HCR Injury Advice Guide

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "HCR Injury Advice Guide"

Transcription

1 HCR Injury Advice Guide

2 CONTENTS Contents What s Inside?...1 Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR)...2 CPR for Babies, Birth to One Year Old...3 CPR For Adults...4 Recovery Position...5 Bleeding, Objects in Wounds & Fractures...6 Shock, Burns...7 Head Injuries, Concussion...8 Concussion, Cerebral Compression...9 Skull Fracture, Seizures...10 During This Type of Seizure, After the Seizure Ends...11 Stroke, What Is Peronal Injury?, What Is Compensation?...12 Related Matters, Claiming Damages, Interim Payments...13 Reduction In Damages, Accidents At Work...14 Claiming Benefits, What You Should Do First...15 Sueing Your Employer, Taking Legal Advice...16 The Three-Year Time Limit, New Legislation for RTAs...17 Faulty Products or Services, The Damages Award, Accidents Abroad, Criminal Injuries...18 Jargon Busters...19

3 What s Inside? This Guide aims to give you an introduction to basic first aid in the event of an injury, as well as information about your legal rights concerning Personal Injury. A list of further contacts is provided towards the back of the Guide. Primary Survey Before you approach anyone who has been injured, you should conduct what is known as the Primary Survey. Remembering the acronym, D.R.A.B., you should check the scene for danger to yourself and the casualty (e.g. if someone has suffered an electric shock, make sure that the electricity has been turned off or attempt to move the person to a place that will be safe for you both using a wooden broom handle, for example). Then see if the casualty responds by shouting, Can you hear me? Open your eyes and gently shaking their shoulders (under no circumstances should you shake a baby or young child). Look, listen and feel for no more than ten seconds to see if the casualty is breathing normally. Look to see if the chest is rising and falling, and listen for breathing. You can also feel for breath against your cheek. If the casualty is breathing normally, you should place them in the recovery position and check for other life-threatening conditions such as severe bleeding. If the casualty is not breathing normally, or if you have any doubt whether breathing is normal, begin CPR. If the casualty responds and there is no further danger, you should leave them in the position found and summon help, if needed. Treat any conditions found - e.g. cuts or burns - and monitor their vital signs (level of response, pulse and breathing). Continue monitoring casualty until help arrives. D R A B Check for DANGER Does the casualty RESPOND? Open AIRWAY Are they BREATHING? If the casualty does not respond, you should shout for help. If possible, leave the casualty in the position you found them and open the airway. If this is not possible, turn the casualty onto their back and open the airway. This is done by placing one hand on the casualty s forehead and gently tilting the head back, then lifting the chin using two fingers only. This will move the casualty s tongue away from the back of their mouth. 1

4 Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a first aid technique that can be used if someone is not breathing properly or if their heart has stopped. Chest compressions and rescue breaths keep blood and oxygen circulating in the body. If someone is not breathing normally and is not moving or responding to you after an accident, call 999 or 112 for an ambulance. Then, if you can, start CPR straight away. In cases of sudden cardiac arrest the oxygen level in the blood will remain high for a few minutes so initially chest compressions will be more important than rescue breaths. To check circulation, feel for a pulse. Press two fingers gently on the victim s neck between the Adam s apple and the muscle at the side of the neck. Don t use your thumb, because your thumb has a pulse of its own. To check an infant s circulation, press two fingers between the armpit and elbow on the inside of the baby s arm. Remember, if your search for breathing and circulation yield nothing, have someone call 999 or call them yourself if you are the only conscious person in the room, and immediately begin compressions and artificial breathing. A B C AIRWAY BREATHING CPR! ABC is an acronym to help you remember the important first steps before performing CPR: airway, breathing, and circulation. Open the airway, check the victim s breathing, and pulse (i.e. circulation). To open the victim s airway, lift the chin carefully. This will move the jaw forward and tilt the head backward, allowing a path for air to travel to the lungs from the mouth and nose. Remember - don t push the forehead back in an effort to open the airway. If the victim has a neck or spinal injury, this will only make it worse. To check for breathing, watch the victim s chest. If you can see it rise and fall even slightly, then they are breathing. Whether or not you can see the chest rise and fall, listen with your ear to the mouth and nose. You are listening for breathing sounds. If you can t hear the victim breathing, but can feel their breath on your ear, then they are breathing. Use as many senses as possible and your best judgment. 2

5 CPR for Babies, Birth to One Year Old Confirm your baby is not breathing, complete the steps of the primary survey (DRAB). If accompanied, send your helper to dial 999 or12 for an ambulance (12 is recommended if you are calling from a mobile as it gives a clearer signal, although you can also reach this number from landlines and in many other European countries). If you are alone, you will have to carry out rescue breaths and chest compressions for one minute before taking the infant with you to call an ambulance. Carefully remove any obvious obstruction from the mouth of the infant (it is important not to touch the back of your child s throat as this could cause swelling and further obstruction of their airway) and give five initial rescue breaths. You do this by slightly tipping the infant s head back. Seal your mouth over their mouth and nose and breathe gently into them, looking along the chest as you breathe. Fill your cheeks with air and use this amount each time. As the chest rises, stop blowing and allow it to fall. Repeat this five times. Having done five rescue breaths, you re now going to do chest compressions. Using the tips of two fingers to compress the chest, place your fingers in the center of the infant s chest (imagine a line joining the nipples and place two fingers along the length of the breastbone below this line) and sharply depress the chest one third of its depth at a rate of compressions a minute (about the speed of the song Nelly the Elephant ). At this speed, you re going to give 30 chest compressions. Alternate 30 chest compressions with two rescue breaths without stopping until help arrives or the infant starts to breathe normally. 3

6 CPR For Adults Carry out the Primary Survey - Danger, Response, Airway, Breathing. At this point, if you are accompanied, send your helper to dial 999 or12 for an ambulance. Open the casualty s airway by placing one hand on the forehead and using two fingers to lift the chin. Position your cheek close to their mouth and look, listen and feel for no more than ten seconds to see if the chest is rising and falling, listen for breathing and feel for breath against your cheek. If you are on your own, you should call an ambulance at this stage and then commence chest compressions immediately. If the casualty is unconscious due to drowning, you should give five rescue breaths and perform CPR for one minute before making the call. To perform rescue breaths, carefully remove any visible obstruction from the mouth or nose of the person and give five initial rescue breaths. Ensure you tip the head back, pinch the nose firmly closed and put your mouth over the person s mouth, forming an airtight seal. Breath into the casualty, ensuring the chest inflates; then remove your mouth and allow the chest to fall. Repeat once more. Place the heel of your hand in the center of the chest. Place the other hand on top and interlock your fingers. Keeping your arms straight and your fingers off the chest, press down by five to six centimeters and release the pressure, keeping your hands in place Repeat the compressions 30 times, at a rate of per minute (about the speed of the song Nelly the Elephant ). You should then do two rescue breaths (see steps 6-9). Continue resuscitation at a rate of 30 compressions to two rescue breaths until emergency help arrives and takes over. Only stop if the casualty shows signs of recovery such as coughing, opening eyes, speaking or moving purposefully, and breathing normally. 4

