sports programs. At WJCC Schools, careful protocols are utilized, including the use of ImPACT software,

More information

Cognitive Rehabilitation of Blast Traumatic Brain Injury

Cognitive Rehabilitation of Blast Traumatic Brain Injury Cognitive Rehabilitation of Blast Traumatic Brain Injury Yelena Bogdanova, PhD VA Boston Healthcare System Rehabilitation Research & Development Boston University School of Medicine IOM Committee on Cognitive

More information

The Link Between Trauma and Substance Misuse: Thinking about the Unthinkable

The Link Between Trauma and Substance Misuse: Thinking about the Unthinkable The Link Between Trauma and Substance Misuse: Thinking about the Unthinkable Dr Lisa Reynolds Greater Glasgow and Clyde NHS Trauma Service: The Trauma and Homelessness Team Aims of Discussion Definition

More information

A patient guide to mild traumatic brain injury

A patient guide to mild traumatic brain injury A patient guide to mild traumatic brain injury Delivering the best in care UHB is a no smoking Trust To see all of our current patient information leaflets please visit www.uhb.nhs.uk/patient-information-leaflets.htm

More information

Anxiety Disorders. Symptoms Checklist Presence of symptoms determines the assigning of a diagnosis

Anxiety Disorders. Symptoms Checklist Presence of symptoms determines the assigning of a diagnosis Anxiety Disorders Symptoms Checklist Presence of symptoms determines the assigning of a diagnosis Panic Attack Palpitation, pounding heart, or accelerated heart rate Sweating Trembling or shaking Sensations

More information

Traumatic brain injury (TBI)

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) Traumatic brain injury (TBI) A topic in the Alzheimer s Association series on understanding dementia. About dementia Dementia is a condition in which a person has significant difficulty with daily functioning

More information

and Traumatic Brain Injury What You Need to Know as an

and Traumatic Brain Injury What You Need to Know as an Asperger Syndrome and Traumatic Brain Injury An Introduction to What You Need to Know as an Employee Assistance Staff Member By Dr. Rozelle Copeland Asperger Syndrome and Traumatic Brain Injury What asperger

More information

Brain Talk. Presented By Rachael Henry, ABI System Navigator

Brain Talk. Presented By Rachael Henry, ABI System Navigator Brain Talk Presented By Rachael Henry, ABI System Navigator If you are concerned about your health, see your doctor!! I am not a doctor and this talk is not intended to substitute individualized medical

More information

Objectives 11/25/2014. Promoting safety, justice and healing by recognizing and responding to the Brain s Response to Trauma and Abuse

Objectives 11/25/2014. Promoting safety, justice and healing by recognizing and responding to the Brain s Response to Trauma and Abuse Promoting safety, justice and healing by recognizing and responding to the Brain s Response to Trauma and Abuse Kim Day, RN, SANE A, SANE P SAFta Project Director Jennifer Pierce Weeks, RN, SANE A, SANE

More information

Mild Traumatic Brain Injury and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder

Mild Traumatic Brain Injury and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder Mild Traumatic Brain Injury and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder Lisa Brenner, PhD, ABPP VISN 19 Mental Illness Research Education and Clinical Center Departments of Psychiatry, Neurology, and Physical Medicine

More information

Cycling-related Traumatic Brain Injury 2011

Cycling-related Traumatic Brain Injury 2011 Cycling-related Traumatic Brain Injury 2011 The Chinese University of Hong Kong Division of Neurosurgery, Department of Surgery Accident & Emergency Medicine Academic Unit Jockey Club School of Public

More information

Cervical Whiplash: Considerations in the Rehabilitation of Cervical Myofascial Injury. Canadian Family Physician

Cervical Whiplash: Considerations in the Rehabilitation of Cervical Myofascial Injury. Canadian Family Physician Cervical Whiplash: Considerations in the Rehabilitation of Cervical Myofascial Injury 1 Canadian Family Physician Volume 32, September 1986 Arthur Ameis, MD Dr. Ames practices physical medicine and rehabilitation,

More information

Review Evaluation of Residuals of Traumatic Brain Injury (R-TBI) Disability Benefits Questionnaire *Internal VA or DoD Use Only*

Review Evaluation of Residuals of Traumatic Brain Injury (R-TBI) Disability Benefits Questionnaire *Internal VA or DoD Use Only* Review Evaluation of Residuals of Traumatic Brain Injury (R-TBI) Disability Benefits Questionnaire *Internal VA or DoD Use Only* Name of patienweteran: SSN: ----------- Your patient is applying to the

More information

Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.

Mild Traumatic Brain Injury. Mild Traumatic Brain Injury. Review of the literature and A look at the WCB of BC data By WCB Evidence Based Practice Group Dr. Craig W. Martin, Senior Medical Advisor August 7, 2003 Compensation and Rehabilitation

More information

How Emotional/ Psychological Trauma Affects the Body

How Emotional/ Psychological Trauma Affects the Body How Emotional/ Psychological Trauma Affects the Body Objectives: Define trauma What is the relationship between physical health and PTSD? Identify how trauma is assessed/screened How can family members

More information

QUICK FACTS ABOUT POSTTRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER AND TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY

QUICK FACTS ABOUT POSTTRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER AND TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY QUICK FACTS ABOUT POSTTRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER AND TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY By Kara Forest, MD July 2011 Page 1 of 21 TABLE OF CONTENTS Introduction... 3 What is Posttraumatic Stress Disorder... 4 What

More information