High. School. Program of Studies. Hilliard City Schools

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1 High School Program of Studies Hilliard City Schools

2 Hilliard City Schools Hilliard City Schools will ensure that every student is Ready For Tomorrow. Superintendent s Office Dr. John Marschhausen, Superintendent Mr. Tim Hamilton, Assistant Superintendent Mrs. Leslie McNaughton, Assistant Superintendent Mrs. Kim Halley, Executive Director of Curriculum and Instruction Mr. Mike McDonough, Director of Secondary Education Mrs. Heather Keck Mr. Paul Lambert Mr. Doug Maggied Mr. Andy Teater Mrs. Lisa Whiting Mrs. Mindy Mordarski, Principal 2800 Walker Road Hilliard, OH Main Office Guidance Office Ms. Joyce Brickley, Principal 4200 Leppert Road Hilliard, OH Main Office Guidance Office Mr. John Bandow, Principal 5100 Davidson Road Hilliard, OH Main Office Guidance Office Board of Education Hilliard Bradley High School Hilliard Darby High School Hilliard Davidson High School Innovative Learning Center Mr. Brent Wise, Director of Innovation and Extended Learning 5323 Cemetery Road Hilliard, OH Main Office Guidance Office

3 CONTENTS A Class Graduation Requirements of 2016 A-1 Class of 2017 A-1 Class of 2018 & Beyond A-2 Ohio Graduation Test A-3 Early Graduation A-3 New State Graduation Requirements for Class of 2018 & Beyond A-4 Physical Education Waiver A-5 Academic Recognition A-5 Diploma with Honors A-6 B Four Scheduling Guidelines Year Planning Overview B-1 Learning Pathways Overview B-1 Learning Pathways Description B-2 Business B-3 Regulation & Protection B-4 Communications & Records B-5 Environmental & Related Studies B-6 Computer & Information B-7 Skilled Trades B-8 Engineering & Technologies B-9 Natural Science B-10 Medical & Related B-11 Arts & Communication B-12 Social Science B-13 Education B-14 Community Services B-15 Healthcare B-16 Four Year Plan Tutorial B-17 Four Year Plan Templates B-20 Schedule Changes B-22 Repeating a Course B-22 Auditing a Course B-23 Late Arrival & Early Release B-23 Athletic Eligibility B-23 Zero Period B-23 Grade Level Promotion B-23 Online B-24 Advanced Placement B-30 Honors Courses B-30 College Credit Plus B-31 Credit Flexibility B-37

4 C College College Planning Preparatory Curriculum C-1 Ohio Means Jobs C-2 PSAT C-2 SAT/ACT C-3 Post-Secondary Counseling Services C-3 College Representatives C-3 College Campus Visits C-3 Transcripts C-3 NCAA C-4 D Art Courses D-1 Business D-5 Code U D-8 English Language Arts D-9 English Language Learners D-17 Family & Consumer Sciences D-19 World Languages D-22 Mathematics D-26 Performing Arts D-32 Pre-Engineering D-37 Science D-39 Social Studies D-46 Wellness D-52 Intervention D-55 Exploring Programs D-59 Zoo School D-59 Mosaic Program D-60 Tolles D-60 Independent Study D-65 Correspondence Courses D-66 Subject Code Sheet D-67

5 E ILC Innovative Learning Center E-1 College Jumpstart Network E-2 Academy VIBE E-3 ON-AIR E-4 ILC STUDIO E-5 Career Mentorship E-6 Academy EDU E-7 Academy INC E-8 Health Professionals Academy E-9 Personal Success Network E-10 Senior Capstone Experience E-11 F Glossary The Hilliard City School District s high school Program of Studies is subject to change and is revised periodically throughout the year. For the latest edition of the Program of Studies, please visit our website at Non Discrimination Statement (Title IX) All of the courses, programs, and activities presented in this booklet are open to all students without regard to race, color, national origin, sex, or handicap. This policy meets all requirements and directions of the U.S. Department of Education under Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973.

6 Graduation Requirements A Contents Class of 2016 A-1 Class of 2017 A-1 Class of 2018 & Beyond A-2 Ohio Graduation Test A-3 Early Graduation A-3 New State Graduation Requirements for Class of 2018 & Beyond A-4 Physical Education Waiver A-5 Academic Recognition A-5 Diploma with Honors A-6

7 High School Graduation Requirements Graduation Classes of 2016 & 2017 A-1 To graduate from a Hilliard City Schools High School, a student must meet the standards adopted by the State of Ohio, and the Hilliard City Schools Board of Education. The ultimate responsibility for tracking and completing necessary credits for graduation lies with the students and parents. Any student who fails to meet the district s graduation requirements shall not participate in commencement exercises or receive a diploma. Subject English 4 World Studies 1 U.S. History 1 U.S. Government 1 Graduation Class of 2016 & 2017 Minimum Credit Requirement 21.5 Science 3 1 credit Biology; 1 credit Physical Science Math 4 Must include Alg. 2 or Honors Alg. 2 Health 1/2 Physical Education 1/2 Students may waive the physical education requirement with participation in athletics, marching band, and/or cheerleading (see page A-4). Students who pursue this option must earn one half elective credit in another subject-area to meet the minimum credit requirement for graduation (21.5 credits). Information & Communication Technology 21 Financial Literacy Elective 1/2 1/2 The financial literacy elective requirement can be fulfilled by taking one of the following courses during the Junior or Senior year: Careers & Money Management, Financial Independence, Personal Finance, College Fundamentals, Principles of Entrepreneurship, Life Skills 1 or CBI 3 Related. Note: Taking one of these prior to the Junior year will not fulfill the graduation requirement. Senior Capstone 1/2 The Senior Capstone can be completed in a variety of ways/courses and must meet defined criteria. See page E-11 for additional details. The Senior Capstone must be completed during the senior year. Additional Electives 5 1 credit must be earned in fine arts unless 2 semesters of fine arts coursework were successfully completed in middle school (grades 7-8). Participation in Tolles or CBI may fulfill the Fine Arts graduation requirement. Elective credits must include one or any combination of world language, fine arts, business, careertechnical education, family and consumer sciences, pre-engineering or English, Mathematics, Science, or Social Studies not otherwise required. TOTAL CREDITS 21.5* Students must earn 5.0 Elective Credits in content areas other than Wellness. *In addition to earning 21.5 credits, students in the class of 2016 & 2017 will also need to pass all five parts of the Ohio Graduation Test to earn their high school diploma. See page A-3 for additional details.

8 A-2 Graduation Class of 2018 & Beyond High School Graduation Requirements Subject English 4 World Studies 1 U.S. History 1 U.S. Government 1 Graduation Class of 2018 & Beyond Minimum Credit Requirement 21.5 Science 3 1 credit Biology; 1 credit Physical Science Math 4 Must include Alg. 2 or Honors Alg. 2 Health 1/2 Physical Education 1/2 Students may waive the physical education requirement with participation in athletics, marching band, and/or cheerleading (see page A-4). Students who pursue this option must earn one half elective credit in another subject-area to meet the minimum credit requirement for graduation (21.5 credits). Information & Communication Technology 21 Financial Literacy Elective 1/2 1/2 The financial literacy elective requirement can be fulfilled by taking one of the following courses during the Junior or Senior year: Careers & Money Management, Financial Independence, Personal Finance, College Fundamentals, Principles of Entrepreneurship, Life Skills 1 or CBI 3 Related. Note: Taking one of these prior to the Junior year will not fulfill the graduation requirement. Senior Capstone 1/2 The Senior Capstone can be completed in a variety of ways/courses and must meet defined criteria. See page E-11 for additional details. The Senior Capstone must be completed during the senior year. Additional Electives 5 1 credit must be earned in fine arts unless 2 semesters of fine arts coursework were successfully completed in middle school (grades 7-8). Participation in Tolles or CBI may fulfill the Fine Arts graduation requirement. Elective credits must include one or any combination of world language, fine arts, business, careertechnical education, family and consumer sciences, pre-engineering or English, Mathematics, Science, or Social Studies not otherwise required. TOTAL CREDITS 21.5** Students must earn 5.0 Elective Credits in content areas other than Wellness. **Per House Bill 487, Ohio s graduation requirements have been updated for the class of 2018 & beyond requiring all students to take Ohio s State Tests in seven courses and providing three pathways for students to earn their high school diploma. See page A-4 for additional details.

9 High School Graduation Requirements O.G.T./Early Graduation A-3 Ohio Graduation Test (O.G.T.) (first administered in grade 10 - if a student has obtained sophomore status 4 or more credits earned) Per guidelines established by the Ohio Department of Education, all students in the graduating classes of 2016; and 2017 must pass all five parts of the Ohio Graduation Test (reading, writing, mathematics, citizenship, and science) to receive a diploma. NOTE: For those students who do not pass one section of the OGT, there is an alternative pathway for receiving a diploma: 1. Pass 4 of 5 tests 2. Miss proficient score by 10 points or fewer on the failed test 3. Maintain 97% attendance, no expulsion 4. Earn 2.5 GPA in courses of test not passed 5. Participate in intervention (as defined by state requirements) 6. Receive letters recommending graduation from principal and teachers has discretion to make the final decision. B. Students who have declared their intent to graduate early prior to the start of their third year of high school and who have earned at least 15 credits will be considered members of the senior class for class rank and senior privileges. Students may choose to walk with the new graduation class. At semester, the counselor will verify with the student and his/her parent that the early graduate plans to graduate during the current school year. Early Graduation To be considered for early graduation, the application form must be turned in to the respective guidance counselor a minimum of nine months prior to the completion of all coursework. A. Procedure for applying for permission to graduate early: 1. Students receive application from guidance counselor. 2. Completed application must be signed by parent, listing reasons for request. Completed application is returned to counselor. 3. Counselor will verify that the student has a minimum 2.75 accumulative average. 4. Counselor will send the application to the principal and schedule a parent meeting. 5. If approved, the principal will send approved application to the superintendent for final approval. 6. If criteria in 1-5 are not met, principal

10 A-4 New State Graduation Requirements for the Class of 2018 & Beyond High School Graduation Requirements New State Graduation Requirements for the Class of 2018 & Beyond Per guidelines established by the Ohio Department of Education in accordance with HB 487 all students in the graduating classes of 2018 & beyond must take Ohio s State Tests in the following seven courses: Ohio s State Tests Algebra 1 HCSD Course Algebra 1 or Algebra 1 with Workshop Geometry Geometry or GAC 2 English 1 English 9 or Honors English 9 English 2 English 10 or Honors English 10 Physical Science or Biology* American History American Government Science 9 or Honors Science 9 Biology or Honors Biology U.S. History or AP U.S. History U.S. Government or AP U.S. Government or Liberal Democracy in America *Students in the class of 2018 must take Ohio s State Physical Science Test. Beginning with the Class of 2019, students will be required to take Ohio s State Biology Test. To earn their high school diploma, students must meet one of the following three pathways: 1. Earn 18 cumulative Graduation Points on the seven Ohio State Tests. Students can earn from 1-5 points based on their performance. Students earning HS credit in any of these courses prior to July 1, 2014 will automatically earn 3 graduation points for those courses. Students must earn at least: 4 points between the math exams 4 points between the English exams 6 points between the science and social studies exams 4 additional points in any combination of the exams *Note: students taking Ohio s State Physical Science Test in the school year will also take Ohio s State Biology Test in the school year. Students will have the option of which score they would like to count towards their cumulative Graduation Points. 2. Earn a remediation-free score on a nationally recognized college entrance exam such as ACT or SAT. Beginning with Class of 2018, the state will pay for all 11 th -grade students to take the exam The college admission test will be selected in spring of 2015 by ODE Students may use his or her highest verifiable score to meet requirement 3. Earn a State Board of Education-approved, industry-recognized credential or stateissued license for practice in a career. Students must achieve a score that demonstrates workforce readiness and employability on a job skills assessment. All credentials must be tied to jobs that are in-demand, either statewide or locally. **Note: The Ohio Department of Education continues to update and revise graduation requirements in accordance with HB 487. All changes to these requirements will be communicated to students and their families as they become available.

11 Physical Education Waiver & Academic Recognition Physical Education Waiver/Academic Recognition A-5 Physical Education Waiver Students in grades 9-11 may be excused from the physical education course requirement by participating in District-sponsored interscholastic athletics, marching band, or cheerleading for at least two (2) athletic seasons during high school grades Ohio Revised Code defines District-sponsored interscholastic athletics, marching band, or cheerleading as any high school athletic team, high school cheerleading squad, or high school marching band of the Hilliard City School District that participates in the District s regular athletic season(s) and is operated under the supervision of a Board employee. Club activities and/or club sports are not considered part of District-sponsored athletics, marching band, or cheerleading. High school students in grades 9-11 who meet this requirement will not be required to complete any physical education course as a condition to graduate. However, in order to be eligible for graduation, a high school student, who is excused from the high school physical education class requirement, must complete at least one (1) semester of instruction in another course of study. This semester of instruction must be separate from and in addition to all other courses of study and hours of instruction that are required to graduate. Students still need to earn a minimum of 21.5 credits to meet the graduation requirements. A student must choose to meet their physical education requirement EITHER through the waiver OR through physical education classes (students may not use a combination of both). A high school student who has not fulfilled his/her physical education requirement prior to the beginning of his/her senior year will be scheduled into physical education classes. Participation in District-sponsored interscholastic athletics, marching band, or cheerleading during the senior year cannot be used to fulfill the physical education graduation requirement. The following activities can be used to waive the physical education requirement: Baseball Boys Basketball Boys Basketball Girls Cheerleading Girls/Boys Football Cheerleading Girls/Boys Basketball Cheerleading Girls/Boys Competition Cross Country Boys Cross Country Girls Football Boys Golf Boys Golf Girls Gymnastics Girls Lacrosse Boys Lacrosse Girls Marching Band/Color Guard Soccer Boys Soccer Girls Softball Girls Swimming/Diving Boys Swimming/Diving Girls Tennis Boys Tennis Girls Track Boys Track Girls Volleyball Boys Volleyball - Girls Wrestling Boys Academic Recognition President s Education Award Program Presidential awards will be made late in the spring to graduating seniors who have met the following criteria: 1. Attained a 3.5 grade-point average or better on a straight 4.0 scale over grades 9, 10, 11, and the first semester of grade 12; 2. Scored at or above the 85th percentile in math or reading on any one of the following nationally recognized standardized achievement tests during either the 11th or 12th grade: PSAT/NMSQT, ACT, SAT I. Varsity Letter in Academics Awarded to students who earn the following cumulative GPA based upon the semester average over the entire school career: Requirements: Grades 9 & 10 = 3.75 Grades 11 & 12 = 3.50

12 A-6 Diploma with Honors Diploma with Honors Criteria Students need to fulfill all but one criterion for any of the following Diplomas with Honors Subject High School Academic Diploma with Honors Career-Technical Diploma with Honors English 4 units 4 units Mathematics 4 units, including Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II or equivalent and another higher level course or a four-year sequence of courses that contain equivalent content 4 units, including Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II or equivalent and another higher level course or a four-year sequence of courses that contain equivalent content Science 4 units, including physics and chemistry 4 units, including physics and chemistry Social Studies 4 units 4 units World Language 3 units, including at least 2 units in each language studied Not counted toward requirements Fine Arts 1 unit Not counted toward requirements Career-Technical Not counted toward requirements, and may not be used to meet requirements Now counted in Electives Electives Not counted toward requirements 4 units of Career-Technical minimum. Program must lead to an industry recognized credential, apprenticeship, or be part of an articulated career pathway which can lead to post secondary credit. Grade Point Average 3.5 on a 4.0 scale 3.5 on a 4.0 scale ACT/SAT Score 27 ACT / 1210 SAT 27 ACT / 1210 SAT [excluding scores from the writing sections]* Additional Assessment for appropriate Ohio Career-Technical Com- Not applicable Achieve proficiency benchmark established petency Assessment or equivalent *Writing sections of either standardized test should not be included in the calculation of this score. Diploma with Honors requirements pre-suppose completion of all high school diploma requirements in Ohio Revised Code including: ½ unit physical education** ½ unit in American history ½ unit health ½ unit in government ***SB 311 allows school districts to adopt a policy exempting students who participate in athletics, marching band or cheerleading for two full seasons from the physical education requirement. ****Please note: a unit refers to one Carnegie unit, which is equivalent to one high school credit

13 Scheduling Guidelines B Contents Four Year Planning Overview B-1 Learning Pathways Overview B-1 Learning Pathways Description B-2 Business B-3 Regulation & Protection B-4 Communications & Records B-5 Environmental & Related Studies B-6 Computer & Information B-7 Skilled Trades B-8 Engineering & Technologies B-9 Natural Science B-10 Medical & Related B-11 Arts & Communication B-12 Social Science B-13 Education B-14 Community Services B-15 Healthcare B-16 Four Year Plan Tutorial B-17 Four Year Plan Worksheets B-20 Schedule Changes B-22 Repeating a Course B-22 Auditing a Course B-23 Late Arrival & Early Release B-23 Athletic Eligibility B-23 Zero Period B-23 Grade Level Promotion B-23 Online B-24 Advanced Placement B-30 Honors Courses B-30 College Credit Plus B-31 Credit Flexibility B-37

14 Scheduling Guidelines Four Year Planning/Learning Pathways B-1 Four Year Planning Overview In order to take full advantage of the high school experience, it is important that students carefully consider the courses, programs, and experiences in which they would like to participate during their four years. To assist with this important task, students are strongly encouraged to develop a Four Year Plan for high school. (See page B-17 for Creating A Four Year Plan directions.) Learning Pathways & Areas of Focus To assist students in developing a four year plan, the Hilliard City School District has identified four (4) Learning Pathways and fourteen (14) Areas of Focus to serve as guides for course and program selections. (see chart below) Because many courses and programs have specific prerequisites and/or selective admission criteria, it is important that students plan ahead to ensure eligibility for their experiences. The four year planning tool will help with this process. Working With Ideas Engineering & Technologies Natural Science & Technologies Medical & Related Arts & Communication Social Science Working with Things Environmental & Related Studies Computer and Information Specialties Skilled Trades & Personal Services Working with Data Business Regulations and Protection Communications & Records Working with People Education Healthcare Community Service

15 B-2 Learning Pathways Description Scheduling Guidelines Learning Pathways and Areas of Focus can be found on pages B-3 B-16. Within each Area of Focus, look for the following information: A: Identifies the Learning Pathway B: Identifies the Area of Focus C: Identifies common human interests, skills and traits associated with the Area of Focus. D: Sample career choices connected to the Area of Focus E: Focused Elective Options are suggested elective courses to explore within the Area of Focus. F: Extended Learning Opportunities are courses and/or programs that allow students further exploration with a particular Area of Focus.

16 Learning Pathways Business B-3 Working with Data Area of Focus: Business Interests / Skills / Traits Associated with this Pathway Computing: Determining information through the use of mathematical or statistical operations Synthesizing: Combine parts or elements to form a whole Analyzing: Examining and evaluating data Compiling: Gathering, arranging, or classifying info Comparing: Examining data Mentoring: Advising, counseling, guiding people Negotiating: Exchange ideas, info, and opinions with others to arrive at a solution Focused Elective Options Focused electives are only suggestions. Students may explore other areas of study to fulfill elective requirements. Art Photography 1, 2 Media Arts 1, 2 Business Accounting 1, 2 Desktop Publishing PC Applications Principles of Entrepreneurship Marketing Personal Finance Legal Studies College Fundamentals Sports & Entertainment Management Business Innovation English/Language Arts Media Awareness Speech, Debate & Public Discourse Leadership Development Family & Consumer Sciences Careers & Money Management Personal Decisions Financial Independence Career Mentorship 1, 2 World Language AP French 4 French 5 AP German 4 German 5 AP Spanish 4 Spanish 5 Chinese 1, 2, 3, 4 Mathematics Pre-Calculus Calculus or AP Calculus AP Calculus BC Statistics or AP Statistics FST (Online) Code U Programming Object Oriented Programming Game Design Computer and Mobile Applications Social Studies Post World War 2 America Contemporary World Issues Sociology Social Psychology Economics (Online) AP Psychology Career Choices Accountant Actuary Auditor Budget Analyst Financial Planner Forensic Accountant Investment Advisor Marketing Real Estate Agent Sales Small Business Owner Loan Officer Statistician Stockholder Treasurer Insurance Agent Extended Learning Opportunities Academy INC Global Logistics Management -Suggestions- Insurance Agent Professional & Collegiate Athletic Representative Real Estate Agent *It is the responsibility of the student to meet all district graduation requirements &/or requirements for the honors diploma &/or NCAA eligibility. Refer to the Program of Studies for detailed criteria.

17 B-4 Regulation & Protection Learning Pathways Working with Data Area of Focus: Regulation & Protection Negotiating: to deal or bargain with another or others Persuasive: Able to influence others Decisive: Capable of using independent judgment Listening/Problem Solving Skills Mentoring: Advising/counseling, guiding people Interests / Skills / Traits Associated with this Pathway Serving: Attending to immediate needs of others Analyzing: Examining and evaluating data Communication: Oral and written Courage/Compassion/Integrity Technical Training/Computer skills Focused Elective Options Focused electives are only suggestions. Students may explore other areas of study to fulfill elective requirements. Business Accounting 1, 2 Principles of Entrepreneurship Marketing Legal Studies College Fundamentals Business Innovation English/Language Arts Media Awareness Speech, Debate & Public Discourse Leadership Development Family & Consumer Sciences Personal Decisions Human Development & Relationships Advanced Child Development Career Mentorship 1, 2 World Language AP French 4 French 5 AP German 4 German 5 AP Spanish 4 Spanish 5 Chinese 1, 2, 3, 4 Mathematics Statistics or AP Statistics FST (Online) Code U Programming Object Oriented Programming Science Chemistry Introduction to Forensic Science Physics Social Studies Post World War 2 America Contemporary World Issues Sociology Social Psychology AP Psychology Wellness Sports Medicine 1, 2 Basic Strength Training and Fitness Strength Training and Conditioning for HS Athletes BUD/S Career Choices Aviation Accident Investigator Arson Investigator Child Protection Worker Corrections Officer Criminal Law Criminal Profiler Emergency Management Federal/Local Law Enforcement Fingerprint Expert Forensic Psychologist Hostage Negotiator Homeland Security Military Police/Fire Extended Learning Opportunities -Suggestions- Police Officer Firefighter/EMT Air Traffic Controller Global Logistics Management Criminal Justice Firefighting/Emergency Medical Service *It is the responsibility of the student to meet all district graduation requirements &/or requirements for the honors diploma &/or NCAA eligibility. Refer to the Program of Studies for detailed criteria.

18 Learning Pathways Communications & Records B-5 Working with Data Area of Focus: Communications & Records Interests / Skills / Traits Associated with this Pathway Computing: Determining information through the use of mathematical or statistical operations Synthesizing: Combine parts/elements to form a whole Creative/Insightful Technical Working Skills Compiling: Gathering, arranging, or classifying info Comparing: Examining data Communication: Verbal/writing skills Consensus Building: Exchange ideas, info, and opinions with others to arrive at a solution Focused Elective Options Focused electives are only suggestions. Students may explore other areas of study to fulfill elective requirements. Art Photography 1, 2 Media Arts 1, 2 Business Accounting 1, 2 Personal Finance Desktop Publishing PC Applications Marketing Legal Studies College Fundamentals Sports & Entertainment Management Business Innovation English/Language Arts Media Awareness Speech, Debate & Public Discourse Leadership Development Family & Consumer Sciences Careers & Money Management Personal Decisions Career Mentorship 1, 2 Financial Independence World Language AP French 4 French 5 AP German 4 German 5 AP Spanish 4 Spanish 5 Chinese 1, 2, 3, 4 Mathematics Statistics or AP Statistics FST (Online) Code U Programming Object Oriented Programming Game Design Social Studies Sociology Social Psychology AP Psychology Career Choices Office Clerk Court Reporter Secretary Bank Teller Budget Analyst Accountant Business Developer Administrative Assistant Data Entry Specialist Human Resources Assistant Controller Extended Learning Opportunities Academy INC Global Logistics Management -Suggestions- Human Resources Director Bank Manager Court Reporter *It is the responsibility of the student to meet all district graduation requirements &/or requirements for the honors diploma &/or NCAA eligibility. Refer to the Program of Studies for detailed criteria.

19 B-6 Environmental & Related Studies Learning Pathways Working with Things Area of Focus: Environmental & Related Studies Interests / Skills / Traits Associated with this Pathway Compiling: Gathering, arranging, or classifying info from various sources into a new form Problem-solving Skills Curiosity/Continuous Learning Comparing: Examining data or things to discover similarities/differences Analyzing: Examining and evaluating data Objective Thinking Focused Elective Options Focused electives are only suggestions. Students may explore other areas of study to fulfill elective requirements. Business Accounting 1, 2 Principles of Entrepreneurship Marketing Legal Studies College Fundamentals Business Innovation English/Language Arts Leadership Development Speech, Debate, & Public Discourse Family & Consumer Sciences Careers & Money Management Foods for Healthy Living Personal Decisions Career Mentorship I, 2 World Language AP French 4 French 5 AP German 4 German 5 AP Spanish 4 Spanish 5 Chinese 1, 2, 3, 4 Mathematics Statistics or AP Statistics FST (Online) Code U Programming Game Design Science AP Biology AP Chemistry AP Physics Environmental Science Scientific Principles of Sustainability A & B Chemistry or Honors Chemistry Physics Freshwater Marine Ecosystems Astronomy Microbiology & Life Structures Social Studies Sociology Social Psychology Post World War 2 America Contemporary World Issues AP Psychology Career Choices Conservation Officer Ecologist Environmental Scientist Fish/Wildlife Tech Forester Geologist Meteorologist Wetlands Expert Zookeeper Zoologist Environmental Lawyer Environmental Engineer EPA Regulator Farmer Nursery Manager Landscaper Extended Learning Opportunities Academy INC Turf, Landscape & Greenhouse Management -Suggestions- Meteorologist Landscaper Zoologist *It is the responsibility of the student to meet all district graduation requirements &/or requirements for the honors diploma &/or NCAA eligibility. Refer to the Program of Studies for detailed criteria.

20 Learning Pathways Computer & Information Specialities B-7 Working with Things Area of Focus: Computer & Information Specialties Interests / Skills / Traits Associated with this Pathway Synthesizing: Combining parts or elements to form a whole, putting together data analysis to develop concepts or interpretation Instructing: Teaching/training through explanation, demonstration and supervised practice Decisive: Capable of using independent judgment Analyzing: Examining and evaluating data Communication: Oral and written Love of theory Value of Knowledge/Competency Focused Elective Options Focused electives are only suggestions. Students may explore other areas of study to fulfill elective requirements. Art Media Arts 1, 2 Photography 1, 2, 3 2D Visual Art (Online) Business Desktop Publishing PC Applications Principles of Entrepreneurship Marketing Business Innovation English Media Communications Media Awareness Family & Consumer Sciences Career Mentorship 1, 2 Personal Decisions World Language AP French 4 French 5 AP German 4 German 5 AP Spanish 4 Spanish 5 Chinese 1, 2, 3, 4 Mathematics Statistics or AP Statistics FST (Online) Pre-Calculus Calculus or AP Calculus AB AP Calculus BC Code U Programming Object Oriented Programming Game Design Computer and Mobile Applications AP Computer Science A Performing Arts Music Theory 1, 2 Career Choices Applications Engineer Business/ Computer Science Teacher Computer Repair Game Programmer Help Desk Multimedia Producer Operating Systems Engineer Software Trainer Video Game Developer Web Designer Desktop Publisher Systems Analyst Actuary Extended Learning Opportunities Academy INC Computer Networking & Support Technology Interactive Media -Suggestions- Engineer Web Designer Computer Technician *It is the responsibility of the student to meet all district graduation requirements &/or requirements for the honors diploma &/or NCAA eligibility. Refer to the Program of Studies for detailed criteria.

21 B-8 Skilled Trades & Personal Services Learning Pathways Working with Things Area of Focus: Skilled Trades & Personal Services Interests / Skills / Traits Associated with this Pathway Synthesizing: Combining parts/elements to form a whole Coordinating: Guiding activities to achieve a goal Technical Working Skills Problem Solving Capabilities Capable of Working with Hands/Operating Equipment Coordinating: Guiding activities to achieve a goal Precision Working: Moving, guiding or placing objects or materials in a precise way Manipulating: Working, moving, guiding, or placing objects or materials Focused Elective Options Focused electives are only suggestions. Students may explore other areas of study to fulfill elective requirements. Art Drawing 1,2,3 Sculpture 1,2 Ceramics 1,2,3 2D Visual Art (Online) Business Accounting 1,2 Principles of Entrepreneurship Marketing Family & Consumer Sciences Career & Money Management Personal Decisions Foods for Healthy Living Global Gourmet Design: Fashion, Textiles & Interiors Career Mentorship 1, 2 World Language AP French 4 French 5 AP German 4 German 5 AP Spanish 4 Spanish 5 Chinese 1, 2, 3, 4 Mathematics Statistics or AP Statistics FST (Online) Performing Arts Theatrical Design & Production Production and Performance Pre-Engineering Introduction to Engineering Design Introduction to Engineering Design WiE Principles of Engineering Digital Electronics Engineering Design & Development Code U Programming Object Oriented Programming Science Physics Chemistry or Honors Chemistry Career Choices Carpenter Electrician Bricklayer Cabinetmaker Chef/Cook Jeweler Tool & Die Maker Machinist Auto Mechanic Aircraft Mechanic Auto Body Repair Dental Lab Tech Quality Control Inspector Heavy Duty Equipment Technician Marine Technician Extended Learning Opportunities Auto Collision Repair Automotive Technology Construction Technology Culinary Arts Engineering Technology Power, Sports, & Diesel Tehnology Cosmetology Welding & Fabrication Technologies -Suggestions- Chef Mechanic Spa Manager *It is the responsibility of the student to meet all district graduation requirements &/or requirements for the honors diploma &/or NCAA eligibility. Refer to the Program of Studies for detailed criteria.

22 Learning Pathways Engineering & Technologies B-9 Working with Ideas Area of Focus: Engineering & Technologies Computing: Determining information through use of mathematical or statistical operations Coordinating: Guiding activities to achieve a goal Analyzing: Examining and evaluating data Decisive: Capable of using independent judgment Interests / Skills / Traits Associated with this Pathway Communication: Verbal/writing skills Curiosity/Continuous Learning Objective/Creative Thinking Technical Working Skills/Problem Solving Focused Elective Options Focused electives are only suggestions. Students may explore other areas of study to fulfill elective requirements. Art Drawing 1, 2, 3 Sculpture 1, 2 Media Arts 1, 2 Ceramics 1, 2, 3 2D Visual Art (Online) Business Principles of Entrepreneurship Legal Studies College Fundamentals Business Innovation English/Language Arts Speech, Debate & Public Discourse Leadership Development Family & Consumer Sciences Career Mentorship 1, 2 Personal Decisions World Language AP French 4 French 5 AP German 4 German 5 AP Spanish 4 Spanish 5 Chinese 1, 2, 3, 4 Mathematics Statistics or AP Statistics FST (Online) Calculus or AP Calculus AB AP Calculus BC Performing Arts Theatrical Design and Production Pre-Engineering Program Introduction to Engineering Design Introduction to Engineering Design WiE Principles of Engineering Digital Electronics Engineering Design & Development Code U Programming Object Oriented Programming Game Design Computer and Mobile Applications AP Computer Science A Science Chemistry or Honors Chemistry AP Chemistry Physics AP Physics Environmental Science (Online) Astronomy Career Choices Aerospace Engineer Agricultural Engineer Architectural Engineer Chemical Engineer Civil Engineer Electrical Engineer Environmental Engineer Industrial Engineer Mechanical Engineer Structural Engineer Engineering Technician Pilot Surveyor Extended Learning Opportunities Academy INC Engineering & Manufacturing Technology -Suggestions- Engineer Research Scientist *It is the responsibility of the student to meet all district graduation requirements &/or requirements for the honors diploma &/or NCAA eligibility. Refer to the Program of Studies for detailed criteria.

