MESTEAD HIGH SCHOOL Course Description Guide Homestead Road Fort Wayne, IN Phone:

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1 H H S HOMESTEAD HIGH SCHOOL Course Description Guide Homestead Road Fort Wayne, IN Phone:

2 HOMESTEAD HIGH SCHOOL AN IMPORTANT MESSAGE TO PARENTS AND STUDENTS The Homestead High School Course Description Guide has been prepared to help you plan your four-year educational program. A study of the contents will reveal the academic strength of the curriculum and the diversity of curricular offerings. The many options will allow you to individualize your course of study to meet your objectives, needs, and interests. The first section of this booklet provides general information about graduation requirements, credits, scheduling guidelines, the Advanced Placement Program, and special opportunities. The rest of the Course Description Guide provides a brief description of each course offered at our school. Your counselor can play an important part in your selection of courses. Not only can the counselor offer advice on Homestead's courses, he or she can also assist you in using the Career Resource Center to obtain the most current information on careers and colleges across the United States. It is important to emphasize, however, that while your counselor is available to assist you in your course selection, the final responsibility for this selection rests with you and your parents. Please use this booklet with your parents and counselor to make informed decisions about your future. (All final course selections must be made prior to the deadline for course changes.) The faculty and staff of Homestead High School are prepared to help you make the most of your opportunities. Our personal best wishes are extended to you for a positive and successful four years of high school. Sincerely, Steve R. Lake, Principal HOMESTEAD HIGH SCHOOL S EDUCATIONAL FOCUS Vision/Purpose: Homestead High School facilitates students personal growth, learning, and success beyond high school. Mission: Graduate students with marketable skills, character, and satisfaction. Core Concept: Greatest amount of success per student. i

3 Table Of Contents GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS... 2 SUMMER SCHOOL... 2 SCHEDULE CHANGE PROCEDURE... 3 BOARD POLICIES REGARDING COURSE SELECTIONS... 3 GRADE POINT AVERAGES... 3 CLASS RANK... 3 ATHLETIC ELIGIBILITY... 4 SPECIAL OPPORTUNITIES... 4 OVERVIEW OF SCHEDULING AND COURSE REGISTRATION PROCESS... 6 RECOMMENDATIONS AND COURSE LEVEL PLACEMENT... 6 A SCHOOL DAY... 7 COURSE SELECTIONS FOR GRADUATION REQUIREMENT CHARTS... 8 COURSE DESCRIPTIONS FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES 10 VISUAL ARTS 13 PERFORMING ARTS 17 BUSINESS, MARKETING AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY 22 ENGLISH 27 WORLD AND CLASSICAL LANGUAGES 31 ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION 36 ANTHIS CAREER CENTER 38 MATHEMATICS 42 SCIENCE 45 SOCIAL STUDIES 49 PHYSICAL EDUCATION 51 SPECIAL PROGRAMS AND COURSES 53 SPECIAL EDUCATION 53 APPENDIX Engineering and Technology Course Sequence Chart English Course Sequence Chart Family and Consumer Sciences Career Pathways Mathematics Course Sequence Chart Performing Arts Course Sequence Chart Science Course Sequence Chart Social Studies Course Sequence Chart Visual Arts Course Sequence Chart Estimated Course Fees Priority Dual Credit Course List 1

4 2 Graduation Requirements Please refer to chart on page 8 Graduation Participation Policy: Students must meet all graduation requirements for graduation in order to participate in commencement exercises. Graduation Qualifying Exam: All students must pass the GQE, The Graduation Qualifying Exam: Algebra I and English 10 End-of-Course Assessments (ECAs) to be granted a diploma. Students have opportunities to retake the tests each semester. A waiver process is available if students do not pass the required exams by the end of their senior year. If a student does not pass the English 10 and/or Algebra ECA, the student will participate in remediation offerings to prepare for the next ECA testing opportunity. These remediation offerings may need to replace other electives and may not count for high school credit. Remediation is required for a GQE waiver. Personal Financial Responsibility Instruction Requirement Personal Financial Responsibility Instruction is required by Indiana Code All students graduating in 2014 or later must participate in financial literacy education at least once by the end of 12 th grade. Classes offered to students at Homestead to meet this requirement are as follows: 0806 Adult Roles and Responsibilities 2106 Personal Financial Responsibility Preparing for College and Careers Quantitative Reasoning Courses Requirement Starting with the Class of 2016, all students must be enrolled in a mathematics or quantitative reason course each year in high school. A quantitative reasoning course is a high school course that advances a student s ability to apply mathematics in real world situations and contexts: and deepen a student s understanding of high school mathematics standards. Courses that the Indiana Department of Education has designated as Quantitative Reasoning Courses are labeled as such in the course description guide. Core 40 with Academic Honors: Refer to pages 8-9 for specific requirements. Core 40 with Technical Honors: Refer to pages 8-9 for specific requirements. Core 40 Diploma: This diploma is adequate preparation for admissions to many state colleges and the minimum expectation for graduation from Homestead High School. However, many state universities now require additional math or science for admission. Refer to pages 8-9 for specific requirements. General Diploma: This diploma is the minimum standards for graduation. Please see your counselor for specific requirements. Homestead High School students work toward a Core 40 Diploma or Core 40 Diploma with Academic Honors or Technical Honors. Any student wishing to earn a General Diploma must schedule a meeting with his/her counselor and parent(s) or guardian(s) in order to receive an exemption from earning the Core 40 Diploma. Certificate of Course Completion: Students who meet the course requirements for a Standard Diploma, but are unable to fulfill the GQE requirements will be awarded a Certificate of Course Completion. Such students may participate in graduation activities without any special identification. Certificate of Completion: Special Education students, who have fulfilled the requirements of their IEP, but are unable to achieve the GQE and/or course requirements for a Standard Diploma will be awarded a Certificate of Completion. Such students may participate in graduation activities without any special identification. Early Graduation A student may elect to graduate from high school prior to the attendance of eight semesters. This is a family decision but requires the approval of the counselor and the principal if the request is for graduation after six semesters. The advantages and disadvantages of these choices should be weighed heavily. In lieu of early graduation, the student is encouraged to consider special opportunities such as postsecondary and high school dual enrollment, or an internship/co-op program through on-the job training. The student desiring to graduate after six or seven semesters must have completed all requirements to participate in the ceremony prior to his/her 6 th or 7 th semester completion date. Procedures to arrange for six-semester graduation 1. The student should schedule a planning meeting with his/her counselor and parents to determine the requirements, feasibility, and social ramifications of early graduation. 2. If a student is considering graduating at the end of six (6) semesters, he/she must also: Submit a formal letter to the principal requesting graduation after six (6) semesters. This letter must contain an endorsement from the parent and the student s counselor. The student should include postsecondary plans for after graduation.

