1. What must be stored in the bow?

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "1. What must be stored in the bow?"

Transcription

1 AP Physics 1 Lesson 7.b Work and Elastic Potential Energy in Springs Outcomes 1. Define work. 2. Define energy. 3. Determine the work done by a constant force. 4. Determine the work done by a force exerted on or by a spring. 5. Determine he kinetic energy of a moving object. 6. Apply the work energy theorem to solve problems. 7. Determine gravitational potential energy and elastic potential energy. 8. Apply the Law of Conservation of energy to solve problems. Name Date Period Engage 1. What must be stored in the bow? 2. When the coyote releases his grip, what will be exerted on the coyote? 3. Prepare a free-body diagram for the coyote once his grip is released and while is still touching the string. 4. What will happen to the elastic potential energy of the coyote once his grip is released? 5. Compare the energy stored in the bow before he releases his grip and the kinetic energy of the coyote at the instant he leaves the bow. 6. If the coyote has a mass of 20 kg, the bow has a maximum potential energy of 2000 J, and the roadrunner has a velocity of 15 m/s, will the coyote catch the roadrunner? Show your work. The teacher will show you the Sling Shot Girl.mov video. 7. What does the tractor exert on the slingshot? 8. If a force is exerted through a distance then what is done on the slingshot? 9. What does this work result in an increase of? (Yes, I ended a sentence with a preposition if you don t like it, change it.) 10. What happens to this elastic potential energy (Ue)? 11. The string will vibrate for a while. The vibrations are called oscillations. Over time, the oscillations decrease in amplitude. Explain why this occurs. 1

2 Explore I. Let s see what you remember from the last lesson. There isn t a vocabulary list, since there are no new terms. Notes I. : The potential to produce change within a system. The ability to do work within a system. II. of energy. Type of Energy Variable Equation Definition Stored energy. III. The Nature of Systems Energy stored in an object that is the result of the position of an object relative to the surface of the earth. Energy that is stored in a spring or other elastic material as a result of its deformation (usually expansion or compression). Energy that is stored in an electric field. Energy of motion. The energy an object has due to the combination of its mass and velocity. The sum of the vibrational, rotational and translational kinetic energies of the particles that make up a material. The amount of molecular kinetic energy transferred between objects or materials. A. 1. A measure of the randomness or disorder in a system. B. The natural tendency of systems is to high potential energy states into more distributed forms of energy. C. D.. IV. The Law of 1. Systems where losses due to dissipative forces (such as friction) are not a factor in making predictions or solving problems. 1. Systems where losses due to dissipative forces are a factor in solving problems. of Energy. A. For conservative systems, the total energy of a system remains unchanged and therefore the change in energy U is =. V. A. The process of transforming energy from one form into another. It is also the force exerted through a distance. 1. W=. 2. Units B. did pioneering work to demonstrate the equivalency of mechanical energy with thermal energy. VI. Theorem 2

3 A. Consider this example. 1. What force is exerted on the ball once it is released? 2. Over what distance is the force exerted? 3. What does this work result in? 4. With respect to the KE of the ball, is this work considered positive, negative or zero? (positive work results in an increase in kinetic energy or in other words the force is in the direction of the motion) VI. Graphical Analysis of Work. Clue: Look at the equation to calculate work and what is recorded on the x and y axis in the graphs below. Think back when you analyzed kinematic graphs. A. Examine the graph below. This force was exerted on a 2kg object in a conservative system. B. Examine the graph below. This force was exerted on a 2kg object in a conservative system. a) How much work was performed by this force over the distance of 3m? a) How much work was performed by this force over the distance of 3m? b) What is the final velocity of the object? b) What is the final velocity of the object? Elaborate The cart can be pulled to the right, stretching the spring. If the cart is released, it will accelerate to the left The can be stretched a small amount (A) or a large amount (B). 3

4 14. In which situation would the kinetic energy of the car be the greatest? Support your answer with graphs of force and displacement. Consider if the force remains constant when the spring is being stretched or if it changes. In the last question you made predictions about the work performed in a conservative system, the maximum Ue developed in the system, and the maximum KE of the motion of the system, assuming perfect energy transformations. In this investigation, we will determine whether or not your predictions are supported by the evidence. The following investigation has two parts. Since the force applied by the spring depends on how far the spring is stretched as well as how stiff or how springy the spring is, we need to find a way to determine this second factor, spring stiffness, first. We are applying Hooke s law to do that. Hooke discovered the relationship between the force applied to a spring either stretching or compressing it and the change in the length of the spring. F = -kx The negative sign indicates that since this force is the restoring force (getting the spring back to its original position) it is exerted in the opposite direction to the force stretching or compressing the spring. x refers to the amount the spring has been stretched or compressed from its resting (equilibrium) position. First, we will examine the relationship between the force required to displace the spring and the distance the spring is being stretched. Prepare the following set up. Measure the extension (change in length) of the spring for increasing amounts of mass. You can also use a meter stick to measure the extension instead of the motion sensor. Force (N) (F=m g) The force stretching the spring is gravity acting on the mass suspended from the spring. Extension (m) How much the spring length changed from its original unstretched length. Plot the data 15. How would you determine the work done stretching this spring? Think graphical analysis and check the variables appearing on the y-axis and x-axis. Would the slope make sense or possibly the area? 4