7 Recovery Position Detailed below is a step-by-step guide to the recovery position: Kneel on the floor to one side of the person. Place the person s arm that is nearest you at a right angle to their body, so it is bent at the elbow with the hand pointing upwards. This will keep it out of the way when you roll them over. Gently pick up their other hand with your palm against theirs (palm to palm). Now place the back of their hand onto their opposite cheek (for example, against their left cheek if it is their right hand). Keep your hand there to guide and support their head as you roll them. Now use your other arm to reach across to the person s knee that is furthest from you, and pull it up so that their leg is bent and their foot is flat on the floor. Now, with your hand still on the person s knee, pull their knee towards you so they roll over onto their side, facing you. The person s body weight should help them to roll over quite easily. Move the bent leg that is nearest to you, away from their body so that it is resting on the floor (bent at a right angle to their body). Lastly, gently raise their chin to tilt their head back slightly, as this will open up their airway and help them to breathe. Check that nothing is blocking their airway. If there is an obstruction, remove this if you can do so safely. Stay with them, giving reassurance, until they have fully recovered or until an ambulance arrives. When dealing with an infant, St. John Ambulance recommend putting them in the recovery position by cradling the child in your arms with their head tilted downwards to prevent them choking on their tongue or inhaling vomit. (Information supplied courtesy of Epilepsy Society). 5

8 Bleeding With all types of bleeding, it's important to stop the flow of blood as quickly as possible. Small cuts - Small cuts in the veins stop bleeding and clot within a few minutes. The area should then be washed, and a plaster placed gently on top. Deeper cuts - Deeper cuts in the veins produce dark blood that seeps out slowly and steadily. It can be stopped by gentle pressure on the wound with a sterile or clean cloth, followed by the application of a clean or sterile bandage. Often, these wounds need sewing or gluing, and therefore medical treatment will be necessary after first aid. Arterial bleeding - Arterial bleeding must always be treated by a doctor. Bleeding from an artery can cause death within a few minutes - so urgent first aid is essential. Objects In Wounds Where possible, swab or wash small objects out of the wound with clean water. However, if there is a large object embedded, you should leave it in place and apply firm pressure on either side of the object. Raise and support the wounded limb or part and lay the casualty down to treat for shock. Gently cover the wound and object with a sterile dressing and build up padding around the object until the padding is higher than the object, then bandage over the object without pressing on it. Depending on the severity of the bleeding, dial 999 or 112 for an ambulance or take the casualty to hospital. This type of bleeding pulsates and squirts blood, as the pulse beats. The blood is often a light red colour. To stop bleeding from an artery, apply hard pressure on the wound and keep this up until the patient receives medical treatment. Press with a sterile cloth or just use your hand, if nothing else is available. Put a bandage on the wound if possible and if the blood soaks through the bandages, press harder until the bleeding stops. Do not remove the soaked bandages, but place another on top if necessary. Do not attempt to clean the wound. The person should be made to lie down, preferably with their head lower than the rest of their body. This will ensure that enough oxygen gets to the brain. If possible, position the wounded area higher than the rest of their body - so that the pressure, and therefore the bleeding, will be reduced. Take particular care if you suspect a bone has been broken. Where possible, you should wear disposable gloves to cover any wounds on your hands and protect yourself from infection. Fractures Fractures are a complete or incomplete break or a crack in a bone due to an excessive amount of force. A fracture can cause other internal injuries and medical help should be sought as soon as possible. With fractures, you should look for the following symptoms: swelling; unnatural range of movement; immobility; grating noise or feeling; deformity; loss of strength; shock; twisting; shortening or bending of a limb. If you suspect a fracture, you should support the limb and immobilise the affected part before calling 999 or 12 for an ambulance. You should also treat the person for shock (see above). 6

9 Shock Shock is a life threatening condition that occurs when the vital organs, such as the brain and heart, are deprived of oxygen due to a problem affecting the circulatory system. The most common cause of shock is blood loss but it can also be caused by other fluid loss such as vomiting or severe burns. Shock can occur when the heart has been damaged by heart attack or angina and is unable to pump an adequate supply of oxygen to the body. Look for the following symptoms to recognise shock: pale face; cold, clammy skin; fast, shallow breathing; rapid, weak pulse; yawning; sighing; and, in extreme cases, unconsciousness. If you think a person is in shock, you should attempt to treat any possible causes and help them to lie down. Raise and support their legs, loosen tight clothing and keep them warm. Call 999 or 12 for emergency help as soon as possible. If there are bystanders, ask someone to call an ambulance. Burns When treating a major burn, you should start cooling the burn immediately by placing the affected area under cold running water for at least ten minutes. Dial 999 or 112 for an ambulance and make the casualty as comfortable as possible. Continue to pour copious amounts of cold water over the burn for at least ten minutes or until the pain is relieved. Whilst wearing disposable gloves, remove the casualty s jewellery, watch or clothing from the affected area unless it is sticking to the skin. Cover the burn using a clean, non-fluffy material to protect from infection. Cloth, a clean plastic bag or kitchen film all make good dressings. Treat for shock. For minor burns, hold the affected area under cold water for at least ten minutes or until the pain subsides. Remove jewellery etc. and cover the burn as detailed above. If a minor burn is larger than a postage stamp, it requires medical attention. All deep burns of any size require urgent hospital treatment. Never use lotions, ointments, creams or adhesive dressings on burns. You should also never break blisters. 7

10 Head Injuries All head injuries are potentially serious and require proper assessment because they can result in impaired consciousness. Injuries may be associated with damage to the brain tissue or to blood vessels inside the skull, or with a skull fracture. A head injury may produce concussion, which is a brief period of unconsciousness followed by complete recovery. Some head injuries may produce compression of the brain (cerebral compression), which is life-threatening. It is therefore important to be able to recognise possible signs of cerebral compression - in particular, a deteriorating level of response. A head wound should alert you to the risk of deeper, underlying damage, such as a skull fracture, which may be serious. Bleeding inside the skull may also occur and lead to compression. Clear fluid or watery blood leaking from the ear or nose are signs of serious injury. Any casualty with an injury to the head should be assumed to have a neck (spinal) injury as well and be treated accordingly. Concussion Concussion occurs when the brain is shaken by a blow to the head. The most common causes of concussion include traffic incidents, sports injuries, falls, and blows received in fights. Concussion produces widespread but temporary disturbance of normal brain activity. However, it is not usually associated with any lasting damage to the brain. The casualty will suffer impaired consciousness, but this only lasts for a short time (usually only a few minutes) and is followed by a full recovery. By definition, concussion can only be confidently diagnosed once the casualty has completely recovered. A casualty who has been concussed should be monitored and advised to obtain medical aid if symptoms such as headache or blurred vision develop later. Concussion can be difficult to recognise but may be identified by a brief period of impaired consciousness following a blow to the head. The injured person may also experience dizziness or nausea on recovery; loss of memory of events at the time of, or immediately preceding, the injury; or a mild, generalised headache. To ensure that the casualty recovers fully and safely, they need to be in the care of a responsible person and receive medical aid if necessary. 8