5 Summer School 3 The funding for summer school programs is determined by the State on a year-to-year basis. Only certain academic courses will be offered during the summer. Students should register for PE in the regular school year, and if it should become available in the summer notification will be given and schedule adjustments will be made. High school students who fail a class during the regular school year are strongly encouraged to enroll in summer school to catch up with their regular class in English, mathematics, and social studies. Current state restrictions allow only required academic courses to be offered. Details about summer school will be published when available. Summer school enrollment is NOT included in THIS registration process. Ninth grade students may enroll in summer academic courses on a space available basis. Driver s Education is also offered. Schedule Change Procedure Change Requests Any request to change or drop a class depending upon space available must be done prior to June 7, A high school counselor is on duty part time during the summer. Call the Guidance Office at to request assistance. Change Guidelines A request to add a class will be considered providing there is space available in the requested course until June 7, Students may drop a 7 th credited class for a study hall until the last day of the 1 st or 3 rd grading period if space is available. After June 5, 2012, only error corrections will be processed. A request to change the level of an academic course during the summer may be difficult. In some cases these requests may be deferred to the first month of school to obtain high school teacher input. Requests to change levels should be addressed before the current school year ends to include teacher recommendations and input. After the school year begins, a student with seven credited classes MAY request to drop one course and add a study hall. This will be honored; however, a NEW class cannot be added only a study hall. Students may drop a class until the last day of the 1 st or 3 rd grading period if space is available. A request to level a class may be done prior to the end of the first grading period. Exception: AP and Honors leveling class changes must be completed by the 20 th academic day of the semester. Board Policies Regarding Course Selections Board Policy 5160 High School Courses Taken in Middle School Middle school students may take high school level mathematics and foreign language classes before formally enrolling at Homestead. Students who complete both semesters of a course will receive high school credit and grades that will be calculated into the high school grade point average. Requests to remove high school credits and grades for courses taken in middle school must be submitted to the Registrar no later than March of the student s freshman year. Board Policy 4055 Retaking High School Courses The rationale for repeating a class is limited to improving the student's understanding and achievement and/or improving the student's ability to meet post-secondary goals. The transcript will show all grades, but only the grade from the second class will be included in the GPA. Thus, students may retake a high school course if the following conditions are present: The student is not adequately prepared for the next related course in the series (i.e., mathematics) and The grade for the previous class was a C+ or below, OR The student desires to repeat a course to meet the eligibility requirements of the Academics Honors Diploma (AHD). The requirements are: A student must have a grade of not lower than a C in any course qualifying for the AHD (excepting the course to be repeated), and an overall GPA of an 8.0 (B). When students meet the criteria and request to repeat a course in the next possible semester, the student, the student's parents or guardians, and the counselor will make the decision. If the criteria are not met or there is a lapse of time before the student asks to repeat a course, the final decision to repeat a course will be made by the school principal. There is no time limit as to when the student must request permission to repeat the class. Grade Point Averages The semester grades for each course are computed into the calculation of the student s grade point average (GPA). No courses may be taken Pass/Fail, and all subjects and all grades are included. The letter grade is converted to a 12-point scale. Although a grade average is computed for each individual semester, the GPA is an accumulative grade average. The total grade points are divided by the total credits earned and/or attempted to determine the GPA. Homestead High School does not weigh grades. Class Rank Class ranks are not included on official transcripts that are mailed to colleges and universities.

6 4 Grades Have the Following Percentages and Grade Point Average Values. ** Semester grades for AP classes have an alternative grading scale. Students will be given the scale on the 1 st day of class. LETTER GRADE GPA VALUE PERCENTAGE RANGE A A A B B B C C C D D D F Athletic Eligibility IHSAA Guidelines All athletes must maintain passing grades in at least five academic classes each grading period in order to remain eligible for IHSAA-sanctioned contests. Eligibility is established at the end of a grading period for the next marking period. A student who does not pass five classes in June is not eligible for fall sports unless he or she attends summer school. This student should contact the Athletic Director and his/her counselor immediately for details. All summer courses must be completed and grades recorded by the first day of fall semester. If a student does not pass five classes in October (1 st nine weeks) the student may not participate in athletic contests until reports cards are issued at the end of the first semester. The semester grades determine eligibility until the next 9 week grades are issued. A student who is academically ineligible MAY practice at the discretion of the coach but not participate in contests. All students must be registered for five credit classes of which three must be taken at Homestead High School. NCAA Eligibility Guidelines If a student is planning to enroll in college as a freshman and wishes to participate in Division I or Division II athletics, the student must be certified by the NCAA Initial-Eligibility Clearinghouse. The Clearinghouse ensures consistent application of NCAA initial-eligibility requirements for all prospective student athletes at all member institutions. Students planning to register with the NCAA Clearinghouse must complete a form at NAIA Eligibility Guidelines If a student plans on enrolling in an NAIA Division School, the student must register with the NAIA Clearinghouse to ensure athletic eligibility. Special Opportunities Included in this section are several programs that are multidisciplinary, extend over more than one period, or offer a different learning style. These may be included in any diploma program. Advanced Placement (AP) Program Homestead High School offers Advanced Placement (AP) classes in the areas of science, math, social studies, Spanish and English. The course descriptions are listed in the department section. These courses are designed to enable students to pursue college-level studies while still in high school. The College Board prescribes the content of these college-level courses. Semester grades for AP classes have an alternative grading scale. AP students will be given the scale on the first day of class. At the completion of an AP course, it is strongly recommended that students take AP exams given nationally in May. By taking AP courses and successfully completing the exams, a student may earn college credit and/or advanced placement in college courses. AP courses are designed to be rigorous, challenging, college-level classes. In assessing a student s application, selective colleges will consider if the student is enrolled in the highest level of courses available to him or her. Colleges look favorably upon courses designated as AP since these courses represent more rigorous content than the standard high school curricula. Students are encouraged to investigate the AP policy of the colleges under consideration, as they vary in the scores required for advanced credit. Homestead High School does not weigh AP or Honors classes in computing grade point averages (GPAs).

7 Post Secondary (Dual) Enrollment Any student in grade 11 or 12 may apply to enroll full-time or part-time in a college or university program and earn credits toward graduation from high school and/or credits in a college program. Most local colleges including IVY Tech (Community College of Indiana) have programs for the high school student. The colleges have different criteria for admission. Information for specific schools may be obtained from your guidance counselor. The student will be released from attendance at the end of the academic day for two periods for each approved 100 level or higher, 3-credit class enrolled in at a college. If the higher education class meets at the beginning of the school day the student may opt to be released from two periods of high school attendance at the start of the academic day if his/her higher education (college) course is an approved 3 credit course. If the higher education course is a one or two credit college course, the student may opt to be released for one high school period. See guidance counselor for details. College courses are also offered at Homestead. There is no additional release time for college classes taken on our campus. Policy for Higher Education Classes Students may attend a school of higher education for Homestead High School dual credit full time or may attend classes at the institution of higher education for Homestead High School dual credit while also taking classes at Homestead. Students will receive one (1) credit at HHS for each course taken at the institution of higher education. If taking classes at Homestead and an institution of higher education, the student will be released two classes for each class of higher education taken and must be enrolled in a total of five (5) credits per semester. If a student is attending a college or university full time for dual credit, the college/university full time attendance policy will be the standard for full time status. However, if a student is in a Homestead High School athletic program, he/she will be required to have a total of five (5) for credit classes, three (3) of which must be taken at Homestead High School, in order to participate in the ISHAA sanctioned sport. Anthis Career Center Homestead students may elect to attend the Anthis Career Center for a variety of career courses. These courses are approved for Academic Honor Diploma electives, as well as Core 40. The course descriptions are detailed in a separate section in this guide. Students usually enter this program which is primarily instructional in their junior year. The second year may be course work, an internship, or on-the-job-training. Students earn three credits each semester they attend. A total of 12 elective credits may be earned in this program. Many of the programs at Anthis award IVY Tech credit (dual credit). In some circumstances a sophomore may enroll. A description of these courses is included in the Technology Education department. Anthis programs are full year programs. Homestead students may not enroll for only one semester. Positions to attend Anthis are limited. Cooperative Education During the senior year a student may enroll in BCE, ME, or ICE. These programs are on-the-job training, with a classroom component. A student earns three credits per semester. This program is designed to provide practical experience in a career of the student s interest. The student who finds employment in a career field of their choice may be dismissed for up to three periods per day. The credit earned in this program is Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors, and Core 40 with Technical Honors credit. These programs have limited enrollment numbers and require an application. A description of these programs is detailed in the Business Technology Department. 5 Impact High School Students who have not been successful in the conventional high school setting may apply for admission to this program. The academic courses operate on a block system with credit issued each grading period. The students attend academic classes for one half day. The other half-day must include a career experience such as Anthis, Co-op, Postsecondary enrollment, or three hours per day of job shadow or volunteer work. The program is designed to provide an educational program that addresses the unique interests and needs of individual students. Transportation is the responsibility of the student and his/her parent. Your counselor may provide you with more detailed information and arrange for a visit if desired. An application that must be completed may be obtained from a counselor. Not all students who apply are accepted immediately, as there is a limited enrollment. If the program is full, a student is placed on a waiting list for the next available opening. Peer Tutoring Students who are willing to share their time and friendship as a mentor to students in our Special Education Department may elect Peer Tutoring. A student may earn up to 2 elective credits during their high school years by participating in the program. Details of the responsibilities are listed in the Special Programs and Courses section. Peer Tutoring Team FACT Program Team FACT peer tutoring gives students the opportunity to learn, develop and use leadership, communication, decision making, and study-group facilitation skills while establishing a helping relationship with freshmen, in a one-on-one and group setting. Tutors will, also assist core subject teachers in meeting freshmen academic needs. Specific details about the program are listed in the Special Programs and Courses section. Future Teachers: See description of program in Family and Consumer Sciences. Mentorship: See description in Special Programs and Courses.