23 B-10 Natural Science & Technologies Learning Pathways Working with Ideas Area of Focus: Natural Science & Technologies Computing: Determining information through use of mathematical or statistical operations Coordinating: Guiding activities to achieve a goal Analyzing: Examining and evaluating data Curiosity/Continuous Learning Interests / Skills / Traits Associated with this Pathway Comparing: Examining data or things to discover their similarities/differences Problem-solving Skills Objective Thinking Technical Working Skills Focused Elective Options Focused electives are only suggestions. Students may explore other areas of study to fulfill elective requirements. Art Drawing 1, 2, 3 Media Arts 1, 2 2D Visual Art (Online) Business College Fundamentals English/Language Arts Speech, Debate & Public Discourse Leadership Development Family & Consumer Sciences Career Mentorship 1, 2 Design: Fashion, Textiles and Interiors Personal Decisions World Language AP French 4 French 5 AP German 4 German 5 AP Spanish 4 Spanish 5 Chinese 1, 2, 3, 4 Mathematics Statistics or AP Statistics FST (Online) Calculus or AP Calculus AB AP Calculus BC Pre-Engineering Program Introduction to Engineering Design Introduction to Engineering Design WiE Principles of Engineering Digital Electronics Engineering Design & Development Code U Programming Object Oriented Programming Game Design Computer and Mobile Applications AP Computer Science A Science AP Biology Chemistry/Honors Chemistry AP Chemistry AP Physics Environmental Science (Online) Physics Human Anatomy & Physiology 1, 2 Astronomy Introduction to Forensic Science Freshwater and Marine Ecosystems Microbiology & Life Structures Career Choices Physicist Biologist Chemist Statistician Forester Zoologist Meteorologist Arborist Industrial Designer Engineer Tech Technical Illustrator Data Recovery Specialist Extended Learning Opportunities Engineering & Manufacturing Technology -Suggestions- Zoologist Meteorologist Arborist *It is the responsibility of the student to meet all district graduation requirements &/or requirements for the honors diploma &/or NCAA eligibility. Refer to the Program of Studies for detailed criteria.

24 Learning Pathways Medical & Related B-11 Working with Ideas Area of Focus: Medical & Related Interests / Skills / Traits Associated with this Pathway Analyzing: Examining and evaluating data Supervising: Determining, explaining procedures for a group of people, assigning duties while maintaining harmonious relationships and promoting efficiency Synthesizing: Combine parts/elements to form a whole Coordinating: Guiding activities to achieve a goal, determining sequence of actions to be taken based on analysis of data Decisive: Capable of using independent judgment Focused Elective Options Focused electives are only suggestions. Students may explore other areas of study to fulfill elective requirements. Business College Fundamentals English/Language Arts Speech, Debate & Public Discourse Leadership Development Family & Consumer Sciences Foods for Healthy Living Global Gourmet Career Mentorship 1, 2 Advanced Child Development Personal Decisions World Language AP French 4 French 5 AP German 4 German 5 AP Spanish 4 Spanish 5 Chinese 1, 2, 3, 4 Mathematics Statistics or AP Statistics FST (Online) Calculus or AP Calculus AB AP Calculus BC Code U Programming Object Oriented Programming Science AP Biology Chemistry or Honors Chemistry AP Chemistry AP Physics Environmental Science Physics Human Anatomy & Physiology 1, 2 Introduction to Forensic Science Freshwater and Marine Ecosystems Microbiology & Life Structures Social Studies Sociology Social Psychology AP Psychology Wellness Basic Strength Training and Fitness Strength Training and Conditioning for HS Athletes BUD/S Sports Medicine 1, 2 Career Choices Athletic Trainer Anesthesiology Chiropractor Clinical Lab Scientist Chemist Dentist Dental Hygienist Forensic Scientist Occupational Therapist Optometrist Pharmacist Physical Therapist Physician Registered Nurse Registered Dietician Speech Pathologist Extended Learning Opportunities Pharmacy Technician Pre-Nursing Sports & Fitness -Suggestions- PT/OT/Nursing Dentist Athletic Trainer Health Professionals Academy *It is the responsibility of the student to meet all district graduation requirements &/or requirements for the honors diploma &/or NCAA eligibility. Refer to the Program of Studies for detailed criteria.

25 B-12 Arts & Communications Learning Pathways Working with Ideas Area of Focus: Arts & Communication Creative: Imaginative, innovative, original Consensus Building: Exchange ideas, info, and opinions with others to arrive at a solution Communicating: Work with audio, visual, graphic, or written media Interests / Skills / Traits Associated with this Pathway Synthesizing: Combine parts or elements to form a whole Comparing: Examining data, people or things to determine similarities/differences Decisive: Uses independent judgment Focused Elective Options Focused electives are only suggestions. Students may explore other areas of study to fulfill elective requirements. Art Drawing 1, 2, 3 Painting 1, 2, 3 Photography 1, 2, 3 Media Arts 1, 2 Ceramics 1, 2, 3 Sculpture 1, 2 Art Portfolio AP Studio Art Portfolio Art Appreciation 1, 2 2D Visual Art (Online) Business Principles of Entrepreneurship College Fundamentals Sports & Entertainment Management Marketing English/Language Arts Media Communication Media Awareness Journalism Production Speech, Debate & Public Discourse Leadership Development Writer s Craft Yearbook Production Family & Consumer Sciences Career Mentorship 1, 2 Design: Fashion, Textiles and Interiors Personal Decisions World Language AP French 4 French 5 AP German 4 German 5 AP Spanish 4 Spanish 5 Chinese 1, 2, 3, 4 Mathematics Statistics or AP Statistics FST (Online) Code U Programming Object Oriented Programming Game Design Computer and Mobile Applications AP Computer Science A Performing Arts Introduction to Theatre Theatrical Design and Production Theatrical Performance Production and Performance Concert Orchestra Symphony Orchestra Chamber Orchestra Jazz Ensemble Music Theory 1, 2 Music History 1, 2 Color Guard Concert Band Symphonic Band Wind Ensemble Percussion Ensemble Rock Band Concert Choir Soprano Concert Choir Tenor Choir 300 Choir 400 Honors Choir 400 Honors Wind Ensemble Honors Chamber Orchestra Career Choices Advertising Art Director Film Director Graphic Designer Web Designer Museum Curator Photographer Video Producer Radio/Television Broadcaster Actor TV Director Writer Journalist Set Designer Composer Music Director Extended Learning Opportunities Academy VIBE/Studio ILC Art, Design and Communications Digital Media Production -Suggestions- Visual or Performing Artist Graphic or Layout Artist Advertising/Marketing Agent *It is the responsibility of the student to meet all district graduation requirements &/or requirements for the honors diploma &/or NCAA eligibility. Refer to the Program of Studies for detailed criteria.

26 Learning Pathways Social Science B-13 Synthesizing: Combine parts or elements to form a whole Coordinating: Guiding activities to achieve a goal Analyzing: Examining and evaluating data Working with Ideas Area of Focus: Social Science Interests / Skills / Traits Associated with this Pathway Communication: Verbal/writing skills Problem-solving Skills Ability to Research Organization/Time Management Focused Elective Options Focused electives are only suggestions. Students may explore other areas of study to fulfill elective requirements. Art Ceramics 1, 2, 3 Art Appreciation 1, 2 2D Visual Art (Online) Business Legal Studies College Fundamentals English/Language Arts Speech, Debate & Public Discourse Leadership Development Family & Consumer Sciences Career Mentorship 1, 2 Personal Decisions World Language AP French 4 French 5 AP German 4 German 5 AP Spanish 4 Spanish 5 Chinese 1, 2, 3, 4 Mathematics Statistics or AP Statistics FST (Online) Calculus or AP Calculus AB AP Calculus BC Code U Programming Object Oriented Programming Performing Arts Music History 1, 2 Social Studies Senior Seminar U.S. Government 2 Economics (Online) Sociology Social Psychology Post World War 2 America Contemporary World Issues America through Film History s Mysteries AP U.S. History AP U.S. Government AP European History Liberal Democracy in America AP Psychology Career Choices Anthropologist Archeologist Archivist Economist Genealogist Historian Museum Curator Sociologist Political Scientist Urban Planner Extended Learning Opportunities Criminal Justice -Suggestions- Museum Director City Planner Political Science Professor *It is the responsibility of the student to meet all district graduation requirements &/or requirements for the honors diploma &/or NCAA eligibility. Refer to the Program of Studies for detailed criteria.

27 B-14 Education Learning Pathways Working with People Area of Focus: Education Interests / Skills / Traits Associated with this Pathway Supervising: Determining, explaining procedures for a group of people, assigning duties while maintaining harmonious relations and promoting efficiency Instructing: Teaching/training through explanation, demonstration and supervised practice Communication: Oral and written Helping: Giving assistance or support Organization/time management Listening Problem-solving Focused Elective Options Focused electives are only suggestions. Students may explore other areas of study to fulfill elective requirements. Business PC Applications College Fundamentals English Speech, Debate & Public Discourse Leadership Development Family & Consumer Sciences Human Development & Relationships Advanced Child Development Career Mentorship I. 2 Personal Decisions World Language AP French 4 French 5 AP German 4 German 5 AP Spanish 4 Spanish 5 Chinese 1, 2, 3 Mathematics Statistics or AP Statistics FST (Online) Social Studies Social Psychology Sociology AP Psychology NOTE! For Elementary Education: Focus on being well-rounded in literacy, art, performing arts, and PE For Secondary Education: Focus on a content area Career Choices Administrator Childcare Teacher Childcare Administrator Elementary Teacher Middle school Teacher High School Teacher College Faculty Library/Media Specialist School Counselor Training Manager Business Manager Extended Learning Opportunities Early Childhood Education *It is the responsibility of the student to meet all district graduation requirements &/or requirements for the honors diploma &/or NCAA eligibility. Refer to the Program of Studies for detailed criteria.

28 Learning Pathways Community Services B-15 Working with People Area of Focus: Community Services Interests / Skills / Traits Associated with this Pathway Mentoring: Advising, counseling, and/or guiding people Negotiating: Exchange ideas, info, and opinions with others to arrive at a solution Communication: Oral and written Service to others Objective thinking Organization/time management Listening Problem solving Ethics/integrity Focused Elective Options Focused electives are only suggestions. Students may explore other areas of study to fulfill elective requirements. Art Drawing 1, 2, 3 Painting 1, 2, 3 Photography 1, 2, 3 Ceramics 1, 2, 3 Sculpture 1, 2 2D Visual Art (Online) Business Legal Studies PC Applications College Fundamentals English Speech, Debate & Public Discourse Writer s Craft Leadership Development Family & Consumer Sciences Human Development & Relationships Advanced Child Development Career Mentorship 1,2 Personal Decisions World Language AP French 4 French 5 AP German 4 German 5 AP Spanish 4 Spanish 5 Chinese 1, 2, 3, 4 Science Human Anatomy and Physiology 1, 2 Mathematics Statistics or AP Statistics FST (Online) Social Studies Senior Seminar U.S. Government 2 Post World War 2 America Contemporary World Issues Social Psychology Sociology AP Psychology Performing Arts Concert Orchestra Symphony Orchestra Chamber Orchestra Jazz Ensemble Music Theory 1, 2 Music History 1, 2 Concert Band Symphonic Band Concert Choir Soprano Concert Choir Tenor Choir 300 Choir 400 Honors Choir 400 Honors Wind Ensemble Honors Chamber Orchestra Career Choices Child Protection Worker Clergy Social Worker Psychologist Counselor Substance Abuse Services Life Coach Probation Officer Sociologist Lawyer Paralegal Art/Music/Drama Therapy Extended Learning Opportunities Criminal Justice -Suggestions- Social Worker Lawyer Pastor/Clergy *It is the responsibility of the student to meet all district graduation requirements &/or requirements for the honors diploma &/or NCAA eligibility. Refer to the Program of Studies for detailed criteria.

29 B-16 Healthcare Learning Pathways Working with People Area of Focus: Healthcare Interests / Skills / Traits Associated with this Pathway: Decisive: Capable of using independent judgment Analyzing: Examining and evaluating data Supervising: Determining, explaining procedures for a group of people, assigning duties while maintaining harmonious relations and promoting efficiency Coordinating: Guiding activities to achieve a goal, determining sequence of actions to be taken based on data Synthesizing: Combining parts or elements to form a whole, putting together data analysis to develop concepts or interpretation Focused Elective Options Focused electives are only suggestions. Students may explore other areas of study to fulfill elective requirements. Business College Fundamentals PC Applications English Speech, Debate & Public Discourse Leadership Development Family & Consumer Sciences Human Development & Relationships Advanced Child Development Foods for Healthy Living Career Mentorship 1, 2 Personal Decisions World Language AP French 4 French 5 AP German 4 German 5 AP Spanish 4 Spanish 5 Chinese 1, 2, 3, 4 Mathematics Statistics or AP Statistics FST (Online) Social Studies Social Psychology Sociology AP Psychology Science Human Anatomy & Physiology 1, 2 Chemistry or Honors Chemistry AP Biology AP Chemistry Microbiology & Life Structures Wellness Sports Medicine 1, 2 Sports and Fitness Aerobics, Body Sculpting, and Fitness Basic Strength Training and Fitness Strength Training and Conditioning for HS Athletes BUD/S Career Choices Clinical Lab Technician Dental Assistant Dental Technician Emergency Medical Technician Home Health Aide Nurse Paramedic Pharmacy Technician Radiology Technician Surgical Technician Veterinary Technician Extended Learning Opportunities Pharmacy Technician Pre-Nursing Pre-Veterinary Technician Sports & Fitness -Suggestions- Athletic/Personal Trainer Firefighter/EMT Veterinarian Health Professionals Academy *It is the responsibility of the student to meet all district graduation requirements &/or requirements for the honors diploma &/or NCAA eligibility. Refer to the Program of Studies for detailed criteria.

30 Scheduling Guidelines Four Year Plan Tutorial B-17 Creating A Four Year Plan Students should use the worksheets on pages B-20 B-21 to build their preliminary four year plan. Upon completion of the four year plan using the worksheets, students should create their official four year plan AND request courses using the district s online scheduling portal, Home Access Center. Using Home Access Center to create/maintain four year career plan To access Home Access Center from any browser, type https://homeaccess.hboe.org into the address bar. To access Home Access Center from your building website, click on the Student Home Access link.. The login page is simple and straightforward. Your Username and Password are the same as what you use to log into the network when you are at school. 1. Enter your username and password and then click the Log In button. You will see several buttons across the top of the screen. Click on the Classes button. 2. Click on Career Plan. A screen similar to the one below will appear. If you are currently taking (or have taken) any high school level courses, they will appear on the page in the appropriate school year column. 3. To enter course requests for future years, click on the Enter Requests button for each future year.

31 B-18 Four Year Plan Tutorial Scheduling Guidelines To see the courses that are recommended for your learning path, click the + sign in front of the Recommended Courses title at the top of the page. Following the template that you have completed in your Program of Studies for each year as a guiding tool. 4. Check the box next to each course that you wish to take for that school year. 5. Once you have chosen all of the courses from the Recommended list, click Add to Requests. If you wish to take a course that is not on the list of recommended courses (ie. Choir, band, etc.), OR, to remove a course from your Career Plan, scroll to the bottom of this screen to find the Course Request area. You will see a list of subject areas. 6. Click on the link for Edit button at the end of the row next to the appropriate subject area.

32 Scheduling Guidelines Four Year Plan Tutorial B-19 A list of courses within that subject area will appear. 7. Click the box next to the course(s) you wish to request and then click Save. 8. Once you have chosen all of the courses for a particular school year, click on the Career Plan button at the top of the screen to return to the Career Plan page. You are now ready to select courses for another future school year. Note: Make sure to COMPLETE your career Plan. An easy way check is to ensure the Est. Credit Column on the Career Plan Screen meets, or exceeds, each Graduation Requirement area. Note the plan below is considered INCOMPLETE.

33 B-20 Four Year Plan Worksheet Scheduling Guidelines Use the following templates to help you schedule your four year plan. Grade 09 Area Course Type Course Code Credit (TR/OL/CF/WR/SC/EC) English 1 Math 1 Science 1 Social Studies 1 World Language 1 Physical Education 1/4 Integrated Computers (ICT 21) /15OL01 1/2 Elective Elective Tr - Traditional OL - On-Line CF - Credit Flexibility WR - PE Waiver SC - Senior Capstone EC - Early College Programs Things to consider when planning: Did you schedule ICT21? This course is required for graduation. What electives have you selected? Begin exploring your learning pathway now. Grade 10 Area Course Type Course Code Credit (TR/OL/CF/WR/SC/EC) English 1 Math 1 Science 1 Social Studies 1 World Language 1 Physical Education 1/4 Health Health /45OL10 1/2 Elective Elective Did you schedule physical education or are you going to use a physical education waiver? Tr - Traditional OL - On-Line CF - Credit Flexibility WR - PE Waiver SC - Senior Capstone EC - Early College Programs Things to consider when planning: Did you make room for health and another physical education course? What other electives can you schedule in your learning pathway? Have you looked at prerequisites for courses you want to take during your junior and/or senior year? Will the courses in your schedule now fulfill these prerequisites? Will you have at least three credits of foreign language? Most colleges want three years of a foreign language.

34 Scheduling Guidelines Four Year Plan Worksheet B-21 Use the following templates to help you schedule your four year plan. Grade 11 Area Course Type Course Code Credit (TR/OL/CF/WR/SC/EC) English 1 Math 1 Science 1 Social Studies 1 World Language 1 Elective Elective Elective Elective Tr - Traditional OL - On-Line CF - Credit Flexibility WR - PE Waiver SC - Senior Capstone EC - Early College Programs Have you fulfilled the fine arts requirement for college admissions? Things to consider when planning: When do you plan to fulfill the financial literacy graduation requirement? Grade 12 Area Course Type Course Code Credit (TR/OL/CF/WR/SC/EC) English/Humanities 1 Math 1 Science 1 Social Studies 1 Senior Capstone Senior Capstone 98SC99 1/2 Elective Elective Elective Elective Tr - Traditional OL - On-Line CF - Credit Flexibility WR - PE Waiver SC - Senior Capstone EC - Early College Programs Things to consider when planning: Have you considered any of the extended learning opportunities available to you to enhance your studies? Have you double-checked your course selections to ensure you re meeting graduation requirements? Are there any more electives in your learning pathway that you want to explore before you leave high school? How will you fulfill the Senior Capstone graduation requirement?

35 B-22 Schedule Changes/Repeating a Course Scheduling Guidelines General Scheduling Information Schedule Changes Planning a schedule for the next school year is a difficult task and situations may occur requiring a change in that schedule. Changes have a serious effect on class size, teacher assignments, and the overall master schedule. The student and parent are urged NOT to plan a program with the idea that it can be changed. All schedule changes will require the completion of an add/drop form in the guidance office. All schedule changes made after the last day of school will require approval from building administration. From the time a student submits their course request in February until the end of the school year in May, a student may request a schedule change. It is important to realize that the master schedule is based upon student requests made in February. In order to be fiscally responsible, the number of class sections within each subject area is based upon these projections. Once classes are scheduled, it is difficult to make a schedule change because some classes will be at capacity. Therefore, if a student wishes to drop an AP and/or Honors course from their schedule they must do so no later than one week after the end of the school year. Only the following reasons will constitute a need for change after this deadline: 1. Semester imbalances. 2. Replacement of summer school course(s) successfully completed. 3. Schedule adjustments for educational options such as Mosaic, Personal Success Network, Post-Secondary Options, or other special educational opportunities. 4. Adjustments for students with special needs. 5. Inappropriate course as dictated by prerequisite, final grade, or staff recommendation. 6. Requests appearing on the original form but not on final schedule. 7. Change of teacher only if student has had the teacher previously and failed the course. 8. Changes which can be made by directly replacing a study hall or dropped course. (Must be room available and be placed in smallest available section that period.) TIMELINES ADDS: Full year classes can be added until the tenth day of school. Semester classes can be added until the tenth day of the semester. DROPS: If a student drops a year-long course by the end of the first nine weeks grading period, or a semester course no later than the 15 th school day, any record of the course will be deleted. A withdraw passing (WP) would be noted should the student drop a semester class that they are passing (A through D-) ten days after grade cards are issued at the end of the quarter. A year-long class drop would be noted as (WP) withdraw passing provided the student is passing (A through D-) ten days after grade cards are issued at semester end. Yearlong and semester courses dropped after the above stated deadlines will result in withdraw failing (WF). No student may be enrolled in less than five classes per semester. Athletes must take/pass 5 courses each 9 weeks. Physical Education and Fitness for Life do not count as one of the five courses. Repeating a Course Students may repeat a course one time. The course information and the grade earned the first time remain on the transcript as part of the student's academic record. However, the grade that is earned the second time may be the grade that is computed in the calculation of the grade point average. This means students will always receive the second grade earned. Credit is only awarded once for the course. 1. A course and its prerequisite may not be taken at the same time. 2. A course may be repeated only once. 3. Grades from out of district sources and correspondence courses will not be accepted as replacement grades. 4. Hilliard Enrichment summer school coursework and Hilliard online coursework may be used as replacement grades.

36 Late Arrival & Early Release/Athletic Eligibility/Zero Period/Grade Level Promotion B-23 Scheduling Guidelines 5. Taking a credit flexibility course proficiency assessment in a course previously completed is a method of repeating a course; the grade earned on the assessment will be calculated into the grade point average. The Credit Flexibility Pass/Fail option may only be used if the grade earned is higher than the grade previously received. 6. The dropping of a course that is being repeated will be handled according to the same rules as all other courses. 7. There are some performing arts courses that are exempt from this rule. Please consult the teacher of the course for specifics. Auditing a Course Students may audit a course, with principal approval, to improve their skills. The student must attend all classes, participate in all classroom activities, take all tests and quizzes, complete all homework assignments, and follow all teacher guidelines regarding classroom rules and behavior. The student will receive a grade on their report card each grading period, however it will be reflected on the transcript as an audit without credit or a grade, and a grade will not be averaged into the cumulative grade point average. Students must make arrangements for auditing a class during the first ten (10) school days. After that time, teacher recommendation and prior approval are required. Audited courses do not count as one of the five courses all students are required to take each semester. Late Arrival and Early Release Seniors who have accumulated at least 16 credits and have passed all sections of the Ohio Graduation Test may select one late arrival or early release period in their schedule. Late arrival/early release may be dropped from a student s schedule if there is a change in academic standing. Late arrival/early release options are only available to Seniors. Ninth, Tenth, and Eleventh grade students participating in credit flexibility, online coursework, early college programs, the personal success network and/or mentorship may be permitted to have late in/early out with approval of the building principal as long as they are enrolled in a minimum of 6 credits of coursework. Athletic Eligibility If you are an athlete, you must be signed up for at least 5 (five) 1/2 credit classes each semester and carry the minimum GPA requirements as established by the district. Physical Education (Online) does not count as 1 of the 5. It is recommended students take at least 6 classes each semester. To be eligible, you also must pass at least 5 (five) 1/2 credit classes with the required GPA. This includes the nine weeks before the sport begins. If you are unsure about your eligibility, please talk to your coach, the athletic department or your school counselor. Zero Period Zero period class may be offered from 6:45 to 7:33 a.m. as an option for students in grades Students who elect to take zero period are allowed to leave school one period early or take an extra course. Students who take zero period must provide their own transportation to and from school, be on time, and maintain good attendance. Zero period courses are offered strictly by the number of students who sign up. If there are not enough students to have a class, it will not be offered. Grade Level Promotion The minimum student load is 5 1/4 credits for 9 th graders and 5 credits for 10 th, 11 th & 12 th graders. You must exceed minimum load in order to meet graduation requirements. Students are not permitted more than two study halls per semester. Students are promoted to the next grade level upon completion of the following minimum credit requirements: 9 th = satisfactory completion of 8 th grade 10 th = completion of 4 credits 11 th = completion of 9 credits 12 th = completion of 15 credits These guidelines should be viewed as minimum. Usually a student will have earned more credits than are needed for promotion.

37 B-24 Online Learning Extended Learning Opportunities Online Learning PART A: PROGRAM STRUCTURE & GUIDELINES I. Providers The Hilliard City School District offers a variety of online course offerings as an enhancement to course offerings in the traditional classroom through the Hilliard City Schools ecampus. All courses offered through the Hilliard City Schools ecampus will be recognized for required and/or elective graduation credit. There are a variety of providers other than the Hilliard City Schools that offer online opportunities for credit enrichment and recovery. If the use of an outside provider is necessary, students are encouraged to choose from the list of district-approved providers to ensure credit earned will be recognized by the Hilliard City School District. II. Course Fees There will be fees assessed for students taking online courses through the Hilliard City Schools ecampus during the school year. The fees will align with the course fees listed in course catalog. Students will be responsible for all fees associated with taking online courses through the summer school program. Students will also be responsible for all fees associated with taking online courses from providers other than the Hilliard City Schools. III. Credit Guidelines The following guidelines are applicable to courses offered through the Hilliard City Schools ecampus: Coursework can be for new credit or credit recovery. The grade earned in the course can replace a grade on a student s transcript. Coursework does count for athletic eligibility when appropriate. Enrolled students must take a minimum of one test face-to-face with the course teacher. IV. Instructors Each Hilliard City Schools ecampus course is assigned a Hilliard City School District instructor. The online instructor is expected to regularly communicate with his/her students via the method most efficient (i.e., telephone, , face-to-face). Additionally, as needed (especially if a student is not completing assignments and/or is at risk of failing the course), the instructor is expected to communicate with the parents/guardians of enrolled students. As an assigned class, the online instructor should treat the online course, students, and parents as he/ she would a traditional classroom course. PART B: ENROLLMENT/PARTICIPATION PROCEDURES V. Enrollment Timeline & Online Course Load A student must enroll in a semester-long online course by the posting of grades for the third grading period.

38 Extended Learning Opportunities On-Line Learning B-25 Students who are enrolled through the Personal Success Network at the McVey Innovative Learning Center may be enrolled in no more than two (2) online courses at one time, if the student takes additional courses at his/her home school. Students whose attendance is solely taken at the ILC as part of the Personal Success Network may be enrolled in no more than three (3) online courses at one time. For a student who attends his/her home school for the traditional school day, he/she may only be enrolled in one (1) online course at any given time through Hilliard City Schools ecampus. If space and the student schedule permits, students may be provided time during the school day to access a computer and complete online work. Students dropping an online course will fall under the same requirements as stated in the Hilliard City School District s Student Handbook for dropping courses. If a student withdrawals from a course as a failure, that course will show as a Withdrawal/Failure, and the online course will show as a separate course on the transcript. A student may be withdrawn from a class if he/she is inactive in the online course for more than 21 calendar days. The instructor will attempt to contact the student and/or parent after seven (7) days of inactivity to discuss the situation. If an administrator and/or guidance counselor withdraws a student from an online course, per student request or because of inactivity, the administrator in charge of online for that building must inform the online instructor. VI. School Procedures for Enrolling Students The following procedures should be followed when enrolling a student in an online course: 1. The traditional registration process takes place for online students through day 10 of each semester. 2. If a student is enrolled after the initial registration period, the following steps should be taken: a. If the guidance counselor considers a student to be a good candidate for the online program, he/she will speak with the administrator responsible for online coursework and the appropriate online instructor at the school about potential enrollment. Once there is agreement to enroll the student in an online course, the counselor will determine how the enrollment will fit into the student s schedule (a class period during the day, student s own time in evening, etc.). b. The guidance counselor and/or administrator will arrange a meeting with the student and his/her parent/guardian to complete the following: (a) Review course expectations; (b) Reveal plan for scheduling during day or p.m.; (c) Set timeline; (d) Establish how many credits will be earned; Complete an Online Course Enrollment Form (link provided by Online Teacher Leader). c. Online Teacher Leader will notify the online teacher of the placement. The online teacher will come to the student s home school to meet with him/her to get started in the course.

39 B-26 Online Learning Extended Learning Opportunities 3. If the student is assigned a period during the school day to complete online work, the guidance counselor will notify the supervising teacher that the student has been assigned and is coming every day, and will change the student s schedule to reflect which period he/she will be in assigned lab/area/classroom doing online work. 4. Students may only be scheduled and be working on one online course at a time. Another course can be added when the first is completed. A course is completed when a final grade is assigned by the online teacher. VII. Course Completion The online course (for all students enrolled) must be completed by one week prior to the final day of classes for 12 th grade students. For students who do not complete the course by the deadline, an F will be issued. Failure to complete the course on time may prohibit a student from participating in commencement exercises. Additionally, in order to participate in commencement, the student must have earned a final grade of 60% or better in the online course prior to the ceremony. PART C: COURSE STRUCTURE VIII. Course Design Standards, as defined in the Hilliard City Schools ecampus Course Rubric Checklist, have been established for the structure and content of online courses offered by the Hilliard City School District. In general, all online courses are to be based on state standards. Assessments and evaluations will use multiple methods, such as quizzes, tests, discussions, essays, projects, and surveys. At least one test will be given face-to-face during each semester. The tests can be paper and pencil or online (as long as it requires a proctor for administration). IX. Exams and/or Tests Students enrolled in an online course must take a minimum of one test (i.e. a final exam) face-to-face with a Hilliard City Schools staff member. In order to earn credit for the online course, the cumulative percentage on the tests must be 60% or better, in addition to passing other minimum requirements as defined by each course. Students cannot use any type of exemption for the two required face-to-face tests. X. Grading Procedures The grading scale for online courses is the same as other district classes. The following criteria will be used to determine a student s grade percentage: Class Semester Average: 40% - 1 grading period grade; 40% - 2 grading period grade; 20% - st nd Exam grade (Note: If the course is a semester course, students must pass both grading periods and have a passing average on face-to-face exams/tests in order to pass the class.) Grading period percentage is calculated based on course assessments, time online, participation, and communication with instructor. Final Grade for Year-Long Course: Grade is calculated by taking the two semester grades and averaging them. (Note: A student must have a passing average on face-to-face exams/tests in order to pass the class.)

40 Extended Learning Opportunities Online Learning B-27 PART D: STUDENT GUIDELINES XI. Student Expectations Students are expected to work at a reasonable pace to complete course requirements. It is not acceptable to procrastinate and not stay current with assignments and/or tests. A student will be withdrawn from a class if he/she is inactive in the online course for more than 21 calendar days. It is extremely important that enrolled online students stay in regular communication with their online instructor while completing lessons and assignments. Students should be respectful of others and their opinions during class interaction including posting to discussion boards. Inappropriate comments are not acceptable online just as in the traditional classroom. Students must follow school rules including the Hilliard City Schools Network Acceptable Use Policy and the Academic Honesty Policy. XII. Technical Requirements It is expected that, when a student enrolls in an online course, he/she can meet the following technical requirements: Students must have access to a computer with an internet connection. Students must have access to the following applications: Microsoft Word or similar word processor; Microsoft Excel or similar spreadsheet application; Internet Explorer, Netscape Navigator, or similar browser*; PowerPoint Reader*; FlashPlayer*; Acrobat Reader*. Applications with an * are available free on the internet. Instructors will help students learn to use the technology to complete course assignments, but they cannot help fix problems on technology outside of the district. Enrolled students will need to keep their systems in working order throughout the course.

41 B-28 Online Extended Learning Opportunities Online Students may enroll in two Online Courses For all students wishing to enroll in more than two online courses, please refer to Online Courses Credit Guidelines. COURSE TITLE* CODE CREDIT 2D Visual Art 10OL45.50 ICT 21 15OL01.50 Personal Finance 15OL36.50 English 9A 30OL01.50 English 9B 30OL03.50 English 10A 30OL05.50 English 10B 30OL06.50 English 11A 30OL45.50 English 11B 30OL46.50 British Literature 1 30OL72.50 British Literature 2 30OL74.50 Contemporary Literature** 30OL04.50 **Credit Recovery Course offered second semester for Seniors only Media Communication A** 30OL15.50 Media Communication B 30OL16.50 Media Awareness 30OL02.50 Speech, Debate & Public Discourse** 30OL55.50 **Only offered as a part of ILC On-Air A Leadership Development 30OL65.50 Careers & Money Management 35OL01.50 Personal Decisions 35OL05.50 Financial Independence 35OL25.50 German 1A 40OL10.50 German 1B 40OL11.50 Spanish 1A 40OL20.50 Spanish 1B 40OL21.50 Physical Education 1 45OL05.25 Physical Education 2 45OL06.25 Health 10 45OL10.50 Algebra 1A 50OL11.50 Algebra 1B 50OL12.50 Geometry & Algebra Connections 1A (GAC 1A) 50OL17.50 Geometry & Algebra Connections 1B (GAC 1B) 50OL27.50 Geometry & Algebra Connections 2A (GAC 2A) 50OL18.50 Geometry & Algebra Connections 2B (GAC 2B) 50OL28.50 Geometry A 50OL21.50 Geometry B 50OL22.50 Algebra 2A 50OL31.50 Algebra 2B 50OL32.50 Functions, Statistics, & Trigonometry A (FST A) 55OL41.50 Functions, Statistics, & Trigonometry B (FST B) 55OL42.50 Science 9A 55OL51.50 Science 9B 55OL52.50 Biology A 55OL08.50 Biology B 55OL09.50 Environmental Science 55OL15.50 Freshwater & Marine Ecosystems 55OL40.50

42 Extended Learning Opportunities Online B-29 COURSE TITLE* CODE CREDIT Chemistry A 55OL26.50 Chemistry B 55OL27.50 Scientific Principles of Sustainability A 55OL23.50 Scientific Principles of Sustainability B 55OL24.50 World Studies 1 60OL01.50 World Studies 2 60OL02.50 U.S. History 1 60OL05.50 U.S. History 2 60OL06.50 Social Psychology 60OL20.50 U.S. Government 1 60OL35.50 U.S. Government 2 60OL36.50 Economics 60OL45.50 * See specific content areas for course descriptions unless noted below.