11 Concussion You should check the casualty s level of response using the AVPU code. THE ACPU CODE A V P Is the casualty unresponsive? U Is the casualty alert, eyes open and responding to questions? Does the casualty respond to voice, obey simple commands? Does the casualty respond to pain (e.g. eyes open or movement in response to being pinched)? Regularly monitor and record vital signs -level of response, breathing and pulse. Even if the casualty appears to recover fully, watch them for any deterioration in their level of response. When the casualty has recovered, place them in the care of a responsible person. If a casualty has been injured on the sports field, never allow them to 'play on' without first obtaining medical advice. Advise the casualty to go to hospital, if following a blow to the head they develop symptoms such as headache, vomiting, confusion, drowsiness or double vision. Warning: if the casualty does not recover fully or, if there is a deteriorating level of response after an initial recovery, dial 999 or 12 for an ambulance. The condition may develop immediately after a head injury, or it may appear a few hours or even days later. For this reason, you should always try to find out whether the casualty has a recent history of a head injury. Cerebral compression can be recognised by a deteriorating level of response and the casualty may become unconscious. The casualty may have a history of a recent head injury or complain that they are experiencing an intense headache, as well as exhibiting noisy breathing, becoming slow; slow, yet full and strong pulse; unequal pupil size; weakness and/or paralysis down one side of the face of body; a high temperature; flushed face; and drowsiness. Noticeable changes in personality or behaviour, such as irritability or disorientation, are also signs of cerebral compression. You should arrange the urgent removal of the casualty to hospital, dialing 999 or 12 at the first possible opportunity. If the casualty is conscious while you are waiting for the ambulance to arrive, keep them supported in a comfortable resting position and reassure them. Regularly monitor and record their vital signs - level of response, pulse, and breathing - until medical help arrives. If the casualty is unconscious, open the airway using the jaw thrust method and check breathing (Primary Survey). Be prepared to give chest compressions and rescue breaths if necessary. If the casualty is breathing, try to maintain the airway in the position the casualty was found. Cerebral Compression Cerebral compression is very serious and almost invariably requires surgery. Cerebral compression occurs when there is a build-up of pressure on the brain. This pressure may be due to one of several different causes, such as an accumulation of blood within the skull or swelling of injured brain tissues. Cerebral compression is usually caused by a head injury. However, it can also be due to other causes, such as stroke, infection, or a brain tumour. 9

12 Skull Fracture Seizures If a casualty has a head wound, then you should be alert for a possible skull fracture. A skull fracture is serious because there is a risk that the brain may be damaged either directly by fractured bone from the skull or by bleeding inside the skull. You should suspect a skull fracture in any casualty who has received a head injury resulting in impaired consciousness. A casualty with a possible skull fracture may also have a neck (spinal) injury and should be treated accordingly. It may be possible to recognise a skull fracture by looking for the following signs: a wound or bruise on the head; soft area or depression on the scalp; bruising or swelling behind one ear; bruising around one or both eyes; clear fluid or watery blood coming from the nose or an ear; blood in the white of the eye; distortion or lack of symmetry of the head or face; or progressive deterioration in the level of response. If you suspect a skull fracture, you should aim to maintain an open airway and arrange for the urgent removal of the casualty to hospital. If the casualty is conscious while you are waiting for the ambulance, help them to lie down but do not turn the head in case there is a neck injury. Control any bleeding from the scalp by applying pressure around the wound. Look for and treat any other injuries. If there is discharge from an ear, cover the ear with a sterile dressing or clean pad, and lightly secure this with a bandage. Do not plug the ear. Monitor and record the casualty s vital signs - level of response, pulse, and breathing - until medical help arrives. Seizures are sudden, brief events. Sometimes called 'fits' or 'attacks', seizures can happen for many different reasons, such as diabetes, a heart condition or epilepsy. In epilepsy, an individual has a tendency to have repeated seizures that start in the brain. Epileptic seizures are caused by excessive electrical activity in the brain, which causes a brief change in the way the brain works. These seizures can affect the individual's emotions, sensations, awareness or behaviour. What happens during a seizure depends on where in the brain the seizure happens and how much of the brain is affected by it. There are many different types of epileptic seizure. Some people become very confused during a seizure, and others may lose consciousness. How you can help someone depends on the type of seizure they have. Here are some examples of seizures, and how you can help. Simple focal seizures: the person may have a strange feeling or taste, which can be intense and unsettling. This is sometimes called a 'warning' or 'aura' if the seizure spreads to become another seizure type (for example, see tonic clonic seizure below). Gentle reassurance many be appropriate. Complex focal seizures: the person loses awareness, becomes confused and may act strangely (such as wandering around, mumbling or making chewing movements with their mouth). These seizures can last for a couple of minutes, and can easily be mistaken for other unusual behaviour. Gently guide them away from any danger and stay with them until they recover. Tonic and atonic seizures: the person abruptly falls down but usually recovers quickly. Check that they are not hurt. Absence seizures: the person becomes blank and unresponsive. If they are walking they may carry on walking, which can be dangerous. Gently guide them away from any danger and stay with them until they recover. Tonic clonic (convulsive) seizures: the person goes stiff and may cry out. They fall to the ground and have convulsions (jerking of the body). Their breathing may be affected and may sound noisy or laboured. They may go pale or blue, particularly around their mouth. They may also bite their tongue, and there may be bloodstained saliva around their mouth. They may also become incontinent. 10

13 During This Type Of Seizure Try to stay calm; Check the time to see how long the seizure goes on for; Only move the person if they are in a dangerous place, for example in the road. Instead, move any objects, such as furniture, away from them so that they don't hurt themselves; Put something soft under their head, or cup their head in your hands, to stop it hitting the ground; If they have tight clothing around their neck, or they are wearing a headscarf or veil, you might want to loosen this to help them breathe Do not restrain them or hold them down - allow the seizure to happen Do not put anything in their mouth - they will not swallow their tongue Try to stop other people crowding around. When To Call For Help? Most epileptic seizures happen suddenly, last a short time and stop on their own, and the person will recover and not need any medical help. However, it is important to call for an ambulance in the following situations: It is the person s first seizure; They have injured themselves or have trouble breathing after the seizure has stopped; One seizure immediately follows another with no recovery in between; The seizure lasts 2 minutes longer than usual; The seizure lasts for more than 5 minutes if you don't know how long their seizures usually last. After The Seizure Ends If they have tight clothing around their neck, or they are wearing a headscarf or veil, you might want to loosen this to help them breathe Do not restrain them or hold them down - allow the seizure to happen When the seizure has ceased, open the casualty s airway and check breathing. Be prepared to give rescue breaths and chest compressions if necessary. If the casualty is unconscious but breathing normally, place them in the recovery position and monitor and record their vital signs - level of response, pulse and breathing. Do not put anything in their mouth - they will not swallow their tongue Try to stop other people crowding around. Roll them on to their side into the recovery position; If their breathing sounds difficult or noisy, check that nothing is blocking their airway; Wipe away any spit from their mouth; try to minimise any embarrassment. If they Have wet themselves try to deal with this sensitively (for example, you could put a coat over them); and Stay with them until they have fully recovered. 11