8 Overview of Scheduling and Course Registration Process 6 Each year Homestead High School creates a new master schedule to accommodate the students course requests as shared with counselors during registration. Faculty members are employed, textbooks are purchased, and rooms are assigned on the basis of these requests. A priority is programmed for each student to receive the same teacher each semester for academic courses. This is not a requirement; it is an if possible priority. If a student does NOT receive the same teacher each semester, it is because it cannot be done. All schedule change requests must be addressed by the end of the academic school year. Only errors are corrected after the school year begins. Course Availability All courses require a sufficient number of student registrations to be offered in a given year. If there is not sufficient interest in a particular course, it will not be provided during the upcoming school year. Courses may be offered, but not be available to certain grade levels, based on high levels of enrollment. Space and teacher availability may limit the number of sections of a course in any given year. Students in higher grades receive priority for enrollment. This occurs in the elective areas. Academic or required courses are not usually affected. In some cases prospective freshmen will be asked to make an alternate elective selection. Selection of Courses Counselors will meet with their assigned students during the last part of the first semester and the beginning of second semester. Students will receive scheduling materials, a current transcript, and information relevant to the specific grade level. Students will then be asked to submit their final selections. They should have decided on most of their choices (with classroom teacher input and recommendations) and be prepared with any questions for the counselor. It is extremely important that the student come to this meeting prepared. Recommendations and Course Level Placement Level placement is utilized in the academic curriculum English, mathematics, science and social studies. All regular courses are traditional college preparatory and are designed to prepare the student for entrance into college and for academic success in the college classroom. Courses designated Honors/Advanced/AP are enriched courses that go into more depth and breadth in content. AP designates Advanced Placement Courses, which follow prescribed course curriculum and are college level courses. AP courses are open to any interested student with sophomore standing or above. Recommendations Recommendations by teachers in English, mathematics, world and classical languages, and science are provided to assist the student and parents in appropriate course selections. The current subject area teachers will take into consideration the student s potential, current academic success and performance, and the level of motivation shown by the student when making the recommendations. Counselors urge students to follow the teacher recommendation, but the final decision regarding course selection is the decision of the parent and student, with the following exceptions: Student not currently enrolled in Alpha math or Honors math courses must be recommended to be placed in a Honors math class. Qualifying for Honors English Students who wish to qualify for an Honors English should have a strong academic record in grade 8 or 9 English (B+ or higher), achievement indicative of student talent and diligence. They must meet the following qualification criteria: Grade 9 Honors English: NWEA Language Usage Test RIT score of 234 or higher and a NWEA Reading Test RIT score of 237 or higher OR Pass+ designation on the E/LA ISTEP+ test at the end of grade 7 or grade 8 OR Passing score on High School Honors English Department Exam that is given Spring Semester. Grade 10 Honors English: Successful completion of Honors English 9 (C+ or higher) OR Passing Score on Honors English Department Exam that is given in the Spring Semester. Only students who have achieved the above criteria will be allowed to select the honors courses during the course selection process. Students wanting to take the Honors English Department exam should complete the testing prior to end of the school year. Students who do not achieve a passing score on this placement test may submit a portfolio of work as an appeal.

9 A School Day 7 The students of Homestead High School must select their courses of study within the framework of the following procedures and suggestions: Students must be enrolled in a full day of classes (7:45 a.m. to 2:35 p.m.) Students must enroll in a minimum of six credit classes and may have no more than one study hall period per day. Students may take only one study hall or assistantship per semester, not both. The assistantship program is open to students in grades 10, 11, and 12. Refer to the chart of graduation requirements on page 8 for a list of the required courses for graduation. The student s choices of courses to complete his/her schedule are some of the most important decisions he/she will make. The traditional or standard academic courses are the same for all students. Homestead students are fortunate to have a wide array of elective areas from which to choose. Some of these departments offer a sequence of courses requiring prerequisites before one can enroll in the higher-level classes. Students should identify senior level courses of interest and determine courses needed to qualify. Course Selections for A complete listing of courses may be found in the next section of this Course Description Guide Prior to the department listings is a page outlining some of the special programs that a student may opt to select. A more complete description may be found in the department offering the program. The class of 2017 will be issued a copy of this document in the first semester of the ninth grade as they finalize their four-year plan. Any changes of course offerings will be added as an addendum to this guide. That information may not be available until the end of the year. Changes that will affect course offerings will be announced through the Homestead Webpage. Homestead High School College and Career Pathways for Success provide an aligned sequence of secondary and postsecondary courses leading to an industry-recognized credential, technical certification, or an associate or baccalaureate degree at an accredited postsecondary institution for careers that are high wage and/or high demand in Indiana. Pathways can be viewed on the Homestead High School Guidance page of the SACS website. Listing of Courses with numbers The appendix contains a list of all courses, course numbers, and estimated costs of the courses. Flow Charts Also listed in the appendix are Flow Charts for several departments to aid students in understanding the scope and sequence of courses that are offered. Special or Non-departmental Numbers 0001 First semester Study Hall 0002 Second semester Study Hall 0052 January Graduate 0256 Middle School Teacher Assistant 1st semester (Summit Middle School only) 0257 Middle School Teacher Assistant 2nd semester (Summit Middle School only) 0451 Impact School 1st Semester 0452 Impact School 2nd Semester 5141 Higher Ed/Dual Enrollment 1st Semester 5142 Higher Ed/Dual Enrollment 2nd Semester 5926 Peer Tutoring 1st Semester 5927 Peer Tutoring - 2nd Semester 5946 Peer Tutoring: Team FACT Program I 1 st semester 5947 Peer Tutoring: Team FACT Program I 2 nd semester 5956 Peer Tutoring: Team FACT Program II 1 st semester 5957 Peer Tutoring: Team FACT Program II 2 nd semester Additional Notes regarding the Course Description Guide Content The course offerings will be listed by department. Check requirements and/or prerequisites for each course.