5 16. Determine the slope of your graph. This slope represents the relationship between the force and the distance the spring is stretched. It is an unique value indicating the stiffness of the spring. This value is called the k value of the spring. Different springs have different k values. Stiffer springs have higher k values and store more energy for a given displacement. 17. The equation for determining elastic potential energy is Ue=1/2kx 2. How is this equation derived? (Not an easy question - look back at question 15 and remind yourself that work equals the change in energy) Examine the set up below Consider the set up below. A spring is connected to a cart by a low friction pulley. A motion detector is set up to monitor the position of the cart. The cart will be pulled back different distances d. 18. Predict what will happen to the elastic potential energy of the spring as it is stretched through the distance d. Assume this is a frictionless set up. 19. Predict what will happen to the kinetic energy of the cart as the spring contracts back through a distance d. 20. Prepare a free body diagram for the cart as the spring contracts back through the distance d. 21. What energy transformations occur for the system? 22. How do you determine the Ue for the system once the cart has been pulled back? 23. How do you determine the final KE of the car once it is released? 5

6 Measure the peak velocity attained by the car for several different distance d values. Conduct 3 trials for each distance d. Calculate the initial Ue, the work done W, and the change in KE experienced by the car. Spring Constant (N/m) Make sure you use the same type of spring for which you found k already. Distance cart is displaced (m) Ue of Spring Ue=1/2kx 2 (Joules) x is the stretch of the spring and equals the displacement of the cart. Work done (W=1/2F d) (Joules) Hint: What is the relationship of work and change of energy? Trial 1 peak velocity (m/s) Trial 2 peak velocity (m/s) Trial 3 peak velocity (m/s) Average Peak Velocity (m/s) Mass of Car (kg) KE of Car 1/2mv 2 (Joules) 24. Compare the Ue to the KE for each of the trials. 25. What could account for differences between the two values for each distance d? 26. On the grid below, plot Ue values (x) vs. KE values (y). 27. What is the apparent relationship between the change gravitational potential energy and kinetic energy for the system? 6

7 Explain 28. Practice I. Total Energy II. I II III Ball released at A. Total Energy. I II III IV V 29. What is the final KE of the skier? 30. What is the initial GPE of the skier? 31. Is this a conservative or non-conservative system? How do you know? The skier has a mass of 75 kg. For the conservative system on the left: 32. What is the K o of the mass? 33. Once the mass is in contact with the spring, what will be the maximum U e of the spring? Think energy transformation and conservation. m= 2.0 kg v= 1.5 m/s k= 20N/m 34. What is the maximum displacement of the spring? 7

8 A block gliding on a smooth surface encounters a rough section. 35. What is the initial K of the block? 36. What is the friction force exerted on the block? 37. What is the friction force exerted on the block? 38. What is the work done by friction on the block over the 0.5 m? m=2.0kg v o=2m/s 39. What is the K of the block at the end of the 0.5 m? 40. What is the final velocity of the block? A 2kg block experiences the forces described by the graph below. Assume the initial velocity of the block = 3.0 m/s 41. What is the work done on the block in the first meter? 42. What is the velocity of the block at the end of 1 meter? 43. What is the work done on the block in the first 2 meters? 43. What is the velocity of the block at the end of 2 meters? 44. What is the total work done on the block after 5 meters? 45. What is the final velocity of the block after 5 meters? A 250 kg roller coaster car travels the track illustrated below. 46. What is the K of the car at A? 47. What is the U g of the car at A? 48. What is the total energy of the car at A? 49. What is the velocity of the car at B? 50. What is the velocity of the car at C? 8

AP Physics - Chapter 8 Practice Test

AP Physics - Chapter 8 Practice Test AP Physics - Chapter 8 Practice Test Multiple Choice Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question. 1. A single conservative force F x = (6.0x 12) N (x is in m) acts on

More information

Unit 3 Work and Energy Suggested Time: 25 Hours

Unit 3 Work and Energy Suggested Time: 25 Hours Unit 3 Work and Energy Suggested Time: 25 Hours PHYSICS 2204 CURRICULUM GUIDE 55 DYNAMICS Work and Energy Introduction When two or more objects are considered at once, a system is involved. To make sense

More information

Objective: Work Done by a Variable Force Work Done by a Spring. Homework: Assignment (1-25) Do PROBS # (64, 65) Ch. 6, + Do AP 1986 # 2 (handout)

Objective: Work Done by a Variable Force Work Done by a Spring. Homework: Assignment (1-25) Do PROBS # (64, 65) Ch. 6, + Do AP 1986 # 2 (handout) Double Date: Objective: Work Done by a Variable Force Work Done by a Spring Homework: Assignment (1-25) Do PROBS # (64, 65) Ch. 6, + Do AP 1986 # 2 (handout) AP Physics B Mr. Mirro Work Done by a Variable

More information

Hooke s Law and Simple Harmonic Motion

Hooke s Law and Simple Harmonic Motion Hooke s Law and Simple Harmonic Motion OBJECTIVE to measure the spring constant of the springs using Hooke s Law to explore the static properties of springy objects and springs, connected in series and

More information

9. The kinetic energy of the moving object is (1) 5 J (3) 15 J (2) 10 J (4) 50 J

9. The kinetic energy of the moving object is (1) 5 J (3) 15 J (2) 10 J (4) 50 J 1. If the kinetic energy of an object is 16 joules when its speed is 4.0 meters per second, then the mass of the objects is (1) 0.5 kg (3) 8.0 kg (2) 2.0 kg (4) 19.6 kg Base your answers to questions 9

More information

AP1 Oscillations. 1. Which of the following statements about a spring-block oscillator in simple harmonic motion about its equilibrium point is false?