14 Stroke What Is Personal Injury? A stroke is caused by a portion of the brain being starved of oxygen. This can be due to a burst blood vessel or a clot blocking a blood vessel. The lack of oxygen causes damage to the brain. The long- term effects of a stroke depend on what part of the brain and how much tissue is affected. To recognise if someone has suffered a stroke, use the FAST test - Face, Arms, Speech, Time. Do this by asking the person to smile - if they have had a stroke, they may only be able to smile on one side, while the other side of their face may droop. Ask them to raise both arms as if they have had a stroke, they may only be able to lift one arm. Next, ask the person to speak to you - a stroke often leaves people unable to respond appropriately. Finally, it is time to call 999/12 for an ambulance. Explain to the operator that you have used the FAST test and suspect a stroke. Please note, that these tips are no substitute for formal first aid training. First aid procedures change from time to time, so the above information may be subject to change. Organisations such as St. John Ambulance now offer alerts to notify people of changes in first aid procedures, as well as a comprehensive range of online advice and training courses. Personal injury can result from a range of circumstances, such as accidents at work, criminal injuries, accidents abroad, road traffic accidents RTAs or work-related illnesses, for example. It may be possible to claim compensation for a personal injury when you are able to show that a person, company or some other organisation is at least partly to blame for your injuries through something that was either done, not done (when it should have been), made or repaired by them. Personal injuries can be psychological as well as physical - for example, depression resulting from the trauma of an accident. Accidents that cause injury to someone (a third party ) are covered by a section of the law known as negligence. To explain this, under the law, each of us owes a duty of care to our fellow human beings. This means that as we go about our daily lives, we must take care that our actions are not harmful to others. Therefore, when we drive our cars, for instance, we must do so in a way that does not put other drivers and pedestrians at risk. Parliament also passes legislation placing a responsibility on all of us to act in such a way as to avoid harming others. Personal injury laws vary between Scotland and the rest of the UK, which means that a personal injury occurring in Scotland needs to be dealt with under Scottish Law. Please request a free copy of our Scottish edition of this guide for more information. What Is Compensation? Compensation is a financial award given in recognition of any injury either physical or mental; for loss of past and future earnings; a broken contract or something that has ruined your enjoyment of your property, for example. Compensation claims can be long- winded and stressful and you are not guaranteed a successful outcome. Therefore, you are advised to think about whether you would be happy with a different resolution to your claim, such as an apology, the offer of counseling or a change in policy from the organisation concerned, are just a few examples. 12

HCR Injury Advice Guide

HCR Injury Advice Guide HCR Injury Advice Guide CONTENTS Contents What s Inside?...1 Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR)...2 CPR for Babies, Birth to One Year Old...3 CPR For Adults...4 Recovery Position...5 Bleeding, Objects

More information

CAMPING CLUB YOUTH FIRST AID

CAMPING CLUB YOUTH FIRST AID CAMPING CLUB YOUTH FIRST AID This document is intended as an aid to training candidates for the Camping Club Youth Test and only covers the core questions. These and other types of situations should be

More information

To help locate the most convenient centre for you, please call our Locallink number on 08700 10 49 50 and you will be

To help locate the most convenient centre for you, please call our Locallink number on 08700 10 49 50 and you will be 1 of 5 St. John Ambulance - First Aid About St. John Ambulance St. John Ambulance is one of the UK's largest and best-known charitable organisations. It exists to provide First Aid and medical support

More information

WET, COUGHING AND COLD NEAR RIVER BANK STUNG BY BEE CAUSING ANAPHYLACTIC SHOCK TO WRIST

WET, COUGHING AND COLD NEAR RIVER BANK STUNG BY BEE CAUSING ANAPHYLACTIC SHOCK TO WRIST GRIT IN EYE BROKEN LEG BONE WET, COUGHING AND COLD NEAR RIVER BANK STUNG BY BEE CAUSING ANAPHYLACTIC SHOCK HEART ATTACK SUFFERING FROM SHOCK CHOKING SEVERE BLEEDING TO WRIST HYPOTHERMIA ANGINA Localised

More information

CASAID THE AIMS OF FIRST AID, INCIDENT ACTION PLAN, INITIAL ASSESSMENT AND THE RECOVERY POSITION. Airway must be open so oxygen can enter the body.

CASAID THE AIMS OF FIRST AID, INCIDENT ACTION PLAN, INITIAL ASSESSMENT AND THE RECOVERY POSITION. Airway must be open so oxygen can enter the body. CASAID THE AIMS OF FIRST AID, INCIDENT ACTION PLAN, INITIAL ASSESSMENT AND THE RECOVERY POSITION The Aims of First Aid The aims of first aid (the three Ps) are to: Preserve the casualty s life. Prevent

More information

Heart information. CPR cardiopulmonary resuscitation

Heart information. CPR cardiopulmonary resuscitation Heart information CPR cardiopulmonary resuscitation Contents 3 What is CPR? 3 What is cardiac arrest? 4 Heart attack and cardiac arrest 4 Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) 5 Danger 6 Response 7 Send

More information

Adult First Aid/CPR/AEd. Ready Reference

Adult First Aid/CPR/AEd. Ready Reference Adult First Aid/CPR/AEd Ready Reference Contents Checking an Injured or Ill Adult 3 CPR 4 AED Adult or Child 5 Conscious Choking 7 Controlling External Bleeding 8 Burns 9 Poisoning 10 Head, Neck or Spinal

More information

Northwestern Health Sciences University. Basic Life Support for Healthcare Providers

Northwestern Health Sciences University. Basic Life Support for Healthcare Providers Northwestern Health Sciences University Basic Life Support for Healthcare Providers Pretest May 2005 This examination to be used only as a PRECOURSE TEST for BLS for Healthcare Providers Courses Based

More information

Huggies First Aid Kit

Huggies First Aid Kit Huggies First Aid Kit page 1 Emergency Phone Number list Police, Ambulance, Fire Dept. From land line: 000 From mobile phones: 112 To contact your local police station Freecall Telstra Directory Assistance:

More information

Emergency procedures instructions to farm staff

Emergency procedures instructions to farm staff Emergency procedures instructions to farm staff The first priority in the event of an emergency is for the safety of all people present. Emergency phone numbers Dial 111 for Fire/Police/Ambulance 1. Tell

More information

CPR/AED for Professional Rescuers and Health Care Providers HANDBOOK

CPR/AED for Professional Rescuers and Health Care Providers HANDBOOK CPR/AED for Professional Rescuers and Health Care Providers HANDBOOK TABLE OF CONTENTS SECTION 1: THE PROFESSIONAL RESCUER The Duty to Respond 2 Preventing the Spread of Bloodborne Pathogens 3 Taking Action

More information

Professor McLellan Emeritus Professor of Rehabilitation

Professor McLellan Emeritus Professor of Rehabilitation Brain injury can be devastating for families and carers as well as the people directly affected. These cases require specialist advice and support and that is what the Brain Injury Group provides. It is

More information

How to make a personal injury claim

How to make a personal injury claim A publication by Cute Injury How to make a personal injury claim A CLEAR AND CONCISE GUIDE TO THE PERSONAL INJURY CLAIMS PROCESS We provide professional and impartial advice from the outset and throughout

More information

2 CHECKING AN INJURED OR ILL ATHLETE

2 CHECKING AN INJURED OR ILL ATHLETE American Red Cross 2 CHECKING AN INJURED OR ILL ATHLETE ~~~'1'H ~.. 2 CHECKING AN INJURED OR III ATHLETE Checking the scene for safety and checking an injured or ill athlete is the first action to take,