10 Homestead High School Diploma Requirements Classes of 2014 & 2015 Every attempt is made to monitor each student s credit and graduation status. However, it is 8 ultimately the parents and student s responsibility to ensure that graduation requirements are met. Curriculum Area Core 40 Core 40 with Academic Honors Core 40 with Technical Honors English 8 Credits 8 Credits 8 Credits Math 2 Credits Algebra I 2 Credits Geometry 2 Credits Algebra II 2 Credits Algebra I 2 Credits Geometry 2 Credits Algebra II 2 Credits Algebra I 2 Credits Geometry 2 Credits Algebra II (students must earn 2 credits 2 Credits Pre Calc w/ Trig 2 Credits Pre Calc w/ Trig in Math or Physics during (students must earn 2 credits in Math or (students must earn 2 credits in Math or Physics during their junior or senior year) Physics during their junior or senior year) their junior or senior year) Science Social Studies 2 Credits Biology 2 Credits Chemistry or Physics 2 Additional Science Credits 2 Credits World History 2 Credits US History 1 Credit Government 1 Credit Economics 2 Credits Biology 2 Credits Chemistry or Physics 2 Additional Science Credits 2 Credits World History 2 Credits US History 1 Credit Government 1 Credit Economics 2 Credits Biology 2 Credits Chemistry or Physics 2 Additional Science Credits 2 Credits World History 2 Credits US History 1 Credit Government 1 Credit Economics PE 2 Credits 2 Credits 2 Credits Health 1 Credit 1 Credit 1 Credit World Recommended 6 Credits in one language or Recommended Languages 4 Credits each in two languages Fine Arts 2 Credits Career- Technical Additional Requirements Directed Electives Electives GPA Requirements Class of 2014 and beyond: 1 credit in personal financial responsibility instruction 5 Credits World Languages, Fine Arts or Career-Technical 6 credits Career Academic Sequence Recommended Complete 1 of the following: AP courses (4 credits) and corresponding exams. Dual Credits Courses (6 college credits) from the Core Transfer Library AP Courses (2 credits) and corresponding exams and Dual Credit Courses (3 college credits) from the Core Transfer Library 1200 SAT (Critical Reading and Math) 26 Composite on the ACT Class of 2014 and beyond: 1 credit in personal financial responsibility instruction 5 Credits World Languages, Fine Arts or Career-Technical (May be satisfied by categories above) 6 credits Career Academic Sequence Recommended No required grade lower than C. Minimum GPA = 8.0 Total 40 Credits 47 Credits 47 Credits Related sequence of 8 Career-Technical credits Complete two of the following, one must be 1 or 2: 1) WorkKeys: Reading for Information - Level 6; Applied Mathematics - Level 6; Locating Information - Level 5 2) Complete dual credit courses in a technical area (6 college credits)complete a Professional Career Internship course or Cooperative Education course (2 credits) 3) Complete an industry-based work experience as part of two-year technical education program (minimum 140 hours) 4) Earn a state-approved, industry-recognized certification Class of 2014 and beyond: 1 credit in personal financial responsibility instruction 5 Credits World Languages, Fine Arts or Career-Technical (May be satisfied by categories above) 6 credits Career Academic Sequence Recommended No required grade lower than C. Minimum GPA = 8.0

11 Homestead High School Diploma Requirements Class of Every attempt is made to monitor each student s credit and graduation status. However, it is ultimately the parents and student s responsibility to ensure that graduation requirements are met. 9 Curriculum Area Core 40 Core 40 with Academic Honors Core 40 with Technical Honors English 8 Credits 8 Credits 8 Credits Math 2 Credits Algebra I 2 Credits Geometry 2 Credits Algebra II (students must earn 2 credits in Math or Physics during their junior or senior year and 6 credits while in high school) 2 Credits Algebra I 2 Credits Geometry 2 Credits Algebra II 2 Credits Adv Modeling & Analysis w/ Trig (students must earn 2 credits in Math or Physics during their junior or senior year and 6 credits while in high 2 Credits Algebra I 2 Credits Geometry 2 Credits Algebra II 2 Credits Adv Modeling & Analysis w/ Trig (students must earn 2 credits in Math or Physics during their junior or senior year and 6 credits while in high school) Science Social Studies 2 Credits Biology 2 Credits Chemistry or Physics 2 Additional Science Credits 2 Credits World History 2 Credits US History 1 Credit Government 1 Credit Economics school) 2 Credits Biology 2 Credits Chemistry or Physics 2 Additional Science Credits 2 Credits World History 2 Credits US History 1 Credit Government 1 Credit Economics 2 Credits Biology 2 Credits Chemistry or Physics 2 Additional Science Credits 2 Credits World History 2 Credits US History 1 Credit Government 1 Credit Economics PE 2 Credits 2 Credits 2 Credits Health 1 Credit 1 Credit 1 Credit World Recommended 6 Credits in one language or Recommended Languages 4 Credits each in two languages Fine Arts 2 Credits Career-Technical Additional Requirements Directed Electives Electives 1 credit in personal financial responsibility instruction 5 Credits World Languages, Fine Arts or Career-Technical 6 credits Career Academic Sequence Recommended Complete 1 of the following: AP courses (4 credits) and corresponding exams. Dual Credits Courses (6 college credits) from the Priority Course List AP Courses (2 credits) and corresponding exams and Dual Credit Courses (3 college credits) from the Priority Course List 1750 SAT (Critical Reading, Writing, and Math of which each must be 530) 26 Composite on the ACT and complete the written section 1 credit in personal financial responsibility instruction 5 Credits World Languages, Fine Arts or Career-Technical (May be satisfied by categories above) 6 credits Career Academic Sequence Recommended No required grade lower than C. Minimum GPA = 8.0 GPA Requirements Total 40 Credits 47 Credits 47 Credits Related sequence of 6 credits in a college and career pathway Complete two of the following, one must be 1 or 2: 5) WorkKeys: Reading for Information - Level 6; Applied Mathematics - Level 6; Locating Information - Level 5, or a minimum score on Accuplacer or Compass 6) Complete dual credit courses in a technical area from the Priority Course List (6 college credits) Complete a Professional Career Internship course or Cooperative Education course (2 credits) 7) Complete an industry-based work experience as part of two-year technical education program (minimum 140 hours) 8) Earn a state-approved, industry-recognized certification 1 credit in personal financial responsibility instruction 5 Credits World Languages, Fine Arts or Career- Technical (May be satisfied by categories above) 6 credits Career Academic Sequence Recommended No required grade lower than C. Minimum GPA = 8.0 Please note: All students must be enrolled in a mathematics or quantitative reasoning course each year in high school.

12 FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES The Family and Consumer Sciences courses empower students to manage the challenges of living and working at home, in the community, in the workplace, and in a diverse and global society. The relationship between work and family is a unique focus of the program. Courses apply to a variety of post high school careers including teaching, childcare, dietetics, hospitality and food service, health services, housing and design, social services, food science, clothing construction and fashion design, and as entrepreneurs. These courses emphasize a project-based approach in the classroom. These activities may be compiled into a student portfolio at the end of each course. *Three courses may be substituted to fulfill the required health education credit: Child Development, Nutrition & Wellness, and Interpersonal Relationships. See State Rule 411 IAC * Adult Roles and Responsibilities (5330) Offered grades 9, 10, 11, 12 Directed elective Course meets the financial responsibility graduation requirement for all students. This course builds financial knowledge that will prepare students to take the next steps toward adulthood in today's ever-changing society. The focus is on becoming independent, contributing, and responsible participants in family, community, and career settings. This course is designed to help individuals realize the responsibilities that are associated with being independent. Students can look forward to a semester long project in which they will be paired up in a marriage-like simulation. Together, couples will learn what it takes to buy or rent a home, purchase a car, pay bills, apply for a loan, manage credit, responsibilities related to finding and maintaining a career and other money planning and goal setting experiences. 10 *0716 Interpersonal Relationships (5364) Offered grades: 10, 11, 12 Directed elective Interpersonal Relationships is an introductory course that is especially relevant for students interested in careers that involve interacting with people. It is also valuable for all students as a life foundation and academic enrichment. This course addresses knowledge and skills needed for positive and productive relationships in career, community, and family settings. Major course topics include communication skills; leadership, teamwork, and collaboration; digital citizenship; conflict prevention, resolution, and management; human sexuality, building and maintaining relationships; and individual needs and characteristics and their impacts on relationships. A project-based approach is utilized that promotes higher order thinking, communication, leadership, and management processes that are fundamental to college and career success. This course provides a foundation for continuing and post-secondary education for all career areas that involve interacting with people both inside and outside of a business/organization, including team members, clients, patients, customers, and the general public. * Child Development (5362) Offered grades: 9,10, 11, 12 Directed elective Child Development is an introductory course that is especially relevant for students interested in careers that draw on knowledge of children, child development, and nurturing of children. This course addresses issues of child development from conception/prenatal through age 2. It includes the study of prenatal development and birth; growth and development of children; child care giving and nurturing; and support systems for parents and caregivers. Topics include: consideration of the roles, responsibilities, and challenges of parenthood, child abuse, human sexuality, adolescent pregnancy; prenatal development preparation for birth; the birth process, meeting the needs of infants and children, caring for children with special needs, and career opportunities. Students will take home a computerized baby for a weekend to get first-hand knowledge of what it would be like to be a parent Advanced Child Development (5360) Prerequisite: Child Development Offered grades: 9, 10, 11, 12 Directed elective Advanced Child Development is a sequential course that addresses development of children from toddler through age 8. This class is a project-based class and will offer students a variety of resources for future endeavors. Students will create a portfolio, learn sign-language, and observe young children. Topics include: positive parenting and nurturing across ages and stages practices that promote long-term well-being of children and their families