AP1 Oscillations. 1. Which of the following statements about a spring-block oscillator in simple harmonic motion about its equilibrium point is false? 1. Which of the following statements about a spring-block oscillator in simple harmonic motion about its equilibrium point is false? (A) The displacement is directly related to the acceleration. (B) The

More information

Chapter 7 WORK, ENERGY, AND Power Work Done by a Constant Force Kinetic Energy and the Work-Energy Theorem Work Done by a Variable Force Power

Chapter 7 WORK, ENERGY, AND Power Work Done by a Constant Force Kinetic Energy and the Work-Energy Theorem Work Done by a Variable Force Power Chapter 7 WORK, ENERGY, AND Power Work Done by a Constant Force Kinetic Energy and the Work-Energy Theorem Work Done by a Variable Force Power Examples of work. (a) The work done by the force F on this

More information

AP Physics C. Oscillations/SHM Review Packet

AP Physics C. Oscillations/SHM Review Packet AP Physics C Oscillations/SHM Review Packet 1. A 0.5 kg mass on a spring has a displacement as a function of time given by the equation x(t) = 0.8Cos(πt). Find the following: a. The time for one complete

More information

1 of 10 11/23/2009 6:37 PM

1 of 10 11/23/2009 6:37 PM hapter 14 Homework Due: 9:00am on Thursday November 19 2009 Note: To understand how points are awarded read your instructor's Grading Policy. [Return to Standard Assignment View] Good Vibes: Introduction

More information

Simple Harmonic Motion

Simple Harmonic Motion Simple Harmonic Motion 1 Object To determine the period of motion of objects that are executing simple harmonic motion and to check the theoretical prediction of such periods. 2 Apparatus Assorted weights

More information

8. Potential Energy and Conservation of Energy Potential Energy: When an object has potential to have work done on it, it is said to have potential

8. Potential Energy and Conservation of Energy Potential Energy: When an object has potential to have work done on it, it is said to have potential 8. Potential Energy and Conservation of Energy Potential Energy: When an object has potential to have work done on it, it is said to have potential energy, e.g. a ball in your hand has more potential energy

More information

both double. A. T and v max B. T remains the same and v max doubles. both remain the same. C. T and v max

both double. A. T and v max B. T remains the same and v max doubles. both remain the same. C. T and v max Q13.1 An object on the end of a spring is oscillating in simple harmonic motion. If the amplitude of oscillation is doubled, how does this affect the oscillation period T and the object s maximum speed

More information

AP1 WEP. Answer: E. The final velocities of the balls are given by v = 2gh.

AP1 WEP. Answer: E. The final velocities of the balls are given by v = 2gh. 1. Bowling Ball A is dropped from a point halfway up a cliff. A second identical bowling ball, B, is dropped simultaneously from the top of the cliff. Comparing the bowling balls at the instant they reach

More information

2.1 Force and Motion Kinematics looks at velocity and acceleration without reference to the cause of the acceleration.

2.1 Force and Motion Kinematics looks at velocity and acceleration without reference to the cause of the acceleration. 2.1 Force and Motion Kinematics looks at velocity and acceleration without reference to the cause of the acceleration. Dynamics looks at the cause of acceleration: an unbalanced force. Isaac Newton was

More information

Chapter 6 Work and Energy

Chapter 6 Work and Energy Chapter 6 WORK AND ENERGY PREVIEW Work is the scalar product of the force acting on an object and the displacement through which it acts. When work is done on or by a system, the energy of that system

More information

Work, Energy and Power Practice Test 1

Work, Energy and Power Practice Test 1 Name: ate: 1. How much work is required to lift a 2-kilogram mass to a height of 10 meters?. 5 joules. 20 joules. 100 joules. 200 joules 5. ar and car of equal mass travel up a hill. ar moves up the hill

More information

1) 0.33 m/s 2. 2) 2 m/s 2. 3) 6 m/s 2. 4) 18 m/s 2 1) 120 J 2) 40 J 3) 30 J 4) 12 J. 1) unchanged. 2) halved. 3) doubled.

1) 0.33 m/s 2. 2) 2 m/s 2. 3) 6 m/s 2. 4) 18 m/s 2 1) 120 J 2) 40 J 3) 30 J 4) 12 J. 1) unchanged. 2) halved. 3) doubled. Base your answers to questions 1 through 5 on the diagram below which represents a 3.0-kilogram mass being moved at a constant speed by a force of 6.0 Newtons. 4. If the surface were frictionless, the

More information

Chapter 8: Conservation of Energy

Chapter 8: Conservation of Energy Chapter 8: Conservation of Energy This chapter actually completes the argument established in the previous chapter and outlines the standing concepts of energy and conservative rules of total energy. I

More information

Physics 41 HW Set 1 Chapter 15

Physics 41 HW Set 1 Chapter 15 Physics 4 HW Set Chapter 5 Serway 8 th OC:, 4, 7 CQ: 4, 8 P: 4, 5, 8, 8, 0, 9,, 4, 9, 4, 5, 5 Discussion Problems:, 57, 59, 67, 74 OC CQ P: 4, 5, 8, 8, 0, 9,, 4, 9, 4, 5, 5 Discussion Problems:, 57, 59,

More information

physics 111N work & energy

physics 111N work & energy physics 111N work & energy conservation of energy entirely gravitational potential energy kinetic energy turning into gravitational potential energy gravitational potential energy turning into kinetic

More information

Assignment Work (Physics) Class :Xi Chapter :04: Motion In PLANE

Assignment Work (Physics) Class :Xi Chapter :04: Motion In PLANE 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. Assignment Work (Physics) Class :Xi Chapter :04: Motion In PLANE State law of parallelogram of vector addition and derive expression for resultant of two vectors