More information

Adult Choking and CPR Manual

Adult Choking and CPR Manual Adult Choking and CPR Manual 2009 Breath of Life Home Medical Equipment and Respiratory Services CHOKING Description: Choking is the coughing spasm and sputtering that happen when liquids or solids get

More information

CHAPTER 2 APPROACH TO THE INCIDENT

CHAPTER 2 APPROACH TO THE INCIDENT CHAPTER 2 APPROACH TO THE INCIDENT Reassuring the casualty is very important in first aid and the best reassurance for both casualty and bystanders is a confident first aider taking decisive action. In

More information

American Heart Association

American Heart Association American Heart Association Basic Life Support for Healthcare Providers Pretest April 2006 This examination to be used only as a PRECOURSE TEST For BLS for Healthcare Providers Courses 2006 American Heart

More information

CHAPTER 6 HEAD INJURY AND UNCONSCIOUSNESS

CHAPTER 6 HEAD INJURY AND UNCONSCIOUSNESS CHAPTER 6 HEAD INJURY AND UNCONSCIOUSNESS BRAIN INJURY Injury to the brain is one of the more serious outcomes that occur due to injury or illness. The first aider plays a major role in limiting damage

More information

Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR): First aid By Mayo Clinic staff

Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR): First aid By Mayo Clinic staff MayoClinic.com reprints This single copy is for your personal, noncommercial use only. For permission to reprint multiple copies or to order presentation-ready copies for distribution, use the reprints

More information

American Heart Association. Basic Life Support for Healthcare Providers

American Heart Association. Basic Life Support for Healthcare Providers American Heart Association Basic Life Support for Healthcare Providers Pretest February 2001 This examination to be used only as a PRECOURSE TEST for BLS for Healthcare Providers Courses 2001 American

More information

Module 5 ADULT RECOvERY POSITION STEP 1 POSITION ThE victim

Module 5 ADULT RECOvERY POSITION STEP 1 POSITION ThE victim Module 5 ADULT RECOVERY POSITION The recovery position is used in the management of victims who are unresponsive but have breathing and pulse. When an unresponsive victim is lying supine, the airway may

More information

Fainting - Syncope. This reference summary explains fainting. It discusses the causes and treatment options for the condition.

Fainting - Syncope. This reference summary explains fainting. It discusses the causes and treatment options for the condition. Fainting - Syncope Introduction Fainting, also known as syncope, is a temporary loss of consciousness. It is caused by a drop in blood flow to the brain. You may feel dizzy, lightheaded or nauseous before

More information

First aid for seizures

First aid for seizures First aid for seizures What is epilepsy? Epilepsy is a tendency to have repeated seizures that begin in the brain. For most people with epilepsy their seizures will be controlled by medication. Around

More information

12/5/2012. Introduction. Head, Neck, and Spine Injuries. Recognizing and Caring for Serious Head, Neck and Back Injuries

12/5/2012. Introduction. Head, Neck, and Spine Injuries. Recognizing and Caring for Serious Head, Neck and Back Injuries Head, Neck, and Spine Injuries Identify the most common causes of head, neck and spinal injuries. List 10 situations that might indicate serious head, neck and spinal injuries. List the signals of head,

More information

5420-R STUDENT HEALTH SERVICES REGULATION NORTH COLONIE CENTRAL SCHOOLS NEWTONVILLE, NEW YORK Emergency Procedures and Approved First Aid Methods

5420-R STUDENT HEALTH SERVICES REGULATION NORTH COLONIE CENTRAL SCHOOLS NEWTONVILLE, NEW YORK Emergency Procedures and Approved First Aid Methods STUDENT HEALTH SERVICES REGULATION NORTH COLONIE CENTRAL SCHOOLS NEWTONVILLE, NEW YORK Emergency Procedures and Approved First Aid Methods EMERGENCY PROCEDURES Contact parents and cooperate with them in

More information

Personal Injury Compensation Guide. Winston Solicitors LLP

Personal Injury Compensation Guide. Winston Solicitors LLP Personal Injury Compensation Guide Winston Solicitors LLP Compensation guide Here we provide a simple, plain speaking guide to no win no fee compensation claims for personal injuries in the UK. If you

More information

Staff, please note that the Head Injury Routine is included on page 3.

Staff, please note that the Head Injury Routine is included on page 3. Staff, please note that the Head Injury Routine is included on page 3. This booklet explains what can happen after a concussion, how to get better and where to go for more information and help if needed.

More information

Types of electrical injuries

Types of electrical injuries Types of electrical injuries Electrical injury is a term for all injuries caused by contact with electrical energy. Electrical contact can cause a wide variety of injuries involving most organ systems.

More information

Legal Support Service South West. Support for life after childhood brain and other serious injuries. www.childbraininjurytrust.org.

Legal Support Service South West. Support for life after childhood brain and other serious injuries. www.childbraininjurytrust.org. Legal Support Service South West Support for life after childhood brain and other serious injuries www.childbraininjurytrust.org.uk Hello and welcome to the Legal Support Services booklet for the South

More information

Your Guide to Pursuing a Personal Injury Claim

Your Guide to Pursuing a Personal Injury Claim Your Guide to Pursuing a Personal Injury Claim 2 Contents Introduction... 3 Important things that you must do... 3 In The Beginning... 4 Mitigating your loss... 4 Time limits... 4 Who can claim?... 4 Whose

More information

Clinical Negligence: A guide to making a claim

Clinical Negligence: A guide to making a claim : A guide to making a claim 2 Our guide to making a clinical negligence claim At Kingsley Napley, our guiding principle is to provide you with a dedicated client service and we aim to make the claims process

More information

Diuretics: You may get diuretic medicine to help decrease swelling in your brain. This may help your brain get better blood flow.

Diuretics: You may get diuretic medicine to help decrease swelling in your brain. This may help your brain get better blood flow. Hemorrhagic Stroke GENERAL INFORMATION: What is a hemorrhagic stroke? A hemorrhagic stroke happens when a blood vessel in the brain bursts. This may happen if the blood vessel wall is weak, or sometimes

More information

First Responder (FR) and Emergency Medical Responder (EMR) Progress Log

First Responder (FR) and Emergency Medical Responder (EMR) Progress Log First Responder (FR) and Emergency Medical Responder (EMR) Progress Log Note: Those competencies that are for EMR only are denoted by boldface type. For further details on the National Occupational Competencies

More information

Obstetric Emergencies

Obstetric Emergencies Obstetric Emergencies Dr. Si Lay Khaing Senior Lecturer/ O&G Specialist Faculty of Medicine University of Malaya 15 th March 2014 Abstract Life Saving, The obstetric patient is unique in medicine as two

More information

ACCIDENT HISTORY QUESTIONNAIRE

ACCIDENT HISTORY QUESTIONNAIRE ACCIDENT HISTORY QUESTIONNAIRE PATIENT INFORMATION Name Date Address City State Zip Code DOB Age SS# Marital Status Sex Male Female How did you hear about the office? Home Phone Work Phone Employer Occupation

More information

First Aid Multiple Choice Test

First Aid Multiple Choice Test First Aid Multiple Choice Test Answer all 25 questions by circling the correct answer. This is an open-book test. Answers are contained in The Boy Scout Handbook. Patrol Troop 1. When making a 911 call,

More information

Advance Health Care Planning: Making Your Wishes Known

Advance Health Care Planning: Making Your Wishes Known Page 1 of 26 Advance Health Care Planning: Making Your Wishes Known Page 2 of 26 What s Inside Why Health Care Planning Is Important... 2 What You Can Do... 4 Work through the advance health care planning

More information

Success Manual and Cheat Sheet Notes to Pass Your Basic Life Support (BLS) Course

Success Manual and Cheat Sheet Notes to Pass Your Basic Life Support (BLS) Course Success Manual and Cheat Sheet Notes to Pass Your Basic Life Support (BLS) Course Written by: Jay Snaric, MS And Kimberly Hickman, RN CPR St. Louis 44 Meramec Valley Plaza St. Louis MO 63088 www.stlcpr.com

More information

Cadet Name: Date: 1. (U4C2L2:F1) If you started to choke on some food and you were alone, what should you do?

