A Profile of Community and Social Service Workers. National Occupational Classification (NOC 4212)

Save this PDF as:
 WORD  PNG  TXT  JPG

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "A Profile of Community and Social Service Workers. National Occupational Classification (NOC 4212)"

Transcription

1 A Profile of Community and Social Service Workers National Occupational Classification (NOC 4212) January 2013

2 The HR Council takes action on nonprofit labour force issues. As a catalyst, the HR Council sparks awareness and action on labour force issues. As a convenor, we bring together people, information and ideas in the spirit of collaborative action. As a research instigator we are building knowledge and improving our understanding of the nonprofit labour force HR Council for the Nonprofit Sector Copyright is waived for charitable and nonprofit organizations for non-commercial use, with attribution. All other rights reserved. ISBN: Aussi disponible en français Dalhousie Street Ottawa, Ontario K1N 7E5 t: tf: f: www: hrcouncil.ca The HR Council is funded by the Government of Canada s Sector Council Program. The opinions and interpretations in this publication are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of the Government of Canada.

3 Contents Introduction 1 An overview of community and social service workers 2 Worker characteristics 3 EDUCATION 4 TYPE OF EMPLOYMENT 4 INCOMES AND EARNINGS 5 National and regional employment 7 PROVINCIAL EMPLOYMENT 7 INDUSTRIES EMPLOYING COMMUNITY AND SOCIAL SERVICE WORKERS 8 Conclusion 10 References 11 Appendix 12 Abstract This report draws on data from the Census of Canada for 2001 and 2006 and from other Statistics Canada sources to examine the basic characteristics and employment patterns of community and social service workers (National Occupational Classification 4212) across Canada. It answers questions such as these: who are these workers, how much are they paid, where in Canada do they work, and in what industries are they employed? The report finds that employment in the category has grown significantly in the past decade, both in terms of the total number of workers, as well as in the number of workers relative to the population. In a sector with high levels of female employment, the report finds that there is a gender gap in earnings, with men out-earning women by approximately 14%. This may be explained in part by the finding that more women than men are employed in non-standard work situations (e.g. temporary or part-time work) Keywords: community workers, gender gap, income, NOC 4212, non-profit sector, social service workers

4 Introduction This report provides a statistical profile of workers within a particular sector Community and Social Services. Understanding any economic sector or industry in detail requires looking at both the organizations and the individuals who work in and for them. While labour market information (LMI) tends to focus on industries, this report provides a statistical profile of workers within a particular sector community and social services made up of women and men who provide front-line human services to those in need. There are two aspects to the report. The first looks at who these workers are their gender, age, education, type of employment, and income. The second examines employment patterns where they are employed across the country, in what industries, and in what numbers. While workers in this category may be employed in any industry and by many organizations, a significant number are employed in the nonprofit sector. As such, a portrait of their characteristics and activities helps to provide a clearer picture of the nonprofit labour force as a whole. This report uses data from the 2006 and 2001 censuses 1, as well as other data from Statistics Canada to examine the basic characteristics of community and social service workers. While the census data used for this report may seem somewhat dated, overall characteristics of workers remain relatively stable from year to year, making the analyses relevant today. 1 With respect to the census data, one must note that income and employment data from the 2006 census pertain to 2005 and 2001 data pertain to 2000, as the census questionnaire asks about work and earnings in the previous year. As such, data for income and earnings are reported as 2000 and 2005 values. A PROFILE OF COMMUNITY AND SOCIAL SERVICE WORKERS 1

5 An Overview of Community and Social Service Workers In labour statistics, these workers are classified together in the National Occupational Classification (NOC) as group 4212: Community and Social Service Workers. Community and social service workers perform a variety of important tasks in the social service field. These workers provide front-line services in a variety of settings. They provide counselling and support, outreach and engagement to the isolated, and help the disadvantaged to meet their basic needs for food, shelter and clothing. In labour statistics, these workers are classified together in the National Occupational Classification (NOC) as group 4212: Community and Social Service Workers. The code both separates the workers and tells us some basic information about them. The leading digit (4) indicates that the workers are employed in occupations in education, law and social, community and government services. The second digit (2) tells us that the occupations usually require college education or apprenticeship training. The final two digits (12) separate the group from similar groups in the NOC matrix. Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (HRSDC) provides the following description for this group: Social and community service workers administer and implement a variety of social assistance programs and community services, and assist clients to deal with personal and social problems. They are employed by social service and government agencies, mental health agencies, group homes, shelters, substance abuse centres, school boards, correctional facilities and other establishments. HRSDC also supplies sample job titles for these workers, which include the following: Aboriginal outreach worker, addictions worker, community development worker, crisis intervention worker, developmental service worker, drop-in centre worker, group home worker, life skills instructor, welfare and compensation officer, and youth worker. 2 2 A full list of job titles associated with this category is available online at noc/2011/viewalltitles.aspx?val=4&val1=4212 A PROFILE OF COMMUNITY AND SOCIAL SERVICE WORKERS 2

6 Worker Characteristics As many people who are familiar with the nonprofit sector and its labour force will anticipate, a strong majority of workers in community and social services are female. As many people who are familiar with the nonprofit sector and its labour force will anticipate, a strong majority of workers in community and social services are female. Indeed, of the 102,360 individuals who indicated they were community and social service workers in the 2006 census, 78,980 (77%) were female (see Figure 1). The results for 2005 are very similar to those for 2000, although the share of females in the community and social service workforce had increased 1% in this time period. For the parent NOC code (NOC 42), which includes paralegals and occupations in education and religion not elsewhere classified, 85% of employees are women. At the highest level of aggregation, where the category includes occupations in social science, education, government service and religion from judges to teachers and policy analysts as well as front-line workers, 69% of the workforce is female. Turning to patterns in workers ages, we also see some significant trends, especially when one compares census results from 2000 and While increases in Figure 1: Sex Distribution, 2005 Female, 77% Male, 23% Source: Census Table XCB employment were seen for all age categories between the two census years, the largest areas of growth in employment are for workers aged and As these years are considered to be one s prime working years, the growth in these categories is not surprising. If one looks at a percentage change in workers (see Figure 2), however, we see that the greatest growth is for workers aged 65 and older (169% growth) and for those aged (79% growth). Growth in the younger cohorts was also relatively strong, although less pronounced, at 37% for the 25 to 44 cohort and 23% for the 15 to 24 cohort. These trends not only reflect a growing level of employment overall for this group of workers, but also reflect the aging of the Canadian workforce as a whole. Between 2000 and 2005, growth in the Canadian workforce as a whole was greatest for workers aged 45 and older, particularly those 65 and older, and very low amongst those in younger age cohorts, where the number of workers aged increased by 4% A PROFILE OF COMMUNITY AND SOCIAL SERVICE WORKERS 3

