A Consumer Guide to. Asbestos

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1 A Consumer Guide to Asbestos Third Edition April 2001

2 A Consumer Guide to Asbestos DISCLAIMER This publication is meant to be instructional, to provide information to assist the consumer in dealing with asbestos. The information in this publication is believed to be accurate at the time of its publication. The Contractors State License Board, the Department of Consumer Affairs and the State of California assume no responsibility for any damage that arises from any action that is based on information found in this publication. Questions regarding civil law and the civil courts system should be addressed to an attorney. Copyright 2001, California Contractors State License Board For information about the Contractors State License Board, call toll-free 1 (800) 321-CSLB (2752) 2

3 Asbestos Introduction The California Contractors State License Board (CSLB) licenses and regulates all contractors who are qualified to do asbestos work in buildings. Additionally, the California Division of Occupational Safety and Health (Cal/OSHA) has responsibility to register all contractors who perform asbestos abatement work and test and certify all asbestos abatement consultants. California law prohibits any person from advertising for the removal of asbestos unless certified for that work. The law also requires that the contractor s license number and the Cal/OSHA registration number be included in that advertising. This booklet provides information for consumers to help identify asbestos in buildings and the precautions needed to prevent harmful exposure to asbestos when planning for and undertaking its removal. It also describes the steps you should take when contracting with a company to remove asbestos. The protections and procedures discussed later in this booklet will protect your health. Equally important, the protections are required by law. Warning to Do-it-Yourselfers Many consumers prefer to do their own homeimprovement jobs, realizing the rewards of planning and completing the jobs themselves and saving the expenses associated with hiring a licensed contractor. While asbestos abatement or removal does not require an asbestos certification if the total area involved is less than 100 square feet, this does not necessarily mean that the job is any easier or less risky to perform. In fact, Cal/OSHA regulates the handling of any asbestos material, regardless of the setting. Further, regulations and stringent transportation and disposal requirements are in effect for any asbestos-related work, even small amounts removed by a homeowner. For this reason, this booklet includes some of the same information about asbestos handling that licensed contractors are required to know. While the booklet may appear to some readers to be complicated and technical, the information is provided to give you an adequate basis upon which to make decisions and take actions that are necessary to ensure your safety and health when handling asbestos. Much of the information provided here is about the specialized skills and equipment required for the services of a registered and certified asbestos abatement contractor. To remove or render harmless all asbestos requires accurate information, correct procedures, and special equipment. If you decide to hire a licensed contractor, make sure the contractor has all the appropriate tools, training, and licensing and certification necessary to comply with the law and to protect you from unnecessary exposure to asbestos fibers. You can remove asbestos yourself. But, keep in mind that if you do not adequately protect yourself, the job could prove more costly in the long run, with respect to health, disability and death, than any amount of money saved in the short run! For additional information about dealing with contractors, contact the CSLB and request a free copy of What You Should Know Before You Hire a Contractor. The CSLB also publishes A Contractor s Guide to Asbestos With Open Book Examination, another excellent resource for additional information about laws and regulations affecting work with asbestos. (See page 12 for contact information.) What is asbestos? Asbestos is a naturally occurring mineral fiber that has been used extensively in construction and many other industries. Nearly every building contains asbestos in some form. It has been widely used because of its special properties. For example, asbestos is very resistant to destruction by heat or chemicals, and its fibers are extremely durable. These characteristics led to its use in wall insulation; paint; sprayed- or troweled-on surfacing materials; ceiling and flooring materials; pipe, boiler, and duct insulations; cement filler; and a variety of other products. However, you, the consumer, should know about the dangers of asbestos. 3