More information

Lesson 39: Kinetic Energy & Potential Energy

Lesson 39: Kinetic Energy & Potential Energy Lesson 39: Kinetic Energy & Potential Energy Total Mechanical Energy We sometimes call the total energy of an object (potential and kinetic) the total mechanical energy of an object. Mechanical energy

More information

Sample Questions for the AP Physics 1 Exam

Sample Questions for the AP Physics 1 Exam Sample Questions for the AP Physics 1 Exam Sample Questions for the AP Physics 1 Exam Multiple-choice Questions Note: To simplify calculations, you may use g 5 10 m/s 2 in all problems. Directions: Each

More information

7. Kinetic Energy and Work

7. Kinetic Energy and Work Kinetic Energy: 7. Kinetic Energy and Work The kinetic energy of a moving object: k = 1 2 mv 2 Kinetic energy is proportional to the square of the velocity. If the velocity of an object doubles, the kinetic

More information

Experiment P19: Simple Harmonic Motion - Mass on a Spring (Force Sensor, Motion Sensor)

Experiment P19: Simple Harmonic Motion - Mass on a Spring (Force Sensor, Motion Sensor) PASCO scientific Physics Lab Manual: P19-1 Science Workshop S. H. M. Mass on a Spring Experiment P19: Simple Harmonic Motion - Mass on a Spring (Force Sensor, Motion Sensor) Concept Time SW Interface Macintosh

More information

KE =? v o. Page 1 of 12

KE =? v o. Page 1 of 12 Page 1 of 12 CTEnergy-1. A mass m is at the end of light (massless) rod of length R, the other end of which has a frictionless pivot so the rod can swing in a vertical plane. The rod is initially horizontal

More information

Weight The weight of an object is defined as the gravitational force acting on the object. Unit: Newton (N)

Weight The weight of an object is defined as the gravitational force acting on the object. Unit: Newton (N) Gravitational Field A gravitational field as a region in which an object experiences a force due to gravitational attraction Gravitational Field Strength The gravitational field strength at a point in

More information

Springs. Spring can be used to apply forces. Springs can store energy. These can be done by either compression, stretching, or torsion.

Springs. Spring can be used to apply forces. Springs can store energy. These can be done by either compression, stretching, or torsion. Work-Energy Part 2 Springs Spring can be used to apply forces Springs can store energy These can be done by either compression, stretching, or torsion. Springs Ideal, or linear springs follow a rule called:

More information

The car is pulled up a long hill. 2. Does the roller coaster ever get higher than the first hill? No.

The car is pulled up a long hill. 2. Does the roller coaster ever get higher than the first hill? No. Roller Coaster Physics Answer Key Vocabulary: friction, gravitational potential energy, kinetic energy, momentum, velocity Prior Knowledge Questions (Do these BEFORE using the Gizmo.) [Note: The purpose

More information

Prelab Exercises: Hooke's Law and the Behavior of Springs

Prelab Exercises: Hooke's Law and the Behavior of Springs 59 Prelab Exercises: Hooke's Law and the Behavior of Springs Study the description of the experiment that follows and answer the following questions.. (3 marks) Explain why a mass suspended vertically

More information

C B A T 3 T 2 T 1. 1. What is the magnitude of the force T 1? A) 37.5 N B) 75.0 N C) 113 N D) 157 N E) 192 N

C B A T 3 T 2 T 1. 1. What is the magnitude of the force T 1? A) 37.5 N B) 75.0 N C) 113 N D) 157 N E) 192 N Three boxes are connected by massless strings and are resting on a frictionless table. Each box has a mass of 15 kg, and the tension T 1 in the right string is accelerating the boxes to the right at a

More information

Center of Mass/Momentum

Center of Mass/Momentum Center of Mass/Momentum 1. 2. An L-shaped piece, represented by the shaded area on the figure, is cut from a metal plate of uniform thickness. The point that corresponds to the center of mass of the L-shaped

More information

WORK DONE BY A CONSTANT FORCE

WORK DONE BY A CONSTANT FORCE WORK DONE BY A CONSTANT FORCE The definition of work, W, when a constant force (F) is in the direction of displacement (d) is W = Fd SI unit is the Newton-meter (Nm) = Joule, J If you exert a force of

More information

Centripetal Force. 1. Introduction

Centripetal Force. 1. Introduction 1. Introduction Centripetal Force When an object travels in a circle, even at constant speed, it is undergoing acceleration. In this case the acceleration acts not to increase or decrease the magnitude

More information

Lesson 3 - Understanding Energy (with a Pendulum)

Lesson 3 - Understanding Energy (with a Pendulum) Lesson 3 - Understanding Energy (with a Pendulum) Introduction This lesson is meant to introduce energy and conservation of energy and is a continuation of the fundamentals of roller coaster engineering.

More information

Work, Power, Energy Multiple Choice. PSI Physics. Multiple Choice Questions

Work, Power, Energy Multiple Choice. PSI Physics. Multiple Choice Questions Work, Power, Energy Multiple Choice PSI Physics Name Multiple Choice Questions 1. A block of mass m is pulled over a distance d by an applied force F which is directed in parallel to the displacement.