7 60,000 50,000 40,000 30,000 20,000 10,000 0 Figure 2: Worker Age, Community and Social Service Workers Source: Census Table XCB and the population of workers aged decreased by 4%. In contrast to the overall national trend, growth in employment for community and social service workers is robust for all age groups. Education 15 to 24 years 25 to 44 years 45 to 64 years 65 years and over According to the description of the community and social service worker category provided by Human Resources and Skills Development Canada and explained above, workers who are employed in this field generally require a college-level education in social service work or a similar field in order to carry out their daily work. However, as Figure 3 indicates, while a large number of workers do have a college certificate or diploma, a significant and growing number also have university certificates, bachelor s degrees or more advanced education. As the number of workers in the occupational category grows, there have been relatively uniform increases in education levels, ranging from a 44% increase for those with a college diploma or certificate to an increase of 60% in the number of workers with a certificate, diploma or degree above the bachelor level. This increase in workers educations may have several causes. For example, it may point to a difficult job market for those attempting to find employment in social work or 80,000 70,000 60,000 50,000 40,000 30,000 20,000 10, similar fields that require a higher level of education (e.g., a bachelor s or master s degree in social work), or it could indicate a high demand for community and social service workers that draws workers from other related fields. The increase in education, especially when coupled with the increasing ages of workers, could also indicate that community and social service work draws in workers who are embarking on second careers and looking for work in the human services fields. While all of these explanations are possible, a survey of workers would be required to determine the precise reasons why more and more highly educated workers are choosing employment in this field. Type of Employment Aside from the workers basic attributes and qualifications, the nature of their employment situations is also of interest. For example, we know that the Canadian employment landscape shifted in the mid-1990s, with more jobs becoming part-time, temporary or casual, and we know that this trend has largely remained in place. How do community and social service workers job situations compare to these national trends? Figure 3: Highest Level of Education, 2000 and 2005 Certificate or diploma below bachelor level Source: Census Table XCB University certificate or degree Bachelor s degree University certificate, diploma or degree above bachelor level A PROFILE OF COMMUNITY AND SOCIAL SERVICE WORKERS 4

8 As Figure 4 shows, community and social service workers show a high level of alternative employment situations. In practice, this can include those employed full-time on a temporary or term basis, as well as those employed year-round or temporarily on a part-time basis. The share of full-time workers, however, is on the increase, rising 2% from 2000 when the number of full-time workers was almost equal to the number of workers with alternative work situations. Although the rates of alternative work arrangements may seem high, for all workers in all occupations at the national level, just 55% are employed full-year, full-time while 45% are considered to have some sort of alternative work arrangements. While the rate of full-year, full-time work is slightly lower for community and social service workers and may at first seem very low to outside observers, it is certainly in line with national trends. Incomes and Earnings Whether one is an employee, a prospective employee, or someone who is managing human resources and salaries, questions about what is a normal or fair wage are common. In Figure 5, we provide an overview of both median and average employment income for community and social service workers. The median income is the 50th percentile of earnings for workers, where half of workers earn more and half earn less. The average, on the other hand, is calculated by adding all of the values and dividing by the number of observations. Both are helpful in understanding wage rates. 30,000 29,000 28,000 27,000 26,000 25,000 24,000 23,000 22,000 21,000 20,000 Median and average incomes for community and social service workers rose approximately 4.5% between 2000 and The growth in wages is strong compared to growth in similar occupations. For Figure 5: Median and Average Income, 2000 and 2005 $27, Source: Census Table XCB $28,286 Median employment income $ $27,480 Average employment income $ Figure 4: Type of Employment, 2005 All others, 47% Worked full year, full time, 53% Source: Census Table XCB $28,681 example, the parent NOC category 421, which includes paralegals, child care workers, social service workers and occupations in education and religion not elsewhere classified, experienced growth of 4% in the same period. However, the increase in earnings does lag behind the 9% increase seen for social workers, a similar group of workers who require a university degree instead of a college diploma. However, during the period there was strong growth in the number of community and social service workers, a total increase of 4.7% in the workforce. In contrast, growth in employment of social workers was slower, at 3.6% in the same period. This may point to employers making trade-offs between increasing wages and increasing staff levels, opting to hire extra staff instead of significantly increasing wages, or simply creating more entry-level positions for community and social service workers. Overall trends in earnings are interesting, but questions often arise about the fairness and equity of a worker s earnings. One common question that is raised in this area concerns the earnings of men and women. While community and social service work is a femaledominated profession, this does not mean that incomes and earnings are fully equitable between the sexes. As Figure 6 demonstrates, median incomes for men and women show some significant disparities: in both 2000 and 2005, there was an income gap of approximately $4,000 between male and female workers. Women A PROFILE OF COMMUNITY AND SOCIAL SERVICE WORKERS 5

9 33,000 31,000 29,000 27,000 25,000 23,000 21,000 19,000 17,000 15,000 Male Figure 6: Median Incomes by Sex, 2000 and 2005 $30,270 Female 2000 Source: Census Table XCB $26,198 $31,271 are, however, slowly closing the gap: their median incomes rose from 87% of men s income levels in 2000 to 88% of men s incomes in What could be causing this gap in women s wages? While differences in job level and classification within an organization in other words, the level of authority and responsibility that the worker holds, or the glass ceiling effect is often cited as the reason for gendered wage gaps in many organizations, this issue should not be overly significant in this analysis. As only community and social service workers are examined, there should not be significant differences between the levels of authority and responsibility of workers. Outside of this reason, there are many other possible reasons for this gap, a few of which can be examined in the available data. First, one might think that the level of a worker s 2005 education may be at play: workers with higher levels of education can often command higher salaries. However, there are no significant $27,433 differences between education levels: women s educational attainments are slightly lower, the difference is no more than 1% for each category. Similarly, one might think that the age of the worker comes into play. Once again though, although men were slightly more likely to be aged (35% of workers versus 32% for women), and women are more likely to be aged (53% versus 49%), the differences between the groups are not large. The one area in which we do see a significant difference between women and men is when examining the rates of full-year, full-time work versus all other work types. Men were more likely than women to have full-year, full-time employment: 59% of men had such employment, compared to only 52% of women. Despite a few differences in age and characteristics of work activity, women and men performing community and social service work are generally well-matched on most attributes. Other factors may be at play here, such as differences between employers (i.e., large healthcare facilities may be able to offer higher wages than small nonprofits), personal preferences for part-time or alternatively-scheduled work, or simply gendered differences in pay. A PROFILE OF COMMUNITY AND SOCIAL SERVICE WORKERS 6

10 National and Regional Employment Ontario has, by far, the highest number of community and social service workers, and experienced a significant jump in the number of workers between 2000 and Community and social service workers are employed in all provinces and territories, although the number of workers, both actual and relative to the total population, varies by region. In the 2006 census data, we see that over 100,000 individuals were classified as community and social service workers. 3 These workers are employed in all regions of the country, although their distribution across Canada is not uniform. Provincial Employment Ontario has, by far, the highest number of community and social service workers, and experienced a significant jump in the number of workers between 2000 and As Ontario has the largest population of any province, it is not surprising that it has such a high tally. However, the fact that Ontario has more than twice the number of workers compared to the next closest province, Quebec, is a bit of a surprise. As one might expect given provincial and territorial populations, we also see, in Figure 7, small numbers of workers in the Atlantic Provinces and the Territories, which have smaller overall populations. Figure 7: Employment by Province/Territory, 2000 and 2005 Newfoundland and Labrador Prince Edward Island Nova Scotia New Brunswick Quebec Ontario Manitoba Saskatchewan Alberta British Columbia Yukon Territory Northwest Territories Nunavut ,000 20,000 30,000 40,000 Source: Census Table XCB Beyond the size of the population in a province or territory, the number of community and social service workers may vary from region to region based on 3 Of note, the number of the workers in the category varies between the available data tables. As numbers are rounded randomly to the nearest 10 for the various attributes (e.g., location, industry, etc.) to protect privacy, there are some variations in the estimates. Nationally, the estimates may shift by several hundred. For example, table XCB indicates a total count of 102,530 community and social service workers, while table XCB indicates 102,360. A PROFILE OF COMMUNITY AND SOCIAL SERVICE WORKERS 7