Cadet Name: Date: 1. (U4C2L2:F1) If you started to choke on some food and you were alone, what should you do? Cadet Name: Date: 1. (U4C2L2:F1) If you started to choke on some food and you were alone, what should you do? A) stick your finger down your throat and try to remove the food B) lean forward over a railing

More information

A patient guide to mild traumatic brain injury

A patient guide to mild traumatic brain injury A patient guide to mild traumatic brain injury Delivering the best in care UHB is a no smoking Trust To see all of our current patient information leaflets please visit www.uhb.nhs.uk/patient-information-leaflets.htm

More information

Personal Injury/Accident Claims Guidance

Personal Injury/Accident Claims Guidance Hutchesons Solicitors 17 Strathmore House East Kilbride Glasgow Lanarkshire G74 1LF Tel: 01355 224545 Fax: 01355 276565 E-mail: mail@hutchesonlaw.co.uk Personal Injury/Accident Claims Guidance 1 This is

More information

Facial Sports Injuries

Facial Sports Injuries Facial Sports Injuries Playing catch, shooting hoops, bicycling on a scenic path or just kicking around a soccer ball have more in common than you may think. On the up side, these activities are good exercise

More information

COALINGA STATE HOSPITAL. Effective Date: August 31, 2006

COALINGA STATE HOSPITAL. Effective Date: August 31, 2006 COALINGA STATE HOSPITAL NURSING POLICY AND PROCEDURE MANUAL SECTION Emergency Procedures POLICY NUMBER: 715 Effective Date: August 31, 2006 SUBJECT: EMERGENCY CARE OF HEMORRHAGE 1. PURPOSE: The management

More information

First aid guidance note

First aid guidance note Document control information First aid guidance note Published document name: First-aid-gn.pdf Date issued: July 2012 Version: 2.0 Previous review dates: Next review date: Related documents: Governing

More information

PERSONAL INJURY COMPENSATION CLAIM GUIDE

PERSONAL INJURY COMPENSATION CLAIM GUIDE PERSONAL INJURY COMPENSATION CLAIM GUIDE Welcome to our Personal Injury Service What is Personal Injury? The Dictionary definition is: An injury not to property, but to your body, mind or emotions Our

More information

Heat Illnesses. Common Heat Rash Sites

Heat Illnesses. Common Heat Rash Sites Heat Illnesses Introduction Heat illnesses happen when the body becomes too hot and cannot cool itself. There are several different types of heat-related illnesses. This includes heat cramps, heat exhaustion,

More information

WHAT IS THE LAW SURROUNDING CAR ACCIDENTS?

WHAT IS THE LAW SURROUNDING CAR ACCIDENTS? WHAT IS THE LAW SURROUNDING CAR ACCIDENTS? How Does The Law Determine Who s At Fault? When determining fault, there is no one answer that covers all scenarios. Accidents produce and are produced by many

More information

Conditional Fee Agreement: What You Need to Know

Conditional Fee Agreement: What You Need to Know Conditional Fee Agreement: What You Need to Know This document forms an important part of your agreement with us. Please read it carefully. Definitions of words used in this document and the accompanying

More information

Types of Brain Injury

Types of Brain Injury Types of Brain Injury The bones of your skull are hard and they protect your brain. Your brain is soft, like firm Jell-O. When your head moves, your brain moves inside your skull. When your head is hit

More information

A GUIDE TO IN RUGBY UNION

A GUIDE TO IN RUGBY UNION A GUIDE TO The aim of this brochure is to provide information on concussion to those involved in rugby union in Ireland. Concussion MUST be taken extremely seriously. Any player with a suspected concussion

More information

Background on Brain Injury

Background on Brain Injury CHAPTER 1 Background on Brain Injury In this chapter, you will: Read about Alberta s definition of Acquired Brain Injury and how that affects which supports you will be able to access. Learn about the

More information

let s talk bleeds a bleed checklist for haemophilia patients

let s talk bleeds a bleed checklist for haemophilia patients let s talk bleeds a bleed checklist for haemophilia patients Specific signs of a bleed Watch for Bruising, with or without lumps Difference in the size of arms/legs Difference in movement in arms/legs

More information

Lighthouse IF YOU WERE THE DRIVER OF YOUR OWN VEHICLE, SOMEONE ELSE S VEHICLE OR A PASSENGER IN THE VEHICLE, ANSWER THIS SECTION COMPLETELY.

Lighthouse IF YOU WERE THE DRIVER OF YOUR OWN VEHICLE, SOMEONE ELSE S VEHICLE OR A PASSENGER IN THE VEHICLE, ANSWER THIS SECTION COMPLETELY. Lighthouse Chiropractic IF YOU WERE THE DRIVER OF YOUR OWN VEHICLE, SOMEONE ELSE S VEHICLE OR A PASSENGER IN THE VEHICLE, ANSWER THIS SECTION COMPLETELY. Your Auto Insurance Company Name Address Policy

More information

Adult, Child, and Infant Written Exam CPR Pro for the Professional Rescuer

Adult, Child, and Infant Written Exam CPR Pro for the Professional Rescuer Adult, Child, and Infant Written Exam CPR Pro for the Professional Rescuer Instructions: Read each of the following questions carefully and then place an X over the correct answer on the separate answer

More information

EWART PRICE SOLICITORS ROAD TRAFFIC ACCIDENTS - NOTES FOR CLAIMING FOR PERSONAL INJURY AND OTHER UNINSURED LOSSES

EWART PRICE SOLICITORS ROAD TRAFFIC ACCIDENTS - NOTES FOR CLAIMING FOR PERSONAL INJURY AND OTHER UNINSURED LOSSES E P EWART PRICE SOLICITORS ROAD TRAFFIC ACCIDENTS - NOTES FOR CLAIMING FOR PERSONAL INJURY AND OTHER UNINSURED LOSSES If you have been involved in a Road Traffic Accident as a driver or passenger we hope

More information

Brain Injury Association National Help Line: 1-800-444-6443 Brain Injury Association Web site: www.biausa.org Centers for Disease Control and

Brain Injury Association National Help Line: 1-800-444-6443 Brain Injury Association Web site: www.biausa.org Centers for Disease Control and Brain Injury Association National Help Line: 1-800-444-6443 Brain Injury Association Web site: www.biausa.org Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Web site: www.cdc.gov/ncipc/tbi Contents About Brain

More information

& WHEN SHOULD I WORRY?