43 B-30 Advanced Placement/Honors Courses Extended Learning Opportunities Advanced Placement & Honors Courses Advanced Placement (AP) Courses The Advanced Placement Program (AP) offers college level courses in various disciplines with the primary aim of preparing a student to master college level material while in a secondary school environment. AP offers a learning experience which is more challenging and requires more work and time than typical high school/college preparatory/honors courses. The AP Exam is an option for students who wish to earn college credit in the respective AP courses. The Exams are administered in May on national test dates established by the College Board. Scores range from 1 (lowest) to 5 (highest). The determination of an acceptable score, placement and whether or not credit is awarded is at the discretion of the receiving college/university. Regardless, the challenges of learning, preparing for, and taking the exam remain among the best experiences in preparing for college level learning. These courses that offer potential college credit are designated throughout the Program of Studies with the following icon: The fee for the AP exam is approximately $91. In some cases (i.e., free/reduced lunch participants, hardship, etc.) partial fee waivers are possible. Students with learning disabilities may request extended time or special accommodations by filing paperwork with College Board at least two months prior to the exams. In recognition of the challenges, higher expectations and requirements of AP courses, one additional point is awarded for each letter grade; i.e., A = 5.0, B = 4.0, C = 3.0, D = 2.0 in the grading scale. Students should obtain a complete understanding of the expectations and requirements of any AP course scheduled. Summer assignments are assigned in English, Social Studies, and Science AP courses. Assignments are posted on the school district s website in the Spring of each school year. Current AP courses offered include: Studio Art Portfolio/2D Design Biology Calculus AB Calculus BC Chemistry* Computer Science English Language English Literature & Composition* European History French* German Physics* Psychology Spanish Statistics* U.S. Government & Politics U.S. History Other courses with an additional 1.0 weighted grade: French 5* German 5* Spanish 5* Engineering Design and Development (EDD) Liberal Democracy in America* All College Jumpstart Courses (see page E-2 for more information) *Denotes a course that may be offered for dual enrollment credit through Kenyon College as part of the Kenyon Academic Partnership (KAP) Honors Courses: In recognition of the challenges, higher expectations and requirements of Honors courses,.5 additional point is awarded for each letter grade; i.e., A = 4.5, B = 3.5, C = 2.5, D = 1.5 in the grading scale. Current Honors courses offered include: Honors English 9 Honors English 10 Honors American Literature Honors Algebra 2 Pre-Calculus Honors Wind Ensemble Honors Choir 400 Honors Chamber Orchestra Honors Science 9 Honors Biology Honors Chemistry Honors World Studies **These courses are reviewed on annual basis by the district GPA taskforce.

44 Extended Learning Opportunities College Credit Plus B-31 College Credit Plus What is College Credit Plus? College Credit Plus is a program that gives high school students in grades 7 12 an opportunity to be enrolled in both high school and college course work at the same time. Students must qualify academically and the tuition will be at a reduced rate. College Credit Plus replaces Ohio s Post-Secondary Enrollment Options program (PSEO) and all dual enrollment programs. Courses offered through College Credit Plus (college credit) are designated throughout the Program of Studies with the following icon: Advantages of College Credit Plus For the student who is eligible for College Credit Plus, he/she must be academically ready for college level courses and be willing to follow the procedures outlined by the university while still in high school. Students will enjoy the following benefits: Students may earn (transcripted) college credit and high school credit upon successful completion of the course Accelerate achievement of educational goals Eliminate duplication of high school and college course content Increase the rigor and challenge of course offerings while in high school Decrease the cost of college with course tuition offered at a reduced rate What colleges/universities partner with Hilliard City Schools? 1. Kenyon College Kenyon Academic Partnership (KAP) Pending approval from the Ohio Board of Regents, Hilliard City Schools will partner with Kenyon College in the Kenyon Academic Partnership (KAP). These courses are taught by Hilliard City School s teachers that serve as adjunct instructors approved by Kenyon College at each high school. These courses are embedded into many of Hilliard s current Advanced Placement courses which include: AP Chemistry All three high schools AP Physics All three high schools AP Literature Darby & Bradley only Spanish 5 All three high schools AP French 4 - Darby & Davidson only French 5 Darby & Davidson only German 5 All three high schools Liberal Democracies of America All three high schools

45 B-32 College Credit Plus Extended Learning Opportunities Kenyon awards credit based on a (unit) system. The unit system can be converted to a (semester) system that consists of:.25 unit equal 2 semester credits.5 unit equal 4 semester credits Below is a list of Kenyon courses by title that will be identified on a Kenyon transcript: Chemistry 121: Intro Chemistry I.5 unit 4 semester credits Chemistry 123: Intro Chemistry Lab.25 unit 2 semester credits Chemistry 124: Biophysical & Medicinal Chemistry.5 unit 4 semester credits Chemistry 126: Intro Chemistry Lab II.25 unit 2 semester credits Physics 140: Classical Physics.5 unit 4 semester credits ENGL 103: Intro. to Lit. & Lang.5 unit 4 semester credits ENGL 104: Intro. to Lit. & Lang.5 unit 4 semester credits SPAN 321: Adv. Grammar & Comp..5 unit 4 semester credits FREN 321: Adv. Comp. & Conversation.5 unit 4 semester credits FREN 323: Adv. Comp. & Conversation.5 unit 4 semester credits GERM 321: Adv. Comp. & Conversation.5 unit 4 semester credits Political Science 200: Liberal Democracy in America.5 unit 4 semester credits 2. Columbus State Community College (CSCC) College Jumpstart These courses are offered at the Innovative Learning Center and are taught by either adjunct instructors approved by CSCC or full-time faculty. This is a two-year program where students take these courses at the ILC with other Hilliard students during the school day. Courses include: Courses planned for the school year include: Year 1 First Semester: ENGL 1100: Composition I 3 semester credits PSY 1100: Introduction to Psychology 3 semester credits COLS 1101: College Success 1 semester credits Year 1 Second Semester: ENGL 2367: Composition II 3 semester credits SOC 1101: Introduction to Sociology 3 semester credits ASC 1190: Critical Thinking in A&S 1 semester credits Year 2 First Semester: POLS 1100: Introduction to American Government 3 semester credits COMM1105: Oral Communication 3 semester credits Student Choice Credits may vary Year 2 Second Semester: POLS 1250: State & Local Government 3 semester credits PHIL 1130: Ethics 3 semester credits Student Choice Credits may vary

46 Extended Learning Opportunities College Credit Plus B-33 Health Professionals Academy Health Professionals Academy (formerly called Academy MD) is for the college bound student that is interested in pursuing a career in a medical related field. This program is structured to be a two-year experience for students in grades 11 & 12. The goal of the program is to expose students to a variety of high-demand Health related careers in the following areas: Medical Assistant; Medical Administrative Assistant; and EKG Technician. This program is designed to provide a first hand experience of the allied health career fields. Students will be exposed to multiple modules and authentic internship experiences. Courses planned for the school year include: Year 1: MULT 1010: Medical Terminology 2 semester credits MLT Introduction to Healthcare 2 semester credits Year 2: MULT1910: Basic Electrocardiograph 3 semester credits Traditional College Experience Students also have the opportunity to take courses on CSCC s campus or on-line (formerly PSEO) 3. The Ohio State University (OSU) The Academy at The Ohio State University The Ohio State University has created an opportunity for Hilliard students to register for one of their first year online courses. This course will be indentified in early spring. Additionally, students may take courses on main campus in a traditional college setting.

47 B-34 College Credit Plus Extended Learning Opportunities How does my child get involved in these programs? Students interested in participating in College Credit Plus an intent to participate form must be on file by April 1, 2015 in the Guidance office. These forms can be found in the Guidance or on the district website Each partnership (college/university) has their own set of requirements. Kenyon College (KAP): To be admitted by Kenyon College, students must rank in the top 25% of their graduating class. An application must be filled out in the spring of each year that will be sent to Kenyon College for approval from a Kenyon faculty member. Students will be notified over the summer if they were approved for the Kenyon course. If students are not approved, they may stay in the AP course and earn articulated college credit by taking the AP exam. Step 1: All students interested in participating in the Kenyon Academic Partnership must apply online at the following link: for each course they intend to take. Step 2: Students must complete the top portion of the application, print the application and have a teacher complete the teacher recommendation portion of the application. Step 3: Students must return the completed application to the Guidance office by Monday, April 13 th. Columbus State Community College Step 1: All students interested in participating must first apply online to Columbus State Community College at the following link : and select the Taking classes while in high school (College Credit Plus) button. Step 2: Students must demonstrate college readiness by submitting qualifying ACT or COMPASS placement scores corresponding to the courses for which they intend to register. COMPASS testing will be administered at the Innovative Learning Center in March 2015 or can be taken at either the Dublin Testing Center or Main Campus Testing Center. See Mr. Woodford to schedule a time to take your COMPASS placement test. The Ohio State University Step 1: Students must apply to The Academy Program at OSU. Refer to the following link for more information: Step 2: Students must demonstrate college readiness by submitting ACT or COMPASS placement scores. Students must meet academic standards that are equal to students currently enrolled at OSU. Step 3: Schedule a meeting with Michelle Brown in admissions at OSU.

48 Extended Learning Opportunities College Credit Plus B-35 How are College credits converted to high school credits? 5 semester credits = 1.0 high school Carnegie Credit 4 semester credits = 1.0 high school Carnegie Credit 3 semester credits = 1.0 high school Carnegie Credit 2 semester credits =. 67 high school Carnegie Credit 1 semester credit =.33 high school Carnegie Credit How many college credits can a student earn? Students can earn a maximum of 30 college semester credit hours per year and a maximum of 120 college semester credits prior to their high school graduation. The Ohio Board of Regents has established a formula that students must refer to when registering for high school and college courses. This formula is utilized to assure students do not exceed full-time status. Full-time status can be calculated as follows: 1. Determine student s number of high school ONLY credits, 2. Multiply that number by 3, and 3. Subtract the result from the number That number is the total number of college credits that College Credit Plus students may earn that academic year. Transfer of credits/transcripts Credits earned through College Credit Plus are transferable to many public and private institutions in Ohio and out of the state. Students who want to transfer to another university will need to send their transcript from the Institute of Higher Learning (IHL) to the university they plan to attend. Many of these courses apply towards the general education requirement or as electives at that school. Two websites are available to help students fully understand what courses will transfer: or How will College Credit Plus courses impact my GPA? Per HB 487, College Credit Plus courses must receive the equivalent weight as any weighted course within a given content area. Therefore, College Credit Plus courses associated with the KAP program through Kenyon College; the College Jumpstart program through Columbus State Community College and the Academy Program through The Ohio State University are weighted on a 5.0 scale. Courses offered through Ohio Dominican University (Business) and the courses associated with the Hilliard Health Academy offered through Columbus State Community College will not receive any additional weight towards a students GPA. FERPA (Family Educational Rights and Privacy ACT) College Credit Plus students are college students and subject to the federal FERPA. For regular college students, this means that college records are not released to anyone, even parents, without written permission from the student. For College Credit Plus students, the high school and the college may exchange information. Cost Students are limited 30 semester credits per academic year paid for through Hilliard City Schools agreements with participating colleges or universities (please note, students are responsible for a portion of the tuition costs associated with private institutions).

49 B-36 College Credit Plus Extended Learning Opportunities Important Notice to Parents and Students Students taking College Credit Plus courses are subject to the rules and regulations of the university they are currently attending, including add/drop dates established by the participating institution. An academic advisor from the participating institution is required to meet with each student within the first two weeks of class. This may be done in a group setting. While in college courses, students are introduced to a learning environment that promotes an open exchange of ideas. Course content is presented on an adult level and class discussions require a mature understanding of divergent viewpoints and the ability to think critically on controversial issues. Students should understand that these courses are college-level courses, and the amount of work, pace, and rigor of content in college courses may be much greater than high school courses. In addition, college course grades become a part of a student s permanent college transcript and are calculated into the college grade point average. Poor performance in college courses may affect future university admissions and financial aid. Therefore, it is important to perform well in college courses to realize the benefits of taking college courses while in high school. If a student fails any college course the cost for tuition, fees, and books will be charged to the student s account in Hilliard. Students must meet prerequisite requirements outlined by the University or College in which they are attending. These courses and the grades associated with them will be reported on both the student s high school transcript as well as the college transcript. College transcripts can be requested by visiting the respective college or university website associated with the courses taken. Hilliard City Schools does not have access to college transcripts. College Credit Plus does not include any college credit courses a student may take in the summer. The students family must pay all costs and tuitions associated with these courses.

50 Extended Learning Opportunities Credit Flexibility B-37 Credit Flexibility In compliance with Senate Bill 311, the Hilliard City School District offers students the opportunity to earn high school credit(s) through a credit flexibility program. Credit flex shifts the focus from evaluating student learning based on seat time to assessing students demonstrated academic and skill level or performance. With Credit Flex, students will have options to show what they know, earn credit(s), and move on to higher-order content. Students can choose to customize aspects of their learning around their interests and needs, which might include flexible schedules and a choice of modalities (e.g., online learning and community-based projects), as well as options to pursue niche interest areas and combine subjects. There are two types of Credit Flexibility: 1. Course Proficiency is testing out of and earning credit for a high school course through the successful completion of an assessment. 2. Educational Options allows students to earn credit through the creation of and completion of a student-designed or district pre-approved project/ proposal. Students interested in learning more about credit flexibility options should contact their guidance counselor for details. It is important to note that there are specific guidelines and timelines that have been established and must be followed in order to be considered for participation in the Hilliard City Schools credit flexibility program. Credit Flexibility Guidelines Course Proficiency: 1. All courses listed in the Hilliard City Schools High School Program of Studies are eligible for the credit flexibility option. All Hilliard City School District students are eligible to participate in the credit flexibility option for course proficiency; this includes students who have not yet taken a course or students who may have previously taken and failed a course. Students who demonstrate proficiency (through a written assessment and/or performance-based assessment) in a course will earn the credit as assigned to the course in the district program of studies. Credit will be issued for an assessment score of 70% or higher; a score of 80% or higher is recommended to move on to the next course in a content area; however, this is not required unless otherwise stated in a course prerequisite. Note that a score below 70% will result in an F on the student s official transcript. Students can elect to receive a letter grade (as determined by performance on the assessment) or a P for passing on their transcript. Students must notify their guidance counselor of this decision within two weeks of receiving score; otherwise, the letter grade will be used. The assessment score will be the final grade awarded. The final grade will appear on the transcript; there will be no exceptions to this rule. Many pre-approved educational options through credit flexibility have been identified and are designated in the Program of Studies with the following icon: Additional details about each of these options can be found on the school district website. Go to > student tab > credit flex program. Students are still required to complete a credit flexibility application and adhere to defined criteria deadlines.

51 B-38 Credit Flexibility Extended Learning Opportunities 2. Course proficiency assessments will adhere to the following general guidelines: Written exams will be approximately two hours in length. A lab or performance component (e.g. lab work, physical activity, speech, painting) may be part of the assessment; however, these elements will be separate and during an additional period of time; the overall assessment time for a single course should not exceed four (4) hours. Students may be asked to bring sample work (pieces of artwork, writing, research paper etc.) to the assessment to demonstrate elements of a course not able to be assessed during an exam time. In other words, students may be asked to bring the types of work they would typically be required to do during the traditional course. A study guide will be available for each course proficiency exam outlining concepts/standards to be covered on the assessment. Study guides will be available for student access on the district s website. Go to > student tab > credit flex program > study guides. Study guides and details about assessment requirements will be available approximately 30 days before the assessment period. 3. Course proficiency assessments will be administered three (3) times a year during designated times only. Designated times for course proficiency exams will be as follows: (1) August dates/times to be established by each department; (2) December during semester exams; (3) June during final exams. A student may not take a proficiency assessment for a course once he/she is enrolled in the course; however, a student may elect, during the drop/add time at the beginning of a course, to drop a course and register to take the course proficiency assessment. A semester course must be dropped within the first fifteen (15) days and a year-long course must be dropped within the first nine (9) weeks to avoid a W from appearing on the transcript. After failing a course, a student may register for the next round of course proficiency testing for that course as a means of credit recovery. Normal grade replacement guidelines will apply. A student may retake a course proficiency assessment one time for each course. Normal grade replacement guidelines will apply. Students who elect to earn credit through the course proficiency option must complete and submit the attached application to the guidance office for each course they plan to flex. The application deadlines for course proficiency assessments are as follows: May 1 for the August assessment; March 13 for the June assessment; October 16th for the December assessment. A letter will be mailed home confirming receipt of the application. Students will be notified of the assessment date, time, and location approximately 30 days prior to the assessment. The final score earned on the assessment will be mailed home. Appeals regarding the Course Proficiency assessment should be submitted in writing to the Executive Director of K-12 Curriculum & Instruction.

52 Extended Learning Opportunities Credit Flexibility B-39 Educational Options 1. Credit can be earned through Educational Options Credit Flexibility in all content areas (departments) within the Hilliard City Schools High School Program of Studies. All high school students are eligible to participate in Educational Options Credit Flexibility. Credit can only be earned for learning experiences beginning with the ninth grade year. Credit can be granted for a specific course or department credit, depending on the scope of the project and student proposal. The amount of credit awarded will depend on the scope of the learning experience; in general 120 hours equates to.5 credit. Credit will be issued for a project review score of 70% or higher; a district rubric is attached to this application that will be used to evaluate projects. Students can elect to receive a letter grade (as determined by the rubric score) or a P for passing on their transcript. The student must notify his/her guidance counselor of this decision within two weeks of receiving score; otherwise, the letter grade will be used. The rubric score will be the final grade awarded. The final grade will appear on the transcript; there will be no exceptions to this rule. 2. Students wishing to earn credit through Educational Options Credit Flexibility must develop a formal proposal and submit it to the guidance office. Students who elect to earn credit through educational options must complete and submit the attached application and proposal form. The deadlines for submitting proposals are May 1st, August 14th and December 4th; students will be notified of approval/disapproval of their proposal approximately thirty (30) days after the established deadline. Note, that, regardless of the submission date, the committee will not review the proposal until after the next established deadline date, and the project cannot start until after approval by the District Credit Flexibility Committee. Students must identify a mentor for their project; the mentor does not have to be a school employee; however, the mentor must be an expert in the content area for proposed work (i.e. a license, certification, and/or degree is required in the field of study). The proposed mentor must be approved by the District Credit Flexibility Committee. Credit will not be issued for any projects retroactively; students must adhere to designated deadlines and follow the application/ proposal process. Projects cannot start until after approval notification by the District Credit Flexibility Committee. Any cost(s) associated with completing the educational options proposal (i.e. fee for a nondistrict created assessment to demonstrate proficiency in a course not offered by the Hilliard City Schools) is the responsibility of the student. 3. A District Credit Flexibility Review Committee will serve students at all three high schools. This committee will be facilitated by the Director of Secondary Education with representation from all three high schools. The District Credit Flexibility Review Committee will review and approve all Educational Options proposals. At the conclusion of the learning experience, students will be required to schedule a presentation time with the Credit Flexibility Review Committee. Presentation dates for 2015/2016 are as follows: September 4th, 2015, January 8th, 2016, May 6th, 2016, September 9th, Students will be required to develop and present a product or products (reflection paper, portfolio, etc.) to the Committee for review; the student s mentor must be present at the presentation. Review the attached rubric for project/ presentation assessment expectations. The Committee will ultimately determine whether or not credit is issued to the student; credit will be granted for what students learn from their experiences, not just having experiences. Appeals of any decision made by the District Credit Flexibility Committee should be submitted in writing to the Executive Director of K-12 Curriculum & Instruction.

53 College Planning C Contents College Preparatory Curriculum C-1 Ohio Means Jobs C-2 PSAT C-2 SAT/ACT C-3 District Post-Secondary Counseling Services C-3 College Representatives C-3 College Campus Visits C-3 Transcripts C-3 NCAA C-4

54 College Planning College Preparatory Curriculum C-1 The following is the minimum college preparatory curriculum recommended by the Council of Admissions Officers of the State-Assisted four-year Universities in Ohio as part of their unconditional admission requirements. Students are strongly encouraged, and in many cases may be required, to exceed the minimum. Curriculum requirements vary from institution to institution (in state, out of state, public, private, etc.) Some programs may require more extensive preparation in specific subject areas. Refer to the guidelines of the university of your choice. Subject English 4 Credit Math 4 Alg. 1, Geometry, Algebra 2 Science Social Studies lab sciences World Language 2-3 In one World Language Visual & Performing Arts Suggested Program Areas College Preparation/Academic Curriculum Please note: the following grade level charts are only suggestions. For information about which courses/ curriculum you should pursue, contact your school s guidance department. 9th Grade 1 This includes Theatre Studies and all courses in Art, Performing Arts, and Music Department except Color Guard. Eng 9 / Honors Eng 9 1 Algebra 1/Geometry 1 Science 9 A & B/Honors Science 9 1 World Studies 1 & 2/ Honors World Studies 1 World Language 1 Credit Physical Education 1/4** Information & Communication Technology 21 1/2 Elective 1* 10th Grade Eng 10 / Honors Eng 10 1 Geometry / Algebra 2 / Honors Algebra 2 1 Biology A & B / Honors Biology / Chemistry / Honors Chemistry US History 1 & 2 / AP US History 1 World Language 1 Credit Physical Education 1/4** Health 1/2 Elective 1* 11th Grade Eng 11 / AP English Language 1 Algebra 2 / Pre-Calculus / AP Statistics / Algebra 3 1 Chemistry / Honors Chemistry / Physics 1 AP European History/AP US History/SS Elective/ AP Psychology (Psychology/Sociology 1/2 each) World Language 1 Elective 1* 12th Grade AP English Literature & Comp / Classical Literature 1 & 2 / British Literature 1 & 2 / World Literature 1 & 2 OR World Drama & Theatre 1 & 2 Pre-Calculus / AP Statistics / AP Calculus / Algebra 3 Science (1) or AP Physics/Chemistry (1.5) US Government 1 & 2 OR AP US Government OR Liberal Democracy in America (1.0) *Elective should include one credit in the Arts, as well as courses in Pre-Engineering/Computer Science, Social Studies and/or English. Students need to complete a financial literacy elective. **Students may waive the physical education requirement with participation in athletics, marching band, and/or cheerleading (see page A-5). Students who pursue this option must earn one half elective credit in another subject -area to meet the minimum credit requirement for graduation (21.5 credits). Students must meet all criteria for the physical education waiver prior to the start of the senior year. 1 Credit 1 Credit or 1.5 Electives 1-3* Senior Capstone 1/2 1

55 C-2 Ohio Means Jobs/PSAT College Planning College bound students should pursue the most challenging/rigorous curriculum that they are capable of pursuing. Universities with more selective admissions prefer/ may require and give preference to students who pursue the most challenging curriculum available. Strength of curriculum, along with class rank, GPA, test scores, school and community activities, special talents, etc., are factors which are part of the admission process. In many cases, strength of curriculum including senior year, may prove to be a deciding factor. Many schools ask the counselor to rate the strength of the student s curriculum. are used to guide students in their selection of a learning pathway and area of focus to modify high school four year planning and course selection. Ohio Means Jobs OhioMeansJobs.com is Ohio s premier free, virtual employment and career planning center. This online hub serves all Ohioans - and it has a special section just for students in grades K For students, begin by going to OhioMeansJobs.com and clicking on the K - 12 icon - the cardinal in a graduation cap. From there, you can register for a K - 12 account. Ohio Means Jobs K - 12 can help students find careers that match their interests. They can learn what it takes to find a job they love, get help with their resumes, learn about internships and part-time jobs if they re old enough, and plan for their future. Ohio Means Jobs highlights Ohio s in-demand careers with a thumbs-up icon. In-demand careers pay well and have a promising future. Students can store all their important information in an online backpack - things like their budget plans, career plan, information about education and training programs, resumes, and job search results. They can even take free college entrance or career preparation practice tests. To use Ohio Means Jobs, just follow these steps: 1. Go to OhioMeansJobs.com 2. Click on the image of the cardinal in the graduation cap 3. Register and create you personal, online backpack 4. Take a career interest survey to find occupations that match your interests College Admissions Testing The Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test/ National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test (PSAT/NMSQT) The PSAT/NMSQT, a preliminary version of the college entrance examination Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT), is primarily designed for college bound juniors. Students who plan to go to college are urged to take this test, for it attempts to measure the academic skills necessary for success in college. The PSAT is one of the first steps in the college entrance testing process and serves as an excellent preparation for other college entrance examinations. In addition, it is the mandatory qualifying test for juniors who wish to participate in scholarship programs and honors administered by the National Merit Scholarship Corporation (NMSC). The PSAT offers students and their parents an opportunity to evaluate critical reading, mathematical and writing skills, which are considered necessary for a successful experience in higher education. Students with learning disabilities (IEP, 504, etc.) may request extended time or special accommodations by completing the paperwork by early Spring of the Freshman year, in advance of registration deadlines. Forms may be obtained from the guidance counselor or the student s intervention specialist. Permission for extended time must come from the College Board. The test is administered each year in mid-october on a Wednesday. A nominal fee is charged to Juniors to cover the cost of the test and its administration. Students may register through the guidance office in September/early October. African American and Hispanic students who wish to participate in the National Achievement Scholarship Program for outstanding African American students or the National Hispanic Recognition Program must take the PSAT.

56 SAT/ACT/College Representatives/College Campus Visits/Transcripts C-3 College Planning The Admissions Testing Program (SAT Reasoning and SAT Subject Tests) & The American College Testing Program (ACT) Many colleges require one or more of these examinations for admission. Admissions test requirements are determined by individual colleges. The tests include the Scholastic Assessment Test (SAT Reasoning), 20 SAT Subject Tests in academic subjects and the American College Testing (ACT) program. The SAT Reasoning consists of critical reading, mathematics, and writing sections. The critical reading section is designed to measure the candidate's ability to read with understanding and discrimination, his/her comprehension of words, and his/her skill in dealing with word and thought relationships. The mathematics section is designed to measure aptitude for handling quantitative concepts rather than achievement in math. Calculators are permitted. The writing skills section asks students to identify sentence errors, improve sentences, improve paragraphs, and write an essay. The SAT Reasoning is offered in October, November, December, January, March, May and June. Seniors are encouraged to take the test no later than the first semester with college deadlines in mind. Juniors who wish to take the SAT Reasoning should take it in winter or spring. The SAT Subject Tests measure what has been learned in specific subject areas. Generally, selective colleges require two to three SAT Subject Tests. Juniors can take SAT Subject Tests in May or June if they finish a subject such as AP language or AP science, AP history, etc. and wish to have a score available. Bulletins of information and registration forms are available in the Counseling Office. For further information and to register online, go to The ACT is used by many colleges for admission. It consists of five tests: English, mathematics, reading, science reasoning, and an optional essay writing. The writing section of the ACT may be required by colleges. Refer to the school s requirements. The individual test items in all areas are designed to measure ability to perform the kind of complex intellectual tasks that college students typically have to perform. Calculators are permitted. These examinations are given in September, October, December, February, April and June. College bound Juniors should consider taking the ACT in the winter or spring of their junior year. Information bulletins and registration forms are available in the Counseling Office. For further information and to register online, go to: School Codes: Davidson Darby Bradley District Post-Secondary Counseling Services Students and their families are encouraged to use the post-secondary counseling services available at the Innovative Learning Center. Guidance is available in college planning, the college application process, financial aid, PSEO/Dual Enrollment options, and scholarship searches. College Representative Sessions Representatives from various colleges and universities visit the high school during the school day to share information with prospective students. Students must sign up in the guidance office at least two days prior to the session. College Campus Visits Seniors and juniors are permitted up to three absences during the school year to visit a college/ university. Sophomores and freshmen must have prior approval from the counselor to take a school recognized college visit. Transcripts Requests for transcripts of high school grades are made through the guidance office. As a general rule, official transcripts will be released and mailed to colleges/universities/scholarships/agencies by the guidance office. The administrative fee for each transcript is $2.00. There will be no cost associated with transcripts that can be sent electronically. Please allow at least ten school days for processing of transcript and the application packet/secondary school report. To receive a transcript only, please allow three days. A parent must sign release forms, if the student is under 18.

57 C-4 NCAA College Planning Core Courses: (16) NCAA Division I Initial-Eligibility Requirements Initial full-time collegiate enrollment before August 1, 2016: o Sixteen (16) core courses are required (see chart below for subject-area requirements). Initial full-time collegiate enrollment on or after August 1, 2016: o Sixteen (16) core courses are required (see chart below for subject-area requirements). Ten (10) core courses completed before the seventh semester; seven (7) of the 10 must be in English, math or natural/physical science. These courses/grades are "locked in" at start of the seventh semester (cannot be repeated for grade-point average [GPA] improvement to meet initial-eligibility requirements for competition). o Students who do not meet core-course progression requirements may still be eligible to receive athletics aid and practice in the initial year of enrollment by meeting academic redshirt requirements (see below). Test Scores: (ACT/SAT) Students must present a corresponding test score and core-course GPA on the sliding scale (see Page No. 2). o SAT: critical reading and math sections. Best subscore from each section is used to determine the SAT combined score for initial eligibility. o ACT: English, math, reading and science sections. Best subscore from each section is used to determine the ACT sum score for initial eligibility. All ACT and SAT attempts before initial full-time collegiate enrollment may be used for initial eligibility. Enter 9999 during ACT or SAT registration to ensure the testing agency reports your score directly to the NCAA Eligibility Center. Test scores on transcripts will not be used. Core Grade-Point Average: Only core courses that appear on the high school's List of NCAA Courses on the NCAA Eligibility Center's website (www.eligibilitycenter.org) will be used to calculate your core-course GPA. Use this list as a guide. Initial full-time collegiate enrollment before August 1, 2016: o Students must present a corresponding test score (ACT sum score or SAT combined score) and core-course GPA (minimum 2.000) on Sliding Scale A (see Page No. 2). o Core-course GPA is calculated using the best 16 core courses that meet subject-area requirements. Initial full-time collegiate enrollment on or after August 1, 2016: o Students must present a corresponding test score (ACT sum score or SAT combined score) and corecourse GPA (minimum 2.300) on Sliding Scale B (see Page No. 2). o Core-course GPA is calculated using the best 16 core courses that meet both progression (10 before seventh semester; seven in English, math or science; "locked in") and subject-area requirements. DIVISION I Core-Course Requirement (16) 4 years of English 3 years of math (Algebra I or higher) years of natural/physical science (1 year of lab if offered) 1 year of additional English, math or natural/physical science 2 years of social science 4 years of additional courses (any area above, foreign language or comparative religion/philosophy) DIVISION I 2016 Qualifier Requirements *Athletics aid, practice, and competition 16 core courses Ten(10) core courses Completed before the start of seventh semester. Seven (7) of the 10 must be English, math, or natural/physical science. Locked in for core courses GPA calculation Corresponding test scores (ACT sum score or SAT combined score) and core -course GPA (minimum 2.300) on sliding scale B (see page no.2). Graduate from high school DIVISION I 2016 Academic Redshirt Requirements *Athletics aid and practice (no competition) 16 core courses o No grades/credits "locked in" (repeated courses after the seventh semester begins may be used for initial eligibility). Corresponding test score (ACT sum score or SAT combined score) and core-course GPA (minimum 2.000) on Sliding Scale B (see Page No. 2). Graduate from high school.

58 College Planning NCAA C-5 For more information, visit or

59 C-6 NCAA College Planning Division II Initial - Eligibility Requirements Core Courses Division II currently requires 16 core courses. See the chart below. Beginning August 1, 2018, to become a full or partial qualifier for Division II, all college-bound student-athletes must complete the 16 core-course requirement. Test Scores Division II currently requires a minimum SAT score of 820 or an ACT sum score of 68. Beginning August 1, 2018, Division II will use a sliding scale to match test scores and core-course grade-point averages (GPA). The sliding scale for those requirements is shown on Page No. 2 of this sheet. The SAT score used for NCAA purposes includes only the critical reading and math sections. The writing section of the SAT is not used. The ACT score used for NCAA purposes is a sum of the following four sections: English, mathematics, reading and science. When you register for the SAT or ACT, use the NCAA Eligibility Center code of 9999 to ensure all SAT and ACT scores are reported directly to the NCAA Eligibility Center from the testing agency. Test scores that appear on transcripts will not be used. Grade-Point Average Be sure to look at your high school s List of NCAA Courses on the NCAA Eligibility Center's website (www.eligibilitycenter.org). Only courses that appear on your school's approved List of NCAA Courses will be used in the calculation of the core GPA. Use the list as a guide. The current Division II core GPA requirement is a minimum of Division II core GPA required to be eligible for competition on or after August 1, 2018, is (corresponding test-score requirements are listed on the Sliding Scale on Page No. 2 of this sheet). The minimum Division II core GPA required to receive athletics aid and practice as a partial qualifier on or after August 1, 2018, is (corresponding test-score requirements are listed on the Sliding Scale on Page No. 2 of this sheet). Remember, the NCAA core GPA is calculated using NCAA core courses only. DIVISION II 16 Core Courses 3 years of English. 2 years of mathematics (Algebra I or higher). 2 years of natural/physical science (1 year of lab if offered by high school). 3 years of additional English, mathematics or natural/physical science. 2 years of social science. 4 years of additional courses (from any area above, foreign language or comparative religion/philosophy).