11 many factors. These factors can be divided into two categories: factors affecting the demand for workers and factors affecting the supply of workers. On the demand side, the number of workers may vary based on the number of existing services, the size/scope of service organizations (larger organizations have more staff), the demand for services in given fields based on local conditions (e.g., rates of homelessness, the number of immigrants or newcomers to a region, rates of social problems such as addictions, etc.), and the current and future prospects for employment opportunities in a region based on growth, turnover, or replacement of retiring workers. Looking at supply-side factors, the number of workers may be influenced by the availability and capacity of training and education programs that produce community and social service workers, the relative mobility (or willingness to move) of the workers, and the overall availability of employment in general in the region. 4 To get a better understanding of population by province, we can examine the number of workers per 100,000 population (see Figure 8). Looking at the numbers in this way provides a better picture of the level of employment as it eliminates differences between the provinces and territories based on their size and shows the number of workers relative to the population as a whole. In Figure 8, the number of workers per 100,000 population is shown in the grey and black bars for 2000 and 2005 respectively, while the lines represents the Canadian averages for 2000 and Interestingly, the highest rates of employment relative to the local population for 2005 are in Yukon (862 workers per 100,000) 5, Northwest Territories (725), Prince Edward Island (525) and Manitoba (460). At the other end of the spectrum, the lowest rates of workers are seen in Newfoundland and Labrador (242), 4 Most individuals do not make decisions about where to live and work in a vacuum: the employment needs of spouses/significant others and other family needs will also factor into the decision. 5 For the 2001 census, data for the Northwest Territories and Nunavut both indicated 0 community and social service workers in each territory, as did data for Nunavut for the 2006 census. These data were likely suppressed to meet the requirements of the Statistics Act. Workers per 100,000 population 1, Newfoundland and Labrador Prince Edward Island Nova Scotia Quebec (254) and New Brunswick (274), respectively. The Canadian average for 2005 was 317. While determining long-term trends would require additional data points, reviewing data from the 2001 census beside data from the 2006 census reveals that there have been some dramatic changes in the employment rates relative to the provinces populations. Indeed, there has been dramatic growth in the numbers for Prince Edward Island (from 293 workers per 100,000 population to 525) and Manitoba (from 308 to 460). While these provinces show particularly dramatic growth, PEI and Manitoba are both too small on their Figure 8: Workers per 100,000 population, 2000 and 2005 New Brunswick Quebec Ontario Canada 2000 Manitoba Saskatchewan Sources: CANSIM Table and Census Table XCB Alberta Canada 2005 British Columbia Yukon Territory Northwest Territories Nunavut own to drive national trends. Alongside the particularly impressive growth in these provinces, we see strong national growth trends, which drove the Canadian average up from 227 workers per 100,000 population to 317. This growth is particularly striking as it occurred in just five years, highlighting strong increases in both the supply and demand for community and social service workers. Data from the 2011 census will be an interesting addition to this chart in the future. Industries Employing Community and Social Service Workers Beyond geographic location, one may wonder where one can find community and social service workers. In general, the employment pattern mimics the mix of A PROFILE OF COMMUNITY AND SOCIAL SERVICE WORKERS 8

12 industries seen when one examines the nonprofit sector as a whole. While there are a handful of industries in which many workers are employed, community and social service workers can be found in small numbers in all of the major industrial categories. 6 10% This widespread presence highlights the workers skills in human services. For example, they may be employed as counsellors or crisis intervention workers in any field, through corporations employee assistance programs or similar initiatives. They may also be employed at nonprofit organizations operating across the industrial spectrum, from work in philanthropic organizations, to working in tenant support for subsidized housing, to providing assistance and services to the disabled in sheltered workshops. Figure 9 shows the industries in which community and social service workers are most frequently employed, broken down using the major categories in the North American Industry Classification System. As over 70% of workers are employed in NAICS 62 Health Care and Social Assistance, this category has been broken down into Social Assistance and Other Healthcare in the chart to provide a more detailed picture of results. Of note, the Other Healthcare category includes workers employed in hospitals, residential care facilities, doctors offices and outpatient medical services (NAICS 621,622, and 623). The social assistance category includes those employed in individual and family services; community food and housing, and emergency and other relief services; vocational 6 Here, we refer to the major (2-digit) categories outlined in the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS). More information on the NAICS is available from the HR Council and Statistics Canada. 11% 8% 31% Figure 9: Industrial Mix, NOC % Source: Census Table XCB , special tabulation Social Assistance Other Healthcare Other Services (Except Public Administration) Public Administration Other Industries rehabilitation services; and child day-care services. The Other Services category (NAICS 81) includes the sub-category Religious, Grant-Making, Civic, and Professional and Similar Organizations (NAICS 813), in which most of the workers in this category are employed. Notably, both NAICS 813 and 624 contain large shares of nonprofit organizations. For example, NAICS 813 includes religious organizations which are, by nature, nonprofit entities; grant-making and giving services where foundations and philanthropic organizations are classified; social advocacy organizations, which are likely to be nonprofit; civic and social organizations including national and local associations, fraternities, community groups, booster clubs, and similar organizations; and business, professional and labour and similar organizations. Similarly NAICS 624 includes community-based welfare organizations, such as: individual and family services; community food and housing, and relief and emergency organizations; vocational rehabilitation services; and child day-care services. A PROFILE OF COMMUNITY AND SOCIAL SERVICE WORKERS 9

13 Conclusion These statistics and trends provide new insight into this segment of the nonprofit labour force. In summary, community and social service workers are a growing and dynamic population of workers. Although most workers are employed in the health care and social assistance industrial sectors, they can be found in small numbers in all industrial sectors across Canada. Employment in the category has grown significantly in the past decade, both in terms of the total number of workers, as well as in the number of workers relative to the population. As in the nonprofit workforce in general, we see high levels of female employment in this occupational sector. We also see increasing levels of education among workers, a trend in line with the increasing level of education and skills for the entire Canadian workforce. We also see national trends in job patterns mirrored in this occupational group, with a large number of workers employed in non-standard work situations. Finally, we see that although incomes in the sector are rising steadily there is a gendered gap in earnings, with men out-earning women by approximately 14%. These statistics and trends provide new insight into this segment of the nonprofit labour force, but also raise questions about employment trends in community and social service work, factors driving growth in the sector, employment in other occupational categories that are common in the nonprofit sector, and trends in employment and worker attributes in the nonprofit sector in general. While the 2011 census data will help to answer some of these questions, more data and research will be required to better understand the nonprofit sector. A PROFILE OF COMMUNITY AND SOCIAL SERVICE WORKERS 10