More information

Experiment: Static and Kinetic Friction

Experiment: Static and Kinetic Friction PHY 201: General Physics I Lab page 1 of 6 OBJECTIVES Experiment: Static and Kinetic Friction Use a Force Sensor to measure the force of static friction. Determine the relationship between force of static

More information

HOOKE S LAW AND OSCILLATIONS

HOOKE S LAW AND OSCILLATIONS 9 HOOKE S LAW AND OSCILLATIONS OBJECTIVE To measure the effect of amplitude, mass, and spring constant on the period of a spring-mass oscillator. INTRODUCTION The force which restores a spring to its equilibrium

More information

Grade/Course: Pre-AP Physics Unit 2

Grade/Course: Pre-AP Physics Unit 2 Grade/Course: Pre-AP Physics Unit 2 Unit Concepts: Newton s Law of Motion, Forces, Equilibrium, Work, Power, & Energy, Simple Machines, Kinetic Energy & Potential Energy, Conservation of Energy, Momentum

More information

Simple Harmonic Motion Concepts

Simple Harmonic Motion Concepts Simple Harmonic Motion Concepts INTRODUCTION Have you ever wondered why a grandfather clock keeps accurate time? The motion of the pendulum is a particular kind of repetitive or periodic motion called

More information

SIMPLE HARMONIC MOTION

SIMPLE HARMONIC MOTION SIMPLE HARMONIC MOTION PURPOSE The purpose of this experiment is to investigate one of the fundamental types of motion that exists in nature - simple harmonic motion. The importance of this kind of motion

More information

ENERGYand WORK (PART I and II) 9-MAC

ENERGYand WORK (PART I and II) 9-MAC ENERGYand WORK (PART I and II) 9-MAC Purpose: To understand work, potential energy, & kinetic energy. To understand conservation of energy and how energy is converted from one form to the other. Apparatus:

More information

Advanced Higher Physics: MECHANICS. Simple Harmonic Motion

Advanced Higher Physics: MECHANICS. Simple Harmonic Motion Advanced Higher Physics: MECHANICS Simple Harmonic Motion At the end of this section, you should be able to: Describe examples of simple harmonic motion (SHM). State that in SHM the unbalanced force is

More information

Physics Midterm Review. Multiple-Choice Questions

Physics Midterm Review. Multiple-Choice Questions Physics Midterm Review Multiple-Choice Questions 1. A train moves at a constant velocity of 90 km/h. How far will it move in 0.25 h? A. 10 km B. 22.5 km C. 25 km D. 45 km E. 50 km 2. A bicyclist moves

More information

Curso2012-2013 Física Básica Experimental I Cuestiones Tema IV. Trabajo y energía.

Curso2012-2013 Física Básica Experimental I Cuestiones Tema IV. Trabajo y energía. 1. A body of mass m slides a distance d along a horizontal surface. How much work is done by gravity? A) mgd B) zero C) mgd D) One cannot tell from the given information. E) None of these is correct. 2.

More information

THE SPRING CONSTANT. Apparatus: A spiral spring, a set of weights, a weight hanger, a balance, a stop watch, and a twometer

THE SPRING CONSTANT. Apparatus: A spiral spring, a set of weights, a weight hanger, a balance, a stop watch, and a twometer THE SPRING CONSTANT Objective: To determine the spring constant of a spiral spring by Hooe s law and by its period of oscillatory motion in response to a weight. Apparatus: A spiral spring, a set of weights,

More information

Newton s Laws of Motion

Newton s Laws of Motion Section 3.2 Newton s Laws of Motion Objectives Analyze relationships between forces and motion Calculate the effects of forces on objects Identify force pairs between objects New Vocabulary Newton s first

More information

Phys 111 Fall P111 Syllabus

Phys 111 Fall P111 Syllabus Phys 111 Fall 2012 Course structure Five sections lecture time 150 minutes per week Textbook Physics by James S. Walker fourth edition (Pearson) Clickers recommended Coursework Complete assignments from

More information

Explaining Motion:Forces

Explaining Motion:Forces Explaining Motion:Forces Chapter Overview (Fall 2002) A. Newton s Laws of Motion B. Free Body Diagrams C. Analyzing the Forces and Resulting Motion D. Fundamental Forces E. Macroscopic Forces F. Application

More information

THE NOT SO SIMPLE PENDULUM

THE NOT SO SIMPLE PENDULUM INTRODUCTION: THE NOT SO SIMPLE PENDULUM This laboratory experiment is used to study a wide range of topics in mechanics like velocity, acceleration, forces and their components, the gravitational force,

More information

Name: Partners: Period: Coaster Option: 1. In the space below, make a sketch of your roller coaster.

Name: Partners: Period: Coaster Option: 1. In the space below, make a sketch of your roller coaster. 1. In the space below, make a sketch of your roller coaster. 2. On your sketch, label different areas of acceleration. Put a next to an area of negative acceleration, a + next to an area of positive acceleration,

More information

Lesson 40: Conservation of Energy

Lesson 40: Conservation of Energy Lesson 40: Conservation of Energy A large number of questions you will do involve the total mechanical energy. As pointed out earlier, the mechanical energy is just the total of all types of energy. In

More information

Lab 5: Conservation of Energy

Lab 5: Conservation of Energy Lab 5: Conservation of Energy Equipment SWS, 1-meter stick, 2-meter stick, heavy duty bench clamp, 90-cm rod, 40-cm rod, 2 double clamps, brass spring, 100-g mass, 500-g mass with 5-cm cardboard square

More information

Work-Energy Bar Charts

Work-Energy Bar Charts Name: Work-Energy Bar Charts Read from Lesson 2 of the Work, Energy and Power chapter at The Physics Classroom: http://www.physicsclassroom.com/class/energy/u5l2c.html MOP Connection: Work and Energy:

More information

A ball, attached to a cord of length 1.20 m, is set in motion so that it is swinging backwards and forwards like a pendulum.