13 developmentally appropriate guidance and intervention strategies with individuals and groups of children accessing, evaluating, and utilizing information, including brain/learning research and other research results meeting needs of children with a variety of disadvantaging conditions exploration of "all aspects of the industry" for selected child-related careers 0746 Early Childhood Education I/IPFW F200: Future Teachers (5412) ** This class is now a dual credit course. Students may take this for college credit and earn 3 credit hours or they as a high school course. Recommended Prerequisites: Child Development and or approval of course teacher Student must have passed both the Algebra I and English 10 GQE End of Course Assessments Offered grades 11, 12 Students may earn two credits. One credit for classroom work and one credit for teaching internship at SACS elementary and middle schools This course may be repeated for additional credit Directed elective This elective course provides students with organized exploratory teaching experiences. Students are assigned to SACS elementary and middle schools to work with teachers and students in an educational atmosphere. This class meets 2 periods consecutively. Students must provide their own transportation. This course provides a balance of class work relating to: (1) classroom organization, (2) classroom management, (3) the curriculum and instructional process, (4) observations of teaching, and (5) instructional experiences. Study topics and background reading provide the Future Teacher with information concerning the teaching profession Early Childhood Education II: Future Teachers (5412) Prerequisite: 1 semester of 0746 Early Childhood Education I: Future Teachers Offered grade 11 and 12 Students earn two or three credits. One credit for classroom work and one or two additional credits for a teaching internship at SACS elementary and middle schools This course may be repeated for credit Directed elective This elective is a higher level course than Students are assigned to SACS elementary and middle schools to work with teachers and students in an educational atmosphere. Students must provide their own transportation. This course provides a balance of class work relating to: (1) classroom organization, (2) classroom management, (3) the curriculum and instructional process, (4) observations of teaching, (5) instructional experiences, (6) independent study of current teaching issues and case studies Introduction to Fashion and Textiles-1 (5380) Offered grades 9. 10, 11, 12 Directed elective Textiles and Fashion Technologies addresses knowledge and skills related to design, production, acquisition, and distribution in the textiles and fashion arenas. Units include: influences of clothing, history of fashion, basic sewing skills, color theory and design principles, fibers, basic construction and the exploration of related careers. Creative sewing offers students an opportunity for selfexpression and opens many career possibilities, such as apparel design, fashion merchandising and textile production. This class enables students to better evaluate ready-made clothing and clothing decisions. The class provides an emphasis on skill development and productivity Introduction to Fashion and Textiles-2 (5380) Prerequisite: 0506-Intro to Fashion and Textiles-1 Offered grades 9, 10, 11, 12 Directed elective This course may be repeated for credit This course continues the skills from Introduction to Fashion and Textiles 1. Students will expand knowledge and skills in the use of various fibers, fabrics, and related career projects. Emphasis is on progressive skill development through individual projects Fashion and Textiles Careers I, II (5420/5421)) Prerequisite: Introduction to Fashion and Textiles 1 and 2 and approval of course teacher. Offered grades 11 or 12 Two or three credits per semester: One credit for independent class work and one or two additional credits for internship experience outside the school. This course may be repeated for additional credit A Career Academic Sequence elective and directed elective for Core 40, Academic Honors and Technical Honors. Directed elective This course prepares students for career clusters that encompass occupations in and higher education programs related to careers in fashion, apparel and other textiles management, production, and services. Intensive laboratory experiences with industry applications are a required component of this class. The student study is independent in the areas related to their internship experience outside of school. Students must provide their own transportation. Number of credits earned for internship experience will be based on the following: (5-9 hours per week = 1 credit, 10 hours + = 2 credits.) Instruction and laboratory experiences may include: Commercial applications of principles of design and production Selection of apparel and textile products Product research, development and testing Demonstration and instruction of related tools and equipment Commercial maintenance or production of apparel or textiles products

14 * Nutrition and Wellness: Foods 1 (5342) Offered grades: 9, 10, 11, 12 Directed elective Nutrition and Wellness enables students to realize the components and lifelong benefits of sound nutrition and wellness practices and empowers them to apply these principles in their everyday lives. Laboratory experiences which emphasize both nutrition and wellness practices are necessary components of this course. The study of foods revolves around the U.S. Dietary Guidelines and the Food Guide Pyramid. Areas of study include basic nutrition, kitchen equipment and skills, safety and sanitation, and an in-depth look at all the food groups. Lab experiences include knife skills, quick breads, fruits and vegetables, meat, and desserts to name a few. Students can also look forward to a cooking at home assignment where they will share learned skills with family. After completing this course, one can expect to be more prepared to live on his/her own Advanced Nutrition and Foods: Foods 2 (5340) Prerequisite: Nutrition and Wellness: Foods 1 Offered grades 9, 10, 11, 12 Directed elective Advanced Nutrition and Foods: Foods 2 is a sequential course that addresses more complex concepts in nutrition and foods, with emphasis on contemporary economic, social, psychological, cultural, and global issues. This course takes the semi-experienced cook into the creative world of foods. It offers more foods opportunities to develop proficiency in food preparation, meal management, and serving. The nutritional emphasis is on meal planning within various budgets. Study will revolve around American regional foods and specialty foods, such as decorated cakes and holiday foods. Topics include: nutrition and wellness for individuals and families across the life span community and world food concerns, including hunger impacts of technology on nutrition, foods, and related tools and equipment management of food-related resources acquiring, organizing, and evaluating information about foods and nutrition exploration of careers in all aspects of the food industry Essentials for success in this class are: Recommended grade of C or above in Nutrition & Wellness: Foods 1 Good writing skills Good math skills Good self-management skills 12 Advanced Nutrition and Foods: Foods 3 is a sequential course that addresses more complex concepts in nutrition and foods, with emphasis on contemporary economic, social, psychological, cultural, and global issues. This is a course designed for self-motivated students who are interested in refining skills and expanding their cooking knowledge. The class is laboratory oriented, emphasizing skills in creative cookery, small appliance use, preparing foods from foreign cultures and world food use. Through the analysis of ingredient functions and nutrients, the students have the opportunity to develop new recipes, original ways of presenting foods and healthy alternatives. Essentials for success in this class are: Recommended grade of C or above in Advanced Nutrition and Foods: Foods 2 Good writing skills Good math skills Good self-management skills 0816 Introduction to Housing and Interior Design (5350) Offered grades 9, 10, 11, 12 This course may be repeated for credit Directed elective Housing and Interiors addresses selecting and planning living environments to meet the needs and wants of individuals and families throughout the family life cycle, considering a broad range of economic, social, cultural, technological, environmental, maintenance, and aesthetic factors. Topics include: evaluation of housing styles, locations, zones, restrictions, and ownership options managing resources to provide shelter for individuals and families, including financing options and tax considerations contemporary housing issues, including homelessness environmental and energy issues; impacts of technology housing to meet special needs elements and principles of design related to interiors, housing, and architecture blueprinting and floor planning skills creating functional, safe, and aesthetic spaces historical aspects and contemporary trends in housing, interiors, furniture, and appliances exploration of housing-related careers 0626 Advanced Nutrition and Foods: Foods 3 (5340) Prerequisite: Advanced Nutrition and Foods: Foods 2 Offered grades: 10, 11, 12 This course may be repeated for credit Directed elective