4 A Consumer Guide to Asbestos Asbestos and Health Why should I be concerned about asbestos? Several types of disease can result from exposure to asbestos. In fact, inhalation of asbestos fibers can be deadly. Even short-term exposure to asbestos can be harmful. For example, family members of asbestos workers have contracted disease from exposure to asbestos fibers on the workers clothing. Authorities believe there is no safe level of exposure, although the higher the exposure to asbestos, the higher the risk of disease. How does exposure to asbestos occur? Asbestos that may be crumbled by hand pressure is called friable asbestos. Material containing friable asbestos is hazardous because asbestos fibers are easily released into the air by impact and deterioration. Some asbestos is bound with other materials in products such as roofing shingles or vinyl-asbestos floor tiles. In these products, asbestos fiber is not released so easily. However, fibers in bound asbestos may be released when the material is cut, drilled, scraped, or sanded or when it is badly deteriorated. Exposure to asbestos occurs when asbestos fibers of various sizes are released into the air and are inhaled. The smaller fibers can remain in the air for long periods of time. These fibers are so small that they are only visible with a microscope. In fact, it takes 600 asbestos fibers bundled together to equal the thickness of a human hair. Some of the large fibers may lodge in the nose, but the smaller ones travel through the upper airways and become embedded in the lungs. The body has no effective mechanism for removing these fibers. How will asbestos affect my health? Exposure to asbestos may cause several types of serious diseases, including the following: Asbestosis Asbestosis occurs when asbestos fibers become lodged in the lungs, irritating the lung tissues and inflaming the small air tubes and sacs in the lungs. As the inflammation heals, permanent scar tissue (called fibrosis) remains. The scarring will cause shortness of breath, which grows worse over time, even after exposure ceases. Eventually, it may be impossible for the victim to inhale enough air, and heart failure may result. What we know about the relationship between exposure to asbestos and asbestosis has been obtained from studies of people who were heavily exposed. Usually, asbestosis is found in people who have been exposed to asbestos over a long period of time. The disease is much less likely to occur if proper precautions such as those described in this booklet are taken. There is no cure for asbestosis. Lung cancer Lung cancer is five times more common in people exposed to asbestos than in individuals who have not been exposed. Early symptoms are coughing, chest pains, and coughing up blood. Smoking greatly increases the risk of developing lung cancer from exposure to asbestos. A smoker who is heavily exposed to asbestos is 30 to 90 times more likely to develop lung cancer than a nonsmoker. However, as with asbestosis, proper precautions can help to reduce the risk of contracting asbestos-related lung cancer. There is usually no cure for this disease, but if the cancer is detected early, it may be surgically treated. Mesothelioma Mesothelioma is an extremely rare and deadly form of cancer that is almost always caused by exposure to asbestos. It is truly an asbestos cancer and may result from relatively light exposure to asbestos. This cancer occurs in the lining of the chest and abdomen. Early symptoms are shortness of breath or pain in the chest or abdomen. Mesothelioma would be expected to occur in only one out of 100,000 people not exposed to asbestos, but one study found that ten of the 124 deaths of asbestos insulation workers were caused by mesothelioma. There is no cure for this disease, and most of the victims die within the first year of diagnosis. Other cancers Exposure to asbestos is also thought to result in cancers of the esophagus, stomach, colon, rectum, and gastrointestinal tract. These diseases may be caused by the victim swallowing some of the longer asbestos fibers that have been caught in the upper air passages. The fibers are then carried to the throat in mucus. 4