A ball, attached to a cord of length 1.20 m, is set in motion so that it is swinging backwards and forwards like a pendulum. MECHANICS: SIMPLE HARMONIC MOTION QUESTIONS THE PENDULUM (2014;2) A pendulum is set up, as shown in the diagram. The length of the cord attached to the bob is 1.55 m. The bob has a mass of 1.80 kg. The

More information

A) F = k x B) F = k C) F = x k D) F = x + k E) None of these.

A) F = k x B) F = k C) F = x k D) F = x + k E) None of these. CT16-1 Which of the following is necessary to make an object oscillate? i. a stable equilibrium ii. little or no friction iii. a disturbance A: i only B: ii only C: iii only D: i and iii E: All three Answer:

More information

UNIT 2D. Laws of Motion

UNIT 2D. Laws of Motion Name: Regents Physics Date: Mr. Morgante UNIT 2D Laws of Motion Laws of Motion Science of Describing Motion is Kinematics. Dynamics- the study of forces that act on bodies in motion. First Law of Motion

More information

AP Physics Energy and Springs

AP Physics Energy and Springs AP Physics Energy and Springs Another major potential energy area that AP Physics is enamored of is the spring (the wire coil deals, not the ones that produce water for thirsty humanoids). Now you ve seen

More information

Name: Lab Partner: Section:

Name: Lab Partner: Section: Chapter 10 Simple Harmonic Motion Name: Lab Partner: Section: 10.1 Purpose Simple harmonic motion will be examined in this experiment. 10.2 Introduction A periodic motion is one that repeats itself in

More information

Practice Test SHM with Answers

Practice Test SHM with Answers Practice Test SHM with Answers MPC 1) If we double the frequency of a system undergoing simple harmonic motion, which of the following statements about that system are true? (There could be more than one

More information

Simple Harmonic Motion

Simple Harmonic Motion Simple Harmonic Motion 9M Object: Apparatus: To determine the force constant of a spring and then study the harmonic motion of that spring when it is loaded with a mass m. Force sensor, motion sensor,

More information

Work and Direction. Work and Direction. Work and Direction. Work and Direction

Work and Direction. Work and Direction. Work and Direction. Work and Direction Calculate the net gravitational force on the shaded ball. Be sure to include the magnitude and direction. Each ball has a mass of 20,000 kg. (0.79N, 22.5 o N of E) Chapter Six Work = Force X distance W

More information

Type: Double Date: Simple Harmonic Motion III. Homework: Read 10.3, Do CONCEPT QUEST #(7) Do PROBLEMS #(5, 19, 28) Ch. 10

Type: Double Date: Simple Harmonic Motion III. Homework: Read 10.3, Do CONCEPT QUEST #(7) Do PROBLEMS #(5, 19, 28) Ch. 10 Type: Double Date: Objective: Simple Harmonic Motion II Simple Harmonic Motion III Homework: Read 10.3, Do CONCEPT QUEST #(7) Do PROBLEMS #(5, 19, 28) Ch. 10 AP Physics B Mr. Mirro Simple Harmonic Motion

More information

Conservative vs. Non-conservative forces Gravitational Potential Energy. Work done by non-conservative forces and changes in mechanical energy

Conservative vs. Non-conservative forces Gravitational Potential Energy. Work done by non-conservative forces and changes in mechanical energy Next topic Conservative vs. Non-conservative forces Gravitational Potential Energy Mechanical Energy Conservation of Mechanical energy Work done by non-conservative forces and changes in mechanical energy

More information

Section 15.1 Energy and Its Forms (pages 446 452)

Section 15.1 Energy and Its Forms (pages 446 452) Section 15.1 and Its Forms (pages 446 452) This section describes how energy and work are related. It defines kinetic energy and potential energy, and gives examples for calculating these forms of energy.

More information

ch 15 practice test Multiple Choice Identify the letter of the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question.

ch 15 practice test Multiple Choice Identify the letter of the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question. ch 15 practice test Multiple Choice Identify the letter of the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question. 1. Work is a transfer of a. energy. c. mass. b. force. d. motion. 2. What

More information

v v ax v a x a v a v = = = Since F = ma, it follows that a = F/m. The mass of the arrow is unchanged, and ( )

v v ax v a x a v a v = = = Since F = ma, it follows that a = F/m. The mass of the arrow is unchanged, and ( ) Week 3 homework IMPORTANT NOTE ABOUT WEBASSIGN: In the WebAssign versions of these problems, various details have been changed, so that the answers will come out differently. The method to find the solution

More information

LUX MIDDLE SCHOOL. 8 th grade Science Objective 8.3.4: Investigate energy and power: b. Describe potential and kinetic energy

LUX MIDDLE SCHOOL. 8 th grade Science Objective 8.3.4: Investigate energy and power: b. Describe potential and kinetic energy LUX MIDDLE SCHOOL 8 th grade Science Objective 8.3.4: Investigate energy and power: b. Describe potential and kinetic energy Scientist: Dorina Marta Mihut Lead Teacher: Angela Zabawa 1 KINETIC AND POTENTIAL

More information

Physics 101 Prof. Ekey. Chapter 5 Force and motion (Newton, vectors and causing commotion)

Physics 101 Prof. Ekey. Chapter 5 Force and motion (Newton, vectors and causing commotion) Physics 101 Prof. Ekey Chapter 5 Force and motion (Newton, vectors and causing commotion) Goal of chapter 5 is to establish a connection between force and motion This should feel like chapter 1 Questions

More information

Work and Energy. W =!KE = KE f

Work and Energy. W =!KE = KE f Activity 19 PS-2826 Work and Energy Mechanics: work-energy theorem, conservation of energy GLX setup file: work energy Qty Equipment and Materials Part Number 1 PASPORT Xplorer GLX PS-2002 1 PASPORT Motion

More information

1) The gure below shows the position of a particle (moving along a straight line) as a function of time. Which of the following statements is true?