60 College Planning NCAA C-7 For more information, visit the NCAA Eligibility Center website at

61 C-8 NCAA College Planning Hilliard City Schools Non-Approved Core Courses for NCAA Eligibility : LEAP 10 LEAP 11 LEAP 12 Math 9 Math 10 Math 11 Math 12 American History Through Film Histories Mysteries

62 Courses Course Code Icon Descriptor See Icon Key Below D Course Description Length of Course Previous Course(s)/ Criteria Required for Enrollment # Social Studies Credit World Studies 1 A student who enrolls in this course must also enroll in World Studies to Present: Ninth graders complete the chronological study of world history. As students study each historical event, they consider the geographic setting, the cultural perspectives, the economic implications and the role of governments. They develop a deeper understanding of their role as a citizen and continue to expand their command of social studies skills and methods. Number & Type of Credit Earned Course Title Icon Key Course fulfills a specific graduation requirement Course is taught via the internet/ computer College credit can be earned through this course Credit is earned for this course through the credit flexibility program Course fulfills the financial literacy graduation requirement NEW New course for the school year Course is taught via distance learning/video conferencing Contents Art D-1 Business D-5 Code U D-8 English Language Arts D-9 English Language Learners D-17 Family & Consumer Sciences D-19 World Languages D-22 Mathematics D-26 Performing Arts D-32 Pre-Engineering D-37 Science D-39 Social Studies D-46 Wellness D-52 Intervention D-55 Exploring Programs D-59 Zoo School D-59 Mosaic Program D-60 Tolles D-60 Independent Study D-65 Correspondence Courses D-66 Subject Code Sheet D-67

63 In the Hilliard City Schools, a variety of art courses are offered on an elective basis. The program includes courses in the major areas of twodimensional and three-dimensional art, as well as beginning and advanced levels within the various mediums. Principles and elements of design are stressed in all levels, as well as the development of technical skills associated with the particular medium. Projects within the courses emphasize critical and meaningful thought in the design and creation of Courses Art original artwork. Through these visual arts offerings, students will be exposed to a variety of tools, materials and processes that will enable them to develop the problem-solving and critical thinking skills, used not only by artists and designers, but by successful individuals in general. These visual arts courses also incorporate the disciplines of art history and art criticism, which empower students to think, write, and speak intelligently about works of art, and their importance in society. Fine Arts Graduation Requirement (1 credit unless 2 semesters completed in middle school) Fine Arts requirement for college admissions and Honors Diploma must be fulfilled during high school. Art D-1 # # # Fine Arts Credit 1 Fine Arts Credit.5 Fine Arts Credit Drawing 1 Entry level course which will introduce students to a variety of dry media such as graphite, charcoal and pen and ink. Emphasis will be on basic skills and foundations for successful drawing. # Fine Arts Credit Drawing 2 This course is for the serious art student and those who wish to increase their drawing skills. It will build on the foundation skills of Drawing 1 with an added emphasis on personal expression and technical mastery. A variety of media will be explored. Prerequisites: Drawing 1 Drawing 3 This course is for the serious drawing student with an emphasis on technical mastery and portfolio development. A variety of media will be employed. Students will be encouraged to enter regional and state art competitions and can expect to purchase additional art supplies beyond the basic fee. Prerequisites: Drawing 2 # Fine Arts Credit Painting 1 Entry level course which will introduce students to a variety of wet media such as watercolor, tempera and acrylics. Emphasis will be on basic drawing and painting foundation skills for successful painting. Painting 2 This course is for the serious art student and those who wish to increase their painting skills. It will build on the foundation skills of Painting 1 with an added emphasis on personal expression and technical mastery. A variety of media will be explored. Prerequisites: Painting 1 # Fine Arts Credit Painting 3 This course is for the serious painting student with an emphasis on technical mastery and portfolio development. A variety of media will be employed. Students will be encouraged to enter regional and state art competitions and can expect to purchase additional art supplies beyond the basic fee. Students will be encouraged to explore their own interests of media and subject matter. Prerequisites: Painting 2 Note: Many courses offered at the high school level have fees associated with them to cover the expense of consumable materials used by students. These fees are finalized in the spring and will be attached to student accounts/schedules prior to the start of the school year.

64 D-2 Art # # # Fine Arts Credit 1 Fine Arts Credit 1 Fine Arts Credit Photography 1 Entry level course which will introduce students to photographic processes. Emphasis will be on basic composition skills and creating a successful photograph. Students will be expected to complete work outside of class and will need to provide their own camera. Instructors will specify camera model and/or type. Students will also be required to purchase additional photographic supplies. Students and parents need to be aware that this can be a very costly course. # Fine Arts Credit Photography 2 Advanced level course which will explore photographic processes. Emphasis will be on advanced composition skills and successful imaging. Students will be expected to complete work outside of class and will need to provide their own camera. Instructors will specify camera model and/or type. Students will also be required to purchase additional photographic supplies. Students and parents need to be aware that this can be a very costly course. Students will learn matting and/or mounting skills and be encouraged to enter regional and state art competitions. Prerequisites: Photography 1 Photography 3 Advanced level course which will explore photographic processes. Emphasis will be on portfolio development. Students will be expected to complete work outside of class and will need to provide their own camera. Instructors will specify camera model and/or type. Students will also be required to purchase additional photographic supplies. Students and parents need to be aware that this can be a very costly course. Students will learn matting and/or mounting skills and be encouraged to enter regional and state art competitions. Prerequisites: Photography 2 # Fine Arts Credit Media Arts 1 This course is an introduction to making Conceptual and Commercial Digital art in still and time-based media. Students will use a variety of computer programs and/or software. Emphasis will be on both technical skills and creative art-making. Media Arts 2 This is an advanced course focused on making Conceptual and Commercial Digital art in still and time-based media. Students will use a variety of computer programs and/or software. Emphasis will be on development of advanced technical skills, creative art-making and portfolio building. Prerequisites: Media Arts 1 # Fine Arts Credit Ceramics 1 Entry level course which will introduce students to a variety of hand-building methods for working with clay. The course will emphasize design concepts and ceramic techniques. # Fine Arts Credit Ceramics 2 This course is for the serious art student and those who wish to increase their ceramic skills. It will build on the foundation skills of Ceramics 1 with a focus on exploration of the potter's wheel and advanced hand-building techniques. Students will also have the opportunity to experiment with a variety of glazing and firing techniques. Prerequisites: Ceramics 1

65 Art D-3 # # # Fine Arts Credit.5 Fine Arts Credit.5 Fine Arts Credit Ceramics 3 This course is for the serious art student and those who wish to increase their ceramic skills. It will build on the foundation skills of Ceramics 2 with an added focus on personal expression and portfolio development. Students will have the opportunity to choose their preferred construction methods. Students will be encouraged to enter regional and state competitions. Prerequisites: Ceramics 2 # Fine Arts Credit Ceramics 4 This course is for the serious art student and those who wish to increase their ceramic skills. It will build on the foundation skills of Ceramics 3 with an added focus on personal expression and portfolio development. Students will have the opportunity to choose their preferred construction methods. Students will be encouraged to enter regional and state competitions. Prerequisites: Ceramics 3 Sculpture 1 Entry level course which will introduce students to a variety of sculpture methods such as addition, subtraction and manipulation. Students will explore a variety of media. Emphasis will be on basic three-dimensional design skills for the creation of successful sculptures. Students may incur some expense beyond the basic course fee. # Fine Arts Credit Sculpture 2 Advanced level course which will continue to explore a variety of sculpture methods. Emphasis will be on advanced three-dimensional design skills and personal expression for the creation of successful sculptures. Students may incur some expense beyond the basic course fee. Prerequisites: Sculpture 1 Art Appreciation 1 This course combines art history, art criticism and aesthetics in order to provide the student with an academic study of the fine arts. The course content is introduced through the use of slides, digital images, videos, lectures and limited art production. The historical component of Art Appreciation 1 begins with prehistoric art and continues through the Romanesque and Gothic Periods. This is a good course for those seeking an art credit without taking a studio course. # Fine Arts Credit Art Appreciation 2 This course takes the same approach as Art Appreciation 1 but the historical component begins with the Renaissance and continues through Modern and Contemporary Art. Prerequisites: Art Appreciation 1

66 D-4 Art # # #10OL45 1 Fine Arts Credit 1 Fine Arts Credit 0.5 Fine Arts Credit Art Portfolio This course is designed to meet the needs of the serious art student who plans to pursue an art-related career beyond high school. The course will focus on developing an art portfolio that can be used for college admission, scholarship competitions and/or professional interviews. Students may need to provide supplies beyond the basic fee. Prerequisites: Successful completion of two level 2 art courses and permission from an art teacher. AP Studio Art Portfolio/2D Design This course is designed for the serious art student. Students enrolled must show a high level of motivation, independence, and ability to work on their own, both in and outside of class. Emphasis will be put on painting and drawing. By definition any art that involves directly making marks on a surface can fit into this portfolio. The content of art making in this course will encompass various techniques and drawing media, proper presentation, expansion of foundation skills and the development of an original, personal style. As a visual arts course, proper presentation (matting and framing, exhibiting) and archiving (digital imagery and an artist s blog) of your artwork will be part of the final cumulating experience. Prerequisites: Successful completion of two level 2 art courses and permission from an art teacher. 2D Visual Art (Online) Entry level course which combines art criticism and aesthetics with a survey of 2-Dimensional media and techniques. Emphasis will be on art making of 2-Dimensional media such as drawing and painting. Students will be given a kit of art materials for use throughout the course.

67 The department of Business introduces students to the value of business skills in the domestic and global marketplace and prepares them for further education and/or entry into the workforce after high school. Accounting, finance, marketing, entrepreneurship, and sports & entertainment management are some of the areas that students can explore. All students are required to take the Information Courses Business Business D-5 and Communication Technology 21 (ICT21) course for graduation. For students who are considering advanced study in business after high school, we offer opportunities through Academy INC designed to put the learning in the hands of the students by focusing on product and business development. Business Graduation Requirement - ICT 21 (.5 credit) The financial literacy elective credit requirement can be fulfilled through multiple courses within in the Business department. # #15OL01 #15CT01.5 Elective Credit Information & Communication Technology (ICT21) This course provides students with twenty-first century skills that are essential in today s global society. Through the use of current software tools and applications, students will identify, select, and apply appropriate technology and resources to produce creative works and construct technologyenhanced products and presentations. In addition, students will use problem-solving skills and critical analysis to explore real world scenarios, study career options, develop electronic research strategies, and practice effective communication techniques. Teacher Approval Required # Elective Credit Accounting 1 This course is an introduction to the financial world of business and is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of fiscal accounting procedures including the analysis of business transactions, journalizing, posting, adjusting and closing entries, and financial statement preparation. Also included are transactions involving payroll accounting, bank accounts, and cash funds. It is strongly recommended that students wishing to pursue careers in the world of business take a full year of Accounting (Accounting 1 & 2). # Elective Credit Accounting 2 This course is a continuation of Accounting 1 with special emphasis on corporate accounting procedures for merchandising businesses. This course includes electronic accounting and business simulations. Prerequisites: Accounting 1 # Elective Credit Desktop Publishing Desktop Publishing enables students to use software to create visual displays of ideas and information such as newsletters, brochures, advertisements, menus, CD/DVD covers, and various multimedia presentations. Sample software learned includes Microsoft Publisher, Word, MovieMaker, Photostory, PowerPoint, and Adobe InDesign. College credit may be available through dual enrollment for an additional fee. Prerequisites: ICT21 Note: Many courses offered at the high school level have fees associated with them to cover the expense of consumable materials used by students. These fees are finalized in the spring and will be attached to student accounts/schedules prior to the start of the school year.

68 D-6 Business # # # Elective Credit.5 Elective Credit #15OL36 PC Applications PC Applications will provide students with an in-depth experience in Excel spreadsheets, Access databases, word processing, and presentation software. PC Applications is an advanced course primarily using Microsoft products. College credit may be available through dual enrollment for an additional fee. A student cannot take this course if credit has been previously earned in Computer Information Systems without teacher permission. Prerequisites: ICT21 # Elective Credit Principles of Entrepreneurship This course is designed to provide students with a broad view of concepts needed to be successful in today s economic climate. The topics will include economics, international business, consumer education, career preparation, personal finance, budgeting and credit. Students will plan and execute the start-up of an entrepreneurial business venture. The course will benefit the college bound student as well as students entering the workforce. This course fulfills the financial literacy requirement if taken during the Junior or Senior year. Marketing Marketing provides the student with an overview of the seven marketing functions in business. Students will learn how effective marketers gain and maintain competitive advantages in a global environment. Students will create commercials, print advertisements, brochures, etc. for simulated and real businesses. Units include: pricing, market research, sales presentations, advertising and promotion, product development, etc. This is an excellent course for students interested in the field of marketing, management or entrepreneurship. College credit is available through dual enrollment for an additional fee. # Elective Credit Legal Studies This course is designed to provide students with a foundation of our legal system. Students will explore personal, business, civil, criminal, and constitutional law by examining current legal issues. Court procedures will be examined and practiced through mock trial performances..5 Elective Credit Personal Finance Personal Finance gives students a practical, down-to-earth introduction to sound money management. It explores the real-life problems that students will face, and trains them to solve those problems. Students will develop the skills needed to deal with financial planning, money management, credit & loans, investments, retirement, housing, insurance, budgeting, and financial aid. Student activities will include financial simulations and the creation of investment portfolios. This course fulfills the financial literacy requirement if taken during the Junior or Senior year. College credit is available through dual enrollment for an additional fee.

69 Business D-7 # # # Elective Credit.5 Elective Credit Four Semesters 2 4 Elective Credit College Fundamentals Students who are planning to attend college will learn the importance of time management, financial planning, ACT/SAT preparation, and exploring college options. Students will develop writing shortcuts, note taking and test taking strategies, and improve reading comprehension. This course fulfills the financial literacy requirement if taken during the Junior or Senior year. # Elective Credit Sports & Entertainment Management Sports & Entertainment Management provides students with a thorough understanding of basic principles in the Sports and Entertainment industries. Through hands-on simulations, our students will cover planning, marketing, financing, leading, and organizing sport and entertainment organizations, events, and facilities. Sport law and sport ethics are also overviewed. Business Innovation This course provides a culminating learning experience with a practical application of business knowledge and skills acquired in the classroom. This course is designed for students who desire to major in business at the college level and want to improve their understanding of marketing, finance, entrepreneurship, and other core business areas. Students will plan, research, and present their business venture/improvement of a service to a panel of business professionals and venture capitalists. Prerequisites: 1 credit from the business department (including ICT21) Academy INC Academy INC is for the college bound student that is interested in pursuing a career in business. This two year program is designed to put the learning in the hands of the students by focusing on product and business development. Students will learn through the experiences of managing the marketing, finances, human resources, creating a business plan, executing the plan, and more. This two year experience is built to challenge the business minded student with entrepreneurial work and real world experiences. Students will engage in competitions based on their product and business plans that are authentically created during this experience. Community connections and global partnerships will be a goal for the students as they study the impact of marketing, financial development, economic development, and more on the world stage. Prerequisites: See page E-8 for prerequisite information. Notes: Academy INC is only offered at the Innovative Learning Center (ILC). See page E-8 for more details.

70 D-8 Code U Students interested in careers in computer programming or software development, should consider enrolling in one or more of the courses in the offered through Code U. Courses range from exploratory to advanced and are designed to spark the interests of all learners. Courses Code U Students can learn basic programming, explore computer game design, and advance in to creating computer and mobile applications. For the advanced computer science student, Advanced Placement Computer Science A is available for college credit. # Elective Credit Programming In this course students will learn the basics of building simple interactive applications, basic units of logic: sequence, selection, and loop. Students will gain experience in using commercial and open source languages, programs, and applications. # Elective Credit NEW Game Design This course will prepare students to design and program games using commercial and open source programs and applications. Students will learn industry standard programming language constructs to write programs that integrate classes, class methods, and class instances. Students will learn input method handling, animation, collision detection, game physics and basic artificial intelligence. Prerequisites: Programming or Object Oriented Programming # Elective Credit Object Oriented Programming Students will learn to represent programming concepts as objects that have data fields and associated procedures known as methods. Objects, which are usually instances of classes, are used to interact with one another to design applications and computer programs. # Elective Credit NEW Computer and Mobile Application Students will learn to create applications for mobile devices using a variety of commercial and open source software. They will install these applications, modify them, and develop customer service skills to handle user issues. Knowledge and skills related to customer service in professional offices, small businesses, departments, work groups, and corporate information services will be addressed. Prerequisites: Programming or Object Oriented Programming Advanced Placement Course # Elective Credit Advanced Placement Computer Science A This course is the study of computer science using the Java language. Topics are compatible with the material normally taught in a first year college computer programming course. Concepts include, but are not limited to: using the built-in classes, arrays, sorting, searching, recursion and designing classes. For an additional fee, students can earn college credit based on his/her score on the AP Computer Science test offered by the College Board. Prerequisites: JAVA Programming, Programming, or Object Oriented Programming Note: Many courses offered at the high school level have fees associated with them to cover the expense of consumable materials used by students. These fees are finalized in the spring and will be attached to student accounts/schedules prior to the start of the school year.

71 Language, literature, and reading are essential to any society. They define and connect us as people while enabling us to preserve traditions from the past as well as to envision what the future might hold. We believe that, through language and literature, we understand ourselves, we contribute to society, and we express the human spirit. It is the mission of English teachers to develop an appreciation and understanding of reading and writing as essential human skills that enable us to be active citizens and Courses English/Language Arts English Graduation Requirement (4 credits) English/Language Arts D-9 enjoy productive personal lives. Students must earn a minimum of four credits in English in order to graduate. The English program further provides a rich array of electives that develop individual talent and open opportunities to study specialties like creative writing, discourse, journalism, and media communication. Students are encouraged to not only work hard in the required English courses, but also to take advantage of the electives to enrich and broaden their high school experience. Students must take an English 9, 10 & 11 and a 12th grade course (AP, Classical, British, World, or World Theatre Literature) # #30OL01 #30CT03 Teacher Approval Required.5 English Credit English 9A A student who enrolls in this course must also enroll in English 9B. Through a general literature survey, students read and analyze a variety of literary genres. Students will read, write about, and interpret literature and be actively involved in the writing processes of thinking, prewriting, drafting, revising, and editing. Grammar and basic mechanics of writing are reviewed. In addition, students will utilize data bases, internet-based resources, electronic and media resources, and write creative and expository essays with an emphasis on the writing process and the use of correct writing conventions. Students will be required to obtain novels for this course. # #30OL03 #30CT04 Teacher Approval Required.5 English Credit English 9B A student who enrolls in this course must also enroll in English 9A. Through a general literature survey, students read and analyze a variety of literary genres. Students will read, write about, and interpret literature and be actively involved in the writing processes of thinking, prewriting, drafting, revising, and editing. Grammar and basic mechanics of writing are reviewed. In addition, students will utilize data bases, internet-based resources, electronic and media resources, and write creative and expository essays with an emphasis on the writing process and the use of correct writing conventions. Students will be required to obtain novels for this course. Prerequisites: English 9A # English Credit Honors English 9 This course is recommended for any student who earns a grade of A or B in Language Arts 8 or teacher recommendation. The student is expected to have critical reading skills, proficient written and verbal skills prior to enrollment. The main focus of this course will be the intensive reading and analysis of all types of literature, including plays, novels, short stories, non-fiction, and poetry, as well as the development of critical writing, speaking, viewing, and presentation skills. Extensive annotation of texts will be expected. Students will complete at least one major project each nine weeks in the form of oral presentations and/ or written assignments. Students will be required to obtain novels for this course. Note: Many courses offered at the high school level have fees associated with them to cover the expense of consumable materials used by students. These fees are finalized in the spring and will be attached to student accounts/schedules prior to the start of the school year.

72 D-10 English/Language Arts # # # #30OL05 #30OL06 #30OL45 #30CT08 Teacher Approval Required #30CT09 Teacher Approval #30CT46 Teacher Approval.5 English Credit.5 English Credit.5 English Credit English 10A A student who enrolls in this course must also enroll in English 10B. Through a general literature survey, students read and analyze a variety of literary genres. Students will read, write about, and interpret literature and be actively involved in the writing processes of researching, thinking, prewriting, drafting, revising, and editing. Grammar and basic mechanics of writing are reviewed. In addition, students will utilize data bases, internet-based resources, electronic and media resources, and write creative and expository essays with an emphasis on the writing process. Students will be required to obtain novels for this course. Prerequisites: English 9, Honors English 9, appropriate ELL course, L.E.A.P. 9 English 10B A student who enrolls in this course must also enroll in English 10A. Through a general literature survey, students read and analyze a variety of literary genres. Students will read, write about, and interpret literature and be actively involved in the writing processes of researching, thinking, prewriting, drafting, revising, and editing. Grammar and basic mechanics of writing are reviewed. In addition, students will utilize data bases, internet-based resources, electronic and media resources, and write creative and expository essays with an emphasis on the writing process. Students will be required to obtain novels for this course. Prerequisites: English 10A # English 11A A student who enrolls in this course must also enroll in English 11B. Through an American literature survey of the Early American Period through the Romantic Period, students read and analyze a variety of literary genres. Students will read, write about, and interpret literature and be actively involved in the writing processes of thinking, prewriting, drafting, revising, and editing. In addition, students will utilize data bases, internet-based resources, electronic and media resources, and write creative and expository essays with an emphasis on the writing process. Students will be required to obtain novels for this course. Prerequisites: English 10, Honors English 10, L.E.A.P. 10, or appropriate ELL course 1 English Credit Honors English 10 This course is recommended for any student who earns a grade of at least a "B" in Honors English 9 or a "B+" in English 9 or teacher recommendation. This course will include a brief review of grammar and challenging vocabulary units. Students will have an opportunity to write short stories, essays, and a research paper. The main focus of the course will be the intensive and extensive reading of all types of literature, including short stories, non-fiction, poetry, novels, and plays, as well as the development of critical reading, writing, speaking, viewing, and presentation skills. Extensive annotating of texts will be expected. Students will be required to obtain novels for this course. Prerequisites: English 9 or Honors English 9

73 English/Language Arts D-11 # # # #30OL46.5 English Credit #30OL72 #30CT47 # Teacher Approval Required.5 English Credit English 11B A student who enrolls in this course must also enroll in English 11A. Through an American literature survey of Realism through Contemporary (or Post-Modern) periods, students read and analyze a variety of literary genres. Students will read, write about, and interpret literature and be actively involved in the writing processes of thinking, prewriting, drafting, revising, and editing. In addition, students will utilize data bases, internet-based resources, electronic and media resources, and write creative and expository essays with an emphasis on the writing process. Students will be required to obtain novels for this course. Prerequisites: English 11A 1 English Credit Honors American Literature In this course, students read and analyze works of American literature including poetry, short stories, novels, drama, and nonfiction. The literary works provide opportunities for critical writing, creative projects, and online discussions. Students develop vocabulary skills and refresh their knowledge of grammar, usage, and mechanics. Students enrolled in this challenging course will also complete independent projects that deepen their understanding of the themes and ideas presented in the curriculum. Prerequisites: This course is recommended for any student that took Honors English 9 as an 8th grader and Honors English 10 as a 9th grader. Classical Literature 1 (Greek & Roman Literature) This course must be taken with Classical Literature 2 and is only offered to seniors. This course will introduce students to classical literature as a study of the working of the ancient mind and its influence on Western Civilization in literary form. Greek literature is distinguished as the originator of genre and theme. These literary genres (e.g., mythology, epic, tragedy, comedy, lyric, satire, history, biography, sciences, philosophy, and prose narrative) and themes form the basis for Roman literature and have carried through to modern times. Roman writers adapted and refined the Greek themes, forms, and choice of meter and verse. Students will be required to obtain novels for this course. Prerequisites: English 11, AP English Language & Composition, LEAP 11r # English Credit Classical Literature 2 (Greek & Roman Literature) This course must be taken with Classical Literature 1 and is only offered to seniors. This course will introduce students to classical literature as a study of the working of the ancient mind and its influence on Western Civilization in literary form. Greek literature is distinguished as the originator of genre and theme. These literary genres and themes form the basis for Roman literature and have carried through to modern times. Roman writers adapted and refined the Greek themes, forms, and choice of meter and verse. Students will be required to obtain novels for this course. Prerequisites: Classical Literature 1.5 English Credit British Literature 1 This course must be taken with British Literature 2 and is only offered to seniors. This course is designed for the student who wishes to gain an appreciation for the literature of Great Britain and its heritage from 449 A.D. through 1795, including the Anglo-Saxon, Medieval and Renaissance periods as well as the Age of Reason. Students will read, write about, and interpret literature. In addition, students will utilize data bases, internet-based resources, electronic and media resources, and write a variety of creative and expository papers with an emphasis on the writing process. Students will be required to obtain novels for this course. Prerequisites: English 11, AP English Language & Composition, LEAP 11r # #30OL74.5 English Credit British Literature 2 This course must be taken with British Literature 1 and is only offered to seniors. This course is designed for the student who wishes to gain an appreciation for the literature of Great Britain and its heritage from 1795 through the present day, including the Romantic and Victorian periods as well as contemporary and modern literature. In addition, students will utilize data bases, internet-based resources, electronic and media resources, and write a variety of creative and expository papers with an emphasis on the writing process. Students will be required to obtain novels for this course. Prerequisites: British Literature 1

74 D-12 English/Language Arts # #30CT50 Teacher Approval Required.5 English Credit World Literature 1 This course must be taken with World Literature 2 and is only open to seniors. Students pursue vocabulary study to aid in the application of word knowledge and acquisition of specialized vocabulary to aid comprehension. Students will read, analyze, and critique both non-fiction and fiction selections including short stories, essays, poetry, novels, plays, biographies/autobiographies from a wide variety to authors and cultures from around the world, including but not exclusive to Asia, the Middle East, Africa, South America, and Europe. In addition, students will utilize data bases, internet-based resources, electronic and media resources, and write a variety of creative and expository papers with an emphasis on the writing process and the use of correct writing conventions. Students will be required to obtain novels for this course. Prerequisites: English 11, AP English Language & Composition, LEAP 11r # #30CT51.5 English Credit World Literature 2 This course must be taken with World Literature 1 and is only open to seniors. Students pursue vocabulary study to aid in the application of word knowledge and acquisition of specialized vocabulary to aid comprehension. Students will read, analyze, and critique both non-fiction and fiction selections including short stories, essays, poetry, novels, plays, biographies/autobiographies from a wide variety to authors and cultures from around the world, including but not exclusive to Asia, the Middle East, Africa, South America, and Europe. Authors may include Achebe, Garcia-Marquez, Hosseini, and Rushdie. Students will be required to obtain novels for this course. Prerequisites: World Literature 1 # Teacher Approval Required.5 English Credit Literature of World Theatre 1 This course must be taken with Literature of World Theatre 2 and is only offered to seniors. This course will introduce students to dramatic literature and theatrical practice and its reflection of/influence on civilization. Students will learn appropriate dramatic/theatrical terminology in order to aid comprehension. Students will read, analyze, and critique dramatic literature and criticism from across the ages. Students who have taken Theatre Studies and/or Advanced Theatre Studies for performing arts credit are welcomed in this class. Students may be required to attend live performances as part of this course. Students will be required to obtain novels for this course. Prerequisites: English 11, AP English Language & Composition, LEAP 11r # English Credit Literature of World Theatre 2 This course must be taken with Literature of World Theatre 1 and is only offered to seniors. This course will introduce students to dramatic literature and theatrical practice and its reflection of/influence on civilization. Students will learn appropriate dramatic/theatrical terminology in order to aid comprehension. Students will read, analyze, and critique dramatic literature and criticism from across the ages. Students who have taken Theatre Studies and/or Advanced Theatre Studies for performing arts credit are welcomed in this class. Students may be required to attend live performances as part of this course. Students will be required to obtain novels for this course. Prerequisites: Literature of World Theatre 1 # Teacher Approval Required 1 English/1 Elective Credit Literacy Explorations & Perspectives 9 (L.E.A.P. 9) This course is for incoming freshmen who have been identified by OAA/PARCC data, SRI data, and/or teacher recommendation. L.E.A.P. 9 is a rigorous intervention class that will focus on a student s individual needs within spelling, vocabulary, reading, comprehension, grammar, fluency, and writing processes and conventions. Students will use the READ 180 Intervention Program with an intense focus on literacy acceleration through skills-based texts and activities. L.E.A.P. 9 is a double-period class. Prerequisites: Teacher permission is required to register for this course.

75 English/Language Arts D-13 # Teacher Approval Required 1 English Credit # Teacher Approval Required 1 English Credit Advanced Placement Courses Literacy Explorations & Perspectives 10 (L.E.A.P. 10) This course is for students who have successfully completed L.E.A.P. 9 and/or students needing an alternative to English 10 to meet the high school graduation requirement for English. This course will cover the Ohio s New Learning Standards for 10th grade English with the addition of intense differentiation to meet each student s needs as he/she continues to improve his/her literacy skills. Students have opportunities to read, write, and interpret literature and are actively involved in the writing process of thinking, researching, prewriting, drafting, revising, and editing. Grammar and basic mechanics of writing are reviewed. Prerequisites: L.E.A.P. 9, English 9. Teacher permission is required to register for this course. NEW Literacy Explorations & Perspectives 12 (L.E.A.P. 12) This course is for students who have successfully completed L.E.A.P. 11 and/or students needing an alternative to senior English class to meet the high school graduation requirement for English. This course will cover the Ohio s New Learning Standards for 12th grade English with the addition of intense differentiation to meet each student s needs as he/ she continues to improve his/her literacy skills. Prerequisites: L.E.A.P. 11 or English 11. Teacher permission is required to register for this # English Credit Advanced Placement English Language & Composition This year-long course will be an intense program of study focusing on literature, non-fiction, rhetoric, and analysis. Students will improve their ability to read closely, write analytically, speak rhetorically, and think abstractly in preparation for the AP English Language Exam offered by The College Board. This course will include reading approximately multiple major works and several essays in addition to informal writing, expository writing, research paper writing, and critical writing. Students will be required to obtain novels for this course. Summer work will be required. Grade level:11 Prerequisites: English 10, Honors English 10, Honors American Literature # Teacher Approval Required # English Credit 1 English Credit Literacy Explorations & Perspectives 11 (L.E.A.P. 11) This course is for students who have successfully completed L.E.A.P. 10 and/or students needing an alternative to English 11 to meet the high school graduation requirement for English. This course will cover the Ohio s New Learning Standards for 11th grade English with the addition of intense differentiation to meet each student s needs as he/she continues to improve his/her literacy skills. Prerequisites: L.E.A.P. 10 or English 10. Teacher permission is required to register for this course. Advanced Placement English Literature & Composition Students will improve their ability to read selected poems and prose passages analytically and to write critical or analytical essays based on poems, prose passages, and complete novels and plays in preparation for the AP Literature exam offered by The College Board. The course will include reading approximately fifteen (15) major works in addition to shorter works and journal writing, expository essay writing, and literary criticism. Students will be required to obtain novels for this course. College credit may be available through dual enrollment for an additional fee. Summer work will be required. Prerequisites: English 11, Advanced Placement English Language & Composition

76 D-14 English/Language Arts English/Language Arts Elective Courses # Elective Credit Media Communication This course is an elective and does not count towards the four credits in English required for graduation. Students will learn the basics of communication through study of theory, current practice, and application. Students will develop expertise in concept development; audience analysis; message analysis; organization; collaboration; problem solving; computer/video/technology usage; informational, creative, and persuasive writing and speaking; illustration; and self-assessment. It will also promote interscholastic projects between students and other departments within the school and the school district. This course will only be offered at the Innovative Learning Center (ILC) as part of Academy VIBE and ILC Studio. See page E-3 and E-5 for more details. #30OL15.5 Elective Credit Media Communication A (Online) A student who enrolls in this course must also enroll in Media Communication B (Online). Students will learn the basics of communication through study of theory, current practice, and application. Students will develop expertise in concept development; audience analysis; message analysis; organization; collaboration; problem solving; computer/video/technology usage; informational, creative, and persuasive writing and speaking; illustration; and self-assessment. #30OL16 #30OL02.5 Elective Credit Media Awareness This course is an elective and does not count towards the four credits in English required for graduation. Introducing students to all aspects of today s media, the Media Awareness course is designed for those who want to expand their writing and reporting skills and increase their overall understanding of today s media and how it works. The course is much less of a traditional journalism course (writing and design) and much more of a how to become an educated consumer of media course..5 Elective Credit Media Communication B (Online) A student who enrolls in this course must also enroll in Media Communication A (Online). Students will learn the basics of communication through study of theory, current practice, and application. Students will develop expertise in concept development; audience analysis; message analysis; organization; collaboration; problem solving; computer/video/technology usage; informational, creative, and persuasive writing and speaking; illustration; and self-assessment. Prerequisites: Media Communication A (Online) # #30OL55 # Elective Credit Speech, Debate and Public Discourse This course is an elective and does not count towards the four credit English requirement for graduation. Students taking speech will focus on all aspects of 21st Century communication skills from group discussion to interview skills to informative and persuasive speeches. Students will read, analyze, and critique exemplary examples of speech and public discourse. Students will engage in the writing of speeches with multiple drafts with explicit feedback from the instructor. In addition, students will utilize data bases, internetbased resources, electronic and media resources, and engage in debate on a variety of real world topics. 1 Elective Credit Journalism Production This course is an elective and does not count towards the four credits in English required for graduation. Students enrolled in Journalism Production will work to produce the school news print publication. Students will be responsible for the writing, editing, photography, artwork, page design, advertising and promotion and be responsible for meeting the requirements of that job. Prerequisites: Application to become a journalism production staff member must be completed prior to registration and students will receive notification of acceptance. It is strongly recommended that the student successfully complete Media Awareness prior to enrolling in this course.