& WHEN SHOULD I WORRY? WHEN SHOULD I WORRY? - Your guide to Coughs, Colds, Earache & Sore Throats Information For:- Who is this booklet for? Having an ill child can be a very scary experience for parents. If you understand more

More information

Pesticide Harmful Effects And Emergency Response

Pesticide Harmful Effects And Emergency Response Pesticide Harmful Effects And Emergency Response Most pesticides are designed to harm or kill pests. Because some pests have systems similar to the human system, some pesticides also can harm or kill humans.

More information

PERSONAL INJURY CLAIMS

PERSONAL INJURY CLAIMS PERSONAL INJURY CLAIMS Frequently Asked Questions 1. Can I make a claim? If you have been injured because of the fault of someone else, you can claim financial compensation through the courts. The dependants

More information

Guide for Ambulance Services

Guide for Ambulance Services Guide for Ambulance Services Please call 119when you need an ambulance service This guide explains how to use ambulance services in Japan and what you should note when you use it. How to call an ambulance

More information

MRC Medical Jeopardy Feud List of Treatments for Possible Injuries/Conditions

MRC Medical Jeopardy Feud List of Treatments for Possible Injuries/Conditions List of Treatments for Possible Injuries/Conditions A. Apply cold compresses to affected area; elevate the area to reduce swelling and possible bleeding B. Apply direct pressure to wound area with sterile

More information

There can be a lot of details in any property transaction and we know what to look for, and when they need to be looked at.

There can be a lot of details in any property transaction and we know what to look for, and when they need to be looked at. There can be a lot of details in any property transaction and we know what to look for, and when they need to be looked at. To make sure the transaction goes smoothly, our experienced team will work with

More information

Our highly specialised team has wide experience in dealing with

Our highly specialised team has wide experience in dealing with Our highly specialised team has wide experience in dealing with complex claims arising from brain injury. We work in a supportive, considered & clear way, dedicated to achieving the best possible outcome

More information

Clinical Negligence. Investigating Your Claim

Clinical Negligence. Investigating Your Claim www.lees.co.uk Clinical Negligence Investigating Your Claim Lees Solicitors LLP 44/45 Hamilton Square Birkenhead Wirral CH41 5AR Tel: 0151 647 9381 Fax: 0151 649 0124 e-mail: newclaim@lees.co.uk 1 The

More information

Road Traffic Accident Claims

Road Traffic Accident Claims Road Traffic Accident Claims A brief guide to the claims process Table on contents: Introduction... 2 If your claim falls out of the new regime... 2 Parties to a claim... 2 The claims process... 3 Time

More information

Conditional Fee Agreement: What You Need to Know

Conditional Fee Agreement: What You Need to Know Conditional Fee Agreement: What You Need to Know This document forms an important part of your agreement with us. Please read it carefully. Definitions of words used in this document and the accompanying

More information

Personal Injury Claims

Personal Injury Claims Dawn Cardwell - dcardwell@hamers.com Robert Holroyd - rholroyd@hamers.com Jeremy Rea - jrea@hamers.com Paul Richardson - prichardson@hamers.com Jim Wyatt - jwyatt@hamers.com Freephone: 0800 591 999 5 Earls

More information

HEMOPHILIA WHAT SCHOOL PERSONNEL SHOULD KNOW

HEMOPHILIA WHAT SCHOOL PERSONNEL SHOULD KNOW HEMOPHILIA WHAT SCHOOL PERSONNEL SHOULD KNOW TABLE OF CONTENTS Introduction p. 3 What Is Hemophilia p. 4 Common Bleeds p. 5 Superficial Bruising p. 8 Lacerations p. 8 Life-Threatening Bleeds p. 9 Sports

More information

Guide to Personal Injury Claims

Guide to Personal Injury Claims PART 1 - INTRODUCTION Our initial meeting At our first meeting, we will discuss the circumstances of your case and the prospects of obtaining compensation (damages) for your injury. We will explain to

More information

Industrial Injuries Branch, Castle Court, Royal Avenue, Belfast, BT1 1SD Tel: 028 9033 6000, Fax 028 9033 6956, www.dsdni.gov.uk

Industrial Injuries Branch, Castle Court, Royal Avenue, Belfast, BT1 1SD Tel: 028 9033 6000, Fax 028 9033 6956, www.dsdni.gov.uk Form BI 100A - December 2005 Industrial Injuries Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit for an accident at work Industrial Injuries Branch, Castle Court, Royal Avenue, Belfast, BT1 1SD Tel: 028 9033 6000,

More information

Looking at the following diagrams, which one shows a casualty in the correct recovery position?

Looking at the following diagrams, which one shows a casualty in the correct recovery position? The Looking at the following diagrams, which one shows a casualty in the correct recovery position? A B C D E F In which order would you complete the following statements to place a casualty in the recovery

More information

IN CASE OF EMERGENCY. Emergency Telephone Number 112

IN CASE OF EMERGENCY. Emergency Telephone Number 112 IN CASE OF EMERGENCY Emergency Telephone Number 112 Police, Fire, Ambulance Dial 112 in case of fire, medical emergency, serious or life threatening traffic or other accident. Tell the operator: What has

More information

Cast removal what to expect #3 Patient Information Leaflet

Cast removal what to expect #3 Patient Information Leaflet Cast removal what to expect #3 Patient Information Leaflet SM466 Now your cast is off, self help is the key! Follow the advice given to you by your doctor and the staff in the clinic. Your skin will be

More information

HEAT ILLNESS PREVENTION PLAN FOR SUTTER COUNTY SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS

HEAT ILLNESS PREVENTION PLAN FOR SUTTER COUNTY SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS HEAT ILLNESS PREVENTION PLAN FOR SUTTER COUNTY SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 Purpose... 1 2.0 Heat Illness Prevention... 2 2.1 Heat Stroke... 2 2.2 Heat Exhaustion... 2 2.3 Heat Cramps...

More information

Alcohol and accidents

Alcohol and accidents The facts about... Alcohol and accidents Five key things you need to know The facts about alcohol and accidents Spilling red wine over your friend s pristine white sofa. Breaking another wine glass all

More information

Emergency Room (ER) Visits: A Family Caregiver s Guide

Emergency Room (ER) Visits: A Family Caregiver s Guide Family Caregiver Guide Emergency Room (ER) Visits: A Family Caregiver s Guide Your family member may someday have a medical emergency and need to go to a hospital Emergency Room (ER), which is also called

More information

Infant CPR. What You Need to Know. How to Do Infant CPR

Infant CPR. What You Need to Know. How to Do Infant CPR Infant CPR Infant CPR also called Cardiopulmonary resuscitation is emergency care given to a baby who has stopped breathing. This sheet has the steps for CPR for newborns or babies less than 1 year old.

