A Linear Algebra Primer James Baugh

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1 Introduction to Vectors and Matrices Vectors and Vector Spaces Vectors are elements of a vector space which is a set of mathematical objects which can be added and multiplied by numbers (scalars) subject to the following axiomatic requirements: Addition must be associative: Addition must be commutative: Addition must have a unique identity: (the zero vector). Every element must have an additive inverse:. Under scalar multiplication 1 must acts as a multiplicative identity: 1 Scalar multiplication must be distributive with addition:, and. Another requirement is closure which we can express singly as closure of linear combinations: o If and are in the space then so too is for any numbers, and. What does all that mean? It simply means that vectors behave just like number as far as doing algebra is concerned except that we don t (as yet) define multiplication of vectors times vectors. (Later we will see several distinct types of vector multiplication.) Examples of Vector Spaces: Arrows (displacements) The typical first example of vectors are arrows which we may think of as acts of displacement i.e. the action of moving a point on a plane or in space in a certain direction over a certain distance: v (Shown is the vector mapping point to point.) The arrow should be considered apart from any specific point but rather as an action we may apply to arbitrary points. In a sense the arrow is a function acting on points. In this context then we define addition of arrows as composition of actions and scalar multiplication as scaling of actions: u v + = w 0.75 v A good exercise is to verify that the various axiomatic rules for vectors hold in this example. When we interpret arrows in this way (as point motions) we refer to them as displacement vectors. Note that if we define an origin point to space (or plane) we can then identify any point with the displacement vector which moves the origin to that point. This is what we then mean by a position vector. = 0.75 v (75% of original length)

2 Examples of Vector Spaces: Function Spaces Consider now a totally different type of vector space. Let V be the set of all continuous functions with domain, the unit interval [0,1]. We can add functions to get functions and we can multiply functions to get functions. It is simple enough then to verify that if f and g have domain [0,1] then the function h: h(x)=a f(x) + b g(x) also has domain [0,1] and is also continuous and thus is also in V. Another example of a function space is the space of polynomials in one variable. This space is denoted: indicating polynomials in the variable with real coefficients. Again we can always add polynomials and multiply them by scalars. A third vector space we can define is the set of linear functions on variables. Example of Vector Spaces: Matrices Matrices are arrays of numbers with a specific number of rows and columns (the dimensions of the matrix). For Example: Here is a 23 ( two by three ) matrix. We use the convention of specifying first the number of rows and then the number of columns. (To remember this, the traditional mnemonic is RC cola! ) We may add matrices with the same dimensions by simply adding corresponding entries. We multiply a matrix by a number (scalar) by multiplying each entry by that number: Thus the set of all matrices forms a vector space. Basis, Span, Independence A basis of a vector space is a set of linearly independent vectors which span the space. To understand this of course we must understand the meaning of span and linear independence. The span of a set of vectors is the set of all linear combinations of those vectors. Example:, :, for all scalar values of and. One can easily show that the span of a set of vectors is itself a vector space (it will be a subspace of the original vector space). There are two basic (equivalent) ways to define linear independence. A set of vectors is linearly independent if no element of the set is a linear combination of the remaining elements (it isn t in the span of the set of remaining elements), or equivalently if no non-trivial linear combination of elements equals the zero vector. (The trivial linear combination would be the sum of zero times each element.) The main role of a basis is to span the space, i.e. it provides a way to express all vectors in terms of the basis set. The linear independence tells us that we have no more elements in the basis than we actually need. Example: Position vectors (or displacement vectors) in the plane can always be expressed in terms of horizontal and vertical displacements. We define the standard basis as, where is the displacement one unit to the right (in the x-direction) and is the unit displacement upward (in the y-direction).

3 3 2 Note then that to express a position vector for the point, we need only note that this is the point obtained by displacing the origin to the right by a distance and up a distance. It thus corresponds to the position vector. The standard basis thus exactly corresponds to the use of rectangular coordinates. When we expand a vector as a linear combination of basis elements then we refer to the coefficients as linear coordinates. Now many different bases (pronounced bayseez ) are possible for the same vector space but the size (number of elements) is always the same and this defines the dimension of the space. The planar displacements have a standard basis of two elements and so has dimension two. We can extend this to three dimensional displacements in space with basis,, corresponding to unit displacements in the x,y, and z-directions respectively. When we expand a vector in terms of an established basis (e.g. ) we can simply give the coefficients in which case we use angle brackets. Example:,,. When working with multiple bases we may use a subscript to indicate which basis is being used.,, where,,. We should however be a bit careful here since our definition of a basis is as a set of vectors. Sets do not indicate order. We can be clear by defining an ordered basis as a sequence instead of a set but otherwise equivalent to the above definition. Matrices as Vectors, Vectors as Matrices As was just mentioned we may view matrices as vectors. As it turns out matrix algebra is a good standard language for all vectors. We will make special use of matrices which have only one column (column vectors) and matrices which have only one row (row vectors). Such as: or First let us define an ordered basis which is simply a basis (set) rewritten as a sequence of basis elements, for example,,. We treat these formally as a matrix (row vector). The reason for ordering a basis is so we can reference elements (and coefficients) by their positions rather than their implicit identities. This is important for example if we consider a nontrivial transformation which, say cycles the basis elements without changing them. (A 60 rotation about the line x=y=z will cycle x, y, and z-axes. This can be expressed by a change of ordered basis, but it leaves the basis set unchanged.) We then write a general vector as a product of a row matrix and column matrix: We take this as the definition of multiplication of a row times a column be it rows of vectors or numbers (or later differential operations). The point here is that once we have decided upon a particular (ordered) basis we may work purely with the column vectors or coordinates.