77 English/Language Arts D-15 # # One semester.5 Elective Credit Writer s Craft This course is an elective and does not count towards the four credit English required for graduation. Selected poems, short stories, and scripts will be used as examples to engage the student in an active appreciation of how to compose his/ her own creative literature. Students will experience a workshop environment in which they will be expected to comment, critique, and analyze other students' work as well as share their own. At the conclusion of the course, a semester project will be presented to show the growth of the writer throughout the semester. Students signing up for this course should have a strong interest in reading and writing, should want to better understand the concepts of literature, and should want to show this understanding through his or her work. 1 Elective Credit Yearbook Production This course is an elective and does not count towards the four credit English requirement for graduation. The school yearbook will be produced in this class. Students will be responsible for the writing, editing, photography, layout, design, advertising, sales, and promotion involved in the production process. Assignment to positions will be determined by the teacher's evaluation of the applicant's written, photographic, and graphic/computer ability. Prerequisites: An application for the yearbook staff must be completed prior to registration, and students will receive notification of acceptance. # #30OL65.5 Elective Credit Leadership Development This course is an elective and does not count towards the four credit English requirement for graduation. Through reading, researching and school-related projects, students will develop the necessary knowledge, attitudes, and skills to fulfill leadership opportunities in the school setting. Students will study leadership, effectiveness; assess their individual leadership styles and skills; and establish a Personal Leadership Handbook based on their personal goals and understanding of leadership effectiveness. An emphasis will be placed on developing effective written and spoken communication skills, habits characteristic of effective teens, and group skills including team building, conflict resolution, and stress management. Students will be asked to participate in group projects that benefit others in order to apply effective decisionmaking, communication, and critical thinking. This course may count as an English or Business elective, but not both. Students will need to purchase the resource book for this class. # Elective Credit Broadcast Media Communications This course is an elective and does not count towards the four credits in English required for graduation. Students will learn the basics of broadcast communication through authentic on-set experiences, current practice, and application. It will also promote interscholastic projects between students and other departments within the school and the school district with a heavy emphasis on running a daily news program. This course will only be offered at the Innovative Learning Center (ILC) as part of On-Air A & B. See page E-4 for more details.

78 Language Arts 7 Advanced Language Arts 7 Honors English 10 Honors American Literature English 11 AP English Language & Composition 6th Grade Hilliard City School District English/Language Arts Course Sequence Grade 6-12 Please Note: A well-suited language arts program for any student must have flexibility built in the process. Classroom and achievement data must be reviewed continuously to determine proper placement and make the appropriate program changes for students. 7th Grade 8th Grade 9th Grade 10th Grade 11th Grade 12th Grade Course Sequence Flow Chart Language Arts 6 Language Arts 8 Advanced Language Arts 8 Honors English 9* English 9 Honors English 9 English 10 Humanities Language Arts 7 Classical Literature 1 & 2; British Literature 1 & 2; World Literature 1 & 2; or Literature of World Theatre 1 & 2 Honors English 10 AP English Literature & Composition *This is a high school credited class. Your child s final grade will be posted on his/her high school transcript. D-16 English/Language Arts

79 Courses for English language learners are designed for beginning, intermediate, and advanced levels of English proficiency. By incorporating literature with content, students are taught, and have ample practice with, the skills they need to meet grade -level standards while being introduced to the Courses English Language Learners English Language Learners D-17 academic language needed for school success. In addition to English language courses, we also offer a variety of content-area courses designed to meet the needs of the student new to the English language and/or American schooling. Specific courses offered may vary from building to building. Students participating in this program should consult their guidance counselor and/or teacher prior to selecting coursework. #30EL01 #30EL03 #30EL44 1 English/1 Elective Credit 1 English Credit 1 English/1 Elective Credit Basic ELL This two-period course will assist the non-native speaker in acquiring pre-functional English skills in reading, writing, speaking and listening. Students will be placed according to standardized tests (1 on OTELA or 1-15 on LAS Links) or teacher recommendation. #30EL02 1 English Credit Intermediate ELL 1 This course will assist the nonnative speaker in acquiring beginning English skills in extended reading, writing, speaking and listening activities. Students will be placed according to standardized tests (2 on OTELA or on LAS Links) or teacher recommendation. Intermediate ELL 2 This course will assist the nonnative speaker in acquiring intermediate English skills in higher level reading, writing, speaking and listening activities. Students will be placed according to standardized tests (3 on OTELA or on LAS Links) or teacher recommendation. #30EL40 1 English/1 Elective Credit ELL Literacy Explorations & Perspectives (E-L.E.A.P.) This course will assist the nonnative speaker in acquiring English skills in reading, writing, speaking, and listening activities. Students will be placed according to assessment data and teacher recommendation. Students will use the READ 180 Intervention Program with an intense focus on literacy acceleration through skills-based texts and activities. E-L.E.A.P. is a double-period class. ELL Literacy Explorations & Perspectives II (E-L.E.A.P. II) This course will assist the nonnative speaker in acquiring English skills in reading, writing, speaking, and listening activities. Students will be placed according to assessment data and teacher recommendation. Students will use the READ 180 Intervention Program with an intense focus on literacy acceleration through skills-based texts and activities. E-L.E.A.P. II is a double-period class. #85EL01 0 Credit Supported Studies This course is designed for those ELL students needing reinforcement of content area skills and concepts through instruction. Students may also receive literacy intervention including OGT preparation. This course is not a study hall. Note: Many courses offered at the high school level have fees associated with them to cover the expense of consumable materials used by students. These fees are finalized in the spring and will be attached to student accounts/schedules prior to the start of the school year.

80 D-18 English Language Learners #50EL01 1 Elective Credit #55EL01 1 Elective Credit Other ELL Course Offerings Basic ELL Math This two period course will prepare ELL students with limited or interrupted formal schooling for high school level Algebra. Topics covered include basic number sense, fractions, ratios, percents, basic geometry, measurement and other pre-algebra concepts. Students will also learn to read, interpret, and understand math concepts and vocabulary while increasing their English language proficiency. This is a preparation course for high school math and covers up to grade 8 curriculum. Placement is not necessarily correlated to OTELA language levels; based on teacher recommendation. Basic ELL Science Students with limited or interrupted formal schooling will be placed in this class according to English language skills and teacher recommendation. Students will learn the basics of physical, life, and earth science and their connections through an introduction to the following topics: the nature of science, matter and its interactions, motion, forces, energy, cells, ecology, the human body (structure/ function/health), earth and space, and processes that shape the Earth. In addition to learning basic science concepts, students will further develop the English language, math concepts, and problem solving techniques through writing, drawing, and speaking. This is a preparation course for high school science. Placement is not necessarily correlated to OTELA language levels; based on teacher recommendation. See specific content areas for descriptions of these courses: Algebra 1A Algebra 1B Science 9A Science 9B Biology A Biology B World Studies 1 World Studies 2 U.S. History 1 U.S. History 2 U.S. Gov. 1 U.S. Gov. 2 Health ICT21 50SH02 50SH03 55SH01 55SH02 55SH05 55SH06 60SH01 60SH02 60SH05 60SH06 60SH35 60SH36 45SH10 15SH01 #60EL01 1 Elective Credit Basic ELL Social Studies Students with limited or interrupted formal schooling will be placed in this class according to English language skills and teacher recommendation. Students will learn basic concepts organized around Ohio s academic content standards for social studies: history, people in societies, geography, economics, government, citizenship rights and responsibilities, and social studies skills and methods. This is a preparation course for high school history and covers up to grade 8 curriculum. Placement is not necessarily correlated with OTELA language levels; based on teacher recommendation.

81 Family & Consumer Sciences courses prepare students to become leaders in their family, career and community. All courses are part of the elective offerings and are open to all students. Our generous course offerings provide students with opportunities to develop a variety of essential skills necessary for success in the 21st century. These courses cover topics ranging from developing healthy relationships and child development, to nutrition and wellness, to financial independence and career exploration. Our Courses Family & Consumer Sciences Family & Consumer Sciences D-19 Financial Independence and Careers and Money Management courses can be used to fulfill the financial literacy graduation requirement. Students are strongly encouraged to consider participating in our Career Mentorship program during either their junior or senior year. Through this program, students can participate in on-site experiences in the career field of their choice, which will help them when choosing a college major as well as a future career path. The financial literacy elective requirement can be fulfilled through two courses in this department. Financial Independence & Careers and Money Management # # # #35OL01 #35OL05.5 Elective Credit.5 Elective Credit Careers and Money Management How is it all connected? In this course you will learn to be a wise consumer and recognize how your career impacts money making decisions. You will learn employability skills such as how to look for a job, fill out applications and successfully interview. Learn to be an informed, educated and responsible consumer by understanding budgeting and basic money management. Students may participate in a job shadowing experience and will leave this class with an Individual Career Plan (ICP). This class fulfills the financial literacy requirement if taken during the Junior or Senior year (class of 2016 and beyond)..5 Elective Credit Personal Decisions Do you want to learn how to get involved and have a great high school experience? This course is designed to provide first year high school students with personal knowledge and skills to help them maximize the benefits of educational opportunities. Learn how to make good decisions, build positive relationships, develop leadership skills, set and reach goals, and communicate effectively. Students learn how organization, time management, and study skills lead to a successful academic and personal high school career. This is an essential course to help with the transition into high school! Foods for Healthy Living This course is designed to help you take care of the only body you will ever have! Develop eating habits that help you perform your best in daily life. Current nutritional information as it relates to total health will be explored. Learn how important it is to practice safe food habits. The course will include taste testing, demonstrations, and guest speakers. Laboratory experiences will include preparing and tasting recipes that meet nutritional needs for life. Note: Many courses offered at the high school level have fees associated with them to cover the expense of consumable materials used by students. These fees are finalized in the spring and will be attached to student accounts/schedules prior to the start of the school year.

82 D-20 Family & Consumer Sciences # # # Elective Credit Global Gourmet Experience a taste of the world in 90 days! Study foods from around the world and learn how the global food market and cultural factors influence healthy lifestyle choices. In this course, students will prepare authentic recipes from various places around the world such as Asia, the Mediterranean, and Latin America. Nutritional content of various foods will be evaluated in order to gain a greater understanding of how to achieve a healthy lifestyle in our multi-cultural society. # Elective Credit Design: Fashion, Textiles and Interiors Do you have a passion related to fashion or interior design? This course entails an introduction to elements and principles of design, color theory, fashion illustration and designing interior spaces. Students apply knowledge and technical skills to create authentic projects throughout the semester. This is an excellent choice not only for students with an interest in design related careers, but also for anyone who loves to use their creativity..5 Elective Credit #35OL25 Human Development & Relationships Students will explore current issues of adolescent dating relationships to establish the building blocks for a future family. Topics will include the transition into marriage and parenthood, the family life cycle, and current social issues to understand how to develop the foundation for starting a family. Students will identify skills for building healthy families that thrive in a culturally diverse society. # Elective Credit Advanced Child Development In this course you will examine and learn the skills necessary for working with children whether it is in the role of teacher, medical professional, counselor, psychologist, or parent. This course will examine prenatal development along with the physical, emotional, intellectual, and social development of children from birth to school age. Students will be introduced to theories, trends, and issues regarding child development and will apply their knowledge and skills by working with young children. Prerequisites: Human Development & Relationships is highly recommended.5 Elective Credit Financial Independence It s never too early to plan for your financially independent future! Students will examine a number of financial topics including budgeting, saving, interest rates, credit, buying a car, renting an apartment, insurance, and investments. Learn how to set personal and family financial goals, select financial institutions, avoid fraud, and understand the impact of public policy on your financial future. Recognize the implications of financial decisions on the individual as well as the family. Develop positive communication skills and knowledge for discussing financial issues. This class will prepare students to meet future financial needs as they transition through life. This class fulfills the financial literacy requirement if taken during the Junior or Senior year (class of 2016 and beyond).

83 Family & Consumer Sciences D-21 # # # Elective Credit 1 Elective Credit.5 Elective Credit Each Career Mentorship 1 Career Mentorship is offered to junior and senior high school students to experience a career they may be interested in pursuing. By gaining a first-hand look at a career, students are prepared to choose a career that matches their passions, strengths, values, and interests and also to choose colleges or other educational opportunities that assist them in reaching these goals. As a result of the mentorship experience, students will approach their next interview and internship prepared and confident. Career Mentorship is structured so students spend time in the classroom setting goals and working on college and career skills. Students arrange to mentor 4 6 hours per week for a total of 50 hours. Students are dismissed from school during their Mentorship class to mentor, but may also mentor after school or on weekends. This is a non-paid opportunity. It is strongly recommended that students interested in education, business, medical and audio/video production and performance consider taking Academy EDU, Academy INC, Academy MD or Academy VIBE. Student expectations are: Provide own transportation to mentor site and class locations Secure a mentor placement before the first day of class Minimum GPA: 2.5 Good attendance record No disciplinary concerns Career Mentorship 2 Students continue their mentorship experience by participating in an on -site placement. Students may continue in the same career field in which they mentored previously or choose a different career field. Students are responsible for attending seminars on a weekly basis, journaling about their experiences, assisting with the Mentorship I class, mentoring for 60 hours, and continuing to develop their career plan. This course is flexible and can be worked around various schedules. Prerequisites: B or better in Career Mentorship 1 # Four Semesters Academy EDU 2-4 Elective Credits Do you want to go into the teaching profession? Would you like to graduate with your college entry level EDU course complete? Do you want to get an real look at the profession while doing student teaching next year? Are you ready to tutor younger students, visit a variety of types of schools, teach lessons, have meaningful and professional relationships with a mentor and explore teaching as a career choice? Are you planning to major in education in college? Notes: Academy EDU is only offered at the Innovative Learning Center (ILC). See page E-7 for more details Graduation, Reality and Dual Role Skills 1,2,3,4 (GRADS) These courses provide knowledge and skills related to child development and positive parenting. Learn to carry out positive health-care practices for yourself and your child during your pregnancy and after delivery. Gain an orientation to the world of work. Set goals to balance work and family. Increase the likelihood that you will graduate from high school. Prerequisites: Must be currently pregnant or parenting

84 D-22 World Languages The changing nature of our society has placed greater demands on students. In order to succeed in the new twenty-first century, they will be required to acquire new communication skills. The acquisition of other languages will enable students to communicate across cultures and gain knowledge of other cultures in order to interact effectively within the community and global marketplace. All students are encouraged to elect one or more world languages in the course of their total education. Extended language study is strongly recommended. Courses World Languages The goals of the World Language program are: To develop students language skills to enable them to communicate effectively in a language other than English. To develop respect for other cultures. To develop a clearer understanding of their own linguistic and cultural heritage. To increase their ability to read, listen, speak, and write in English. 2-3 Credits of a World Language should be part of a College Preparatory Curriculum. Requirements vary from institution to institution. Refer to the guidelines of the university of your choice for details. # # # Elective Credit 1 Elective Credit 1 Elective Credit French 1 This course emphasizes basic proficiency skills in reading, writing, listening and speaking through the use of technology and learning stations. The students will also gain a basic cultural understanding of French-speaking countries. # Elective Credit French 2 This course is an extension of French 1, continuing the development of oral, written, spoken and auditory learning, as well as cultural awareness. Prerequisites: French 1 French 3 This course is a continuation of French 2, which expands the existing knowledge gained in all performance areas and cultural situations. Prerequisites: French 2 # Elective Credit AP French 4 This course in AP Language emphasizes the use of language for active communication, continuing the development of the four language skills (reading, writing, speaking and listening). This course is intended for students who are interested in completing studies comparable in content and difficulty to composition and conversation courses at the third-year college level. Students are given the option to take the Advanced Placement Foreign Language test. There is an additional fee for this test. If a minimum number of students is not met, this course may be taught via video and/or on-line instruction. Prerequisites: French 3 French 5 This course is designed to provide advanced students with the opportunity to strengthen their abilities to write, read, and speak French. The conversation component of the course will focus on the discussion of articles from the current French and Francophone press, films, other media, and websites, and on developing the fluency in French to perform linguistically and culturally appropriate tasks. The composition component will seek to improve the ability to write clearly and coherently in French. In order to foster these goals, the course will also provide a review of selected advanced grammatical structures and work on literary excerpts. College credit may be available through dual enrollment for an additional fee. If a minimum number of students is not met, this course may be taught via video and/or on-line instruction. Prerequisites: AP French 4 Note: Many courses offered at the high school level have fees associated with them to cover the expense of consumable materials used by students. These fees are finalized in the spring and will be attached to student accounts/schedules prior to the start of the school year.

85 World Languages D-23 # # # Elective Credit 1 Elective Credit 1 Elective Credit German 1 This course emphasizes basic proficiency skills in reading, writing, listening and speaking through the use of technology and learning stations. The students will also gain a basic cultural understanding of German-speaking countries. #40OL10.5 Elective Credit German 1A (Online) A student who enrolls in this course must also enroll in German 1B (Online). This course emphasizes basic proficiency skills in reading, writing, listening and speaking through the use of technology. The students will also gain a basic cultural understanding of German-speaking countries. #40OL11.5 Elective Credit German 1B (Online) A student who enrolls in this course must also enroll in German 1A (Online). This course emphasizes basic proficiency skills in reading, writing, listening and speaking through the use of technology. The students will also gain a basic cultural understanding of German-speaking countries. Prerequisites: German 1A (Online) German 2 This course is an extension of German 1, continuing the development of oral, written, spoken and auditory learning, as well as cultural awareness. Prerequisites: German 1 # # Elective Credit AP German 4 This course in AP Language emphasizes the use of language for active communication, continuing the development of the four language skills (reading, writing, speaking and listening). The course is intended for students who are interested in completing studies comparable in content and difficulty to composition and conversation courses at the third-year college level. Students are given the option to take the Advanced Placement Foreign Language test. There is an additional fee for this test. If a minimum number of students is not met, this course may be taught via video and/or online instruction. Prerequisites: German 3 1 Elective Credit German 3 This is a continuation of German 2, which expands the existing knowledge gained in all performance areas and cultural situations. Prerequisites: German 2 German 5 This course is designed to give advanced students the opportunity to refine and increase their abilities to write, read and speak German. The course will have a strong emphasis on oral proficiency. Cultural and literary readings and selected German-language films are among the materials on which class discussion and assignments may be centered. A grammar review, focused mainly on typical areas of difficulty, will be included. College credit may be available through dual enrollment for an additional fee. If a minimum number of students is not met, this course may be taught via video and/or online instruction. Prerequisites: AP German 4 # Elective Credit Spanish 1 This course emphasizes basic proficiency skills in reading, writing, listening and speaking through the use of technology and learning stations. The students will also gain a basic cultural understanding of Spanish-speaking countries. #40OL20.5 Elective Credit Spanish 1A (Online) A student who enrolls in this course must also enroll in Spanish 1B (Online). This course emphasizes basic proficiency skills in reading, writing, listening and speaking through the use of technology. The students will also gain a basic cultural understanding of Spanish-speaking countries.

86 D-24 World Languages #40OL21 # # Elective Credit 1 Elective Credit 1 Elective Credit Spanish 1B (Online) A student who enrolls in this course must also enroll in Spanish 1A (Online). This course emphasizes basic proficiency skills in reading, writing, listening and speaking through the use of technology. The students will also gain a basic cultural understanding of Spanish-speaking countries. Prerequisites: Spanish 1B (Online) # Elective Credit Spanish 2 This course is an extension of Spanish 1, continuing the development of reading, oral, written, and auditory learning, as well as cultural awareness. Prerequisites: Spanish 1 # Elective Credit Spanish 3 Spanish 3 is an upper level course where the application of all grammar and vocabulary learned in levels one and two is needed to function in the performance areas, cultural situations and on projects. Prerequisites: Spanish 2 AP Spanish 4 This course in AP Language emphasizes the use of language for active communication, continuing the development of the four language skills (reading, writing, speaking and listening). They are intended for students who are interested in completing studies comparable in content and difficulty to composition and conversation courses at the third-year college level. Students are given the option to take the Advanced Placement Foreign Language test. There is an additional fee for this test. If a minimum number of students is not met, this course may be taught via video and/or on-line instruction. Prerequisites: Spanish 3 # Elective Credit Spanish 5 This course is designed to give advanced students the opportunity to refine and increase their abilities to write, read and speak Spanish. The course will have a strong emphasis on oral proficiency. Cultural and literary readings and selected Spanish-language films are among the materials on which class discussion and assignments may be centered. A grammar review, focused mainly on typical areas of difficulty, will be included. College credit may be available through dual enrollment for an additional fee. If a minimum number of students is not met, this course may be taught via video and/or on-line instruction. Prerequisites: AP Spanish 4 Chinese 1 This course emphasizes basic proficiency skills in reading, writing, listening and speaking through the use of technology and learning stations. The students will also gain a basic cultural understanding of Mandarin Chinese speaking countries. This is a blended approach course taught via video conferencing and teacher-tostudent in the classroom. Enrollment may be limited. # Elective Credit Chinese 2 This course is an extension of Chinese 1, continuing the development of oral, written, spoken and auditory learning, as well as cultural awareness of Mandarin Chinese speaking countries. This is a blended approach course taught via video conferencing and teacher-tostudent in the classroom. Prerequisites: Chinese 1 # Elective Credit Chinese 3 Chinese 3 is an upper level Mandarin Chinese course where the application of all material learned in levels one and two is needed to function in the performance areas, cultural situations, communication activities, projects and presentations. This is a blended approach course taught via video conferencing and teacher-to-student in the classroom. Prerequisites: Chinese 2

87 World Languages D-25 # Elective Credit Chinese 4 Chinese 4 is an upper level Mandarin Chinese course where the application of all material learned in levels two and three is needed to function in the performance areas, cultural situations, communication activities, projects and presentations.. This is a blended approach course taught via video conferencing and teacher-to-student in the classroom. Prerequisites: Chinese 3

88 D-26 Mathematics In order to graduate from the Hilliard City School District, students are required to successfully earn four credits in mathematics that must include Algebra 2. Typically, students begin their high school math experience with Algebra I followed by either Geometry or two years of Geometry and Algebra Connections. These courses are then followed by Algebra 2. Courses Mathematics The department of mathematics offers a wide range of courses for all ability levels. Advanced study includes Advanced Placement Statistics, Advanced Placement Calculus AB, and Advanced Placement Calculus BC. College credit can be earned through all of these advanced courses. Mathematics Graduation Requirement (4 credits) Students must successfully complete Algebra 2 to satisfy the graduation requirement. # #50OL11 #50CT02 Teacher Approval Required.5 Mathematics Credit Algebra 1A A student who enrolls in this course must also enroll in Algebra 1B. Algebra 1A is designed to provide a solid foundation for all future work in mathematics. A strong background in ratios, rates, and proportional reasoning, number sense and operations working with rational numbers, and the ability to solve linear equations and graph linear functions is essential. The fundamental purpose of this course is to formalize and extend the mathematics that students learned in the middle grades. Algebra 1 involves a focus on critical areas which deepen and extend understanding of linear and exponential relationships as well as analyzing, solving, and using quadratic functions. Prerequisites: Math 8 # #50OL12 #50CT03 Teacher Approval Required.5 Mathematics Credit Algebra 1B A student who enrolls in this course must also enroll in Algebra 1A. Algebra 1B is designed to provide a solid foundation for all future work in mathematics. A strong background in ratios, rates, and proportional reasoning, number sense and operations working with rational numbers, and the ability to solve linear equations and graph linear functions is essential. The fundamental purpose of this course is to formalize and extend the mathematics that students learned in the middle grades. Algebra 1 involves a focus on critical areas which deepen and extend understanding of linear and exponential relationships as well as analyzing, solving, and using quadratic functions. Prerequisites: Math 8 # #50CT12.5 Mathematics Credit Algebra 1 w/workshop A A student who enrolls in this course must also enroll in Algebra 1 w/workshop B. This double-blocked course is designed to provide additional instruction and practice for students concurrently enrolled in Algebra 1. The same Algebra 1 topics will be covered as listed above. Students will be placed into this course based on teacher recommendation. Prerequisites: Math 8 # #50CT13 Teacher Approval Required Teacher Approval Required.5 Mathematics Credit Algebra 1 w/workshop B A student who enrolls in this course must also enroll in Algebra 1 w/workshop A. This double-blocked course is designed to provide additional instruction and practice for students concurrently enrolled in Algebra 1. The same Algebra 1 topics will be covered as listed above. Students will be placed into this course based on teacher recommendation. Prerequisites: Math 8 Note: Many courses offered at the high school level have fees associated with them to cover the expense of consumable materials used by students. These fees are finalized in the spring and will be attached to student accounts/schedules prior to the start of the school year.

89 Mathematics D-27 # # # #50OL17 #50OL18 1 Mathematics Credit #50CT17.5 Mathematics Credit Geometry and Algebra Connections 1A (GAC 1A) A student who enrolls in this course must also enroll in GAC 1B. GAC 1A and GAC 1B are for those students who passed Algebra 1 with a "C" or "D" test average. GAC 1A and GAC 1 B will enhance Algebra 1 skills and cover the first semester of Geometry. Upon successful completion of GAC 1A and GAC 1B, students will further develop their Geometry skills in GAC 2A and GAC 2B the following year. Prerequisites: Algebra 1 # Teacher Approval Required #50CT27.5 Mathematics Credit Geometry and Algebra Connections 2A (GAC 2A) A student who enrolls in this course must also enroll in GAC 2B. GAC 2A and GAC 2B are for those students who have passed GAC 1A and GAC 1B. GAC 2A and GAC 2B students will cover the second semester of Geometry and continue developing algebraic skills. Upon successful completion, students will enroll in Algebra 2. Prerequisites: GAC 1A/1B # #50OL28 Teacher Approval Required Geometry Geometry is for students who successfully passed Algebra 1 with a "B" or better test average. Geometry is the study of visual patterns. This course explores the relationships between different types of plane and solid figures in order to improve a student s ability to see patterns, improve a student s problem solving skills and to apply geometric principles in the world around us. Topics to be studied include logic and geometric proof, parallel and perpendicular lines, rigid and non-rigid transformations including similarity and congruence, right triangle trigonometry, properties of polygons, extending surface area and volume, and geometric probability. Prerequisites: Algebra 1 #50OL27 #50CT28 Teacher Approval Required #50OL21 #50CT18 Teacher Approval Required.5 Mathematics Credit Geometry and Algebra Connections 1B (GAC 1B) A student who enrolls in this course must also enroll in GAC 1A. GAC 1A and GAC 1B are for those students who passed Algebra 1 with a "C" or "D" test average. GAC 1A and GAC 1 B will enhance Algebra 1 skills and cover the first semester of Geometry. Upon successful completion of GAC 1A and GAC 1B, students will further develop their Geometry skills in GAC 2A and GAC 2B the following year. Prerequisites: Algebra 1.5 Mathematics Credit Geometry and Algebra Connections 2B (GAC 2B) A student who enrolls in this course must also enroll in GAC 2B. GAC 2A and GAC 2B are for those students who have passed GAC 1A and GAC 1B. GAC 2A and GAC 2B students will cover the second semester of Geometry and continue developing algebraic skills. Upon successful completion, students will enroll in Algebra 2. Prerequisites: GAC 1A/1B.5 Mathematics Credit Geometry A (Online) A student who enrolls in this course must also enroll in Geometry B (Online). Geometry is the study of visual patterns. This course explores the relationships between different types of plane and solid figures in order to improve a student s ability to see patterns, improve a student s problem solving skills and to apply geometric principles in the world around us. Topics to be studied include logic and geometric proof, parallel and perpendicular lines, rigid and nonrigid transformations including similarity and congruence, right triangle trigonometry, properties of polygons, extending surface area and volume, and geometric probability. Prerequisites: Algebra 1

90 D-28 Mathematics #50OL22.5 Mathematics Credit Geometry B (Online) A student who enrolls in this course must also enroll in Geometry A (Online). Geometry is the study of visual patterns. This course explores the relationships between different types of plane and solid figures in order to improve a student s ability to see patterns, improve a student s problem solving skills and to apply geometric principles in the world around us. Topics to be studied include logic and geometric proof, parallel and perpendicular lines, rigid and nonrigid transformations including similarity and congruence, right triangle trigonometry, properties of polygons, extending surface area and volume, and geometric probability. Prerequisites: Geometry A (Online) # Mathematics Credit Honors Algebra 2 Honors Algebra 2 is for students who successfully completed Geometry with a B or better test average. Students work closely with the expressions that define functions, explore and generalize the effects of transformations on these functions. They will continue to expand and hone their abilities to model situations and to solve equations, including solving polynomial equations over the set of complex numbers and solving exponential equations using the properties of logarithms. Additionally, Algebra 2 topics also include using the coordinate plane to extend right triangle trigonometry understanding to periodic phenomena, as well as relating prior statistical knowledge to different types of data and probability distributions. Heavy emphasis will be placed on applying algebraic concepts to solve realworld problems. Although the graphing calculator is used to enhance, introduce, and support many of the Honors Algebra 2 topics, most assessments are done without the calculator to assess numerical analysis. A TI 83+ or TI- 84 Graphing Calculator is required. TI-89 or TI-92 calculators are NOT allowed. Prerequisites: Geometry NOTE: Students cannot earn two Algebra 2 credits, however Honors Algebra 2 credit may replace Algebra 2. # #50OL31 #50CT32 Teacher Approval Required.5 Mathematics Credit Algebra 2A A student who enrolls in this course must also enroll in Algebra 2B. Algebra 2A is for students who passed Geometry with C or lower test average or completed GAC2. Students work closely with the expressions that define functions, explore and generalize the effects of transformations on these functions. They will continue to expand and hone their abilities to model situations and to solve equations, including solving polynomial equations over the set of complex numbers and solving exponential equations using the properties of logarithms. Additionally, Algebra 2 topics also include using the coordinate plane to extend right triangle trigonometry understanding to periodic phenomena, as well as relating prior statistical knowledge to different types of data and probability distributions. Heavy emphasis will be placed on applying algebraic concepts to solve realworld problems and graphing calculators are extensively used as an exploratory tool. A TI 83+ or TI- 84 Graphing Calculator is required. TI-89 or TI-92 calculators are NOT allowed. Prerequisites: Geometry or GAC 2A & GAC 2B