More information

Living Arts Institute @ School of Communication Arts Emergency Preparedness Plan. - Table of Contents -

Living Arts Institute @ School of Communication Arts Emergency Preparedness Plan. - Table of Contents - Living Arts Institute @ School of Communication Arts Emergency Preparedness Plan - Table of Contents - Purpose 1 Evacuation Procedures 2 Medical Emergency 3 Accident Report Form 4 Blood and Body Fluid

More information

Personal Injury. We re on your side. Petherbridge Bassra. Your Local Solicitors

Personal Injury. We re on your side. Petherbridge Bassra. Your Local Solicitors Personal Injury We re on your side is a Bradford firm helping clients with cases close to home, nationally and internationally. These pages will tell you what we do and how we do it and naturally we will

More information

THE MANAGEMENT OF CONCUSSION IN AUSTRALIAN FOOTBALL

THE MANAGEMENT OF CONCUSSION IN AUSTRALIAN FOOTBALL THE MANAGEMENT OF CONCUSSION IN AUSTRALIAN FOOTBALL AFL Research board AFL MEDICAL OFFICERS' ASSOCIATION THE MANAGEMENT OF CONCUSSION IN AUSTRALIAN FOOTBALL This document has been published by the AFL

More information

Employers Liability and Public Liability Claims

Employers Liability and Public Liability Claims Employers Liability and Public Liability Claims A brief guide to the claims process Table on contents: Introduction... 2 Parties to a claim... 3 The claims process... 3 Time limit for bringing a claim...

More information

L.E. LAW INFORMATION SHEET NO. 11 GUIDE TO PERSONAL INJURY CLAIMS

L.E. LAW INFORMATION SHEET NO. 11 GUIDE TO PERSONAL INJURY CLAIMS LE Law Services Ltd 127 High Road Loughton Essex IG10 4LT Telephone: 020 8508 4961 Facsimile: 020 8508 6359 www.lelaw.co.uk L.E. LAW INFORMATION SHEET NO. 11 GUIDE TO PERSONAL INJURY CLAIMS 1. Introduction

More information

CHAPTER 1 DISASTER FIRST AID INTRODUCTION

CHAPTER 1 DISASTER FIRST AID INTRODUCTION CHAPTER 1 DISASTER FIRST AID INTRODUCTION This chapter will cover the following topics: Introduction: The basic concepts of providing disaster first aid and the equipment required to safely respond to

More information

CLS Direct Information Leaflet 17. Jul. Personal Injury. Complaining and claiming compensation

CLS Direct Information Leaflet 17. Jul. Personal Injury. Complaining and claiming compensation CLS Direct Information Leaflet 17 Jul 04 Personal Injury Complaining and claiming compensation If you are injured because someone was negligent (they did something they shouldn t, or didn t do something

More information

Non-epileptic seizures

Non-epileptic seizures Non-epileptic seizures a short guide for patients and families Information for patients Department of Neurology Royal Hallamshire Hospital What are non-epileptic seizures? In a seizure people lose control

More information

INJURY LAW ALERT WINTER 2006/2007 ISSUE WHAT IS MEDICAL MALPRACTICE?

INJURY LAW ALERT WINTER 2006/2007 ISSUE WHAT IS MEDICAL MALPRACTICE? INJURY LAW ALERT WINTER 2006/2007 ISSUE WHAT IS MEDICAL MALPRACTICE? Medical malpractice is a broad term used to describe a number of different kinds of lawsuits brought against doctors and hospitals.

More information

Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR): A Decision Aid For. KGH Patients And Their Families

Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR): A Decision Aid For. KGH Patients And Their Families Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR): A Decision Aid For KGH Patients And Their Families The goal of this pamphlet is to provide information about cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) so you can be adequately

More information

What Medical Emergencies Should a Dental Office be Prepared to Handle?

What Medical Emergencies Should a Dental Office be Prepared to Handle? What Medical Emergencies Should a Dental Office be Prepared to Handle? Gary Cuttrell, DDS, JD, University of NM Division of Dental Services Santiago Macias, MD, First Choice Community Healthcare Dentists

More information

BINSA Information on Brain Injury

BINSA Information on Brain Injury Acquired Brain Injury (ABI) There are a number of ways an individual can suffer an acquired brain injury (ABI) Figure one - ABI causes Significant causes of ABI Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) Traumatic Brain

More information

In order to prove negligence the Claimant must establish the following:

In order to prove negligence the Claimant must establish the following: Introduction A wealth of law exists to provide compensation to people who have suffered injuries, both physical and psychological, following an accident. This fact sheet provides a very brief guide to

More information

The FacTs: * All concussions are serious. A Fact Sheet for School Nurses

The FacTs: * All concussions are serious. A Fact Sheet for School Nurses A Fact Sheet for School Nurses Assess the situation Be alert for signs and symptoms Contact a health care professional The FacTs: * All concussions are serious. * Most concussions occur without loss of

More information

The self-help guide to understanding and managing your own symptoms of

The self-help guide to understanding and managing your own symptoms of The self-help guide to understanding and managing your own symptoms of Contents 1 Introduction 2 What is Breathlessness? 3 Coping with Breathlessness 4 Moving on with Breathing exercises 5 Breathing exercises

More information

B U R T & D A V I E S PERSONAL INJURY LAWYERS

B U R T & D A V I E S PERSONAL INJURY LAWYERS TRANSPORT ACCIDENT LAW - TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY Traumatic Brain Injury ( TBI ) is a common injury in transport accidents. TBI s are probably the most commonly undiagnosed injuries in a hospital setting.

More information

Road Traffic Accidents Do s and Don ts & the Legal Process

Road Traffic Accidents Do s and Don ts & the Legal Process Legal Discussion on Tipp FM with Orlagh Wafer 22 nd January 2013 Road Traffic Accidents Do s and Don ts & the Legal Process Introduction As the temperatures are dropping and the roads are becoming more

More information

OPTIONAL LESSON Anaphylaxis and Epinephrine Auto-Injector

OPTIONAL LESSON Anaphylaxis and Epinephrine Auto-Injector OPTIONAL LESSON Anaphylaxis and Epinephrine Auto-Injector Lesson Length: 54 minutes GUIDANCE FOR THE INSTRUCTOR To complete this lesson and meet the lesson objectives, you must: Discuss all points in the

More information

The Family Library. Understanding Diabetes

The Family Library. Understanding Diabetes The Family Library Understanding Diabetes What is Diabetes? Diabetes is caused when the body has a problem in making or using insulin. Insulin is a hormone secreted by the pancreas and is needed for the

More information

Legal Action / Claiming Compensation in Scotland

Legal Action / Claiming Compensation in Scotland Legal Action / Claiming Compensation in Scotland This help sheet explains your legal rights if you have been injured as a result of medical treatment and the steps involved in seeking compensation through

More information

Functional rehab after breast reconstruction surgery

Functional rehab after breast reconstruction surgery Functional rehab after breast reconstruction surgery UHN A guide for women who had DIEP, latissimus dorsi with a tissue expander or implant, or two-stage implant based breast reconstruction surgery Read

More information

After a suspected seizure. Information for patients, relatives and carers

After a suspected seizure. Information for patients, relatives and carers After a suspected seizure Information for patients, relatives and carers This booklet has been provided to help answer some of the questions you may have about your suspected seizure. What happened to

More information

ORAL ANTICOAGULANTS - RIVAROXABAN (XARELTO) FOR DEEP VEIN THROMBOSIS (DVT)

ORAL ANTICOAGULANTS - RIVAROXABAN (XARELTO) FOR DEEP VEIN THROMBOSIS (DVT) ORAL ANTICOAGULANTS - RIVAROXABAN (XARELTO) FOR DEEP VEIN THROMBOSIS (DVT) Information Leaflet Your Health. Our Priority. Page 2 of 6 What Are Anticoagulants And What Do They Do? This information leaflet

More information