5 How great is the risk of developing these diseases? The likelihood of your developing asbestos-related disease depends on the amount of asbestos to which you are exposed, the length of time, and the number of times you are exposed. The greater the total exposure, the greater the chance you will become ill. However, many experts believe that there is no definite safe exposure level. Some workers who had done shipyard work with asbestos for only a few weeks during World War II developed asbestosrelated disease in the 1960s. Workers in the construction, renovation, and demolition trades who encounter asbestos on the job are among the higher risk groups. The best way to protect your health or the health of your family is to limit exposure as much as possible. Usually disease will not show up for 15 to 40 years after exposure. That means that people exposed today will not know for a considerable time whether they are disease victims. Are there any medical tests to determine whether exposure to asbestos has been harmful? Anyone frequently exposed to asbestos on the job should have regular medical exams. The worker should discuss his or her work history with a doctor, and the exam should include a complete medical history, a chest X-ray, a lung function test, and a stool sample. If you believe your work brings you into contact with asbestos, even though most damage from asbestos-releated disease may not show up for many years, you should see a doctor regularly to determine whether you have signs of asbestos-related disease and to discuss ways to better protect yourself. For more information concerning the health hazards of asbestos, contact the American Lung Association. (See the Resources for Asbestos Information on page 12.) Where does exposure to asbestos occur? Exposure to asbestos can occur in a number of construction- and home improvement-related operations. Even if a homeowner or contractor is working with less than 100 square feet of surface area of asbestos-containing material, exposure may occur. For example: When remodeling a home, if you cut a small ceiling section to add a stairway, room addition, or a porch, you may disturb sprayed-on asbestos insulation; While replacing plumbing pipes during a minor renovation, you may be exposed to deteriorated, asbestos-containing pipe covering; When cutting through asbestos shingle siding to insulate a wall, you may be exposed to insulation fibers. Regardless of the size of the job, check first to determine if asbestos fibers are in the air. Certified asbestos consultants are available to help identify the presence of asbestos and the precautions needed to protect yourself. Their services, including a sample collection and analysis, should cost around $200. Remember, unless it is explicitly labeled, no one can tell just by looking whether asbestos is present in the material you encounter. If it is, you, your family, and any workers involved in the job must be protected. The protections and procedures discussed later in this booklet will protect your health. Equally important, the protections are required by law. 5

6 A Consumer Guide to Asbestos Where can asbestos be found in my home? There are many areas in the home in which asbestos has been used as a building product. The following list can offer some guidance to help identify potential asbestos risks in the home. Vinyl floor tiles and vinyl sheet flooring Asbestos has been added to some vinyl tiles to strengthen them. It is also present in the backing on some vinyl sheet flooring and in the adhesives used to place the flooring. While in most instances the asbestos is bound into the vinyl or backing, fibers can be released if the tiles are sanded or seriously damaged, if the backing on the sheet flooring is dryscraped or sanded, or if the tiles are severely worn or cut to fit into place. When replacement or repair becomes necessary, follow the guidelines provided on page 9 of this booklet. The tiles should be handled as little as possible. Avoid sanding or otherwise damaging them. A safe and recommended alternative is to place new flooring material directly over the old tiles or sheet. Patching compounds and textured paints In 1977, the Consumer Product Safety Commission banned patching compounds that contain asbestos. Some wall and ceiling joints may be patched with asbestos-containing material manufactured before If the material is in good condition, it is best to leave it alone. Sanding and scraping will release asbestos fibers. If it is in poor condition, or if the wall or ceiling needs to be removed or repaired, follow the guidelines on page 9. Some textured paint sold before 1978 contained asbestos. As with patching compounds, textured paint is best left alone if undamaged. Sanding or cutting a textured paint surface that may contain asbestos should be avoided. Ceilings Many buildings built or remodeled between 1945 and 1978 may contain a crumbly, asbestoscontaining material that has been either sprayed or troweled onto the ceiling or walls. If the material is in good condition, it is best to leave it alone. If the material appears damaged, you may have it tested to see if it contains asbestos. If it does, you can then have it repaired or removed. If possible, contact the builder or contractor who applied the ceiling coating to determine whether asbestos-containing material was used. This may be difficult to do in older homes. If you discover that it contains asbestos and you decide that it is necessary to remove it, follow the guidelines on page 9. As with other similar tasks dealing with removal of asbestos, a trained, certified, and registered asbestos abatement and removal contractor is the professional best equipped to do the job. Stove insulation Asbestos-containing cement sheets, millboard, and paper have been used frequently in homes with wood-burning stoves. These asbestos-containing materials are used as thermal insulation to protect the floor and walls around the stoves. Cement sheets may have a label indicating that they contain asbestos. The cement sheet material probably will not release asbestos fibers unless scraped. This sheet material may be coated with a high-temperature paint, which will help seal any asbestos into the material. Asbestos paper or millboard are also used for this type of thermal insulation. If these materials have been placed where they are subject to wear, there is an increased possibility that asbestos fibers may be released. Damage or misuse of the insulating material by sanding, drilling, or sawing will also release asbestos fibers. Furnace insulation Oil, coal, or wood furnaces with asbestos-containing insulation and cement may be found in some older homes. Updating the system to oil, gas, or electricity can result in removal or damage to the old insulation. If the insulation on or around your furnace is in good condition, it is best to leave it alone. If the insulation is in poor condition, or pieces are breaking off, you may want to consider having it repaired or removed. First find out if the insulation contains asbestos (see page 8); if it does, then follow the guidelines on page 9. 6