14 References Statistics Canada. (2012). CANSIM Table : Estimates of population, by age group and sex for July 1, Canada, provinces and territories. Ottawa: Statistics Canada. Statistics Canada. (2012). Census of Canada Table XCB : Wage and Salary Statistics (4) in Constant (2005) Dollars, Work Activity in the Reference Year (3), Highest Certificate, Diploma or Degree (5), Age Groups (5A), Occupation - National Occupational Classification for Statistics 2006 (720B) and Sex (3) for the Paid Workers 15 Years and Over With Wages and Salaries of Canada, Provinces, Territories, 2000 and % Sample Data. Ottawa: Statistics Canada. Statistics Canada. (2012). Census of Canada Table XCB : Employment Income Statistics (4) in Constant (2005) Dollars, Work Activity in the Reference Year (3), Occupation - National Occupational Classification for Statistics 2006 (720A) and Sex (3) for the Population 15 Years and Over With Employment Income of Canada, Provinces and Territories, 2000 and % Sample Data. Ottawa: Statistics Canada. Statistics Canada. (2012). Census of Canada Table XCB [special tabulation]: Selected Industries (NAICS 2002)(34), Selected Occupations (NOC-S 2006)(66), Class of Worker (6) and Sex (3) for the Labour Force 15 Years and Over of Canada, Provinces and Territories, 2006 Census. Ottawa: Statistics Canada. A PROFILE OF COMMUNITY AND SOCIAL SERVICE WORKERS 11

15 Appendix Table 1. Age and Education Level of Community and Social Service Workers Age group n % n % ,620 17% 14,340 14% ,780 56% 53,110 52% ,855 27% 33,685 33% 65 and over 455 1% 1,225 1% Total 69, % 102, % Highest level of education Certificate or diploma below bachelor level 49,525 71% 71,340 70% University certificate or degree 20,180 29% 31,020 30% Bachelor s degree 15,790 23% 23,990 23% University certificate, diploma or degree above bachelor level 4,390 6% 7,030 7% Total 69, % 102, % Table 2. Number of Community and Social Service Workers by province and territory, 2000 and 2005 Community and Social Service Workers Community and Social Service Workers per 100,000 population Newfoundland and Labrador 875 1, Prince Edward Island Nova Scotia 1,755 3, New Brunswick 1,405 2, Quebec 12,545 19, Ontario 24,555 39, Manitoba 3,540 5, Saskatchewan 2,865 3, Alberta 8,335 11, British Columbia 12,925 14, Yukon Northwest Territories Nunavut A PROFILE OF COMMUNITY AND SOCIAL SERVICE WORKERS 12

Compensation of Full-Time Employees in Small Charities in Canada (2010)

Compensation of Full-Time Employees in Small Charities in Canada (2010) Compensation of Full-Time Employees in Small Charities in Canada (2010) January 2013 The HR Council takes action on nonprofit labour force issues. As a catalyst, the HR Council sparks awareness and action

More information

Profile of Employment in Community Food and Housing, and Emergency and Other Relief Services

Profile of Employment in Community Food and Housing, and Emergency and Other Relief Services Profile of Employment in Community Food and Housing, and Emergency and Other Relief Services North American Industry Classification System (NAICS 6242) January 2013 The HR Council takes action on nonprofit

More information

Occupational Therapists in Canada, 2010 National and Jurisdictional Highlights and Profiles

Occupational Therapists in Canada, 2010 National and Jurisdictional Highlights and Profiles Occupational Therapists in Canada, 2010 National and Jurisdictional Highlights and Profiles October 2011 Spending and Health Workforce Who We Are Established in 1994, CIHI is an independent, not-for-profit

More information

Canada Post Group Economic Impact on Canada. Corporate Planning and Strategy

Canada Post Group Economic Impact on Canada. Corporate Planning and Strategy Canada Post Group Economic Impact on Canada Corporate Planning and Strategy July 27 Section 1 1. The National Impact 2. Impact on the Provinces Corporate Planning and Strategy, July 27 Page 2 Study of

More information

New Brunswick Minimum Wage Factsheet

New Brunswick Minimum Wage Factsheet New Brunswick Minimum Wage Factsheet Post-Secondary Education, Training and Labour September 2016 Contents INTRODUCTION... 3 PART 1 - MINIMUM WAGE RATES IN NEW BRUNSWICK... 3 1.1 Recent history of minimum

More information

Pharmacist Workforce, 2012 Provincial/Territorial Highlights

Pharmacist Workforce, 2012 Provincial/Territorial Highlights pic pic Pharmacist Workforce, 2012 Provincial/Territorial Highlights Spending and Health Workforce Our Vision Better data. Better decisions. Healthier Canadians. Our Mandate To lead the development and

More information

Child Care Human Resources Sector Council

Child Care Human Resources Sector Council Child Care Wages and a Quality Child Care System Child Care Human Resources Sector Council Prepared for the Child Care Human Resources Sector Council Authors: Jane Beach & Bozica Costigliola 2 Child Care

More information

Article. Gambling 2011. by Katherine Marshall. Component of Statistics Canada Catalogue no. 75-001-X Perspectives on Labour and Income

Article. Gambling 2011. by Katherine Marshall. Component of Statistics Canada Catalogue no. 75-001-X Perspectives on Labour and Income Component of Statistics Canada Catalogue no. 75-001-X Perspectives on Labour and Income Article Gambling 2011 by Katherine Marshall September 23, 2011 Statistics Canada Statistique Canada Standard symbols

More information

4.0 Health Expenditure in the Provinces and Territories

4.0 Health Expenditure in the Provinces and Territories 4.0 Health Expenditure in the Provinces and Territories Health expenditure per capita varies among provinces/territories because of different age distributions. xii Population density and geography also

More information

A L B E R T A L A B O U R F O R C E P R O F I L E S W o m e n

A L B E R T A L A B O U R F O R C E P R O F I L E S W o m e n A L B E R T A L A B O U R F O R C E P R O F I L E S W o m e n 2 0 1 5 Highlights For the purpose of this profile, the population is defined as women 15+. Working Age Population of Women in Alberta The

More information

Saskatchewan Small Business Profile 2015

Saskatchewan Small Business Profile 2015 Saskatchewan Small Business Profile 2015 October 2015 Ministry of the Economy Performance and Strategic Initiatives Division economy.gov.sk.ca Table of Contents INTRODUCTION... 1 KEY FACTS... 3 1. SMALL

More information

Occupational Injuries and Diseases in Canada, 1996 2008

Occupational Injuries and Diseases in Canada, 1996 2008 Fair, Safe and Productive Workplaces Labour Occupational Injuries and Diseases in Canada, 1996 2008 Injury Rates and Cost to the Economy Jaclyn Gilks and Ron Logan Research and Analysis, Occupational Health

More information

Engineers Canada 2012 Membership Survey

Engineers Canada 2012 Membership Survey Engineers Canada 2012 Membership Survey June 3, 2013 Contents List of Tables... i List of Figures... ii Descriptions of Membership Categories... iii 1 Introduction... 1 2 Membership Composition... 1 2.1

More information

Saskatchewan Small Business Profile 2012

Saskatchewan Small Business Profile 2012 Saskatchewan Small Business Profile 2012 October 2013 Economic and Competitive Analysis Branch www.economy.gov.sk.ca Table of Contents INTRODUCTION... 1 KEY FACTS... 3 1. SMALL BUSINESS SECTOR... 4 2.