15 VISUAL ARTS 13 courses building the necessary skills and knowledge to make more advanced art courses successful. Areas of study will include rendering and shading with a variety of media and techniques, various artists and subject matter, composition and color theory. While the main focus is art production, students will also participate in reading, writing and discussions about various aspects of art. Students taking this course engage in sequential learning experiences that encompass art history, art criticism, aesthetics, and production Introduction to Three Dimensional Art (L) (4002) Offered grades 9, 10, 11, 12 Directed elective A study of the elements and principles of design and their application in three-dimensional artwork, Intro to 3-D is one of the foundation courses building the necessary skills and knowledge to make more advanced courses successful. Students will solve compositional problems utilizing various three-dimensional media, such as plaster, glass, clay, etc. While the main focus is art production, students will also participate in reading, writing and discussions about various aspects of art. Students taking this course engage in sequential learning experiences that encompass art history, art criticism, aesthetics, and production. The Visual Arts Department is an elective department with a wide variety of 2-D, 3-D, and technology courses. Whether students just enjoy the visual arts or may be considering further exploration and pursuit of the arts as a career option, students will find courses appropriate for their interest level. A key factor to success in this department is for students to take fundamental courses early in their high school program in order to be eligible for advanced courses later. The department offers a broad range of opportunities for personal artistic enrichment and growth. Toward that end, each course offers students the opportunity to reflect upon his/her own work and the work of others as well as strengthening problem solving, writing, criticism, and presentation skills. Two (2) fine arts credits are required for the Academic Honors Diploma. NOTE: Courses with the (L) designation are considered lab courses. Courses have specific grade levels to which they may be offered. Due to the high volume of requests for certain classes, they may not be available to all grade levels. The Visual Arts Department strongly recommends that students achieve a minimum of a C- average in the prerequisite course to consider moving into an advance level course Introduction to Two Dimensional Art (L) (4000) Offered grades 9, 10, 11, 12 Directed elective A study of the elements and principles of design and their application in two-dimensional artwork, Intro to 2-D, primarily a drawing course, is one of the foundation Advanced Two Dimensional Art (L) (4004) Prerequisite: 1006 Intro to Two Dimensional Art Offered grades 9, 10, 11, 12 Directed elective In this course, students will explore a range of twodimensional creative options building on the knowledge and skills learned in Introduction to Two-Dimensional Art, including some new media (i.e. oil pastels, and printmaking) and subject matter (i.e. perspective, figure drawing, etc). The emphasis is on realistic rendering and composition. While the main focus is art production, students will also participate in reading, writing and discussions about various aspects of art. A sketchbook will be maintained throughout the course. Students in this course build on the sequential learning experiences of Introduction to Two Dimensional Art that encompass art history, art criticism, aesthetics, and production Advanced Three Dimensional Art (L) (4006) Prerequisite: 1007 Intro to Three Dimensional Art Offered Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 Directed elective In this course, students will explore a range of threedimensional creative options building upon the knowledge and skills learned in Introduction to Three-Dimensional Art. Some new subject matter, media, and artists (i.e. Surrealism, copper foil/repousse, casting, Alexander Calder, etc.) will be introduced. While the main focus is art production, students will also participate in reading, writing and discussions about various aspects of art. Students in this course build on the sequential learning experiences of Introduction to Three Dimensional Art that encompass art history, art criticism, aesthetics, and production.

16 1026 Beginning Ceramics (L) (4040) Prerequisites: 1006 Intro to Two Dimensional Art or 1007 Intro to Three Dimensional Art Offered Grades 10, 11, 12 Directed elective Beginning Ceramics students will experience the possibilities and limitations of clay while creating a variety of ceramic pieces using coil, slab, and wheel thrown techniques. A variety of glazing and decorating techniques will be studied and utilized. Aesthetics and craftsmanship within a student s individual style are of particular importance. While the main focus is art production, students will also participate in reading, writing and discussions about various aspects of art. Students in this course engage in sequential learning experiences that encompass art history, art criticism, aesthetics, and production as they relate to the study of pottery/ceramics Advanced Ceramics (L) (4040) Prerequisite: 1026 Beginning Ceramics Offered grades 10, 11, 12 Directed elective This course may be repeated for credit Students will create works of art using both hand built and wheel thrown techniques and will also utilize glazing and decorating techniques. Advanced Ceramics allows students to develop a more personalized style while continuing to develop a deeper understanding of the creative possibilities of clay. Studio maintenance and developmental responsibilities are also a factor in this course. While the main focus is art production, students will also participate in reading, writing and discussions about various aspects of art. Students in this course engage in sequential learning experiences that encompass art history, art criticism, aesthetics, and production as they relate to the study of pottery/ceramics Beginning Fiber Arts (L) (4046) Offered Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 Directed elective Beginning Fiber Arts students will create works of art utilizing a variety of fibrous media, such as basketry, yarn, cotton linter, and hemp in various loom and offloom processes such as weaving, dyeing, papermaking, calligraphy, and macrame. While the main focus is art production, students will also participate in reading, writing and discussions about various aspects of art. Students in this course engage in sequential learning experiences that encompass art history, art criticism, aesthetics, and production as they relate to the study of fiber arts Advanced Fiber Arts (L) (4046) Prerequisite: 1106 Beginning Fiber Arts Offered grades 9,10, 11, 12 Directed elective May be repeated for credit 14 Advanced Fiber Arts students will create works of art utilizing a variety of fibrous media such as silk, basketry, yarn and embroidery floss and processes such as weaving, dyeing and stitchery. Building on previously learned skills, Advanced Fiber Arts students will learn and utilize more difficult production methods and more intricate compositional applications. While the main focus is art production, students will also participate in reading, writing and discussions about various aspects of art. Students in this course engage in sequential learning experiences that encompass art history, art criticism, aesthetics, and production as they relate to the study of fiber arts Beginning Jewelry (L) (4042) Prerequisites: Any 2 visual art classes other than Film/Video Offered grades 10, 11, 12 Directed elective Beginning Jewelry provides the opportunity to study and apply a variety of jewelry making techniques. Beginning Jewelry students will create works of art using wire, sheet and cast metal, while utilizing a variety of jewelry techniques, i.e. soldering, casting and cutting. Brass, copper, and silver are the primary media used. While the main focus is jewelry production, students will also participate in reading, writing and discussions about various aspects of art. Students taking this Jewelry course engage in sequential learning experiences that encompass art history, art criticism, aesthetics, and production as they relate to the study of metalsmithing/jewelry production Advanced Jewelry (L) (4042) Prerequisite: 1126 Beginning Jewelry Offered grades 10, 11, 12 Directed elective This course may be repeated for credit Advanced Jewelry students will create works of art using wire, sheet and cast metal. Building on previously learned skills; students will learn and utilize more difficult production methods, such as roll printing and bezel style stone setting. The emphasis will be on mastery of technique and creative design. While the main focus is art production, students will also participate in reading, writing and discussions about various aspects of art. Students taking this Jewelry course engage in sequential learning experiences that encompass art history, art criticism, aesthetics, and production as they relate to the study of metalsmithing/jewelry production Beginning Sculpture (L) (4044) Prerequisites: 1006 Intro to Two Dimensional Art and 1007 Intro to Three Dimensional Art Offered grades 10, 11, 12 Directed elective Beginning Sculpture students will create works of art using additive, subtractive and assemblage sculptural techniques. One major project is a modeled self-portrait bust, allowing students to learn to utilize their 2-D rendering skills in 3-D media. Students will utilize waste mold casting and other sculpture processes. While the