7 Door gaskets Some door gaskets in furnaces, ovens, and wood and coal stoves may contain asbestos. The asbestoscontaining door gaskets on wood and coal-burning stoves are subject to wear and can release asbestos fibers under normal use conditions. Handle the asbestos-containing material as little as possible, following the guidelines on page 9. Pipe insulation Hot water and steam pipes in some older homes may be covered with an asbestos-containing material primarily for reducing heat loss and for protecting nearby surfaces from the hot pipes. Pipes may also be wrapped in an asbestos blanket or asbestos paper tape. Asbestos-containing insulation has also been used on furnace ducts. Most asbestos pipe insulation in homes is preformed to fit around various diameter pipes. This type of asbestos-containing material was manufactured from 1920 to If you have damaged insulation around pipes or boilers, the best current recommendation is to leave the insulation in place and repair the protective covering. In many circumstances, this is the best way to minimize potential exposure to asbestos. For example, small holes in pipe covering may be filled with caulking or spackling and then covered with fire-resistant fiberglass cloth or scrim cloth pipe wrap. (These materials may not be readily available at most hardware stores.) If the damaged area is easily accessible and does not involve a substantial amount of exposure, you may use heat resistant duct tape to carefully seal in the damaged area. Wall and ceiling insulation Homes constructed between 1930 and 1950 may contain insulation made with asbestos. Insulation that contains asbestos may be found inside the walls or ceiling, sandwiched between plaster walls, as well as blown-in or loose-fill insulation. Renovation and home improvements may expose and disturb the materials. In cases of major disruption of asbestoscontaining material, it is especially important that a trained asbestos contractor be used. Appliances Some appliances are, or have been, manufactured with asbestos-containing parts or components. The Consumer Product Safety Commission is making an effort to identify household appliances that could release asbestos fibers during use. The commission has reviewed information on the use of asbestoscontaining parts in toasters, popcorn poppers, boilers, slow cookers, dishwashers, refrigerators, ovens, ranges, clothes dryers, and electric blankets. There has been a general decline in the use of asbestos in these appliances in recent years. When asbestos is used, it is in parts that will probably not result in the release of asbestos fibers during use. It is unlikely that asbestos components in these appliances present a significant health risk from release of asbestos fibers. Hair dryers with asbestos-containing heat shields are one notable exception. Manufacturers voluntarily recalled such hair dryers in Laboratory tests of most hair dryers showed that asbestos fibers were released during use. Current production hair dryer models do not contain asbestos heat shields. If you are concerned about asbestos in an appliance, do not repair it yourself. Instead, have a qualified repair technician repair it. Roofing, shingles, and siding Some roofing shingles, siding shingles, and sheets have been manufactured with asbestos, using Portland cement as a binding. Since these products are already in place and outdoors, there is little risk to human health. However, if the siding is worn or damaged, you may spray-paint it to help seal the fibers. You should avoid disturbing these products if they are already part of your home. Unless roofing must be replaced as a result of normal wear, it is wiser to simply leave it in place. 7