91 Mathematics D-29 # #50OL32 #50CT33 Teacher Approval Required.5 Mathematics Credit Algebra 2B A student who enrolls in this course must also enroll in Algebra 2A. Algebra 2B is for students who passed Geometry with C or lower test average or completed GAC2. Students work closely with the expressions that define functions, explore and generalize the effects of transformations on these functions. They will continue to expand and hone their abilities to model situations and to solve equations, including solving polynomial equations over the set of complex numbers and solving exponential equations using the properties of logarithms. Additionally, Algebra 2 topics also include using the coordinate plane to extend right triangle trigonometry understanding to periodic phenomena, as well as relating prior statistical knowledge to different types of data and probability distributions. Heavy emphasis will be placed on applying algebraic concepts to solve realworld problems and graphing calculators are extensively used as an exploratory tool. A TI 83+ or TI- 84 Graphing Calculator is required. TI-89 or TI-92 calculators are NOT allowed. Prerequisites: Algebra 2A Note: Upon successful completion of Algebra 2, students will continue their mathematical career in Algebra 3 or FST. # # Mathematics Credit Algebra 3 Algebra 3 is for those students who passed Algebra 2 or passed Honors Algebra 2 with a "C or D" test average. (Students who received a "D" or below in Algebra 2 are encouraged to retake Algebra 2 and replace that grade). In Algebra 3, emphasis will be placed on reviewing and strengthening Algebra 2 skills necessary for students to be successful in future math courses. Additionally, some advanced math topics will be introduced including operations and applications of vectors and matrices, unit circle trigonometry, and trigonometric identities. A TI- 83+ or TI-84 graphing calculator is required. Prerequisites: Algebra 2 or Honors Algebra 2 1 Mathematics Credit Pre-Calculus Pre-Calculus is for those students who passed Honors Algebra 2 or Algebra 3 with a B or better test average. Topics in this course will include the extension and application of concepts learned in Honors Algebra 2/Algebra 3, as well as an introduction to analytic trigonometry, trigonometric identities, operations and applications using vectors and matrices, and conic sections. Pre- Calculus is designed for students pursuing STEM-related fields. This course will REQUIRE the daily use the TI-83 or TI-84 series of graphing calculators. Prerequisites: Honors Algebra 2 or Algebra 3 #50OL41.5 Mathematics Credit Functions, Statistics, & Trigonometry A (FST A) (Online) FST will strengthen students understanding of concepts taught in Algebra 2. First, students will investigate a variety of functions in greater detail. Next, they will examine many facets of statistics, including probability, simulations, permutations, combinations, and distributions. Finally, students will expand their knowledge of trigonometric ratios, exploring trigonometric relations, functions, laws, and applications and will be able to communicate this knowledge in standard mathematical notation. A TI-83+ or TI-84 graphing calculator is required. Prerequisites: Algebra 2 #50OL42.5 Mathematics Credit Functions, Statistics, & Trigonometry B (FST B) (Online) FST will strengthen students understanding of concepts taught in Algebra 2. First, students will investigate a variety of functions in greater detail. Next, they will examine many facets of statistics, including probability, simulations, permutations, combinations, and distributions. Finally, students will expand their knowledge of trigonometric ratios, exploring trigonometric relations, functions, laws, and applications and will be able to communicate this knowledge in standard mathematical notation. A TI-83+ or TI-84 graphing calculator is required. Prerequisites: Algebra 2

92 D-30 Mathematics # Mathematics Credit Advanced Placement Courses # Mathematics Credit Statistics Statistics is designed for students going to college to major in nonmath or science fields. Students are ENCOURAGED to have a TI-83/84 graphing calculator to investigate statistical concepts. Students will develop strategies for collecting, organizing, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. Students will design, administer, and tabulate results from surveys and experiments. Probability and simulations aid students in constructing models for chance phenomena. Sampling distributions provide the logical structure for confidence intervals and hypothesis tests. To develop effective statistical communication skills, students will be required to prepare frequent written and oral analyses of real data. Prerequisites: Algebra 2 or Honors Algebra 2 # Mathematics Credit Calculus This course is intended for students who completed Pre-Calculus but do not intend to take the AP Calculus exam, or for those students who had difficulty with the pace and content of Pre-Calculus but would like the opportunity to study the concepts of Calculus. Topics will include a review of Pre-Calculus mathematics in the areas of trigonometry, logarithms, exponentials, function theory, and equations. Calculus topics include limits, differentiation, and integration. Students are required to have daily access to a TI-83+ or TI- 84+ graphing calculator. Prerequisites: Pre-Calculus # Mathematics Credit Advanced Placement Statistics Statistics is designed for students going to college to major in business, economics, medicine, social science, or research science. Students are REQUIRED to have daily access to a TI-83 or TI-84 graphing calculator. Students study descriptive analysis, probability, hypothesis testing, sampling, study design, and distributions. This course is offered as an Advanced Placement course and college credit may be available through dual enrollment for an additional fee. Students enrolling in AP statistics are required to take an AP examination in May, or a comparable exam, as a requirement for successful completion of this course. Prerequisites: Algebra 2 or Honors Algebra 2 # Advanced Placement Calculus AB It is strongly recommended that a student should have a "B" average or better in Pre-Calculus. AP Calculus is intended for students who plan to major in life or physical sciences, engineering, business, medicine, or any other math-related field. Topics will include analytical geometry, absolute values, inequalities, functions, limits, derivatives and their applications, integration, application of integrals, transcendental functions, trigonometric functions, vectors, and parametric equations. Students are required to have daily access to a TI-83, or TI-84 graphing calculator. Students enrolling in AP calculus are required to take an AP examination in May, or a comparable exam, as a requirement for successful completion of this course. Prerequisites: Pre-Calculus 1 Mathematics Credit Advanced Placement Calculus BC This course is designed to be a continuation of the calculus material learned in AP Calculus AB. Additional topics include partial fractions, differential equations, Taylor series, parametric, polar, and vector calculus. This course prepares the student to take the AP Calculus BC test. Daily use of the TI-83 or TI-84 graphing calculator is required. Students enrolling in AP calculus are required to take an AP examination in May, or a comparable exam, as a requirement for successful completion of this course. Prerequisites: AP Calculus AB or Calculus

93 Pre-Algebra Algebra 1* GAC 1 Algebra 2 Algebra 3 GAC 2 AP Statistics 6th Grade Hilliard City School District Mathematics Course Sequence Grade 6-12 Please Note: A well suited mathematics program for any student must have flexibility built in the process. Classroom and achievement data must be reviewed continuously to determine proper placement and make the appropriate program changes for students. 7th Grade 8th Grade 9th Grade 10th Grade 11th Grade 12th Grade GAC 2 Math 7 Math 8 Course Sequence Flow Chart Math 6 Algebra 1* Geometry* Algebra 1 Algebra 1 GAC 1 Geometry Honors w/workshop Algebra 2 Geometry Honors Algebra 2 Algebra 2 Honors Algebra 2 Pre-Algebra Pre-Calc.** Algebra 3 Pre-Calculus** AP Statistics Calculus** Calculus AB** Algebra 2 Algebra 3 Statistics Pre-Calculus AP Statistics Calculus** Calculus AB** Calculus BC** *This is a high school credited class. Your child s final grade will be posted on his/her high school transcript. **These courses may be taken concurrently with AP Statistics. Mathematics D-31

94 D-32 Performing Arts The Performing Arts are essential to the basic education of all students and are considered a core curriculum on both the local, state, and national level. Quality arts education engages students in processes now recognized as vital by educators and business professionals. These processes include problem anticipation and solving, flexibility, persistence, cooperation, tolerance, inquiry, communication, and critical thinking as well as understanding their own history, culture and humanity. Hilliard high schools Courses Performing Arts offer a variety of courses to appeal to all students ranging from beginner to advanced. Opportunities are available to study theatre and theatrical production; music including choir, band, jazz, and orchestra; and music theory and history. Some of these courses require audition and/or permission of the instructor; however, there are a variety of courses open to all students. All performing arts courses fulfill the fine arts requirement for college admissions. Fine Arts Graduation Requirement (1 credit unless 2 semesters completed in middle school) Performing Arts requirements for college admissions must be fulfilled during high school. # # # Fine Arts Credit.5 Fine Arts Credit.5 Fine Arts Credit Introduction to Theatre This course gives students exposure to a broad range of theatrical concepts required for work both on and backstage. The course will include concepts such as theatre terminology and history, performance areas such as movement, scene work, character development, and improvisation as well as technical elements such as scenic, lighting, sound, costume and makeup design and execution. Theatrical Design and Production This course will allow the serious technical theatre student to explore all aspects of production in greater depth. In this course, students will apply theoretical concepts and gain practical experience in such areas as scenic, lighting, sound, costume and makeup design through handson projects. Prerequisites: Introduction to Theatre or permission of instructor Theatrical Performance The course will allow the serious acting student to explore all aspects of performance in greater depth. The course will examine various acting techniques through intensive work on scenes and monologues and script analysis as well as covering the responsibilities of a director. Prerequisites: Introduction to Theatre or permission of instructor # Fine Arts Credit Production and Performance Students will continue their exploration and practical application of production and performance concepts, including the creation of collaborative theatrical productions. This course is repeatable. This course can be used as the basis of a Senior Capstone Project. Prerequisites: Theatrical Performance, Theatrical Design and Production, or permission of instructor. Note: Many courses offered at the high school level have fees associated with them to cover the expense of consumable materials used by students. These fees are finalized in the spring and will be attached to student accounts/schedules prior to the start of the school year.

95 Performing Arts D-33 # # # Fine Arts Credit 1 Fine Arts Credit 1 Fine Arts Credit Concert Orchestra The Concert Orchestra is comprised of string players who can demonstrate a moderate level of proficiency on violin, viola, cello, bass, piano or harp. The members of the Concert Orchestra should be prepared for a performance schedule that includes three to four performances per year and may also include adjudication. Students in this group are expected to make all performances associated with the group. Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor is Required / Audition Required # Fine Arts Credit Symphony Orchestra The Symphony Orchestra is comprised of advanced string players who can demonstrate a high level of proficiency on violin, viola, cello, bass, piano or harp. Acceptance into this group is by audition only. The members of the Symphony Orchestra should be prepared for a rigorous rehearsal and performance schedule, including but not limited to four inschool performances, state contest, convention performances and clinics. Students in this group are expected to make all performances including those which may involve travel or touring. Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor is Required / Audition Required Chamber Orchestra The Chamber Orchestra is comprised of the most advanced string players who can demonstrate the highest level of proficiency on violin, viola, cello, bass, piano or harp. Acceptance into this group is by audition only. The members of the Chamber Orchestra should be prepared for a rigorous rehearsal and performance schedule, including but not limited to six performances, state contest, convention performances and clinics. Students in this group are expected to make all performances, including those that will involve travel or touring. Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor is Required / Audition Required # Fine Arts Credit Honors Chamber Orchestra This performance-based Orchestra course challenges students to engage in pre-collegiate level musicianship and critical thinking. Students will be highly analytical about the quality of their music making, demonstrate their own accelerated and in-depth study of music through performances and academic projects. Students will accomplish the regular Chamber Orchestra performance curriculum, as well as additional components from a menu of choices. Acceptance into this group is by audition only. Prerequisites: 3 Credits of Orchestra with at least 1 credit earned in Chamber Orchestra. Permission of Instructor is Required / Audition Required Jazz Ensemble Membership in Jazz Ensemble is elective and selective. The performance group is open to all high school band members who play saxophone, trumpet, trombone, tuba, drum set, guitar, or string bass. Students must display advanced playing technique and an interest in Jazz music. The ensemble will perform traditional and modern Jazz in various concerts, community events, and/or adjudicated events throughout the school year and summer. Students who play non-band instruments (piano, bass, guitar) should see the director at the time of registration to arrange an audition. Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor is Required / Audition Required

96 D-34 Performing Arts # # # Fine Arts Credit 1 Fine Arts Credit 1 Fine Arts Credit Music Theory 1 This course of study includes music construction, arranging, ear training and sight singing. Students who may continue in music are encouraged to take this course. Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor is Required # Fine Arts Credit Music Theory 2 This is a continuation of Music Theory 1. The construction of the course would allow for individual instruction in composition and instrumental and choral arranging during the second semester. Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor is Required # Fine Arts Credit Music History 1 Music History 1 is offered every other year. The purpose of this course is to present music as an art and a science. Music History 1 is a study of the progress of music through the ages. In this course, music studied will be from the Baroque, Romantic, and Classical music periods. Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor is Required Music History 2 This course would be a study of music history from the Romantic Period (1820) to the present. Music History 1 is not a prerequisite. This course is especially recommended for students who plan to continue their music education after high school. Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor is Required # Fine Arts Credit Color Guard Color Guard is comprised of those individuals who provide visual elements for the band through the use of flags, rifles, etc. The group rehearses after school for the first ten weeks of the school year. Performances are at Friday night football games and Saturday contests. The second semester consists of continued instruction in marching fundamentals, dance and flag work with a focus on an "indoor" show. The group may perform at several color guard contests in the winter guard circuit. Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor is Required / Audition Required Fee: $100 (pay-to-participate fee) Note: Participation in Color Guard can be used to waive the PE requirement. See page A-4 for more details. Concert Band Membership in Concert Band is elective and selective. The ensemble will develop advanced musicianship and skills through daily rehearsals and participating in after school concerts and OMEA Adjudicated Events. Music will be selected from many different styles and music periods. Membership in Concert Band includes membership in Marching Band unless a student is a member of a fall school athletic team or by special permission of the head band director. Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor is Required / Audition Required # Fine Arts Credit Symphonic Band Membership in Symphonic Band is elective and selective. The ensemble will develop advanced musicianship and skills through daily rehearsals and participating in after school concerts and OMEA Adjudicated Events. Music will be selected from many different styles and music periods. Membership in Symphonic Band includes membership in Marching Band unless a student is a member of a fall school athletic team or by special permission of the head band director. Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor is Required / Audition Required

97 Performing Arts D-35 # # # Fine Arts Credit.5 Fine Arts Credit 1 Fine Arts Credit Wind Ensemble Membership in Wind Ensemble is elective and selective. The ensemble will develop advanced musicianship and skills through daily rehearsals and participating in after school concerts and OMEA Adjudicated Events. Music will be selected from many different styles and music periods. Membership in Wind Ensemble includes membership in Marching Band unless a student is a member of a fall school athletic team or by special permission of the head band director. Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor is Required / Audition Required # Fine Arts Credit Honors Wind Ensemble This performance-based Band course challenges students to engage in pre-collegiate level musicianship and critical thinking. Students will be highly analytical about the quality of their music making, demonstrate their own accelerated and in-depth study of music through performances and academic projects. Students will accomplish the regular Wind Ensemble performance curriculum, as well as additional components from a menu of choices. Acceptance into this group is by audition only. Prerequisites: 3 Credits of Band with at least 1 credit earned in Wind Ensemble. Permission of Instructor is Required / Audition Required Percussion Ensemble Membership in Percussion Ensemble is elective and selective. The ensemble will begin rehearsals following the conclusion of marching band season. The ensemble will develop advanced musicianship and percussion skills through preparation and participation in concert and contest performances. Literature will include classical, jazz, rock, and contemporary music. All Percussion Ensemble members must be members of Symphonic Band, Concert Band, or Wind Ensemble. Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor is Required / Audition Required # Fine Arts Credit Rock Band This auditioned group will learn the fundamentals of performing and working in today's music industry. Students will experience individual and small group coaching, learn cover songs, and eventually compose and perform their own original music. Students will also learn the basics of sound engineering and music technology. Note: This course will be offered at the Innovative Learning Center (ILC) and partnered with Media Communications as part of Academy VIBE. See page E-3 for more details. Concert Choir Soprano Concert Choir Soprano is open to all students who are interested in singing and performing. This choir may perform at various functions throughout the year concerts, OMEA adjudicated events, and various invitations. This group will focus on developing proper vocal production and technique. There may be fees NOT covered by school fees that are paid each year. # Fine Arts Credit Concert Choir Tenor Concert Choir Tenor is open to all students who are interested in singing and performing. This choir may perform at various functions throughout the year concerts, OMEA adjudicated events, and various invitations. This group will focus on developing proper vocal production and technique. There may be fees NOT covered by school fees that are paid each year.

98 D-36 Performing Arts # # Fine Arts Credit 1 Fine Arts Credit Choir level choir is a select choir. Members are selected by auditioning interested students. Some ability to read music is assumed on the part of the student. During the year, this group presents choral concerts which consist of music drawn from classical, sacred, and popular fields. They may perform at various functions throughout the year concerts, OMEA adjudicated events, and various invitations. The chorus meets five periods per week. Permission of the instructor is required. There may be fees NOT covered by school fees that are paid each year. Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor is Required / Audition Required Honors Choir 400 This performance-based Choir course challenges students to engage in pre-collegiate level musicianship and critical thinking. Students will be highly analytical about the quality of their music making, demonstrate their own accelerated and in-depth study of music through performances and academic projects. Students will accomplish the regular Choir 400 performance curriculum, as well as additional components from a menu of choices. Acceptance into this group is by audition only. Prerequisites: 3 Credits of Choir with at least 1 credit earned in Choir 400. Permission of Instructor is Required / Audition Required # Fine Arts Credit Choir level choir is a very select choir and is the school's most advanced performing group in the field of vocal music. Members are selected by auditioning interested students. Ability to read music is assumed on the part of the student. During the year, this group presents choral concerts which consist of music drawn from classical, sacred to contemporary genres. The chorus meets five periods per week, and performs a rigorous schedule of performances, including but not limited to in-school concerts, OMEA Adjudicated Events, and possible convention performances and clinics. Permission of the instructor is required. A choir camp/retreat is part of this course. There may be fees NOT covered by school fees that are paid each year. Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor is Required / Audition Required

99 Are you interested in making a lot of money in doing something that you enjoy? If so, consider a degree in engineering after high school. Find out now in high school if engineering is right for your future. All of our courses are highly interactive, full of hands -on activities, and engaging. Use awesome technology and the latest engineering software. Projects include things like, designing puzzle cubes and toy trains, building fuel cell cars, ballistic devices, Courses Pre-Engineering Pre-Engineering D-37 recycling centers, and complex electronic units, playing with robots, and so much more. The department of Pre-Engineering offers a variety of courses through the national Project Lead the Way program. Students typically begin their study with the Introduction to Engineering Design course followed by Principles of Engineering and Digital Electronics. College credit is available in all preengineering courses. # # # Elective Credit 1 Elective Credit 1 Elective Credit Introduction to Engineering Design (IED) Ever tried to design something new or draw up an idea you wanted to share with your friends and wondered how you could communicate your idea? Or, have you wondered how someone designed that new MP3 player or sleek new phone? Then Introduction to Engineering Design is the course for you. Students will use sophisticated three-dimensional modeling software, learn the design process, and solve design problems as they develop, analyze, and create product models. This class is a great choice for those students planning to study engineering after high school. The projects in these courses naturally lead to exciting capstone experiences, even without previous enrollment. Students have choice to earn transcripted college credit for this course through Sinclair Community College or articulated through the Ohio Board of Regents that is recognized at many Ohio public institutions. Prerequisites: Enrolled in or Completed Algebra 1 Introduction to Engineering Design Women in Engineering (IED WiE) The Women in Engineering section of Introduction to Engineering Design is focused on women in all different fields of engineering. The course will use the Introduction to Engineering Design objectives and offer opportunities to connect with local female professionals, college students, professors and others to help prepare girls who are interested in Engineering and want to know what that experience will entail. The projects in these courses naturally lead to exciting capstone experiences, even without previous enrollment. Students have choice to earn transcripted college credit for this course through Sinclair Community College or articulated through the Ohio Board of Regents that is recognized at many Ohio public institutions. Prerequisites: Enrolled in or Completed Algebra 1 Principles of Engineering (POE) This course provides an overview of engineering and engineering technology. Students develop problem-solving skills by tackling real-world engineering problems. Through theory, building and testing several different systems, students will address the emerging social and political consequences of technological change. The course of study includes: Engineering Career study, Compound machines, Energy sources, Energy applications, Machine control (robotics), Fluid Power (pneumatics), STATICS truss design, Material Properties, Material testing, Advanced Statistics Kinematics (study of ballistic trajectory). All of which are supported by several complex hands-on projects. The projects in these courses naturally lead to exciting capstone experiences, even without previous enrollment. Students have choice to earn transcripted college credit for this course through Sinclair Community College or articulated through the Ohio Board of Regents that is recognized at many Ohio public institutions. Prerequisites: Successful Completion of Introduction to Engineering Design and Algebra 1 or Enrolled in Algebra 2 or Above Note: Many courses offered at the high school level have fees associated with them to cover the expense of consumable materials used by students. These fees are finalized in the spring and will be attached to student accounts/schedules prior to the start of the school year.

100 D-38 Pre-Engineering # # Elective Credit 1 Elective Credit Digital Electronics (DE) Digital Electronics is the foundation of all modern electronic devices such as cell phones, MP3 players, laptops, digital cameras and HD televisions. The major focus of the DE course is to expose students to the process of combinational and sequential logic design, teamwork, communication methods, engineering standards and technical documentation. Activities include: robot control, circuit boards, programming and others. The projects in these courses naturally lead to exciting capstone experiences, even without previous enrollment. Students have choice to earn transcripted college credit for this course through Sinclair Community College or articulated through the Ohio Board of Regents that is recognized at many Ohio public institutions. Prerequisites: (1) Successful Completion of Principles of Engineering or (2) Permission of the Instructor Engineering Design and Development (EDD) This is an engineering research course in which students will work in teams to research, design, test and construct a solution to an openended engineering problem. The product development life cycle and a design process are used to guide and help the team to reach a solution to the problem. The team presents and defends their solution to a panel of outside reviewers at the conclusion of the course. The EDD course allows students to apply all the skills and knowledge learned in previous Project Lead The Way courses. This course also engages students in time management and teamwork skills, a valuable set for students in the future. Students will be required to purchase additional supplies. Depending on project choice the costs for this course can vary greatly. The projects in these courses naturally lead to exciting capstone experiences, even without previous enrollment. Students have choice to earn transcripted college credit for this course through Sinclair Community College or articulated through the Ohio Board of Regents that is recognized at many Ohio public institutions. Prerequisites: Successful Completion of at least 2 previous Pre-Engineering courses or Permission of the Instructor

101 In a world filled with the products of scientific inquiry, scientific literacy has become a necessity for everyone. Everyone needs to use scientific information to make choices that arise in everyday life. In the workplace, jobs demand advanced skills, requiring people to learn, reason, think critically, make decisions, and solve problems. Understanding science and the processes of science contributes to students learning these skills in an essential way. Most students begin their study of science in high school with Science 9A/9B and then enroll in Biology Courses Science Science Graduation Requirement (3 credits) in the 10th grade year. Those students who complete Algebra I before Grade 9 and score advanced or accelerated on the 8th grade O.A.A. begin high school science with Honors Science 9. After successful completion of Biology, students should enroll in the core courses (Chemistry and Physics) or choose from the many science elective courses. We offer a full complement of advanced placement science courses AP Biology, AP Chemistry, and AP Physics C. Science credits must include 1 credit of Biology and 1 credit of Physical Science. Science D-39 # #55OL51 #55CT01 Teacher Approval Required Science 9A A student who enrolls in this course must also enroll in Science 9B. This is a hands-on, lab-based course that is designed for ninth grade students. The following topics will be covered: scientific inquiry, metrics and measurement; matter, atoms and the periodic table; forces and motion; energy; waves; electricity; the universe; and scientific inquiry..5 Science Credit # #55OL52 #55CT02 Teacher Approval Required Science 9B A student who enrolls in this course must also enroll in Science 9A. This is a hands-on, lab-based course that is designed for ninth grade students. The following topics will be covered: scientific inquiry, metrics and measurement; matter, atoms and the periodic table; forces and motion; energy; waves; electricity; the universe; and scientific inquiry..5 Science Credit # Science Credit Honors Science 9 This course is recommended for students who are also enrolled in Geometry or higher level math. Honors Science 9 is an accelerated and enriched science class designed for ninth grade students who anticipate taking one or more AP Sciences. This is a hands-on, lab-based course that is designed for ninth grade students. Students will apply math concepts to the following topics: metrics and measurement; matter, atoms and the periodic table; forces and motion; energy; waves; electricity; and the universe. This course is a year-long course because students will be required to complete a research project or other independent project. Note: Many courses offered at the high school level have fees associated with them to cover the expense of consumable materials used by students. These fees are finalized in the spring and will be attached to student accounts/schedules prior to the start of the school year.

102 D-40 Science # # # #55OL08 1 Science Credit #55OL40 #55CT05 Teacher Approval Required.5 Science Credit Biology A A student who enrolls in this course must also enroll in Biology B. Biology is a twosemester sequence that examines the structure and function of living organisms and the interdependence within living systems. Topics covered include chemistry of life, characteristics and structure of life, heredity, diversity and interdependence of life, scientific inquiry and evolution. Prerequisites: Science 9A/9B or Honors Science 9 # #55OL09 #55CT06 Teacher Approval Required.5 Science Credit Biology B A student who enrolls in this course must also enroll in Biology A. Biology is a twosemester sequence that examines the structure and function of living organisms and the interdependence within living systems. Topics covered include chemistry of life, characteristics and structure of life, heredity, diversity and interdependence of life, scientific inquiry and evolution. Prerequisites: Science 9A/9B or Honors Science 9 Honors Biology This course is recommended for any student who earns an A or B in science 9 (or by teacher recommendation) or A or B in honors science 9. Honors Biology is an accelerated and enriched biology class designed for ninth and tenth grade students who anticipate taking one or more AP Sciences. Topics covered include biochemistry, characteristics and structure of life, heredity, diversity and interdependence of life, and evolution. This course is a yearlong course because students will be required to complete a research project. Students will be engaged in many inquiry-based labs and activities, as well as ecampus assignments. Prerequisites: Science 9A/9B or Honors Science 9 #55OL15.5 Science Credit Environmental Science This course involves examining the ways organisms, especially humans, interact with their environment. It will focus on issues such as loss of biodiversity, habitat change, global climate change and sustainable development. Studying the earth s present biodiversity and ecosystems are essential to understanding threats to them. Another focus will be sociological and political aspects of this dynamic field of science. Students may take environmental science and biology concurrently. Prerequisites: Science 9A/9B, Honors Science 9 Note: Environmental Science is only offered online..5 Science Credit Freshwater and Marine Ecosystems This course is an introduction to physical, chemical and biological oceanography, including study of the history and development of oceanography utilizing the advancements in technology throughout the years and an overview of each ocean, ocean zones, and organisms found in each zone. There is an emphasis on the characteristics of significant phyla, focusing on the structure and functions of their adaptations. The discussion of physical oceanography includes large-scale patterns, ocean circulation, as well as small-scale phenomena such as waves. Topics of current interest (global warming, coastal development, fisheries, and introduced species, resumption of whaling, coral bleaching and hydrothermal vents) are presented throughout the course. Laboratories and dissections are an integral part of this course. Prerequisites: Biology # Science Credit Astronomy This course begins with an introduction to the history and methods of astronomy. The scope of study then moves from the earth outward to the moon, planets, minor objects in the solar system, our sun, other stars, and galaxies. The origin and history of the universe and the search for extraterrestrial life, are also studied. Students may take astronomy and biology concurrently. Prerequisites: Science 9A/9B or Honors Science 9

103 Science D-41 # Science Credit Human Anatomy & Physiology 1 These courses will study the following subjects: histology (types of tissues), skeletal and muscular systems, integumentary system, digestive system, respiratory system, excretory system, circulatory system, immune system, nervous system, endocrine system, and reproductive system. Anatomy and physiology will be taught in an integrated way. Students will be sharing information in a variety of ways in order to enhance student participation. Students will be participating in collaborative projects. We will be doing many labs and working with the Internet. This class will be of particular use to students entering health fields, as well as those pursuing college degrees that will involve biology. Prerequisites: Biology # Science Credit Human Anatomy & Physiology 2 This course will continue the study of the following subjects: histology (types of tissues), skeletal and muscular systems, integumentary system, digestive system, respiratory system, excretory system, circulatory system, immune system, nervous system, endocrine system, and reproductive system. Prerequisites: Human Anatomy & Physiology 1 # Science Credit Introduction to Forensic Science This course begins with an introduction to the history and fundamental principles of forensic science. The course will examine the procedures that take place during a crime scene investigation. Students will explore crime scene analysis, physical evidence, forensic entomology, relevant biological and chemical concepts, and apply physical and geological principles. Students will also learn how to work independently and collaboratively in a lab setting. Case studies will be read and discussed. Due to the subject matter, some content may be graphic and disturbing in nature. Prerequisites: Biology & Chemistry # #55OL23 #55CT23 Teacher Approval Required.5 Science Credit Scientific Principles of Sustainability A A student who enrolls in this course must also enroll in Scientific Principles of Sustainability B. This is an integrated course that focuses on sustainable use of Earth s materials to emphasize the connectedness of the major science fields. This course is designed for students who are interested in the practical applications of major science topics and themes and will include the study of composition, structure, and properties of various materials. Topics will include safe laboratory practices, matter and its properties, crystal structures, metals, ceramics, polymers, and composites. Prerequisites: Science 9A/B or Honors Science 9 # #55OL24 #55CT24 Teacher Approval Required.5 Science Credit Scientific Principles of Sustainability B A student who enrolls in this course must also enroll in Scientific Principles of Sustainability A. This is an integrated course that focuses on sustainable use of Earth s energy to emphasize the connectedness of the major science fields. This course is designed for students who are interested in the practical applications of major science topics and themes. Topics include combustion, nuclear energy, endothermic and exothermic processes, the use of fuels, and renewable energy technologies. Prerequisites: Science 9A/9B or Honors Science 9 # Science Credit Chemistry The student will use principles of chemistry to understand chemistryrelated technological problems confronting our society. The course includes the major concepts, vocabulary and intellectual and laboratory skills expected in any introductory chemistry course. Students will study both inorganic and organic chemistry with an emphasis on chemical structure and chemical reactions and nuclear processes and reactions. Students should be proficient in Algebra 1 skills so that students may be successful with concepts such as the mole, solution concentration, and gas laws. Prerequisites: Science 9A/9B or Honors Science 9, Biology and concurrent enrollment in Geometry or GAC 2 or higherlevel math

104 D-42 Science #55OL26 #55OL27 # Science Credit.5 Science Credit 1 Science Credit Chemistry A (Online) A student who enrolls in this course must also enroll in Chemistry B (Online). The student will use principles of chemistry to understand chemistry-related technological problems confronting our society. The course includes the major concepts, vocabulary and intellectual and laboratory skills expected in any introductory chemistry course. Students will study both inorganic and organic chemistry with an emphasis on chemical structure and chemical reactions and nuclear processes and reactions. Students should be proficient in Algebra 1 skills so that students may be successful with concepts such as the mole, solution concentration, and gas laws. Prerequisites: Science 9A/9B or Honors Science 9, Biology and concurrent enrollment in Geometry or GAC 2 or higherlevel math Chemistry B (Online) A student who enrolls in this course must also enroll in Chemistry A (Online). The student will use principles of chemistry to understand chemistry-related technological problems confronting our society. The course includes the major concepts, vocabulary and intellectual and laboratory skills expected in any introductory chemistry course. Students will study both inorganic and organic chemistry with an emphasis on chemical structure and chemical reactions and nuclear processes and reactions. Students should be proficient in Algebra 1 skills so that students may be successful with concepts such as the mole, solution concentration, and gas laws. Prerequisites: Chemistry A (Online) Honors Chemistry Honors Chemistry is an accelerated course for students planning to major in science, medicine or engineering. It will prepare students for AP Chemistry and college-level science courses. Students will develop an understanding of the fundamental interactions of matter. Concepts include nomenclature, the mole and stoichiometry, atomic models, thermochemistry, gas laws, and types of chemical reactions. Students should have completed or are concurrently taking Algebra 2 as there is a strong emphasis on the quantitative calculations of chemistry. Honors Chemistry, Physics, and AP Physics or AP Biology may be scheduled concurrently. Students will be required to keep a lab notebook with a record of all laboratory activities. Prerequisites: Honors Biology or Biology, Algebra 1 and concurrently in Algebra 2 or higher-level math # Science Credit Physics This course explores the physical laws of matter and physical behavior. Topics include motion in one and two dimensions, forces in one and two dimensions, the laws of conservation, electrostatics and electricity, light and sound. Critical and analytical thinking are essential. A good background in mathematics, especially Algebra 1 and Geometry, is essential. Chemistry and Physics may be scheduled concurrently. Prerequisites: Biology and Geometry or GAC 2

105 Science D-43 # Science Credit Advanced Placement Courses # Science Credits NEW Microbiology & Life Structures This integrated zoology, botany, and microbiology course is designed to familiarize students with the variety of life science concepts to include studies of cells, genetics, natural selection, evolution, classification, energy exchange, roles and relationships, endangered species, and conservation. It includes a comprehensive survey of structure and function relationships of major and common animal, plant, and microbial phyla. Prerequisites: Biology A/B or Honors Biology Note: This course will be offered every other year. # Science Credits Advanced Placement Biology AP Biology is 1.5 periods long and may allow students to earn college credit. The course is designed to be the equivalent of a college introductory biology course usually taken by biology majors during their first year. Upon showing yourself qualified on the AP Examination, you may, as a college freshman, be permitted to take upper-level courses in biology or to register for courses for which biology is a prerequisite. AP Biology will include those topics regularly covered in a college biology course for majors in biology: basic chemistry, chemistry of life, cells, cell processes, molecular genetics, genetics, evolution and natural selection, organisms and populations, and ecology. The college course in biology differs significantly from the usual first high school course in biology with respect to the kind of textbook used, the range and depth of topics covered, the kind of laboratory work done by students, and the time and effort required of students. The textbook used is a college biology text. The AP Biology course has been designed to be taken by students after the successful completion of a first course in biology and one in high school chemistry. Students are encouraged to take an AP test in the spring, which has an additional charge. Summer coursework will be required. Prerequisites: Biology or Honors Biology; Honors Chemistry or Chemistry is a prerequisite or corequisite Advanced Placement Chemistry AP Chemistry is a second-year chemistry course that is 1.5 periods long and may allow students to earn college credit. The course is recommended for students who have a strong interest in the area of physical sciences. It will prepare students for post high school chemistry and science related career plans. It should be taken along with physics by all students interested in an engineering career. The main emphasis is placed on the following inorganic chemistry concepts: acids and bases, equilibrium, oxidationreduction reactions, solubility, nuclear chemistry, molecular structure, chemical bonding and energy of reactions. Laboratory work is used extensively in the course and is often a cooperative venture. Lab work involves both quantitative and qualitative analysis of compounds. Individual areas of interest in chemistry may be investigated. Students should come to the class proficient with the mole concept, applications of stoichiometry, formula names and symbols, and the mathematics of chemistry. Students who will have junior or senior status may have the opportunity to earn college credit through dual enrollment for an additional fee. Additionally, students scoring a 3 or better on the AP Chemistry Test in May will be eligible for college credit at certain colleges. If you plan to take the AP Test, there is an additional charge. Summer coursework will be required. Prerequisites: Chemistry or Honors Chemistry and Algebra 2

106 D-44 Science # Science Credits Advanced Placement Physics C: Mechanics, Electricity, and Magnetism AP Physics is 1.5 periods long and is calculus-based. This course is recommended for future scientists, engineers or those going into medicine. Approximately the first half of the year is spent on Mechanics. Topics to be studied include kinematics, Newton's laws of motion, work, conservation of energy, conservation of momentum, gravitation. The second half of the year is spent on Electricity and Magnetism. Topics to be studied include electrostatics, conductors, capacitors, electric circuits, and electromagnetism. This course is intended to help prepare students for college physics, to get into an honors college physics class, or to place out of freshman college physics altogether. Students who will have junior or senior status may have the opportunity to earn college credit through dual enrollment for an additional fee. Additionally, students scoring a 3 or better on the AP Physics Tests may be eligible for college credit at certain colleges. If you plan to take the AP Tests, there is an additional charge. Summer coursework will be required. Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in any Calculus course

107 6th Grade Hilliard City School District Science Course Sequence Grade 6-12 Please Note: A well suited science program for any student must have flexibility built in the process. Classroom and achievement data must be reviewed continuously to determine proper placement and make the appropriate program changes for students. 7th Grade 8th Grade 9th Grade 10th Grade 11th Grade 12th Grade Science 6 Science D-45 Science 7 Advanced Science 7 Science 9 Biology Course Sequence Flow Chart Science 8 Honors Science 9* Honors Science 9 Honors Biology Science Electives Chemistry Honors Chemistry Physics *This is a high school credited class. Your child s final grade will be posted on his/her high school transcript. Honors Biology Honors Chemistry AP Biology; AP Chemistry; or AP Physics AP Biology; AP Chemistry; or AP Physics Only 3 Science credits are required for high school graduation. There are a variety of Science elective options that students should consider taking to enhance their high school experience. See pages D-39 - D-44 of the high school program of studies for course descriptions and prerequisite information.