More information

Physicians in Canada, 2014

Physicians in Canada, 2014 Physicians in Canada, 2014 Summary Report September 2015 Spending and Health Workforce Our Vision Better data. Better decisions. Healthier Canadians. Our Mandate To lead the development and maintenance

More information

Driving Change: A National Study of Canadian Nonprofit Executive Leaders

Driving Change: A National Study of Canadian Nonprofit Executive Leaders 1 Driving Change: A National Study of Canadian Nonprofit Executive Leaders The HR Council takes action on nonprofit labour force issues. As a catalyst, the HR Council sparks awareness and action on labour

More information

Dimensions of core housing need in Canada

Dimensions of core housing need in Canada C O O P E R A T I V E H O U S I N G F E D E R A T I O N O F C A N A D A Dimensions of core housing need in Canada Completed by Will Dunning Inc. for Co-operative Housing Federation of Canada July 2007

More information

Educational Portrait of Canada, 2006 Census

Educational Portrait of Canada, 2006 Census Catalogue no. 97-560-X Educational Portrait of Canada, 2006 Census Census year 2006 How to obtain more information Specifi c inquiries about this product and related statistics or services should be directed

More information

Looking to Ontario: Reena Fills HR Gap with Specialized Curriculum. Overview and context

Looking to Ontario: Reena Fills HR Gap with Specialized Curriculum. Overview and context Looking to Ontario: Reena Fills HR Gap with Specialized Curriculum Reena will enable people with developmental disabilities to realize their full potential by forming lifelong partnerships with individuals

More information

A profile of foreign students who transition to permanent resident status in Atlantic Canada

A profile of foreign students who transition to permanent resident status in Atlantic Canada A profile of foreign students who transition to permanent resident status in Atlantic Canada Monica van Huystee April 2011 Research and Evaluation The views and opinions expressed in this document are

More information

Consulting Services. Service bulletin. Highlights. Catalogue no. 63-259-X

Consulting Services. Service bulletin. Highlights. Catalogue no. 63-259-X Catalogue no. 63-259-X. Service bulletin Consulting Services 2010. Highlights revenues for the consulting services industry in Canada increased by 1.6% in 2010 to $12.8 billion, up from $12.6 billion in

More information

Additional Tables, Youth Smoking Survey 2008-09

Additional Tables, Youth Smoking Survey 2008-09 Additional Tables, Youth Smoking Survey 2008-09 Table 1. cigar use in last 30 days, cigarillo/little cigar/cigar use in last 30 days, cigarette use in the last 30 days, self defining as a smoker, Canada,

More information

Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2007 to 2011

Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2007 to 2011 Spending and Health Workforce Our Vision Better data. Better decisions. Healthier Canadians. Our Mandate To lead the development and maintenance of comprehensive and integrated health information that

More information

CLIENT SEGMENT PROFILE

CLIENT SEGMENT PROFILE P a g e 1 CLIENT SEGMENT PROFILE Youth Aged 15 to 29 Ontario April 2014 P a g e 2 TABLE OF CONTENTS ACRONYMS... 3 LIST OF FIGURES... 3 LIST OF TABLES... 3 ABOUT THE CLIENT SEGMENT PROFILE... 4 KEY POINTS...

More information

Street Smart: Demographics and Trends in Motor Vehicle Accident Mortality In British Columbia, 1988 to 2000

Street Smart: Demographics and Trends in Motor Vehicle Accident Mortality In British Columbia, 1988 to 2000 Street Smart: Demographics and Trends in Motor Vehicle Accident Mortality In British Columbia, 1988 to 2000 by David Baxter 3-Year Moving Average Age Specific Motor Vehicle Accident Death Rates British

More information

Patterns of Job Growth and Decline

Patterns of Job Growth and Decline Patterns of Job Growth and Decline www.brandonu.ca/rdi/ July 2014 Highlights In Manitoba, 34% of employment is in non-metro, higher than the 28% share for Canada. Manitoba s non-metro employment has shown

More information

Highlights. Please see the Appendix for important definitions.

Highlights. Please see the Appendix for important definitions. Highlights Please see the Appendix for important definitions. 1. Immigrants in Alberta 1 Of the 6.9 million working age immigrants in Canada, 9.9% lived in Alberta in 2014. In 2014, immigrants accounted

More information

Regulated Nurses, 2013

Regulated Nurses, 2013 Report July 2014 Spending and Health Workforce Our Vision Better data. Better decisions. Healthier Canadians. Our Mandate To lead the development and maintenance of comprehensive and integrated health

More information

CONTRIBUTING PERSPECTIVE DEMOGRAPHIC TRENDS

CONTRIBUTING PERSPECTIVE DEMOGRAPHIC TRENDS CONTRIBUTING PERSPECTIVE DEMOGRAPHIC TRENDS June 2013 Canadian Bar Association 865 Carling Avenue, Suite 500 Ottawa, ON K1S 5S8 Tel.: (613) 237-2925 / (800) 267-8860 Fax: (613) 237-0185 E-mail: futures@cba.org

More information

Control and sale of alcoholic beverages, for the year ending March 31, 2013 Released at 8:30 a.m. Eastern time in The Daily, Thursday, April 10, 2014

Control and sale of alcoholic beverages, for the year ending March 31, 2013 Released at 8:30 a.m. Eastern time in The Daily, Thursday, April 10, 2014 Control and sale of alcoholic beverages, for the year ending March 31, 2013 Released at 8:30 a.m. Eastern time in The Daily, Thursday, April 10, 2014 Beer and liquor stores and agencies sold $21.4 billion

More information

Trends in University Finances in the New Millennium, 2000/01 2012/13

Trends in University Finances in the New Millennium, 2000/01 2012/13 Spring 2015 Trends in University Finances in the New Millennium, 2000/01 2012/13 Since the turn of the 21st century, universities in Canada have undergone significant changes. Student enrolment has exploded.

More information

Early retirement trends

Early retirement trends Patrick Kieran IN THE EARLY 197S, one in five Canadians was 5 or older. By 8, one in three will fall into this age group. This reality has led many researchers to focus on the potential consequences of

More information

The Dietitian Workforce in Canada

The Dietitian Workforce in Canada The Dietitian Workforce in Canada Meta-Analysis Report MARCH 2011 www.dietitians.ca www.dietetistes.ca Dietitians of Canada 2011. All rights reserved. DIETITIANS OF CANADA 1 Executive Summary The purpose

More information

For most of the 1990s, employment opportunities

For most of the 1990s, employment opportunities Jeannine Usalcas For most of the 1990s, employment opportunities for young people (age 15 to 24) were scarce. The recession at the beginning of the decade had a lasting effect on the youth labour market.

More information

CONTENTS. Executive Summary... 3 BC Labour Market. Credentials. Employment Outcomes

CONTENTS. Executive Summary... 3 BC Labour Market. Credentials. Employment Outcomes CONTENTS Executive Summary... 3 BC Labour Market Skills Deficit 2016 to 2020. 5 Labour Market Outlook 2010 to 2020. 6 Employment by Sector..... 7 Job Openings 2010 to 2020..... 8 Regional Job Openings

More information

Funds for Fleets. A guide to government funding opportunities for employers in Canada s trucking industry

Funds for Fleets. A guide to government funding opportunities for employers in Canada s trucking industry Funds for Fleets A guide to government funding opportunities for employers in Canada s trucking industry Funds for Fleets Government funding opportunities for employers in Canada s trucking industry 1.