8 A Consumer Guide to Asbestos How will I know asbestos when I see it? Before you undertake any project in which you suspect the presence of asbestos, you should first try to determine whether the material contains asbestos. Avoid disturbing the material if at all possible. If you cannot determine from a label, the installer, or the manufacturer whether the material contains asbestos, it is best to assume that the product does contain asbestos. People who have frequently worked with asbestos material (such as plumbers, building contractors, and heating contractors) often can make a reasonable preliminary judgment about whether or not a product contains asbestos, based on a visual inspection. However, proper sampling and testing are necessary in order to confirm the presence of asbestos. In some cases, you may want to have the material analyzed. Such analysis may be desirable if you have a large area of damaged material or if you are preparing a major renovation that will expose material contained behind a wall or other barrier. More than one sample ought to be used in order to ensure accurate analysis. Use a lab certified to perform asbestos analysis that utilizes state-of-theart technology, which may include polarized light microscopy, (estimated to cost $25-$50 per sample tested) or the more costly, but more sensitive transmissible electron microscopy (TEM) (about $265 per test). You should look for a lab that is able to positively identify collected dust samples as asbestos. A list of certified test labs can be obtained from the National Institute for Standards and Technology (see page 12 for additional resource information). 8

9 General Guidelines for handling products containing asbestos Follow these basic precautions for working with asbestos: Do not disturb any material you think may contain asbestos unless you have to. Removal of the material is usually the last alternative. Seal off the work area from the rest of the building. You may use plastic sheeting and duct tape. Take great care not to track asbestos dust into other areas of the residence. Always wear a certified respirator appropriate for the specific asbestos activity. Wear gloves, hats, and other protective clothing. If possible, dispose of all of this equipment immediately after using it (see page 10). If you cannot dispose of your clothing, these work clothes must be washed separately from the family s wash. The person doing the laundry should be informed about proper procedures to prevent the release of asbestos fibers. When working with asbestos-containing material, wet it with a hand sprayer. The sprayer should provide a fine mist, and the material should be thoroughly dampened, but not dripping wet. Wet fibers do not float in the air as readily as dry fibers and will be easier to clean up. The addition of a small amount (about a teaspoon to a quart of water) of a low-sudsing dish or laundry detergent will improve the penetration of the water into the material and reduce the amount of water needed. If you must drill or cut an asbestos-containing material, do the drilling or cutting outside if possible. Wet the material first (according to instructions above). If you must remove the material, avoid breaking it into small pieces. While it is easier to remove and handle small pieces, you are more likely to release asbestos fibers if the material is broken into small pieces. Pipe insulation was usually installed in preformed blocks; remove these in complete pieces. Refer to the section dealing with Disposal on page 10 of this booklet to learn how to properly complete the job. If you think that a material contains asbestos, and you have to handle it, do so very carefully. Special precautions should be taken while removing exposed or damaged asbestos-containing material. If possible, find a contractor trained in safe procedures for handling asbestos (such as a contractor familiar with removal of asbestos ceilings in schools). Always keep the following caution in mind: CAUTION! Do not dust, sweep, or vacuum particles suspected of containing asbestos. This will disturb tiny asbestos fibers and may make them airborne. The fibers are so small that they cannot be seen. If you attempt to use a conventional home or shop vacuum cleaner, you are likely to do more harm than good. Asbestos fibers are so small that they can pass through normal vacuum cleaner filters and be propelled back into the air. The dust should be removed by a wetmopping procedure or by specially-designed HEPA vacuum cleaners used by trained asbestos contractors. 9