108 D-46 Social Studies Social studies courses draw upon the wealth of information and insight to be found in anthropology, history, psychology, economics, geography, political science, and sociology. The curriculum encourages students to apply the lessons of the past to the problems of the present, and to utilize investigation and problem-solving techniques to become vital participants in shaping and directing the future of our local, national, and world communities. Courses Social Studies All students are required to take World Studies 1 & 2 (or Honors World Studies), U.S. History 1 & 2 (or AP U.S. History), U.S. Government 1 & 2 (or AP U.S. Government or Liberal Democracy in America) for high school graduation. In addition to required courses, we offer a generous variety of elective classes to spark many interests. Students are encouraged to explore these many options. Social Studies Graduation Requirement (3 credits) Students must earn credit in World Studies, U.S. History, U.S. Government OR AP U.S. Government/Liberal Democracy in America # #60OL01 #60CT01.5 Social Studies Credit World Studies 1 A student who enrolls in this course must also enroll in World Studies to Present: Ninth graders complete the chronological study of world history. As students study each historical event, they consider the geographic setting, the cultural perspectives, the economic implications and the role of governments. They develop a deeper understanding of their role as a citizen and continue to expand their command of social studies skills and methods. Teacher Approval Required # #60OL02 #60CT02.5 Social Studies Credit World Studies 2 A student who enrolls in this course must also enroll in World Studies to Present: Ninth graders complete the chronological study of world history. As students study each historical event, they consider the geographic setting, the cultural perspectives, the economic implications and the role of governments. They develop a deeper understanding of their role as a citizen and continue to expand their command of social studies skills and methods. Teacher Approval Required # Social Studies Credit Honors World Studies This course is recommended for any student who took Creating America as an 8th grader or any student earns a grade of A or B in Social Studies 8 with teacher recommendation. The student is expected to have proficient written and verbal skills prior to enrollment. Honors World Studies is an accelerated and enriched World Studies course with a strong emphasis placed on extended reading and writing. This course is designed for students who anticpate taking one or more AP Social Studies course to Present: Ninth graders complete the chronological study of world history. As students study each historical event, they consider the geographic setting, the cultural perspectives, the economic implications and the role of governments. They develop a deeper understanding of their role as a citizen and continue to expand their command of social studies skills and methods. Note: Many courses offered at the high school level have fees associated with them to cover the expense of consumable materials used by students. These fees are finalized in the spring and will be attached to student accounts/schedules prior to the start of the school year.

109 Social Studies D-47 # # # #60OL05.5 Social Studies Credit.5 Social Studies Credit #60CT05 U.S. History 1 A student who enrolls in this course must also enroll in U.S. History to Present: Tenth graders complete the chronological study of the history of the United States. As students study historical events, they consider the geographic setting, the cultural perspectives, the economic implications and the role of governments. They develop a deeper understanding of their role as a citizen and continue to expand their command of social studies skills and methods. Prerequisites: World Studies 1 and 2 # #60OL06 #60CT06 Teacher Approval Required.5 Social Studies Credit Teacher Approval Required.5 Social Studies Credit U.S. History 2 A student who enrolls in this course must also enroll in U.S. History to Present: Tenth graders complete the chronological study of the history of the United States. As students study historical events, they consider the geographic setting, the cultural perspectives, the economic implications and the role of governments. They develop a deeper understanding of their role as a citizen and continue to expand their command of social studies skills and methods. Prerequisites: World Studies 1 and 2 Post World War 2 America Post World War 2 America will explore popular culture s influence in the United States from the 1950s to the present. We will study iconic films, television shows, music, sports, food, and social networking to identify how ongoing phenomenon have shaped and/or reflected American values. The identification of these effects will lead discussion of our essential question: Does popular culture truly change our perception of the world? Students will be required to develop an informed critical analysis pertaining to this essential question to exhibit their own critical viewpoints on popular culture. # Social Studies Credit Contemporary World Issues Contemporary World Issues will introduce students to various international issues facing the world today. The primary goal is to raise awareness of current events through the lens of multiple perspectives. We will develop a common language for analysis of issues while encouraging discussion of currents events. Students become aware of social, economic, cultural, and political issues that affect them in a globally multi-cultural society. Through regular screening of print and television media, an emphasis is placed on the role of the media in shaping world events and influencing public opinion. Through discussion forums, debates and guest speakers, students will evaluate the issues and propose solutions from a variety of perspectives. Sociology Man is not an island. We do not live isolated from every other person in our society. We are part of a large society that has many different lifestyles, roles and groups. This class illustrates the importance of social interaction upon the behavior of mankind. Basic institutions of society are discussed such as the family, religion and economy. Problems of our diverse society are discussed such as divorce, crime, discrimination and poverty. The class will revolve around much class discussion and participation in activities such as skits, role-playing, debates and planning a social movement. # #60OL20.5 Social Studies Credit Social Psychology Nothing fascinates man so much as his own kind. This introductory course is designed to study the psychology of man. The concepts of the development of psychology as a science, human development (from conception through death), learning, personality theory, psychological disorder, therapy, and stress and health will be covered. The student will be expected to become familiar with a variety of source materials including paperback books, magazines, newspapers and personal experiences. Two short papers are required which relate psychology to ones' own life. Class discussion will be a major facet of this course.

110 D-48 Social Studies # Social Studies Credit American History Through Film Explore American history by analyzing its portrayal through Hollywood feature films and documentaries in this elective course. Students will explore the way particular events, figures, and eras have been depicted in film. Students will comparatively analyze the historical accuracy of the films, the interpretation of history by the film-maker, and consider what films can teach us about society s view of history. # Social Studies Credit History s Mysteries History's Mysteries explores the stories, events and legends that have intrigued people for generations and started debate in countless time periods. No subject is left untouched in the quest for answers as we investigate the people, places and things that make the history of our world so fascinating. Students will develop analytical research and critical thinking skills as they explore different topics such as: the decision to use the A-Bomb; the decline of the Roman Empire; Guns, Germs and Steel in Europe; the disappearance of the Mayan Empire; the Bubonic Plague; the rise of Genghis Khan and the Mongols and much more as students will be given the freedom to explore topics based on their areas of interest. # #60OL35 #60CT35 Teacher Approval Required.5 Social Studies Credit U.S. Government 1 This course will acquaint the student with the basic principles of democracy and the essential workings of a democratic society. They entail a study of our government--focusing on the legal foundations and institutions as they relate to current political, social and economic issues. Topics include principles of Government, three branches, U. S. Constitution, and Federalism. Prerequisites: U.S. History 1 and 2 or AP U.S History and World Studies 1 and 2 # #60OL36 #60CT36 Teacher Approval Required.5 Social Studies Credit U.S. Government 2 This course will acquaint the student with the basic principles of democracy and the essential workings of a democratic society. They entail a study of our government--focusing on the legal foundations and institutions as they relate to current political, social and economic issues. Topics include principles of Government, three branches, U. S. Constitution, and Federalism. Either U.S. Government 2 or Senior Seminar U.S. Government 2 (Class of 2015 and beyond), must be taken as a complement to Government, to fulfill the senior social studies requirement. Prerequisites: U.S. History 1 and 2 or AP U.S History and World Studies 1 and 2 #60OL45.5 Social Studies Credit Economics (Online) Students acquire a working knowledge of major economic concepts, issues and systems in order to develop economic reasoning skills used to make informed choices as producers, consumers, investors, workers, and citizens in an interdependent world. Prerequisites: U.S. History 1 and 2 or AP U.S History and World Studies 1 and 2 Note: Economics is only offered online. # Social Studies Credit Liberal Democracy in America (KAP) This is a dual enrollment class. This is our introductory course to the field of American politics. Classes are taught with lectures and discussions. The course begins with a study of the American founding and the political thought of the Founders, including readings from the Federalist Papers. We then study each of the major institutions of our political system: the presidency, bureaucracy, Congress, Supreme Court, political parties and elections, and other topics. This section of the course regularly employs current events to illuminate and challenge the analyses of institutions. The course concludes with a broad overview of the character of liberal democracy, through a reading of Tocqueville s Democracy in America. Students will receive high school and college credit upon adequate completion and an additional fee. Prerequisites: Successful completion of U.S History AP Test with a 3, 4, or 5 score and Teacher Recommendation

111 Social Studies D-49 Advanced Placement Courses # Social Studies Credit # Social Studies Credit # Social Studies Credit Advanced Placement U.S. History A.P. United States History is designed to provide students with the analytic skills and factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with the problems and materials in United States history. The program prepares students for intermediate and advanced college courses by making demands upon them equivalent to those made by full-year introductory college courses. Students should learn to assess historical materials-their relevance to a given interpretive problem, their reliability, and their importance-and to weigh the evidence and interpretations presented in historical scholarship. The student must understand his/ her critical role and responsibility in group activities and should be an active participant in these processes. Summer coursework will be required. Prerequisites: World Studies 1 and 2 Advanced Placement U.S. Government This course is designed to give students a critical perspective on politics and government in the United States. It emphasizes a conceptual approach to the understanding of American politics. Two major themes are used to frame the study of American Government. The first is the conflict among the values of freedom, order, and equality in the American system. The second is looking at the system as either majoritarian or pluralistic in nature. Both of these are followed as we cover the topics of the Constitution, Federalism, Public Opinion and Political Socialization, the Mass Media, Participation and voting, Political Parties, Nominations, Campaigns and elections, Interest Groups, Congress, The Presidency, The Bureaucracy, The Courts, Order and Civil Liberties, and Equality and Civil Rights. This class also involves extensive and sophisticated outside reading as well as essay writing. The student must understand his/ her critical role and responsibility in group activities and can be an active participant in these processes. Summer coursework will be required. Prerequisites: U.S. History 1 and 2 or AP U.S History and World Studies 1 and 2 Advanced Placement European History This course will present students with information about the major trends and events of modern European history over the past 500 years. Students will learn skills necessary to analyze and synthesize historical facts and primary source documents, in order to assess the historical importance and relevance to the modern world. Course themes will focus on Europe and its influences on the world from the Renaissance through the Reformation, Scientific Revolution, Age of Nationalism, Exploration, Colonization, Political Revolutions, Industrialism, World Wars, Cold War, the end of the 20th Century and Present Day. Summer coursework will be required. Prerequisites: U.S. History 1 and 2 or AP U.S History and World Studies 1 and 2

112 D-50 Social Studies # Social Studies Credit Advanced Placement Psychology AP Psychology is designed to go beyond an introductory survey course and explore the behavioral, biological and mental processes of human beings and other animals. Students will study the psychological subfields; biopsychology, sensation and perception, abnormal behavior and treatment, as well as learning, states of consciousness, Motivation and emotion, social psychology and testing methods. Students will also learn about the ethics and methods psychologists use in their science and practices. This class involves extensive outside reading and students must be willing to participate in scenarios exploring psychological principles and experimentation. Group work where a student is an active, critical participant is also required. Summer coursework will be required. Prerequisites: U.S. History 1 and 2 or AP U.S History and World Studies 1 and 2

113 Social Studies 7 Advanced Social Studies 7 6th Grade Hilliard City School District Social Studies Course Sequence Grade 6-12 Please Note: A well suited social studies program for any student must have flexibility built in the process. Classroom and achievement data must be reviewed continuously to determine proper placement and make the appropriate program changes for students. 7th Grade 8th Grade 9th Grade 10th Grade 11th Grade 12th Grade World Studies Course Sequence Flow Chart Social Studies 6 Social Studies 8 Creating America* U.S. History U.S. Government 1 & 2 or U.S. Government 1 & Senior Seminar U.S. Government 2** Humanities Social Studies 7 AP U.S. Government** *This is a high school credited class. Your child s final grade will be posted on his/her high school transcript. **One of these course sequences/courses must be taken during the Senior year. Honors World Studies AP U.S. History AP European History or AP Psychology Liberal Democracy in America** Only 3 Social Studies credits are required for High School graduation. There are a variety of social studies elective options that students should consider taking to enhance their high school experience. See pages D-45 - D-49 of the high school program of studies for course descriptions and prerequisite information. Social Studies D-51

114 D-52 Wellness The Wellness program provides opportunities for students to gain an understanding and improve important health and skill related components, develop personal physical fitness levels, and participate in individual and team activities. All courses are focused on the development and maintenance of a healthy and active lifestyle. Courses Wellness Students must earn at least one half credit in physical education (unless eligible for a physical education waiver) and one half credit in health to meet graduation requirements. Additional courses within the wellness department may be taken as electives to assist in meeting personal health and fitness goals. Physical Education Graduation Requirement (.5 credit) Health Graduation Requirement (.5 credit) Students may waive the physical education credit requirement with participation in athletics, marching band, and/or cheerleading. See Physical Education Waiver on page A-4 for details. # # # P.E. Credit.25 P.E. Credit.25 P.E. Credit Sports and Fitness Students in this course will participate in a variety of individual and team activities. Students will have an opportunity to practice game and sportsmanship skills, participate in tournaments, and develop leadership, decisionmaking and communication skills. This class will incorporate activities to enhance lifelong recreational participation. Students will understand the components of physical fitness and the benefits of a physically active lifestyle while participating in recreational team activities. It will help the students develop activity and personal fitness plans to meet their needs now and in the future. Activities can include but are not limited to Frisbee golf, badminton, pickle ball, tennis, golf, fitness, archery, horseshoes, bocce ball, croquet, soccer, touch football, basketball, volleyball, softball, ultimate Frisbee, floor hockey and recreational games. Aerobics, Body Sculpting, and Fitness Students in this course will participate in a variety of aerobic activities, evaluate personal fitness levels, develop personal fitness goals, and demonstrate knowledge of nutrition and responsible eating plans. Activities may include but are not limited to low and high impact aerobics, circuit training, Pilates, Yoga, P90X, and Tai Bo, step aerobics, jump rope, and jogging. They will develop an understanding of the components of physical fitness and the benefits of an active lifestyle. Basic Strength Training and Fitness This course is designed for those students with little or no prior strength training experience. In this course students will be instructed in proper lifting and spotting techniques along with safety procedures. Students will be introduced to the benefits of strength training and its contributions to overall health. Workouts will be customized to meet individual s desired results. It will help the students develop activity and personal fitness plans to meet their needs now and in the future. Note: Many courses offered at the high school level have fees associated with them to cover the expense of consumable materials used by students. These fees are finalized in the spring and will be attached to student accounts/schedules prior to the start of the school year.

115 Wellness D-53 # P.E. Credit Strength Training and Conditioning for HS Athletes This class is designed for students who have had previous experience in Basic Strength Training or are currently in a sport at the HS. In this course students will receive instruction in more advanced lifting programs. Students will develop an individual strength program to benefit their individual needs. Individuals will be able to use their sport specific workouts during class time. Additional activities in this course may include but are not limited to agility training, plyometrics, flexibility development, cardiovascular conditioning and health related issues. Prerequisites: Students must be athletes who compete for a high school team or students who have completed the basic strength training class. #45OL05.25 P.E. Credit Physical Education 1 (Online) This course is designed to educate students on the importance of exercise, physical activity, and living a healthy life style. The class includes written assignments, forum discussions, and a project. The topics include fitness goals, warm-up and cool-down, FITT principles, Health and Exercise related fitness, nutrition, muscular strength, muscular endurance, cardiovascular fitness, and flexibility. Students will be given a pedometer/accelerometer to wear that will monitor daily exercise and activity. The activity will be graded weekly by the instructor. Note: Students may utilize Virtual Fitness Lab with guidance from online teacher at the Innovative Learning Center (ILC) as a part of this course. #45OL06.25 P.E. Credit Physical Education 2 (Online) This course is designed to educate students on the importance of exercise, physical activity, and living a healthy life style. The class is project based with the student taking their knowledge from Online PE 1 and exploring projects of their interest using Self Directed Learning. A total of 4 projects worth will be completed with topics that could include fitness goals, warm-up and cooldown, FITT principles, Health and Exercise related fitness, nutrition, muscular strength, muscular endurance, cardiovascular fitness, and flexibility. Students will be given a pedometer/accelerometer to wear that will monitor daily exercise and activity. The activity will be graded weekly by the instructor. Prerequisites: Physical Education 1 (Online) Note: Students may utilize Virtual Fitness Lab with guidance from online teacher at the Innovative Learning Center (ILC) as a part of this course.

116 D-54 Wellness # Elective Credit BUD/S Building Unconditional Drive/ Success. This military-style course modeled after Navy Seal training is designed to provide students the opportunity to learn skills in the following areas: self-discipline, teamwork, perseverance, integrity, character, and leadership. This class is open to both male and female students, and they will work side by side to accomplish their goals. If you choose to enroll, you will find that you are capable of ten times what you thought you were capable of. Your sense of pride in your accomplishment will lead you to even more success, both in school, and in life. # #45OL10 #45CT10 Teacher Approval Required.5 Health Credit Health How can you stay in tip-top shape, mentally, physically, and socially? This course has some of the answers. Your ability to recognize, correct and maintain a healthful condition is of utmost importance to your success in life. Topics such as Safety-First Aid-CPR, nutrition, fitness, emotions and mental health, family and reproduction, disease prevention, AIDS education and health aid consumer products will be covered. There is a minimal charge for certification and protective shields used during CPR. # Elective Credit Sports Medicine 1 This course is designed for any student interested in the biological sciences, athletic training, physical education, first aid, medicine, or other health related fields. Students will learn prevention, evaluation, management, treatment, and rehabilitation of athletic injuries. The body parts that will be covered in this class are the ankle, knee, hip, and hand. There will also be in class laboratory experiences involving basic human anatomy and common medical procedures. Note: This course does not count towards the 5.0 elective credits required by the Ohio Department of Education. # Elective Credit Sports Medicine 2 This course is designed to help those students who did well in Sports Medicine 1 and still want to learn more about the medical field. This second class will cover the anatomy, assessment and evaluation of athletic injuries to the related areas. The body parts that will be covered in this class are the elbow, shoulder, head & neck, and internal injuries. There will also be in class laboratory experiences involving basic human anatomy and common medical procedures. Prerequisites: Sports Medicine 1 Note: This course does not count towards the 5.0 elective credits required by the Ohio Department of Education.

117 Courses Intervention Intervention D-55 Enrollment in all Intervention Courses Requires Permission. Do not register for an intervention course without first consulting with a guidance counselor. COURSE TITLE* CODE CREDIT ICT 21 15MH01.50 English 9 30MH English 10 30MH English 11 30MH English 12 30MH Life Skills 1 35MH Life Skills 2 35MH Life Skills 3 35MH Life Skills 4 35MH Health 45MH10.50 Math 9 50MH Math 10 50MH Math 11 50MH Math 12 50MH Science 9A 55MH01.50 Science 9B 55MH02.50 Biology 55MH Scientific Principles of Sustainability 55MH Consumer Science 55MH World Studies 60MH U.S. History 60MH Career Social Studies 60MH Government 60MH ICT 21 15RR01.50 English 9 30RR English 10 30RR English 11 30RR English 12 30RR Adaptive Physical Education 45RR01.25 Health 45RR10.50 Math 9 50RR Math 10 50RR Math 11 50RR Math 12 50RR Science 9A 55RR01.50 Science 9B 55RR02.50 Biology A 55RR05.50 Biology B 55RR06.50 Environmental Science 55RR Scientific Principles of Sustainability 55RR World Studies 1 60RR01.50 World Studies 2 60RR02.50 U.S. History 1 60RR05.50 U.S. History 2 60RR06.50 U.S. Government1 60RR35.50 U.S. Government 2 60RR36.50 Intervention 85RR10 0 Intervention 85RR11 0 Decisions 85RR03.50 Occupational Work Study 1A 85WS Occupational Work Study 1B 85WS Occupational Work Study 2A 85WS Occupational Work Study 2B 85WS

118 D-56 Intervention COURSE TITLE* CODE CREDIT ICT 21 (co-taught) 15CT01.50 English 9A 30CT03.50 English 9B 30CT04.50 English 10A 30CT08.50 English 10B 30CT09.50 English 11A 30CT46.50 English 11B 30CT47.50 World Literature 1 30CT50.50 World Literature 2 30CT51.50 Health 10 45CT10.50 Algebra 1A 50CT02.50 Algebra 1B 50CT03.50 Algebra 1 w/workshop A 50CT12.50 Algebra 1 w/workshop B 50CT13.50 Geometry & Algebra Connections 1A (GAC 1A) 50CT17.50 Geometry & Algebra Connections 1B (GAC 1B) 50CT18.50 Geometry & Algebra Connections 2A (GAC 2A) 50CT27.50 Geometry & Algebra Connections 2B (GAC 2B) 50CT28.50 Algebra 2A 50CT32.50 Algebra 2B 50CT33.50 Science 9A 55CT01.50 Science 9B 55CT02.50 Biology A 55CT05.50 Biology B 55CT06.50 Scientific Principles of Sustainability A 55CT23.50 Scientific Principles of Sustainability B 55CT24.50 World Studies 1 60CT01.50 World Studies 2 60CT02.50 U.S. History 1 60CT05.50 U.S. History 2 60CT06.50 U.S. Government 1 60CT35.50 U.S. Government 2 60CT36.50 * See specific content areas for course descriptions unless noted below.

119 Intervention D-57 #55MH40 #30RR05 #30RR75 1 Science Credit 1 English Credit 1 English Credit Consumer Science Science instruction will be based on individual IEP goals and objectives as well as a focus on basic concepts such as cooking, measurement (inch, foot, etc.), Human Body Systems, Basic Ecosystem, Weather and Seasons, States of Matter, Rock and Minerals, Environmental Issues, Recycling, Solar System, Ocean Life, Animals, and Plant Life. #60MH65 #30RR01 1 English Credit English 9 English 9 is a rigorous intervention class that will focus on a student s individual needs within spelling, vocabulary, reading, comprehension, grammar, fluency, and writing processes and conventions. Students will use the READ 180 Intervention Program with an intense focus on literacy acceleration through skills-based texts and activities. English 9 is a double-period class in which students rotate among whole group instruction, independent reading stations, technology components, small group instruction with teacher, and small group activities. 1 Social Studies Credit Career Social Studies Basic use of maps to find cities and states, directional and geographical landform. Students will also explore their role as citizens, the constitution, basic U.S. government, elections, national symbols, and current events. English 10 English 10 is a rigorous intervention class that will focus on a student s individual needs within spelling, vocabulary, reading, comprehension, grammar, fluency, and writing processes and conventions. Students will use the READ 180 Intervention Program with an intense focus on literacy acceleration through skills-based texts and activities. English 10 is a double-period class in which students rotate among whole group instruction, independent reading stations, technology components, small group instruction with teacher, and small group activities. Prerequisites: English 9 #30RR45 1 English Credit English 11 English 11 is a rigorous intervention class that will focus on a student s individual needs within spelling, vocabulary, reading, comprehension, grammar, fluency, and writing processes and conventions. Students will use the READ 180 Intervention Program with an intense focus on literacy acceleration through skills-based texts and activities. English 11 is a double-period class in which students rotate among whole group instruction, independent reading stations, technology components, small group instruction with teacher, and small group activities. Prerequisites: English 10 English 12 English 12 is a rigorous intervention class that will focus on a student s individual needs within spelling, vocabulary, reading, comprehension, grammar, fluency, and writing processes and conventions. Students will use the READ 180 Intervention Program with an intense focus on literacy acceleration through skills-based texts and activities. English 12 is a double-period class in which students rotate among whole group instruction, independent reading stations, technology components, small group instruction with teacher, and small group activities. Prerequisites: English 11 #50RR01 1 Math Credit Math 9 This course focuses on the state standards including number sense, measurement, geometry, algebra, data analysis, probability and mathematical processes. #50RR02 1 Math Credit Math 10 This course focuses on the state standards including number sense, measurement, geometry, algebra, data analysis, probability and mathematical processes.

120 D-58 Intervention #50RR03 #85WS07 1 Math Credit 1-2 Elective Credits Math 11 This course focuses on the state standards including number sense, measurement, geometry, algebra, data analysis, probability and mathematical processes. #50RR04 1 Math Credit Math 12 This course focuses on the state standards including number sense, measurement, geometry, algebra, data analysis, probability and mathematical processes. #85WS05 #85WS08 Occupational Work Study 2A Occupational Work Study 2B Work Study 2 involves paid community employment. **More or less credit may be awarded. Note: This program can be used to fulfill the Senior Capstone graduation requirement (Class of 2015 and beyond). Additional work will be required above and beyond students not using the course as a Capstone experience. Course must be taken during the Senior year to count as a Capstone. #85RR Elective Credits.5-2 Elective Credits 0 Credit #85WS Elective Credits Occupational Work Study 1A Occupational Work Study 1B Work Study 1 involves in-school workstations and volunteer community sites. **More or less credit may be awarded. Note: This program can be used to fulfill the Senior Capstone graduation requirement (Class of 2015 and beyond). Additional work will be required above and beyond students not using the course as a Capstone experience. Course must be taken during the Senior year to count as a Capstone. Intervention Designed to provide individual and small group study support to increase student achievement in all content areas. #85RR03.5 Elective Credit Decisions Supported study hall designed to improve decision-making skills and coping skills in order to improve student success in the school setting.

121 Extended Learning Opportunities Exploring Programs/Zoo School D-59 Exploring Exploring is the Simon Kenton Council s (Boy Scouts of America) career education program for young men and women who are 14 through 20 years old. Exploring s purpose is to provide experiences to help youth mature and prepare them to become responsible and caring adults. Exploring is based on a unique and dynamic relationship between youth and the organizations in their communities. Local businesses and organizations initiate an Explorer post by matching their professionals and program resources to the interests of the youth in the community. The result is a program of activities that helps youth pursue their special interests, grow and develop. Explorer post meetings take place at the actual worksite after the school day about once a month during the school year (time commitment and schedule vary by posts). Benefits for students involved in Exploring include: Gain practical knowledge and experience in a career Engage in a program of activities which will encourage personal and career development Experience positive leadership from adult mentors Build relationships with working professional in their career choice Great experiences to talk about in job interviews The Columbus Zoo offers a half day high school experience for juniors and seniors who are interested in zoology, veterinary medicine or other related studies. The Zoo School is designed to give students greater insight and understanding of the excitement and demands of science. The program curriculum is zoology driven, research focused, rich in the use of technology and application based. Admission to the Zoo School is selective, and seats are limited. Student qualities include self-motivated/ directed learner, responsible, reliable and curious with a desire to produce high-quality work. Students earn high school credits in science, math and an elective. College credits are also available. The student s family is responsible for assuring that daily round trip transportation is provided for their student. Interested students should contact their guidance counselor to learn more and discuss application procedures early in their high school career to ensure deadlines are met. Elective credit can be earned through Exploring in a variety of content areas. The credit is earned through the district s credit flexibility program. To be eligible for credit, students must complete an Educational Options Credit Flexibility application and proposal AND receive approval from the district credit flexibility committee. The details about earning credit through credit flexibility and Exploring can be found on the school district s website at For more details, contact the Simon Kenton Council at

122 D-60 Mosaic/Tolles Extended Learning Opportunities Mosaic is sponsored by the Education Council. It is designed as a two year experience for high school juniors and seniors, although seniors may enter the program for a one year experience. The curriculum is project-based, integrating English, social studies, art and cultural studies. Students receive one credit each for English and social studies and one-half credit each for cultural studies and art. First year participants attend their home school in the morning and then attend Mosaic from 12:45-2:50 pm. Second year participants attend Mosaic from 8:00-10:00 am and return to their home school in the afternoon. In the spirit of community involvement, Mosaic classes are based at the First Congregation Church, 499 E. Broad St. Classes also meet at the Columbus Metropolitan Library, The Ohio State University, First Congregational Church, Wexner Center for the Arts and the Columbus Museum of Art. The most successful candidates have a strong commitment to independent learning, are capable of assuming responsibility for self-direction, work well with others, and have an interest in multicultural/ global issues and/or the arts. The student s family is responsible for assuring that daily round trip transportation is provided for their student. Students interested in participating in Mosaic should contact their guidance counselor. There are a limited number of seats available for Hilliard students in this program. City Schools, students are expected to meet graduation requirements in order to graduate from their respective Hilliard high school. In addition to receiving their high school diploma, students who successfully complete a Tolles program will receive a Certificate of Completion and Career Passport from the Center. Tolles offers a full range of college preparatory academics and Spanish. Tolles provides students with several opportunities to receive college credit through the dual enrollment and articulation agreements. Articulation agreements with several central Ohio two- and four-year colleges provide students with the opportunity to receive college credit for successful completion of certain programs. Many Tolles students continue their education at the post-secondary level, receiving over $600,000 in college scholarships last year. Full-day and half-day options are available to students. Students may choose to take their academics at a Hilliard High School or at Tolles. Transportation is provided to and from the Center. Entrance Requirements Admission requirements to attend Tolles include a minimum of eight (8) high school credits (including six core course requirements in English, Math, Science, and Social Studies). Students with three years of high school must have ten (10) high school credits with eight core courses. It is strongly suggested that students satisfy their Health and Physical Education credits prior to attending Tolles. Additional prerequisites may be required depending on the program. Additional Information For more information about Tolles, please contact your Hilliard counselor or call Tolles at (614) ; alternatively, visit the Tolles website at Tolles offers tuition-free career & technical programming to students who are interested in pursuing their education at a two- or four-year university; students interested in pursuing a career immediately after high school; or a combination of both. As Tolles is considered an extension of Hilliard

123 Extended Learning Opportunities Tolles D-61 # # Animal Management & Services If you have a love for animals, then this might be the profession for you. Use your nurturing spirit to handle, manage, groom and care for little creatures while becoming equally proficient in the office environment catering to their needs. Agriculture & Environmental Pathway Sports Turf and Landscape Management Do you want to be a future leader for the Green Industry? Whether you re working on a sports field, landscape, golf course or in a greenhouse, you will enjoy developing skills to become part of this budding billion dollar industry. Art & Communication Pathway # Digital Media Production Lights, camera, action! From originating an idea to executing it through channels such as TV, radio, and digital photography, this is your shot to record, edit and script out the future. # Art, Design & Communications An eye for color, art and layout will help you design the future as you work your way through illustration and computerized methods to produce a vibrant portfolio. Business, Finance & Marketing Pathway # # Academy INC at the McVey Innovative Learning Center Academy INC is for the college bound student that is interested in pursuing a career in business See page E-8 for more information. Global Logistics Management Students will gain the cutting edge components of the business world: Logistics and Supply Chain Management. Students will learn the fast paced world of the industry to include: Business Concepts, Interactive Management, Economics, Supply Chain, Procurement, Microsoft Suite, Accounting, Basic Bookkeeping, Operations, Marketing, Traffic and Transportation, Channel Partnering, Inventory Control and Management, Purchasing, Export/Import, Materials Control, Warehousing, and Public Relations, as well as 21st century skills. A dynamic partnership between secondary, postsecondary, and business and industry will allow students opportunities for college and career readiness to include 2 years of High School work, 2 years of Community College work, and 2 years of University work for a fast paced, fast track entrance into a career.