17 main focus is art production, students will also participate in reading, writing and discussions about various aspects of art. Students taking this course engage in sequential learning experiences that encompass art history, art criticism, aesthetics, and production as they relate to the study of sculpture. Due to the level of difficulty of this course, it is recommended (although not required) that Advanced 2-D or Advanced 3-D Art also be taken prior to this course Advanced Sculpture (L) (4044) Prerequisite: 1156 Beginning Sculpture Offered grades 10, 11, 12 Directed elective This course may be repeated for credit Advanced Sculpture students will create works of art using additive, subtractive and assemblage sculptural techniques. Building on previously learned skills, Advanced Sculpture students will create a more advanced portraiture sculpture as well as other projects. A more individualized style is encouraged. While the main focus is art production, students will also participate in reading, writing and discussions about various aspects of art. Students taking this course engage in sequential learning experiences that encompass art history, art criticism, aesthetics, and production as they relate to the study of sculpture Art History (4024) Offered Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 Directed elective In this overview of multi-cultural art history from cave painting to present, students will search for meaning and significance in the study of cultural and historical foundations of world art. Major art movements such as Stone Age, Gothic, Renaissance, etc. will be studied with special attention given to artists and influences of each period. The focus of Art History is more oriented to the academic study of art, including reading, writing and discussions about art with minor production projects. Students taking Art History engage in sequential learning experiences that encompass art history, art criticism, aesthetics, and production Beginning Drawing (L) (4060) Prerequisite: 1006 Intro to Two Dimensional Art and 1016 Advanced Two Dimensional Art Offered grades 10, 11, 12 Directed elective Offered Fall semester only This class provides further study of drawing. Emphasis will be placed on composition, portraiture, figure drawing and still life. Students will learn techniques such as sighting, visual perspective, proportion, etc. and will work in media such as charcoal, pencil, pastels, ink, prismacolor, and mixed media. A sketch journal will be maintained throughout the course. Students in this course engage in sequential learning experiences that encompass art history, art criticism, aesthetics, and production as they relate to drawing Advanced Drawing (L) (4060) Prerequisite: 1206 Beginning Drawing Offered grades 10, 11, 12 Directed elective Offered Spring semester only Building on the skills learned in Beginning Drawing, students will continue to explore three-dimensional forms on a two-dimensional surface. At this level, color and creative concepts are more heavily emphasized. Continued work in the area of realistic rendering is important in order to develop the students understandings of light and shadow, perspective, proportion, and composition. While the main focus is art production, students will also participate in reading, writing and discussions about various aspects of art. A sketch/journal will be maintained throughout the course. Students in this course engage in sequential learning experiences that encompass art history, art criticism, aesthetics, and production as they relates to drawing Beginning Painting (L) (4064) Prerequisite: 1016 Advanced Two Dimensional Art Offered grades 10, 11, 12 Directed elective Students will build upon their knowledge of composition and color while exploring painting media and history. Subject matter will be kept simple to allow students to develop their knowledge and skills in painting. Students will work primarily in oils and watercolor. While the main focus is art production, students will also participate in reading, writing and discussions about various aspects of art. A sketch/journal will be maintained throughout the course. Students in this course engage in sequential learning experiences that encompass art history, art criticism, aesthetics, and production as they relate to painting Advanced Painting (L) (4064) Prerequisite: 1236 Beginning Painting Offered grades 11, 12 Directed elective This course may be repeated for credit Students will build upon previously acquired knowledge of composition and color, while further exploring painting media and developing their own technique. Students will work on larger painting surfaces and explore more difficult subject matter in greater depth. In addition to oils and watercolors, students may have the opportunity to work with mixed media or acrylic. While the main focus is art production, students will also participate in reading, writing and discussions about various aspects of art. A sketch/journal will be maintained throughout the course. Students taking Advanced Painting engage in sequential learning experiences that encompass art history, art criticism, aesthetics, and production as they relate to painting.

18 1266 Beginning Photography (L) (4062) Offered grades 10, 11, 12 Directed elective Beginning Photography students will create works of art using 35mm film cameras for on and off-site photo shoots, hands-on film processing, darkroom image printing and creative print manipulation. Photo shoots will encompass a variety of topics including basic composition, portraiture and photo-journalism. Art photo prints will include a variety of creative darkroom printing techniques including straight, flipped, layered, textured and montage. Hand-coloring and print manipulation will further individualize each student s photo artwork. Computer enhancement using Photoshop will be introduced. While the main focus is art production, students will also participate in reading, writing and class critiques and discussions about various aspects of art. This class is the prerequisite for the advanced and digital photo classes. Students taking Beginning Photography engage in sequential learning experiences that encompass art history, art criticism, aesthetics, and production as they relate to photography. It is strongly recommended that the students have their own 35mm manually adjustable camera Advanced Photography (L) (4062) Prerequisite: 1266 Beginning Photography Offered grades 11, 12 Directed elective This course may be repeated for credit. Advance Photography students will build upon skills learned in the introductory class. The emphasis will be on mastery of technique and individual creative design. They will further their photography skills by producing individual art photo portfolios using both traditional and experimental photo shoot and darkroom print techniques. A unique blend of darkroom and computer skills will be practiced that utilizes scanning darkroom prints for enhancement and Photoshop manipulation. These students will also research and experience their choice of historic and modern photographers ideas and methods. Studio maintenance and developmental responsibilities are also a part of this course. Students taking Advanced Photography engage in sequential learning experiences that encompass art history, art criticism, aesthetics and production as they relate to photography. It is strongly recommended that the students have their own 35mm manual or semi-auto adjustable camera Advanced Photography: DIGITAL (L) (4062) Prerequisite: Any 1 of the following classes 1266 Beginning Photography 1006 Intro to 2D 4516 Computer Illustration and Graphics Offered grades 11, 12 One Credit A Core 40 & AHD elective course Directed elective This course may be repeated for credit Building upon previously acquired knowledge and skills concerning photo themes, composition and lighting, 16 Digital Photography introduces the integration of digital cameras with computer readers, scanners, and Adobe Photoshop software allowing students to develop unique digitally printed images. In this course, students will create works of art using both traditional and experimental computer/digital photo techniques. They will also have the opportunity to study digital photographers ideas and methods. Advanced digital students will work on developing a photo portfolio. While the main focus is art production, students will also participate in reading, writing and discussions about various aspects of art. Digital photo students engage in sequential learning experiences that encompass art history, art criticism, aesthetics, and production as they relate to digital photography. It is required that the students have their own digital camera with removable memory card or USB cord and instruction manual Advanced Two-Dimensional Art: Independent Study (L) (4004) Prerequisite: Teacher approval AND Seniors only Offered grade 12 One credit Directed elective This course is intended only for students having the intention of pursuing their artistic studies at the college level and may be taken as an independent study. Students will explore college/career opportunities and develop portfolio quality pieces. This is an opportunity for students to examine scholarship possibilities. This course allows for personal growth and exploration within the study of various media and subject matter. Students taking this course should have already exhausted the opportunities for study in other specific courses (i.e. painting, sculpture, photography, etc.) While the main focus is art production, students will also participate in reading, writing and discussions about various aspects of art. A sketch journal will be maintained throughout the course. Students in this course engage in sequential learning experiences that encompass art history, art criticism, aesthetics, and production as they relate to portfolio production Beginning Digital Design (L) (4082) Prerequisites: 1006 Introduction to Two Dimensional Art OR 4516 Computer Illustration and Graphics Offered grades 10, 11, 12 Directed elective Students will build upon their computer skills and incorporate the computer as a tool for illustration as well as design. Students will work with and explore computer programs such as Adobe PhotoShop, Adobe Illustrator, and InDesign. While the main focus is art production, students will also participate in reading, writing and discussions about various aspects of art. Students in this course engage in sequential learning experiences that encompass art history, art criticism, aesthetics, and production as it relates to computer digital design.