10 A Consumer Guide to Asbestos Disposal Unless otherwise provided for in a contract, the asbestos wastes generated by you or a contractor performing abatement and removal work are the property of the building or home owner. It is the legal responsibility of the owner to properly package, transport, and dispose of the wastes without posing any unnecessary risk to public health. The California Department of Toxic Substances Control has classified friable asbestos waste, which is asbestos that can be reduced to a powder or dust with hand pressure when dry, as a hazardous waste material. This asbestos waste must be handled and transported in one of the following ways: In sealed nonreturnable containers (for example, double plastic bags of 6-mil thickness, cartons, drums, or cans) from which fibers cannot escape. Wastes within the container should be wetted to prevent blowing of fibers in case the container is broken; or In closed vehicles (for example, covered drop boxes or canvas-covered truck boxes) if wastes are too bulky to enclose in sealed containers, and provided the wastes are wetted to prevent blowing dust. Asbestos wastes totaling more than 5 gallons in volume or more than 50 pounds must be transported by a registered hazardous waste hauler to an approved treatment, storage, or disposal facility. Persons generating and transporting less than 5 gallons or 50 pounds of a hazardous waste to a permitted hazardous waste facility are exempt from this requirement upon meeting all of the following conditions pursuant to Section 25163(c) of the Health and Safety Code: The hazardous wastes are transported in closed containers and packed in a manner that prevents the containers from tipping, spilling, or breaking during transporting; Different hazardous waste materials are not mixed within a container during the transporting; If the hazardous waste is extremely hazardous waste or acutely hazardous waste, the extremely hazardous waste or acutely hazardous waste was not generated in the course of any business, and is not more than 2.2 pounds; The person transporting the hazardous waste is the producer of that hazardous waste, and the person produces no more than 100 kilograms of hazardous waste in any month; and The person transporting the hazardous waste does not accumulate more than a total of 1,000 kilograms of hazardous waste on-site at any one time. Caution labels are required on containers or drop boxes and must be in conspicuous legible lettering that spells out the following or equivalent warning: CAUTION! CONTAINS ASBESTOS FIBERS AVOID CREATING DUST BREATHING ASBESTOS DUST MAY CAUSE SERIOUS BODILY HARM The Department of Transportation does not require you to place cautionary signs on transport vehicles. Contact your local health department for information about local landfill facilities capable of receiving the asbestos waste. Cleaning Up After you finish removing the material, thoroughly clean the area with wet mops, wet rags, or sponges. Repeat the cleaning procedure a second time. Wetting will help to reduce the chance that the fibers get spread around. Again, see that no asbestos material is tracked into other areas. If possible, dispose of the mop heads, rags, and sponges in the trash bags with the removed materials. Otherwise, vigorously flush the mop, rag, or sponge in running water in a sink or basin with a drain. Make sure to completely rinse both the utensil and the basin. If you are going to have work done by a contractor, discuss these guidelines and other steps to minimize asbestos exposure. 10