More information

Atlantic Provinces 71 COMMUNITIES

Atlantic Provinces 71 COMMUNITIES NATIONAL STUDY OF AUTOMOBILE INSURANCE RATES Third Release Atlantic Provinces 71 COMMUNITIES vs. British Columbia, Alberta Saskatchewan, Manitoba & Ontario 3,985,162 Auto Insurance Rates Compared October

More information

Legal Aid in Canada: Resource and Caseload Statistics

Legal Aid in Canada: Resource and Caseload Statistics Catalogue no. 85F0015X Legal Aid in Canada: Resource and Caseload Statistics 2010/2011 How to obtain more information For information about this product or the wide range of services and data available

More information

PEI Population Demographics and Labour Force Statistics

PEI Population Demographics and Labour Force Statistics PEI Population Demographics and Labour Force Statistics PEI Public Service Commission PEI Population Demographics and Labour Force Statistics Diversity Division PEI Public Service Commission November 2010.

More information

Retail Training and Employee Development Benchmark Survey 2015

Retail Training and Employee Development Benchmark Survey 2015 Retail Training and Employee Development Benchmark Survey 2015 Sponsored By Retail Training and Employee Development Benchmark Survey 2015 Retail Council of Canada (RCC), in partnership with WCG International

More information

Internet Connectivity Among Aboriginal Communities in Canada

Internet Connectivity Among Aboriginal Communities in Canada Internet Connectivity Among Aboriginal Communities in Canada Since its inception the Internet has been the fastest growing and most convenient means to access timely information on just about everything.

More information

Software Development and Computer Services

Software Development and Computer Services Catalogue no. 63-255-X. Service bulletin Software Development and Computer Services 2012. Highlights revenue generated by businesses in the software development and computer services industry advanced

More information

Profile of Canadian Environmental Employment

Profile of Canadian Environmental Employment Profile of Canadian Environmental Employment LABOUR MARKET RESEARCH STUDY 2010 ECO CANADA ECO Canada develops programs that help individuals build meaningful environmental careers, provides employers with

More information

Employment termination and group insurance coverage

Employment termination and group insurance coverage HEALTH & DENTAL / DISABILITY, LIFE AND AD&D 14-11 Employment termination and group insurance coverage This GroupLine is a revised version of GroupLine 07-02. Previous versions also include 05-21, 02-11

More information

2015 Annual Alberta Labour Market Review. Employment. Unemployment. Economic Regions. Migration. Indigenous People. Industries

2015 Annual Alberta Labour Market Review. Employment. Unemployment. Economic Regions. Migration. Indigenous People. Industries 2015 Annual Alberta Labour Market Review Employment. Unemployment. Economic Regions Migration. Indigenous People. Industries Occupations. Education. Demographics Employment Despite the economic downturn,

More information

Our Employees. CIBC s vision, mission and values are at the centre of our commitment to create an environment where all of our employees can excel.

Our Employees. CIBC s vision, mission and values are at the centre of our commitment to create an environment where all of our employees can excel. Our Employees CIBC s vision, mission and values are at the centre of our commitment to create an environment where all of our employees can excel. CIBC focuses on the things that matter to our employees

More information

Canadian Provincial and Territorial Early Hearing Detection and Intervention. (EHDI) Programs: PROGRESS REPORT

Canadian Provincial and Territorial Early Hearing Detection and Intervention. (EHDI) Programs: PROGRESS REPORT Canadian Provincial and Territorial Early Hearing Detection and Intervention (EHDI) Programs: PROGRESS REPORT www.sac-oac.ca www.canadianaudiology.ca 1 EHDI PROGRESS REPORT This progress report represents

More information

Understanding the Capacity of Social Services Organizations

Understanding the Capacity of Social Services Organizations Understanding the Capacity of Social Services Organizations A Synthesis of Findings from the National Survey of Nonprofit and Voluntary Organizations and the National Survey of Giving, Volunteering and

More information

Issues in Canadian Universities and Impact on Business Schools

Issues in Canadian Universities and Impact on Business Schools Issues in Canadian Universities and Impact on Business Schools November 14, 2012 Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario By Christine Tausig Ford, Vice-President and Chief Operating Officer, AUCC Summary

More information

Measuring the age of retirement

Measuring the age of retirement Measuring the age of retirement Chart Retirees are younger than ever. Median age 66 65 64 63 62 61 Women Men 60 1976 1980 1985 1990 1995 Both sexes Table 1 Distribution of ages at retirement 1976-1980

More information

Physicians in Canada, Summary Report

Physicians in Canada, Summary Report Physicians in Canada, 2015 Summary Report Production of this document is made possible by financial contributions from Health Canada and provincial and territorial governments. The views expressed herein

More information

Catalogue no. 89-640-X. 2008 General Social Survey: Selected Tables on Social Engagement

Catalogue no. 89-640-X. 2008 General Social Survey: Selected Tables on Social Engagement Catalogue no. 89-640-X 2008 General Social Survey: Selected Tables on Social Engagement 2008 How to obtain more information For information about this product or the wide range of services and data available

More information

Museums and Art Gallery Attendance in Canada and the Provinces

Museums and Art Gallery Attendance in Canada and the Provinces Museums and Art Gallery Attendance in Canada and the Provinces Hill Stgies Research Inc. http://www.hillstgies.com Hill Stgies Research Inc. Originally published in March 2003 Research series on the arts,

More information

Not Working For Profit: A LABOUR MARKET DESCRIPTION OF

Not Working For Profit: A LABOUR MARKET DESCRIPTION OF Not Working For Profit: A LABOUR MARKET DESCRIPTION OF THE NON- PROFIT SECTOR IN TORONTO Toronto Workforce Innovation Group On behalf of the Ontario Nonprofit Network Prepared by Tom Zizys May 2011 With

More information

University tuition fees, 2014/2015 Released at 8:30 a.m. Eastern time in The Daily, Thursday, September 11, 2014

University tuition fees, 2014/2015 Released at 8:30 a.m. Eastern time in The Daily, Thursday, September 11, 2014 University tuition fees, 2014/2015 Released at 8:30 a.m. Eastern time in The Daily, Thursday, September 11, 2014 Canadian full-time students in undergraduate programs paid 3.3% more on average in tuition

More information

Business Immigrants Investors Findings from the Longitudinal Immigration Database (IMDB)

Business Immigrants Investors Findings from the Longitudinal Immigration Database (IMDB) IMDB 2008 Research Series Economic Class For internal use only IMDB 2008 Immigration Category Profiles Business Immigrants Investors Findings from the Longitudinal Immigration Database (IMDB) March 2012

More information

Operating revenue for the accounting services industry totaled $15.0 billion, up 4.8% from 2011.