124 D-62 Tolles Extended Learning Opportunities Construction Technology Pathway # Construction Technology Students will be introduced to the many aspects of construction technology. Students will gain skills in carpentry, tools, safety, structural systems, blueprint reading, HVAC, plumbing, electrical, and equipment related to the industry. After students complete the program they can enter the workforce, continue their education through apprentice programs or pursue a degree in Construction Management. Education & Training Pathway # # Academy EDU at the McVey Innovative Learning Center Designed as an introduction to the teaching field, students get an indepth view of the teaching profession and hands-on experience working with children. See page E-7 for more information. Early Childhood Education Guide little ones as they take those instrumental first steps in education. Study child nutrition, curriculum, center operation and many other building blocks to success. Health Sciences Pathway # Pharmacy Technician Are you fascinated by modern medicine? Do you like to help people? Come get a healthy dose of what pharmacy is all about. Study medical terminology, safety practices, calculating and dispensing. This might be the exact prescription for you! # Sports & Fitness Don t stand on the sidelines any longer. We ve got the training to help you get in the game! Safety practices, exercise therapies, athletic taping and sports nutrition are just some of the courses that will give you the competitive edge in this exciting field. # Pre-Nursing If caring for and assisting others is in your nature, then foster your future with us. Be trained in diseases and disorders, medical terminology and patient care skills. Become a vital part of the healthcare field. # Health Professionals Academy HPA is for the student that is interested in pursuing a career in a medical related field. See page E-9 for more information. # Pre-Veterinary Technician Channel your fondness for animals into a lucrative career. Join us for training in preventative animal care and lab animal medicine then embrace your days tending to some fun creatures!

125 Extended Learning Opportunities Tolles D-63 Hospitality Services Pathway # Culinary Arts Already know your way around a kitchen and want to become a cuisine expert? Craft your skills with us. From nutrition and menus to baking and food preparation, we ve got all the right elements to help you cook up a new experience. Human Services Pathway # Cosmetology Give your future a makeover! Discover the latest hair coloring and styling techniques as well as skin care and nail application in this specialized course. Code U Students interested in careers in computer programming or software development, should consider enrolling in one or more of the courses in the offered through Code U. Courses range from exploratory to advanced and are designed to spark the interests of all learners. Students can learn basic programming, explore computer game design, and advance in to creating computer and mobile applications. For the advanced computer science student, Advanced Placement Computer Science A is available for college credit. See page D-8 for a list of courses. Information Technology Pathway # Computer Network & Support Technology Are you hard-wired with an insight for technology? Want to be equipped when it comes to hardware and software challenges? Then let us show you how to configure an exciting future supporting the latest business operating systems. # Interactive Media In this program, formerly called Video Game Software Design, students will explore all the facets of this innovative industry: Video Game Design and Animation, App Design, Web Design, and Graphic Design. Students will be exposed to many additional facets of the industry to include marketing, business concepts, customer service, program code writing, aesthetics of design modalities, website building and design, as well as 21st century skills. Tolles is the only high school in the United States equipped with an Organic Motion Capture System that allows for students to include real-life movement into their designs. The program is articulated to classes at Columbus State and allows for students to earn college credit while enrolled in high school with no cost to the student s family.

126 D-64 Tolles Extended Learning Opportunities Law & Public Safety Pathway # Criminal Justice Ready to investigate a new career path? We ve got all the evidence you need to make a conclusive decision. Study patrol procedures, crime scene investigation, self defense and security training as part of this extensive program. # Firefighting/Emergency Medical Service Want to be first on the scene to help others? Then jump on board and receive concentrated instruction in fire equipment operation, search and rescue, and emergency care. We ve got the gear to dispatch you into an exhilarating career. Manufacturing & Engineering Pathway # Engineering & Manufacturing Technology Become the mastermind behind 3D models, AutoCAD, hydraulics and pneumatics, electronics, robotics, architectural drafting, solar, geothermal, and wind energies. Gain an understanding of how things work through hands-on projects. Great jobs are waiting for those with a variety of experience in these fields. Get it here! # Welding & Fabrication Technologies Flash forward to opportunity. Gain the skill and knowledge to secure the best industry jobs. Learn to read blueprints, SMAW, GMAW, GTAW and many other welding & fabrication technologies. Transportation Systems Pathway # Automotive Technologies Identify with engines and like to make systems run smoothly? Here s the key to your future. Troubleshoot and computer analyze; then learn to diagnose and repair everything from electrical units to brakes and steering systems. # Automotive Collision Technologies Get a comprehensive education that is custom made for you. Acquire skills such as frame repair, welding and refinishing techniques, estimating and detailing everything you will need to make vehicles look their best. # Power, Sports & Diesel Technologies This program is designed to build a strong mechanical aptitude that can be applied to many different career paths. Students will diagnose and repair chainsaws, mowers, trimmers, motorcycles, ATVs, compact tractors, diesel motors, and hydraulic systems. Preventative maintenance, shop safety, electronic fuel injection, brake systems, diesel motors, hydraulics, engine rebuilding, fuel system service, suspension systems and technical troubleshooting are just a few of the skills one will acquire.

127 Extended Learning Opportunities Tolles/Independent Study D-65 Students who attend the Tolles for the eleventh and twelfth grade years are to successfully complete 21.5 credits: English 4 Credits Health 1/2 Credit Social Studies 2 Credits P.E. *** 1/2 Credit U.S. History 1/2 Credit Info. & Communication Tech. 21 1/2 Credit U.S. Govt. 1/2 Credit Elective ** 1 Credit Science * 3 Credits Electives 5 1/2 Credits Math 3 Credits Senior Capstone**** 1/2 Credit *One unit Biology and one unit Physical Science **One unit or two half units from: Fine Arts, Foreign Language, or Business Technology (any course in the Business, Computer Science, or Pre-Engineering Program) Tolles Labs count toward this elective. ***Students may waive the physical education requirement with participation in athletics, marching band, and/or cheerleading (see page A-4). Students who pursue this option must earn one half elective credit in another subject-area to meet the minimum credit requirement for graduation (21 credits). ****The Senior Capstone graduation requirement will be fulfilled in cooperation with the students respective building capstone coach. Students who attend Tolles and return to their home school shall complete the prescribed requirements for graduation as indicated on page A-1 and A-2. Independent Study Recognizing that learning situations must be organized in such a fashion as to influence the ebb and flow of student interests, the Independent Study may be offered to the student who is willing to abide by the following: 1. The student must be able and willing to work independently of the classroom teacher. 2. The student will arrange with a sponsoring teacher a mutually agreeable number of conferences for organizing, planning, and evaluating the Independent Study. 3. The student will meet all teacher requirements, guidelines and deadlines for an Independent Study. 4. The building principal will certify that the study has been completed satisfactorily and will award all credit for the study. (This will be done in concert with the sponsoring teacher.) 5. Only a final grade is recorded for an Independent Study. Independent Study grades will not be factored into the student s grade point average until course work is completed and posted. Independent Study grades will not show on the report card; however, the final grade will appear on the student s transcript. 6. Any fees required for the course will be paid by the student and/or parent. 7. This Independent Study is to be completed by a date established by the principal or his/her designee.

128 D-66 Correspondence Courses Extended Learning Opportunities Correspondence Courses Recognizing that systematic instruction by mail or electronic media between a pupil and instructor is sometimes desirable, students may be permitted to participate in correspondence study with the following guidelines: 1. Total costs of correspondence study will be the student s/parent s responsibility. 2. The course must be selected from a districtapproved list. 3. The student s guidance counselor must approve all correspondence courses and all paperwork must be submitted prior to beginning any coursework. 4. The ultimate responsibility for the timely completion of the correspondence course rests with the student. 5. Class placement and graduation are dependent on the timely receipt of grade(s). This is the responsibility of the student. Course should be completed by May 10 th. 6. Only a final grade is recorded for a Correspondence Course. Correspondence course grades will not be factored into the student s grade point average until course work is completed and posted. Correspondence Course grades will not show on the report card; however, the final grade will appear on the student s transcript. Requests to not record a correspondence course grade will not be considered. Students using a Correspondence course for first time credit are encouraged to seek approval through the Credit Flexibility program prior to beginning the course.

129 Subject Codes Subject Codes D-67 SUBJECT CODE SHEET Code Course Title Credit ART Drawing Drawing Drawing Ceramics Ceramics Ceramics Ceramics Art Appreciation Art Appreciation Sculpture Sculpture Painting Painting Painting Photography Photography Photography Media Arts Media Arts Art Portfolio AP Studio Art Portfolio/2D Design 1.00 BUSINESS Information & Communication Technology Accounting Accounting Desktop Publishing PC Applications Principles of Entrepreneurship Marketing Personal Finance Legal Studies College Fundamentals Sports & Entertainment Management Business Innovation.50 CODE U Programming Object Oriented Programming Game Design Computer and Mobile Applications AP Computer Science A 1.00

130 D-68 Subject Codes Subject Codes Code Course Title Credit ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS English 9A English 9B Honors English English 10A English 10B Honors English AP English Language & Composition AP English Literature & Composition Media Communication Journalism Production Classical Literature Classical Literature British Literature British Literature Writer s Craft L.E.A.P L.E.A.P L.E.A.P. 11r English 11A English 11B Honors American Literature World Literature World Literature Speech, Debate & Public Discourse Yearbook Production Leadership Development Literature of World Theatre Literature of World Theatre 2.50 ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS (ELL) 30EL01 Basic ELL EL02 Intermediate ELL EL03 Intermediate ELL EL40 E - L.E.A.P EL44 E - L.E.A.P EL01 Basic ELL Math EL01 Basic ELL Science EL01 Basic ELL Social Studies EL01 Supported Studies.00 15SH01 Information & Communication Technology SH10 Health.50 50SH02 Algebra 1 A.50 50SH03 Algebra 1B.50 55SH01 Science 9A.50 55SH02 Science 9B.50 55SH05 Biology A.50 55SH06 Biology B.50 60SH01 World Studies SH02 World Studies SH05 U.S. History SH06 U.S. History SH35 U.S. Government SH36 U.S. Government 2.50

131 Subject Codes Subject Codes D-69 Code Course Title Credit FAMILY & CONSUMER SCIENCES Careers and Money Management Personal Decisions Design: Fashion, Textiles & Interiors Foods For Healthy Living Global Gourmet Financial Independence Human Development & Relationships Advanced Child Development Career Mentorship Career Mentorship GRADS GRADS GRADS GRADS 4.50 WORLD LANGUAGE French French French AP French French German German German AP German German Spanish Spanish Spanish AP Spanish Spanish Chinese Chinese Chinese Chinese MATHEMATICS Algebra 1 A Algebra 1 B Algebra 1 w/workshop A Algebra 1 w/workshop B Geometry & Algebra Connections 1A (GAC 1A) Geometry & Algebra Connections 1B (GAC 1B) Geometry Geometry & Algebra Connections 2A (GAC 2A) Geometry & Algebra Connections 2B (GAC 2B) Honors Algebra Algebra 2 A Algebra 2 B Algebra Pre-Calculus AP Statistics Calculus AP Calculus AB AP Calculus BC 1.00

132 D-70 Subject Codes Subject Codes Code Course Title Credit PERFORMING ARTS Introduction to Theatre Theatrical Design & Production Theatrical Performance Production & Performance Concert Band Symphonic Band Wind Ensemble Honors Wind Ensemble Percussion Ensemble Rock Band Concert Choir - Soprano Concert Choir - Tenor Choir Choir Honors Choir Concert Orchestra Symphony Orchestra Chamber Orchestra Honors Chamber Orchestra Jazz Ensemble Music Theory Music Theory Music History Music History Color Guard.25 PRE-ENGINEERING PROGRAM Introduction to Engineering Design Principles of Engineering Digital Electronics Engineering Design & Development Introduction to Engineering Design Women in Engr SCIENCE Science 9A Science 9B Honors Science Biology A Biology B Honors Biology AP Biology Human Anatomy & Physiology Human Anatomy & Physiology Astronomy.50

133 Subject Codes Subject Codes D-71 Code Course Title Credit SCIENCE (continued) Scientific Principles of Sustainability A Scientific Principles of Sustainability B Chemistry Honors Chemistry AP Chemistry Physics AP Physics C Introduction to Forensic Science Freshwater and Marine Ecosystems Microbiology & Life Structures.50 SOCIAL STUDIES World Studies World Studies Honors World Studies U.S. History U.S. History AP U.S. History Post World War 2 America Contemporary World Issues Sociology Social Psychology American History Through Film History s Mysteries U.S. Government U.S. Government AP U.S. Government AP European History Liberal Democracy in America AP Psychology 1.00 WELLNESS Health Sports Medicine Sports Medicine Sports and Fitness Aerobics, Body Sculpting, and Fitness Basic Strength Training and Fitness Strength Training and Conditioning for HS Athletes BUD/S.25 INNOVATIVE LEARNING CENTER Academy INC Academy EDU Academy VIBE Option On-Air A ILC Studio Health Professionals Academy On-Air B College Jumpstart Network Year 1 Varies College Jumpstart Network Year 2 Varies

134 D-72 Subject Codes Subject Codes Code Course Title Credit INTERVENTION 15CT01 ICT 21 (Co-taught).50 30CT03 English 9A.50 30CT04 English 9B.50 30CT08 English 10A.50 30CT09 English 10B.50 30CT46 English 11A.50 30CT47 English 11B.50 30CT50 World Literature CT51 World Literature CT10 Health CT02 Algebra 1A.50 50CT03 Algebra 1B.50 50CT12 Algebra 1 w/workshop A.50 50CT13 Algebra 1 w/workshop B.50 50CT17 Geometry & Algebra Connections 1A (GAC 1A).50 50CT18 Geometry & Algebra Connections 1B (GAC 1B).50 50CT27 Geometry & Algebra Connections 2A (GAC 2A).50 50CT28 Geometry & Algebra Connections 2B (GAC 2B).50 50CT32 Algebra 2A.50 50CT33 Algebra 2B.50 55CT01 Science 9A.50 55CT02 Science 9B CT05 Biology A.50 55CT06 Biology B.50 55CT23 Scientific Principles of Sustainability A CT24 Scientific Principles of Sustainability B CT01 World Studies CT02 World Studies CT05 U.S. History CT06 U.S. History CT35 U.S. Government CT36 U.S. Government MH01 ICT MH01 English MH05 English MH45 English MH75 English MH01 Life Skills MH02 Life Skills MH03 Life Skills MH04 Life Skills MH10 Health.50 50MH01 Math MH02 Math MH03 Math MH04 Math MH01 Science 9A.50 55MH02 Science 9B.50 55MH05 Biology MH25 Scientific Principles of Sustainability MH40 Consumer Science MH01 World Studies MH05 U.S. History MH65 Social Studies MH35 Government 1.00

135 Subject Codes Subject Codes D-73 Code Course Title Credit INTERVENTION (continued) 15RR01 ICT RR01 English RR05 English RR45 English RR75 English RR01 Adaptive Physical Education.25 45RR10 Health.50 50RR01 Math RR02 Math RR03 Math RR04 Math RR01 Science 9A.50 55RR02 Science 9B.50 55RR05 Biology A.50 55RR06 Biology B.50 55RR15 Environmental Science RR25 Scientific Principles of Sustainability RR01 World Studies RR02 World Studies RR05 U.S. History RR06 U.S. History RR35 U.S. Government RR36 U.S. Government RR10 Intervention 0 85RR11 Intervention 0 85RR03 Decisions.50 85WS05 Occupational Work Study 1A WS06 Occupational Work Study 1B WS07 Occupational Work Study 2A WS08 Occupational Work Study 2B ONLINE 10OL45 2D Visual Art.50 15OL01 ICT OL36 Personal Finance.50 30OL01 English 9A.50 30OL03 English 9B.50 30OL05 English 10A.50 30OL06 English 10B.50 30OL45 English 11A.50 30OL46 English 11B.50 30OL72 British Literature OL74 British Literature OL04 Contemporary Literature**.50 **Credit Recovery Course for Seniors only 30OL15 Media Communication A.50 30OL16 Media Communication B.50 30OL02 Media Awareness.50 30OL55 Speech, Debate & Public Discourse.50 **Only offered as a part of ILC On-Air A 30OL65 Leadership Development.50 35OL01 Careers and Money Management.50 35OL05 Personal Decisions.50 35OL25 Financial Independence.50 40OL10 German 1A.50 40OL11 German 1B.50

136 D-74 Subject Codes Subject Codes Code Course Title Credit ONLINE (continued) 40OL20 Spanish 1A.50 40OL21 Spanish 1B.50 45OL05 Physical Education OL06 Physical Education OL10 Health.50 50OL11 Algebra 1A.50 50OL12 Algebra 1B.50 50OL17 Geometry & Algebra Connections 1A (GAC 1A).50 50OL27 Geometry & Algebra Connections 1B (GAC 1B).50 50OL18 Geometry & Algebra Connections 2A (GAC 2A).50 50OL28 Geometry & Algebra Connections 2B (GAC 2B).50 50OL21 Geometry A.50 50OL22 Geometry B.50 50OL31 Algebra 2A.50 50OL32 Algebra 2B.50 50OL41 Functions, Statistics, & Trigonometry A (FST A).50 50OL42 Functions, Statistics, & Trigonometry B (FST B).50 55OL51 Science 9A.50 55OL52 Science 9B.50 55OL08 Biology A.50 55OL09 Biology B.50 55OL15 Environmental Science.50 55OL23 Scientific Principles of Sustainability A.50 55OL24 Scientific Principles of Sustainability B.50 55OL26 Chemistry A.50 55OL27 Chemistry B.50 55OL40 Freshwater & Marine Ecosystems.50 60OL01 World Studies OL02 World Studies OL05 U.S. History OL06 U.S. History OL20 Social Psychology.50 60OL35 U.S. Government OL36 U.S. Government OL45 Economics.50

137 Innovative Learning Center E Contents The ILC E-1 College Jumpstart Network E-2 Academy VIBE E-3 ON-AIR E-4 ILC STUDIO E-5 Career Mentorship E-6 Academy EDU E-7 Academy INC E-8 Health Professionals Academy E-9 Personal Success Network E-10 Senior Capstone Experience E-11

138 The Innovative Learning Center The ILC E-1 Revolutionary ideas & experiences That customize learning to meet The educational needs of our community.

139 E-2 College Jumpstart Network College Jumpstart Network This network is designed for the student who wants to experience higher education during their high school career. Through a partnership with local institutes of higher learning students will be able to enroll in college level courses participate in dual enrollment courses on-site, and/or earn college credits prior to graduation. This network is truly for the student who wants to personalize their learning by getting a jumpstart on their college career. Two year comprehensive dual enrollment experience that will allow Hilliard City School students the opportunity to graduate with credit hours from Columbus State Community College: # Credits May Vary First Year (14 Semester Hours) Autumn Semester Spring Semester # Credits May Vary COLS ASC ENGL English PSY SOC Total Sem. Hrs. 7 Total Sem. Hrs 7 Second Year (12-18 Semester Hours) Autumn Semester Spring Semester POLS POLS COMM PHIL *Student Choice 0-3 *Student Choice 0-3 Total Sem. Hrs 9 Total Sem. Hrs 9 *Denotes Student Choice: Students have the choice to select any course at CSCC on campus or online OR Students have the choice to elect Fridays as a work session at the Innovative Learning Center. Students plugging into the College Jumpstart Network will attend classes at the Innovative Learning Center for block of time identified by 90 minutes. The following is an example of a typical week, but may not be an exact representation of a week in regards to the time courses are offered or held. Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday 7:30am-9:00am ENGL 1100 PSY 1100 ENGL 1100 PSY 1100 COLS 1100 Please see the College Credit Plus information beginning on page B-31 for more information regarding entrance requirements and tuition costs.

140 Imagination Network Academy VIBE E-3 This network is designed for the student who wants to creatively explore learning through the lens of the humanities. Advanced levels of the arts, language, and other forms of expression encompass the framework for this individualized experience. This network is for the student who wants to discover unique ways for imaginative learning. Have you ever wanted to record live music in a real recording studio? Do you want to learn cover songs and record original music? Video and edit your own original music video? Academy VIBE will combine the industries of music and digital media for a once and lifetime school experience. # Elective Credits ACADEMY VIBE Academy Vibe is for the student that is interested in performing musically, growing as an artist, and learning how to make professional recordings. Along with the music industry, students will be exposed to video production and learning the needed skills to produce, film, and edit a professional production. Rock Band Media Communication # Elective Credit # Elective Credit Groups/individuals will audition to enroll in this experience that will teach fundamentals of performing and working in today s music industry. Students will experience individual and small group coaching, learn cover songs, and eventually compose and perform their own original music. Students will also learn the basics of sound engineering and music technology. Registering for Rock Band does not guarantee your participation. Application and video instructions will be provided. Students participating in Rock Band will record at the professional recording studio located in the Innovative Learning Center. This course is an elective and does not count towards the four credits in English required for graduation. Students will learn the basics of communication through study of theory, current practice, and application. Students will develop expertise in concept development; audience analysis; message analysis; organization; collaboration; problem solving; computer/video/ technology usage; informational, creative, and persuasive writing and speaking; illustration; and self-assessment. It will also promote interscholastic projects between students and other departments within the school and the school district.

141 E-4 ON-AIR Imagination Network This network is designed for the student who wants to creatively explore learning through the lens of the humanities. Advanced levels of the arts, language, and other forms of expression encompass the framework for this individualized experience. This network is for the student who wants to discover unique ways for imaginative learning. Do you want to be an on screen talent? Anchor, Host, Producer, Director? Interested in producing a weekly show for production using a professionally lit and green screen technology studio? ON-AIR (A and B) ON-AIR is for the student that is interested in being an on screen talent, anchor, host, or more along with students that are interested in working behind the scenes as a television producer, director, or more. This semester long course will teach the foundations of broadcast communications both technically and performance based. ON-AIR A # Elective Credit Broadcast Media Communications # Elective Credit #30OL Elective Credit This course is an elective and does not count towards the four credits in English required for graduation. Students will learn the basics of broadcast communication through authentic on-set experiences, current practice, and application. It will also promote interscholastic projects between students and other departments within the school and the school district with a heavy emphasis on running a daily news program. Speech, Debate and Public Discourse (0nline) This course is an elective and does not count towards the four credit English requirement for graduation. Students taking speech will focus on all aspects of 21st Century communication skills from group discussion to interview skills to informative and persuasive speeches. Students will read, analyze, and critique exemplary examples of speech and public discourse. Students will engage in the writing of speeches with multiple drafts with explicit feedback from the instructor. In addition, students will utilize data bases, internet-based resources, electronic and media resources, and engage in debate on a variety of real world topics. ON-AIR B # Elective Credit Broadcast Media Communications Student Choice of Online Course from HCSD # Elective Credit This course is an elective and does not count towards the four credits in English required for graduation. Students will learn the basics of broadcast communication through authentic on-set experiences, current practice, and application. It will also promote interscholastic projects between students and other departments within the school and the school district with a heavy emphasis on running a daily news program. 0.5 Elective Credit

142 Imagination Network ILC Studio E-5 This network is designed for the student who wants to creatively explore learning through the lens of the humanities. Advanced levels of the arts, language, and other forms of expression encompass the framework for this individualized experience. This network is for the student who wants to discover unique ways for imaginative learning. Do you want to: Create short films? Produce public service announcements? Write your own script? Act in or produce your own film? Enhance your film skills? ILC STUDIO # Elective Credits Studio is for the advanced level media production student. This course is designed as a more independent experience that will provide the student the opportunity to test their skill limit. Do you have a passion for writing a screenplay? A desire to direct your own short film? Film a documentary to raise awareness on a certain topic? Then ILC STUDIO is for you. # Elective Credit Media Communication This course is an elective and does not count towards the four credits in English required for graduation. Students will learn the basics of communication through study of theory, current practice, and application. Students will develop expertise in concept development; audience analysis; message analysis; organization; collaboration; problem solving; computer/video/technology usage; informational, creative, and persuasive writing and speaking; illustration; and selfassessment. It will also promote interscholastic projects between students and other departments within the school and the school district. #30OL65.5 Elective Credit Leadership Development This course is an elective and does not count towards the four credit English requirement for graduation. Through reading, researching and school-related projects, students will develop the necessary knowledge, attitudes, and skills to fulfill leadership opportunities in the school setting. An emphasis will be placed on developing effective written and spoken communication skills, habits characteristic of effective teens, and group skills including team building, conflict resolution, and stress management. Students will be asked to participate in group projects that benefit others in order to apply effective decision-making, communication, and critical thinking. This course may count as an English or Business elective, but not both. Students will need to purchase the resource book for this class. # One semester.5 Elective Credit Writer s Craft This course is an elective and does not count towards the four credit English required for graduation. Selected poems, short stories, and scripts will be used as examples to engage the student in an active appreciation of how to compose his/ her own creative literature. Students will experience a workshop environment in which they will be expected to comment, critique, and analyze other students' work as well as share their own. At the conclusion of the course, a semester project will be presented to show the growth of the writer throughout the semester.

143 E-6 Career Mentorship Young Professionals Network This network is designed for the student who wants to experience school through authentic learning opportunities outside the classroom. Whether a student is active in a career mentorship role or enrolled in teacher or entrepreneur academies, this network is built for them. The Young Professionals Network is for the student who wants to personalize their learning through authentic real world experiences while becoming a young professional. Do you want to learn from professionals who are willing to offer experience and expertise in the career field you may wish to pursue in the future? Would you like to have authentic experiences while in high school that includes mentorships, internships, and seminars? # # Elective Credit 1 Elective Credit Career Mentorship 1 Career Mentorship is offered to junior and senior high school students to experience a career they may be interested in pursuing. By gaining a first-hand look at a career, students are prepared to choose a career that matches their passions, strengths, values, and interests and also to choose colleges or other educational opportunities that assist them in reaching these goals. As a result of the mentorship experience, students will approach their next interview and internship prepared and confident. Career Mentorship is structured so students spend time in the classroom setting goals and working on college and career skills. Students arrange to mentor 4 6 hours per week for a total of 50 hours. Students are dismissed from school during their Mentorship class to mentor, but may also mentor after school or on weekends. This is a nonpaid opportunity. Career Mentorship 2 Students continue their mentorship experience by participating in an on -site placement. Students may continue in the same career field in which they mentored previously or choose a different career field. Students are responsible for attending seminars on a weekly basis, journaling about their experiences, assisting with the Mentorship I class, mentoring for 60 hours, and continuing to develop their career plan. This course is flexible and can be worked around various schedules. Prerequisites: B or better in Career Mentorship 1 It is strongly recommended that students interested in education, business, medical and audio/video production and performance consider taking Academy EDU, Academy INC, Academy MD or Academy VIBE. Student expectations are: Provide own transportation to mentor site and class locations Secure a mentor placement before the first day of class Minimum GPA: 2.5 Good attendance record No disciplinary concerns

144 Young Professionals Network Academy EDU E-7 This network is designed for the student who wants to experience school through authentic learning opportunities outside the classroom. Whether a student is active in a career mentorship role or enrolled in teacher or entrepreneur academies, this network is built for them. The Young Professionals Network is for the student who wants to personalize their learning through authentic real world experiences while becoming a young professional. Do you want to go into the teaching profession? Would you like to graduate with your college entry level EDU course complete? Do you want to get an real look at the profession while doing student teaching next year? Participation in Academy EDU can either be a (1) year or (2) year experience. # Elective Credits Students May Earn Entry Level Education Placement Toward College Academy EDU Are you ready to tutor younger students, visit a variety of types of schools, teach lessons, have meaningful and professional relationships with a mentor and explore teaching as a career choice? Are you planning to major in education in college? Academy EDU is the course for you! Designed as an introduction to the teaching field, students get an in-depth view of the teaching profession and hands-on experience working with children. Students will identify skills required for teaching, and understand personal characteristics needed to succeed in the profession. The curriculum includes lesson planning, classroom management, license requirement, history of education, meeting the needs of exceptional learners, and developing teacher professionalism. During class seminars topics learned will include: theories of child development, multiple intelligences and learning styles and explore topics such as diversity, character education, instructional technology, learning environments, instructional strategies and professionalism. Students will explore the teaching profession through a variety of experiences, which may include: field experience, lesson planning, one-to-one tutoring, and project development. Students observe in 4 specific areas including preschool-3 rd, 4 th -6 th, 9 th -12 th and special needs for a total 70 + hours of observation Students will create a portfolio, which will include teaching samples as a final project. Upon successful completion students will receive 2-4 high school credits as well as placement above the entry level education college course/ credit if they score an 85 or higher on their Teaching Professions portfolio. This credit is approved by OBR as CTAG credit at any Ohio Public University. 1 Year Program 3 periods per day 450 Hours 72 Hours of internships Attend seminars at the ILC Professional Portfolio Completion 2 Year Program 2 periods per day 450 Hours 72 Hours of internships Attend seminars at the ILC Professional Portfolio Completion

145 E-8 Academy INC Young Professionals Network This network is designed for the student who wants to experience school through authentic learning opportunities outside the classroom. Whether a student is active in a career mentorship role or enrolled in teacher or entrepreneur academies, this network is built for them. The Young Professionals Network is for the student who wants to personalize their learning through authentic real world experiences while becoming a young professional. Do you want to major in business in college? Are you interested in marketing, finance, entrepreneurship? Do you want to be the CEO of a startup company at the ILC? Do you have the next big idea? Participation in Academy INC is a (2) year commitment. # Elective Credits Academy INC Academy INC is for the college bound student that is interested in pursuing a career in business. This two year program is designed to put the learning in the hands of the students by focusing on product and business development. Students will learn through the experiences of managing the marketing, finances, human resources, creating a business plan, executing the plan, and more. This two year experience is built to challenge the business minded student with entrepreneurial work and real world experiences. Students will engage in competitions based on their product and business plans that are authentically created during this experience. Community connections and global partnerships will be a goal for the students as they study the impact of marketing, financial development, economic development, and more on the world stage. Year 1 2 periods a day Marketing, finance, research and product development Business management and entrepreneurship Year 2 2 periods a day Business strategy and development and economics International business

146 Young Professionals Network Health Professionals Academy E-9 This network is designed for the student who wants to experience school through authentic learning opportunities outside the classroom. Whether a student is active in a career mentorship role or enrolled in teacher or entrepreneur academies, this network is built for them. The Young Professionals Network is for the student who wants to personalize their learning through authentic real world experiences while becoming a young professional. Do you want a career in health services? Are you interested in learning more about allied health majors? Do you want to be a physicians assistant some day? Health Professionals Academy is a (2) year commitment. # Elective Credits Health Professionals Academy HPA is for the student that is interested in pursuing a career in a medical related field. This program is structured to be a twoyear experience for students in grades 11 & 12. The goal of the program is to expose students to a variety of high -demand Health related careers in the following areas: Medical Assistant; Medical Administrative Assistant; and EKG Technician. This program is designed to provide a first hand experience of the allied health career fields. Students will be exposed to multiple modules and authentic internship experiences. Year 1 Experience Hands on labs and foundational knowledge of the health care field. EKG Tech, CPR Certification, First Aide Certification, and OSHA Certification. Dual-enrollment through Columbus State Community College* Year 2 Experience Medical Assisting Authentic internship/mentorship experiences in collaboration with the established Medical Advisory Committee Dual-enrollment through Columbus State Community College* Dual Enrollment College Credit Earned through Columbus State Community College: MULT 1010: Medical Terminology - Year 1 - Semester 1 (2 Semester Credit Hours) MLT 1100: Intro to Healthcare - Year 1 - Semester 2 (2 Semester Credit Hours) MULT 1910: Basic Electrocardiography - Year 2 - Semester 2 (3 Semester Credit Hours) Partnerships Tolles Participation in Health Occupations Students of America (HOSA) Columbus State Community College Workforce Credentials that can be earned: Certified Medical Administrative Assistant Certified Clinical Medical Assistant Certified EKG Technician *Please see the College Credit Plus information beginning on page B-31 for more information regarding entrance requirements and tuition costs.

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