11 Choosing a contractor to deal with your asbestos For additional information, contact the Contractors State License Board and request a free copy of What You Should Know Before You Hire a Contractor. A current list of contractors certified pursuant to Section to engage in asbestosrelated work registered pursuant to Section of the Labor Code may be obtained by sending a selfaddressed mailing label to the Contractors State License Board, P.O. Box 26000, Sacramento, CA Your selection of a contractor to remove, encapsulate or enclose asbestos in your home is a very important decision. You should make this decision only after you do the following: Get bids from a minimum of three different qualified and licensed contractors; Clearly define the parameters of the project and your expectations to each bidding contractor so that they know how to bid. Beware of any bid that is substantially lower than the other bids this may be an indication that the contractor takes short cuts at the expense of safety; Ask each contractor for references that you can contact to learn about the quality of the contractors previous work; Request a work plan that details procedures and project schedules. This helps determine whether the contractor you are considering fully understands and can handle the project. Obtain a written commitment for full-time, on-site project supervision and make sure the project supervisor s training certification document is included in bid documents; Select a contractor who has a comprehensive employee training program. Call the Contractors State License Board to: Make sure the contractor you are considering has a valid, current contractor s license and certificate for asbestos abatement work; Make certain that the contractor has a current and valid license bond. Call Cal/OSHA to: Make sure the contractor has current registration (or an approved exemption) as an asbestos abatement contractor. Insurance and Bonding Your contractor should have general liability as well as asbestos-specific policies; since this is the most important coverage, make sure there are no exclusions. Establish whether your contractor has occurrencetype insurance, rather than claims-made insurance. Occurrence coverage begins when the policy is instituted by the contractor and provides that claims may be filed against an asbestos contractor for damages for an indefinite period of time after the exposure occurred. Although more difficult to obtain, this insurance provides maximum protection long after an individual s exposure to insure against future claims. With a claims-made insurance policy, the contractor is only covered for claims filed during the period for which the policy is in force. If the contractor changes insurance companies or ceases doing business as an asbestos abatement contractor, under the terms of a claims-made policy, you may have nowhere to turn for insurance compensation for damages arising out of an exposure to asbestos caused by your contractor. A performance and completion bond is an equally important selection criterion. The funds guaranteed by this kind of bond provide for the satisfactory completion of the project or cash settlement up to the limit of the value of the bond, even if the contractor s insurance is canceled or if the contractor fails to perform on the contract. Be sure that specific details and coverages are included in the bid package. Documentation Demand that the contractor provide the following documentation: Copies of required notification materials for the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and California Occupational Safety and Health Administration (Cal/OSHA); Job site log-in sheets; Monitoring reports for air and personnel; Accident reports; Hauling and disposal information and permits as required; Final air monitoring report. Experts agree that the proper selection of an asbestos abatement contractor can take a lot of effort and time on the part of the consumer. However, the complex nature of asbestos treatment, and the dire effects that can occur if it is mishandled make the contractor selection process all the more important. The effort you put into a thorough screening and evaluation to choose the right contractor is probably the most important task you will undertake to make sure your asbestos abatement project is successful. 11

12 Resources for Asbestos Information Abatement Certification California Contractors State License Board (CSLB) CSLB or California Division of Occupational Safety and Health (Cal/OSHA) Accreditation for abatement work In schools Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Regional Asbestos Coordinator In schools demolition and renovation work National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPS) In public buildings/labs NESHAPS Air and toxics Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Public Information Center Air monitoring National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) EPA Public Information Center Commercial and public buildings Cal/OSHA Consultation Service EPA Regional Asbestos Coordinator Demolition/renovation Contact your local Pollution Control District for information regarding the National Emission Standards. For additional help contact: NESHAPS Disposal procedures and sites NESHAPS Department of Toxic Substances Control Generator ID Information Regional Duty Officer Water Resources Control Board EPA requirements and the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPS) EPA Public Information Center NESHAPS Health risks and disease For the nearest Lung Association office consult your telephone directory or call: American Lung Association LUNG-USA ( ) Laboratories that analyze samples American Industrial Hygiene Association National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Land disposal fee and tax Board of Equalization (BOE) taxpayer number Local air quality agency See your local phone directory listed under Air Quality or Air Pollution Control. Overexposure to asbestos (to report) Contact the local district office of Cal/OSHA listed in your telephone directory. Products containing asbestos Contact the local district office of Cal/OSHA listed in your telephone directory. Protective clothing, respirators, and respiratory protection requirements Contact the local district office of Cal/OSHA listed in your telephone directory. Registration of work involving asbestos Division of Occupational Safety and Health (DOSH) Asbestos Contractor Registration Unit DOSH Occupational Carcinogens Control Unit Sealants for encapsulation EPA Regional Asbestos Coordinator Standards Cal/OSHA Federal OSHA Suspected asbestos problem Contact the local district office of Cal/OSHA listed in your telephone directory. For additonal assistance, contact: EPA Public Information Center Temporary worksites Contact the local district office of Cal/OSHA listed in your telephone directory. Training and continuing education (EPA-required) EPA Public Information Center CSLB CSLB (2752) or Waste manifests and identification numbers For information about manifests and identification numbers, to issue temporary or emergency ID numbers, or to obtain an application, contact: Department of Toxic Substances Control or Work practices Cal/OSHA Federal OSHA Work/workforce safety National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health Additional consumer information U.S. Consumer Products Safety Commission (CPSC)

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