Operating revenue for the accounting services industry totaled $15.0 billion, up 4.8% from 2011. Catalogue no. 63-256-X. Service bulletin Accounting Services 2012. Highlights Operating revenue for the accounting services industry totaled $15.0 billion, up 4.8% from 2011. Accounting, bookkeeping and

More information

Control and sale of alcoholic beverages, for the year ending March 31, 2012 Released at 8:30 a.m. Eastern time in The Daily, Thursday, April 11, 2013

Control and sale of alcoholic beverages, for the year ending March 31, 2012 Released at 8:30 a.m. Eastern time in The Daily, Thursday, April 11, 2013 Control and sale of alcoholic beverages, for the year ending March 31, 2012 Released at 8:30 a.m. Eastern time in The Daily, Thursday, April 11, 2013 Beer and liquor stores and agencies sold $20.9 billion

More information

Looking Into Poverty: Income Sources of Poor People with Disabilities in Canada

Looking Into Poverty: Income Sources of Poor People with Disabilities in Canada Looking Into Poverty: Income Sources of Poor People with Disabilities in Canada Researched and written by Cameron Crawford Director of Research, IRIS Looking Into Poverty: Income Sources of Poor People

More information

The National Shelter Study

The National Shelter Study The National Shelter Study Highlights The National Shelter Study is the first national analysis using consistent shelter data collected over an extended period of time to establish a baseline count and

More information

Business Immigrants Entrepreneurs Findings from the Longitudinal Immigration Database (IMDB)

Business Immigrants Entrepreneurs Findings from the Longitudinal Immigration Database (IMDB) IMDB 2008 Research Series Economic Class For internal use only IMDB 2008 Immigration Category Profiles Business Immigrants Entrepreneurs Findings from the Longitudinal Immigration Database (IMDB) March

More information

Narrowing the Gender Gap:

Narrowing the Gender Gap: MARCH 2008 NO 2 Introduction The Representation of Women by Academic Rank Regional and Institutional Comparisons Conclusion Narrowing the Gender Gap: Women Academics in Canadian Universities The number

More information

Repair and Maintenance Services

Repair and Maintenance Services Catalogue no. 63-247-X. Service bulletin Repair and Maintenance Services 2010. Highlights The repair and maintenance services industry earned $22.5 billion in operating revenues in 2010, an increase of

More information

Policy Brief. Canada s Labour Market Puts in a Strong Performance in 2012. The Canadian Chamber is committed to fostering.

Policy Brief. Canada s Labour Market Puts in a Strong Performance in 2012. The Canadian Chamber is committed to fostering. Canada s Labour Market Puts in a Strong Performance in 2012 Introduction Policy Brief Economic Policy Series February 2013 Canada s labour market ended 2012 on a high note with almost 100,000 net new jobs

More information

TECHNICAL NOTE... 3 KEY FACTS... 4

TECHNICAL NOTE... 3 KEY FACTS... 4 ... 1 TECHNICAL NOTE... 3 KEY FACTS... 4... 6... 8... 11... 12... 14... 15... 17... 18... 19... 20... 23... 24... 25... 26... 27... 28 ii Small business is anything but small in Saskatchewan. Saskatchewan

More information

Yukon Bureau of Statistics

Yukon Bureau of Statistics Yukon Bureau of Statistics 2 9 # $ > 0-2 + 6 & ± 8 < 3 π 7 5 9 ^ Highlights: Yukon Statistics 203 Taxation Year There were 27,200 income taxfilers in Yukon in 203, an increase of 290, or.%, compared to

More information

MULTILATERAL INSTRUMENT 33-107 PROFICIENCY REQUIREMENTS FOR REGISTRANTS HOLDING THEMSELVES OUT AS PROVIDING FINANCIAL PLANNING AND SIMILAR ADVICE

MULTILATERAL INSTRUMENT 33-107 PROFICIENCY REQUIREMENTS FOR REGISTRANTS HOLDING THEMSELVES OUT AS PROVIDING FINANCIAL PLANNING AND SIMILAR ADVICE MULTILATERAL INSTRUMENT 33-107 PROFICIENCY REQUIREMENTS FOR REGISTRANTS HOLDING THEMSELVES OUT AS PROVIDING FINANCIAL PLANNING AND SIMILAR ADVICE PART 1 PROFICIENCY REQUIREMENTS 1.1 Proficiency Requirements

More information

NCLEX-RN 2015: Canadian Results. Published by the Canadian Council of Registered Nurse Regulators (CCRNR)

NCLEX-RN 2015: Canadian Results. Published by the Canadian Council of Registered Nurse Regulators (CCRNR) NCLEX-RN 2015: Canadian Results Published by the Canadian Council of Registered Nurse Regulators (CCRNR) March 31, 2016 Contents Message from the president 3 Background on the NCLEX-RN 4 The role of Canada

More information

UNIVERSITY WORKS. 2014 employment report

UNIVERSITY WORKS. 2014 employment report UNIVERSITY WORKS 2014 employment report Empirical data shows Ontario university graduates have the best labour market outcomes. A university education leads to success. UNIVERSITY grads get jobs University

More information

The business support services industry,

The business support services industry, Ernest B. Akyeampong The business support services industry, a major component of which is believed to consist of telephone call centres, has been one of the fastest growing industries in Canada over the

More information

College of Nurses of Ontario. Membership Statistics Highlights 2014

College of Nurses of Ontario. Membership Statistics Highlights 2014 College of Nurses of Ontario Membership Statistics Highlights 2014 Revised February 25, 2015 VISION Leading in regulatory excellence MISSION Regulating nursing in the public interest Membership Statistics

More information

In contrast to other age groups, more Canadians

In contrast to other age groups, more Canadians Youth volunteering on the rise Frank Jones In contrast to other age groups, more Canadians aged 15 to 24 are becoming volunteers. The volunteer participation rate of most of the population changed little

More information

Nurses make up the largest proportion of

Nurses make up the largest proportion of Employment trends in nursing Wendy Pyper Nurses make up the largest proportion of health workers in Canada. Whether in hospitals, home care or nursing care facilities, they play an integral role in the

More information

Re s e a r c h a n d E v a l u a t i o n

Re s e a r c h a n d E v a l u a t i o n Portrait of an Integration Process D i f f i c u l t i e s e n c o u n t e r e d a n d r e s o u r c e s r e l i e d o n f o r n e w c o m e r s i n t h e i r f i r s t 4 y e a r s i n C a n a d a E v

More information

AFB2010. Is EI Working for Canada s Unemployed? Analyzing The Great Recession. Rising Unemployment and Access to EI. Introduction

AFB2010. Is EI Working for Canada s Unemployed? Analyzing The Great Recession. Rising Unemployment and Access to EI. Introduction AFB2010 January 2010 technical paper alternative FEDER AL BUDGET 2010 Is EI Working for Canada s Unemployed? Analyzing The Great Recession Andrew Jackson and Sylvain Schetagne Introduction Rising Unemployment

More information

Regulated Nurses, 2012 Summary Report

Regulated Nurses, 2012 Summary Report Spending and Health Workforce Our Vision Better data. Better decisions. Healthier Canadians. Our Mandate To lead the development and maintenance of comprehensive and integrated health information that

More information

Article. Work absences in 2011. by Maria Dabboussy and Sharanjit Uppal

Article. Work absences in 2011. by Maria Dabboussy and Sharanjit Uppal Component of Statistics Canada Catalogue no. 75-001-X Perspectives on Labour and Income Article Work absences in 2011 by Maria Dabboussy and Sharanjit Uppal April 20, 2012 Statistics Canada Statistique

More information

Welfare in Canada 2013

Welfare in Canada 2013 Welfare in Canada 2013 by Anne Tweddle, Ken Battle and Sherri Torjman November 2014 Welfare in Canada 2013 by Anne Tweddle, Ken Battle and Sherri Torjman November 2014 Copyright 2014 by The Caledon Institute

More information

If you have an accident

If you have an accident LABOUR PROGRAM If you have an accident What to do and how to do it LT-058-03-05 This publication is available in multiple formats (large print, audio cassette, braille and diskette) in English and French.