19 It is strongly recommended that the students have their own digital camera with removable memory card or USB cord and instruction manual. PERFORMING ARTS Advanced Digital Design (L) (4082) Prerequisite: 1316 Beginning Digital Design Offered grades 10, 11, 12 Directed elective This course may be repeated for credit Utilizing knowledge and skills from Beginning Digital Design, students will study and apply more advanced techniques featured by various computer programs such as Adobe Photo Shop, Adobe Illustrator, and InDesign in order to create more complex and sophisticated digital artwork. While the main focus is art production, students will also participate in reading, writing and discussions about various aspects of art. Students in this course engage in sequential learning experiences that encompass art history, art criticism, aesthetics, and production as it relates to computer graphics. It is strongly recommended that the students have their own digital camera with removable memory card or USB cord and instruction manual Photography: Beginning Film/Video (L) (4062) Offered Grades 10, 11, 12 Directed elective As well as studying relevant professional films, students will produce a public service announcement and music video, as well as smaller productions that may include commercials, infomercials, and stop-action animation. Students will gain experience with the post-production aspect of video making by editing their projects on the computer. A great deal of group work will be required as the class develops each project. While the main focus is film production, students will also participate in reading, writing and discussions about various aspects of art/film. Students in this course engage in sequential learning experiences that encompass art history, art criticism, aesthetics, and production as it relates film and video Photography: Advanced Film/Video (L) (4062) Prerequisite: 1326 Photography: Beginning Film/Video Offered grades 10,11, 12 Directed elective This course may be repeated for credit with teacher approval As well as studying relevant professional films, students will explore advanced editing techniques and computer editing programs, which will allow them to create a major project: a clay animation, a silent film, as well as several smaller group projects. While the main focus is film production, students will also participate in reading, writing and discussions about various aspects of art/film. Students in this course engage in sequential learning experiences that encompass art history, art criticism, aesthetics, and production as it relates film and video. The Performing Arts Department of Homestead High School has a wide range of course offerings. These courses provide a class setting that imparts knowledge and works toward culminating performances based on course study. State and National Standards for Performing Arts courses are achieved through the intense study within each course. Students hone talents for performance and critical and analytical skills that will be used throughout their entire life. The performing arts options include: several dance courses, several drama courses, several choir courses and several instrumental music courses. The traditions and excellence of all of the performing groups of Homestead High School are held to the highest standards. For many of the Performing Arts courses, there are additional time requirements beyond the regular school hours. Auditions are required for select courses Theatre Arts (L) (4242) Offered grades 9, 10, 11, 12 Directed elective This course is an introduction to drama and the world of the theatre. It is open to any student, regardless of experience. Instruction in this course enables students to: (1) improvise and write plays or scenes; (2) imaginatively express thoughts, feelings, moods, and characters; and (3) apply techniques involving voice, gesture, facial expression, and body movement to reproduce the subtleties of language and voice inflection in conveying emotion and meaning. Students are introduced to warmup activities for body and voice, including mime activities. Students develop skills enabling them to speak clearly and expressively with; (1) appropriate articulation, (2) pronunciation, (3) volume, (4) stress, (5) rate, (6) pitch, (7) inflection, and (8) intonation. Using knowledge gained through the study of technical theatre and scripts, students focus on solving the problems faced by actors, directors, and technicians. They also refine their abilities to collaborate on performances, and they learn to constructively evaluate their own and others' efforts. In-class performing as well as participation in regular Homestead productions (both on stage and backstage) will be encouraged.

20 1356 Advanced Theatre Arts (4240) Prerequisite: 1346 Theatre Arts Offered grades 9, 10, 11, 12 Directed elective This course may be repeated for credit This course may be taken for dual credit through IPFW s Collegiate Connection Program. This class is step two in an actor's training at Homestead High School. Instruction in this course builds upon the skills developed in the Theatre Arts course. Activities enable students to: improvise dialogue that produces characterizations in a variety of settings and forms identify the physical, social, and psychological dimensions and qualities of characters in texts of plays create consistent characters from a variety of theatrical works, either in class or in informal productions, demonstrating effective management of emotions as an individual and as a character construct personal meanings from a variety of performances, including the self-evaluation of personal work, which leads to further development of various skills and abilities write scripts for theatre, film, or television, in both traditional and new forms demonstrate analytical skills by explaining roles, comparing various forms of artistic expression and interpretation, and discussing their relationship to cultural values and historical contexts understand the interrelationships among the functions of playwrights, directors, actors, designers, producers, and technicians refine interpersonal and collaborative skills by identifying and resolving conflicts effectively; and explore the historical tradition and the repertoire of the theatre This course also allows students to expand upon their ability to make artistic decisions and evaluations by discussing and critiquing live performances. Examination of career opportunities includes instruction in the auditioning and interviewing processes Advanced Theatre Arts: Strictly Scenes (4240) Prerequisites: 1356 Advanced Theatre Arts and Teacher approval Offered grades 10, 11, 12 One credit Directed elective This course may be repeated for credit Strictly Scenes is a class for the serious stage performer. Comic, serious, melodramatic, romantic, Greek, Shakespearean, and modern scenes will be studied, rehearsed, and presented. Memorization (quick study) is required. Acting skills will be polished through performance Technical Theatre (L) (4244) Offered grades 9, 10, 11, 12 One credit Directed elective Technical Theatre instruction combines the theories of design and stagecraft with the construction and operation 18 of the various elements of technical theatre. Students are provided with opportunities to: (1) develop stage craft skills: (2) learn various techniques in scenery, lighting, sound, properties, costumes, and makeup; (3) practice theatre safety; and (4) learn effective stage management, business plans, and promotional techniques. Students are made aware of career opportunities in technical theatre. They also continue to analyze and evaluate scripts and live theatre performances so that they learn to determine appropriate technical requirements for a variety of theatrical works. Students will be provided with the opportunities to develop stagecraft skills, explore various types of scenery, and work with lighting, sound, and properties Applied Music: Guitar (4200) Offered grades 9, 10, 11, 12 One credit Directed elective This class is for the beginning guitar student and will deal with the elementary level of chord development, strumming, style, and finger picking techniques. The class will include basic music theory and song development in addition to guitar technique (each student must provide his/her own instrument). 1401/ Beginning Chorus: Concert Choir (4182) Offered Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 One credit per semester Directed elective This course may be repeated for credit All students are invited to participate in this choir. Students taking Concert Choir develop musicianship and specific performance skills. Activities in the class create the development of quality repertoire in the diverse styles of choral literature appropriate in difficulty and range for the students. Instruction is designed so that students are enabled to connect, examine, imagine, define, try, extend, refine, and integrate music study into other subject areas. Chorus classes provide instruction in creating, performing, conducting, listening to, and analyzing, in addition to focusing on the specific subject matter. 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