1) The gure below shows the position of a particle (moving along a straight line) as a function of time. Which of the following statements is true? Physics 2A, Sec C00: Mechanics -- Winter 2011 Instructor: B. Grinstein Final Exam INSTRUCTIONS: Use a pencil #2 to ll your scantron. Write your code number and bubble it in under "EXAM NUMBER;" an entry

More information

ENERGY Types of Energy and Energy Transfers

ENERGY Types of Energy and Energy Transfers ENERGY Types of Energy and Energy Transfers Energy is the ability to make something useful happen. These types Light Kinetic an object has due to its motion. Chemical can be released when chemical reactions

More information

Potential / Kinetic Energy Remedial Exercise

Potential / Kinetic Energy Remedial Exercise Potential / Kinetic Energy Remedial Exercise This Conceptual Physics exercise will help you in understanding the Law of Conservation of Energy, and its application to mechanical collisions. Exercise Roles:

More information

Chapter 8: Potential Energy and Conservation of Energy. Work and kinetic energy are energies of motion.

Chapter 8: Potential Energy and Conservation of Energy. Work and kinetic energy are energies of motion. Chapter 8: Potential Energy and Conservation of Energy Work and kinetic energy are energies of motion. Consider a vertical spring oscillating with mass m attached to one end. At the extreme ends of travel

More information

LABORATORY 9. Simple Harmonic Motion

LABORATORY 9. Simple Harmonic Motion LABORATORY 9 Simple Harmonic Motion Purpose In this experiment we will investigate two examples of simple harmonic motion: the mass-spring system and the simple pendulum. For the mass-spring system we

More information

226 Chapter 15: OSCILLATIONS

226 Chapter 15: OSCILLATIONS Chapter 15: OSCILLATIONS 1. In simple harmonic motion, the restoring force must be proportional to the: A. amplitude B. frequency C. velocity D. displacement E. displacement squared 2. An oscillatory motion

More information

PHY231 Section 2, Form A March 22, 2012. 1. Which one of the following statements concerning kinetic energy is true?

PHY231 Section 2, Form A March 22, 2012. 1. Which one of the following statements concerning kinetic energy is true? 1. Which one of the following statements concerning kinetic energy is true? A) Kinetic energy can be measured in watts. B) Kinetic energy is always equal to the potential energy. C) Kinetic energy is always

More information

6: Applications of Newton's Laws

6: Applications of Newton's Laws 6: Applications of Newton's Laws Friction opposes motion due to surfaces sticking together Kinetic Friction: surfaces are moving relative to each other a.k.a. Sliding Friction Static Friction: surfaces

More information

charge is detonated, causing the smaller glider with mass M, to move off to the right at 5 m/s. What is the

charge is detonated, causing the smaller glider with mass M, to move off to the right at 5 m/s. What is the This test covers momentum, impulse, conservation of momentum, elastic collisions, inelastic collisions, perfectly inelastic collisions, 2-D collisions, and center-of-mass, with some problems requiring

More information

Force. Net Force Mass. Acceleration = Section 1: Weight. Equipment Needed Qty Equipment Needed Qty Force Sensor 1 Mass and Hanger Set 1 Balance 1

Force. Net Force Mass. Acceleration = Section 1: Weight. Equipment Needed Qty Equipment Needed Qty Force Sensor 1 Mass and Hanger Set 1 Balance 1 Department of Physics and Geology Background orce Physical Science 1421 A force is a vector quantity capable of producing motion or a change in motion. In the SI unit system, the unit of force is the Newton

More information

ACTIVITY SIX CONSERVATION OF MOMENTUM ELASTIC COLLISIONS

ACTIVITY SIX CONSERVATION OF MOMENTUM ELASTIC COLLISIONS 1 PURPOSE ACTIVITY SIX CONSERVATION OF MOMENTUM ELASTIC COLLISIONS For this experiment, the Motion Visualizer (MV) is used to capture the motion of two frictionless carts moving along a flat, horizontal

More information

Oscillations: Mass on a Spring and Pendulums

Oscillations: Mass on a Spring and Pendulums Chapter 3 Oscillations: Mass on a Spring and Pendulums 3.1 Purpose 3.2 Introduction Galileo is said to have been sitting in church watching the large chandelier swinging to and fro when he decided that

More information

www.mathsbox.org.uk Displacement (x) Velocity (v) Acceleration (a) x = f(t) differentiate v = dx Acceleration Velocity (v) Displacement x

www.mathsbox.org.uk Displacement (x) Velocity (v) Acceleration (a) x = f(t) differentiate v = dx Acceleration Velocity (v) Displacement x Mechanics 2 : Revision Notes 1. Kinematics and variable acceleration Displacement (x) Velocity (v) Acceleration (a) x = f(t) differentiate v = dx differentiate a = dv = d2 x dt dt dt 2 Acceleration Velocity

More information

Physics 2A, Sec B00: Mechanics -- Winter 2011 Instructor: B. Grinstein Final Exam

Physics 2A, Sec B00: Mechanics -- Winter 2011 Instructor: B. Grinstein Final Exam Physics 2A, Sec B00: Mechanics -- Winter 2011 Instructor: B. Grinstein Final Exam INSTRUCTIONS: Use a pencil #2 to fill your scantron. Write your code number and bubble it in under "EXAM NUMBER;" an entry

More information

8 SIMPLE HARMONIC MOTION

8 SIMPLE HARMONIC MOTION 8 SIMPLE HARMONIC MOTION Chapter 8 Simple Harmonic Motion Objectives After studying this chapter you should be able to model oscillations; be able to derive laws to describe oscillations; be able to use

More information

CHAPTER 6 WORK AND ENERGY

CHAPTER 6 WORK AND ENERGY CHAPTER 6 WORK AND ENERGY CONCEPTUAL QUESTIONS. REASONING AND SOLUTION The work done by F in moving the box through a displacement s is W = ( F cos 0 ) s= Fs. The work done by F is W = ( F cos θ). s From

More information

Mass, energy, power and time are scalar quantities which do not have direction.