More information

MINING IN CANADA S OIL SANDS. Labour Market Trends and Human Resources Challenges

MINING IN CANADA S OIL SANDS. Labour Market Trends and Human Resources Challenges MINING IN CANADA S OIL SANDS Labour Market Trends and Human Resources Challenges This project is funded in part by the Government of Canada. The opinions and interpretations in this publication are those

More information

Article. Economic Well-being. by Cara Williams. December 2010. Component of Statistics Canada Catalogue no. 89-503-X

Article. Economic Well-being. by Cara Williams. December 2010. Component of Statistics Canada Catalogue no. 89-503-X Component of Statistics Canada Catalogue no. 89-503-X Women in Canada: A Gender-based Statistical Report Article Economic Well-being by Cara Williams December 2010 How to obtain more information For information

More information

Business Immigrants Self-employed Findings from the Longitudinal Immigration Database (IMDB)

Business Immigrants Self-employed Findings from the Longitudinal Immigration Database (IMDB) IMDB 2008 Research Series Economic Class For internal use only IMDB 2008 Immigration Category Profiles Business Immigrants Findings from the Longitudinal Immigration Database (IMDB) March 2012 Economic

More information

Summary of CSLS Long Term Fiscal & Economic Projections

Summary of CSLS Long Term Fiscal & Economic Projections Summary of CSLS Long Term Fiscal & Economic Projections 2014 to 2038 M ANITOBA B UREAU OF S TATISTICS RIGHT ANSWERS RIGHT NOW January 18, 2016 Summary of CSLS Long Term Fiscal & Economic Projections In

More information

Artists in Canada s Provinces, Territories and Metropolitan Areas

Artists in Canada s Provinces, Territories and Metropolitan Areas Artists in Canada s Provinces, Territories and Metropolitan Areas A Statistical Analysis Based on the 2001 Census http://www.hillstrategies.com info@hillstrategies.com Statistical insights on the arts,

More information

INDUSTRY PROFILES. Educational Services Industry

INDUSTRY PROFILES. Educational Services Industry INDUSTRY PROFILES Educational Services Industry June 2012 Overview: The Educational Services industry 1 in Alberta includes: public and private schools, colleges, universities and training centres; instructional

More information

2006 Master of Library & Information Science Placement Survey. FACULTY OF INFORMATION AND MEDIA STUDIES The University of Western Ontario

2006 Master of Library & Information Science Placement Survey. FACULTY OF INFORMATION AND MEDIA STUDIES The University of Western Ontario 2006 Master of Library & Information Science Placement Survey FACULTY OF INFORMATION AND MEDIA STUDIES 2006 Placement Survey of MLIS Graduates SUMMARY Of the 143 students who graduated from the Master

More information

Minimum wage. Minimum-wage legislation exists in every province

Minimum wage. Minimum-wage legislation exists in every province Minimum-wage legislation exists in every province and territory as part of provincial employment standards legislation. The minimum wage is the lowest wage employers can pay employees covered by the legislation

More information

Occupation Labour Market Analysis

Occupation Labour Market Analysis Occupation Labour Market Analysis The POMS produces information that can be used to help Labour Market Information (LMI) analysts to identify significant supplydemand gaps across the occupations and the

More information

Table 8.1.1: Comparison of Education Expenditures with Other Government Sectors, 1991/92-1997/98

Table 8.1.1: Comparison of Education Expenditures with Other Government Sectors, 1991/92-1997/98 8. Cost of Education 8.1 How do educational expenditures compare with expenditures for other major government sectors? The total government expenditure for the year 1995/96, the last year for which actual

More information

Policy in Focus SUMMARY. Maytree. Featured Research. Fix Employment Insurance to support the temporarily unemployed. Background and Context...

Policy in Focus SUMMARY. Maytree. Featured Research. Fix Employment Insurance to support the temporarily unemployed. Background and Context... The Maytree Foundation Maytree Policy in Focus issue 2 Dec 07 Background and Context...2 Employment Insurance Doesn t Insure Many Canadians Featured Research...4 Towards a New Architecture Canada s Adult

More information

Software Development and Computer Services

Software Development and Computer Services Catalogue no. 63-255-X. Service bulletin Software Development and Computer Services 2011. Highlights revenue in the Canadian software development and computer services industry group increased by 9.5%

More information

Graduating in Canada: Profile, Labour Market Outcomes and Student Debt of the Class of 2005

Graduating in Canada: Profile, Labour Market Outcomes and Student Debt of the Class of 2005 Catalogue no. 81-595-M No. 074 ISSN: 1711-831X ISBN: 978-1-100-12334-9 Research Paper Culture, Tourism and the Centre for Education Statistics Graduating in Canada: Profile, Labour Market Outcomes and

More information

CANADA SUMMER JOBS 2016. Creating Jobs, Strengthening Communities. Applicant Guide

CANADA SUMMER JOBS 2016. Creating Jobs, Strengthening Communities. Applicant Guide CANADA SUMMER JOBS 2016 Creating Jobs, Strengthening Communities Applicant Guide Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose... 3 2.0 Introduction... 3 2.1 Objectives... 3 2.2 Assessment Criteria... 3 2.3 Application

More information

INJURIES by Kathryn Wilkins and Evelyn Park

INJURIES by Kathryn Wilkins and Evelyn Park Injuries 43 INJURIES by Kathryn Wilkins and Evelyn Park In 2000/01, an estimated 3.4 million Canadians aged 12 or older (13%) were seriously injured (Table A). That is, they sustained an injury severe

More information

A Demographic and Socio-Economic Portrait of. AboriginAl PoPulAtions in CAnAdA

A Demographic and Socio-Economic Portrait of. AboriginAl PoPulAtions in CAnAdA A Demographic and Socio-Economic Portrait of AboriginAl PoPulAtions in CAnAdA table of Contents Aboriginal Population (Total)....1 Registered Indian Population....9 Non-Status Indian Population....17 Métis

More information

This article answers the question, To what

This article answers the question, To what Overqualified? Recent graduates, employer needs Marc Frenette This article answers the question, To what extent, if any, have the education levels of graduates surpassed the needs of employers? In other

More information

Tobacco Use in Canada: Patterns and Trends. 2012 Edition

Tobacco Use in Canada: Patterns and Trends. 2012 Edition Tobacco Use in Canada: Patterns and Trends 212 Edition Tobacco Use in Canada: Patterns and Trends 212 Edition This report was prepared by Jessica Reid, MSc, and David Hammond, PhD. Data analysis was completed

More information

CANADA S CULTURAL SECTOR LABOUR FORCE

CANADA S CULTURAL SECTOR LABOUR FORCE CANADA S CULTURAL SECTOR LABOUR FORCE CANADA S CULTURAL SECTOR LABOUR FORCE Cultural Human Resources Council 2004 This project is funded by the Government of Canada s Sector Council Program. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

More information

Aboriginal People in Canada s Labour Market: Work and Unemployment, Today and Tomorrow

Aboriginal People in Canada s Labour Market: Work and Unemployment, Today and Tomorrow Aboriginal People in Canada s Labour Market: Work and Unemployment, Today and Tomorrow by Michael Mendelson March 2004 Aboriginal People in Canada s Labour Market: Work and Unemployment, Today and Tomorrow

More information