Mass, energy, power and time are scalar quantities which do not have direction. Dynamics Worksheet Answers (a) Answers: A vector quantity has direction while a scalar quantity does not have direction. Answers: (D) Velocity, weight and friction are vector quantities. Note: weight and

More information

Newton s Third Law, Momentum, Center of Mass

Newton s Third Law, Momentum, Center of Mass Team: Newton s Third Law, Momentum, Center of Mass Part I. Newton s Third Law Atomic Springs When you push against a wall, you feel a force in the opposite direction. The harder you push, the harder the

More information

= mg [down] =!mg [up]; F! x

= mg [down] =!mg [up]; F! x Section 4.6: Elastic Potential Energy and Simple Harmonic Motion Mini Investigation: Spring Force, page 193 Answers may vary. Sample answers: A. The relationship between F g and x is linear. B. The slope

More information

F mg (10.1 kg)(9.80 m/s ) m

F mg (10.1 kg)(9.80 m/s ) m Week 9 homework IMPORTANT NOTE ABOUT WEBASSIGN: In the WebAssign versions of these problems, various details have been changed, so that the answers will come out differently. The method to find the solution

More information

Activity 5a Potential and Kinetic Energy PHYS 010. To investigate the relationship between potential energy and kinetic energy.

Activity 5a Potential and Kinetic Energy PHYS 010. To investigate the relationship between potential energy and kinetic energy. Name: Date: Partners: Purpose: To investigate the relationship between potential energy and kinetic energy. Materials: 1. Super-balls, or hard bouncy rubber balls. Metre stick and tape 3. calculator 4.

More information

THE CONSERVATION OF ENERGY - PENDULUM -

THE CONSERVATION OF ENERGY - PENDULUM - THE CONSERVATION OF ENERGY - PENDULUM - Introduction The purpose of this experiment is to measure the potential energy and the kinetic energy of a mechanical system and to quantitatively compare the two

More information

Work and Kinetic Energy

Work and Kinetic Energy Chapter 6 Work and Kinetic Energy PowerPoint Lectures for University Physics, Thirteenth Edition Hugh D. Young and Roger A. Freedman Lectures by Wayne Anderson Goals for Chapter 6 To understand and calculate

More information

Conservation of Energy Workshop. Academic Resource Center

Conservation of Energy Workshop. Academic Resource Center Conservation of Energy Workshop Academic Resource Center Presentation Outline Understanding Concepts Kinetic Energy Gravitational Potential Energy Elastic Potential Energy Example Conceptual Situations

More information

Ch 8 Potential energy and Conservation of Energy. Question: 2, 3, 8, 9 Problems: 3, 9, 15, 21, 24, 25, 31, 32, 35, 41, 43, 47, 49, 53, 55, 63

Ch 8 Potential energy and Conservation of Energy. Question: 2, 3, 8, 9 Problems: 3, 9, 15, 21, 24, 25, 31, 32, 35, 41, 43, 47, 49, 53, 55, 63 Ch 8 Potential energ and Conservation of Energ Question: 2, 3, 8, 9 Problems: 3, 9, 15, 21, 24, 25, 31, 32, 35, 41, 43, 47, 49, 53, 55, 63 Potential energ Kinetic energ energ due to motion Potential energ

More information

How to calculate work done by a varying force along a curved path. The meaning and calculation of power in a physical situation

How to calculate work done by a varying force along a curved path. The meaning and calculation of power in a physical situation Chapter 6: Work and Kinetic Energy What is work done by a force What is kinetic energy work-energy theorem How to calculate work done by a varying force along a curved path The meaning and calculation

More information

PHYS 100 Introductory Physics Sample Exam 2

PHYS 100 Introductory Physics Sample Exam 2 PHYS 00 Introductory Physics Sample Exam Formulas: Acceleration due to Gravity = 0 m/s Weight = Mass x Acceleration due to Gravity Work = Force x Distance Gravitational Potential Energy = Weight x Height

More information

Periodic Motion or Oscillations. Physics 232 Lecture 01 1

Periodic Motion or Oscillations. Physics 232 Lecture 01 1 Periodic Motion or Oscillations Physics 3 Lecture 01 1 Periodic Motion Periodic Motion is motion that repeats about a point of stable equilibrium Stable Equilibrium Unstable Equilibrium A necessary requirement

More information

Chapter 6. Work and Energy

Chapter 6. Work and Energy Chapter 6 Work and Energy The concept of forces acting on a mass (one object) is intimately related to the concept of ENERGY production or storage. A mass accelerated to a non-zero speed carries energy

More information

Chapter 4 Newton s Laws: Explaining Motion

Chapter 4 Newton s Laws: Explaining Motion Chapter 4 Newton s s Laws: Explaining Motion Newton s Laws of Motion The concepts of force, mass, and weight play critical roles. A Brief History! Where do our ideas and theories about motion come from?!

More information