4 So we have three ways of expressing a vector in terms of a given basis, i. Explicitly as in: ii. Using the angle bracket notation:,,, iii. Using a column vector (matrix): We write the first two as equations because they are identifications. The last however is not quite since matrices are defined as their own type of mathematical objects. We rather are identifying them by equivalent mathematical behavior rather than by identical meaning. Dual Vectors and Matrix Multiplication Dual Vectors and Row Vectors If we consider a vector space then a linear functional is a function mapping vectors in to scalars obeying the linearity property (see below). Since functionals are just functions we can add them and multiply them by scalars so they form yet another vector space. We denote the space of linear functionals by, the dual space of. We thus also call these linear functionals dual vectors. Linearity: : ( is a linear mapping from to ) means that: for all, in and for all, in. Said in English is linear means of a linear combination of objects equals the same linear combination of of each object. If we combine this with the use of a basis then we can express any linear functional uniquely by how it acts on basis elements. If and and then What s more by moving to the column vector representation of a vector (in the standard basis) we can express dual vectors (linear functionals) using row vectors: We can then entirely drop the function notation and write the functional evaluation as a matrix product: A Side Note: This form of multiplication is contracted which means we reduce dimensions by summing over terms (also the dimensions must be equal or rather dual but of equal size). Compare this with scalar multiplication which is a form of distributed multiplication. Distributed multiplication preserves dimension. I mention this to clarify its use later.

5 Multiplying Matrices times Column Vectors Now that we can multiply a row vector times a column vector to get a scalar, we can use this to define general matrix multiplication. A general matrix may be simultaneously considered as a row vector of column vectors or vis versa So we can multiply an matrix by a column vector of length ( an 1 matrix) as follows: Treat the matrix as a row vector (with columns) of column vectors (with rows) and apply the row times column multiplication. The result will be an 1 matrix We describe this as contracting outer multiplication combined with distributed inner multiplication. Now this works but there is another way to go about it. Treat the matrix instead as a column of rows and multiply the column vector on the right times each row. Column of rows times column = column of (row times column) This is a more often used sequence and it allows us to then generalize consistently. You can view this as distributed outer multiplication with contracting inner multiplication. In a similar way we can multiply a row vector times a matrix to yield another row vector. Matrix Multiplication To multiply two general matrices the number of columns of the left matrix must equal the number of rows of the right matrix. Using the dimensions (remember RC cola) we see then that we can multiply a matrix times a matrix and the result is a matrix. In short. Treat the left matrix as a column vector of row vectors and the right as a row vector of column vectors Example: and use distributed multiplication except contact at the inner most level and now contracting products (row times column):

6 Things to note: Matrix multiplication is not commutative that is given the matrix product the reverse product may not even be defined, and if defined may not yield a matrix with the same dimensions as and even in the special case (square matrices) where it does, it will not in general yield the same matrix. There are some interesting special cases one of which is square matrices which are matrices with the same number of rows and columns. Multiplication by square matrices of the same dimension yields again square matrices of the same dimension. Consider the following square (33) matrix: It is called the (3x3) Identity matrix because multiplication by this matrix (when defined) will leave the other matrix unchanged. Examples: and We can define the inverse of a square matrix to be the square matrix (if it exists) such that As the identity behaves like multiplication by 1, the inverse is analogous to the reciprocal, hence the -1 power notation. Example: Formula for 22 matrices: /2 Provided 0. If this (determinant) is equal to zero then the matrix has no inverse. Transpose, Adjoint, and Inner (dot) Products Given a vector space, an inner product (dot product) is a symmetric positive definite bilinear form, As a bilinear form it is a function mapping two vectors to a scalar (, in ) in such a way that the function is linear with respect to each of the two vectors (remember action on linear combination equals linear combination of actions).,,, and likewise with the other argument. The positive definiteness means that when we apply the form to two copies of the same (nonzero) vector we get a positive number,0, and if,0 then. By symmetric we mean that exchanging the two vector arguments doesn t change the value.,,. There are various notations for an inner product:, or or or ( here is the name of the bilinear form as a function.)

7 SIDE NOTE: This definition assumes we re using real scalars. The extension to complex numbers forks in either of two ways. We can maintain symmetry (orthogonal form) or maintain positivity (Hermitian form) but not both. We will mostly here use the dot notation and call the inner product the dot product. But one should be aware that more than one inner product can be defined on the same space. Inner (dot) products provide us with a sense of the length or size of a vector (we call this a norm of the vector) in that dotting a vector with itself may be considered as the squared magnitude: or This is the reason we insist on the positive definiteness of the inner product so we can take the square root to get a positive real valued norm. One may show that given we start with a norm we can define a corresponding inner product. So the two ideas are equivalent. We thus also refer to the inner product as a metric, (specifically a positive definite metric). In the example of displacement vectors (arrows) the norm defines (or is defined by) the length of the vector which is the distance it moves the points to which it is applied. SIDE NOTE: Sometimes we relax this positive definiteness requirement in which case we end up with a pseudo-norm. For example special relativity unifies space and time into a space-time in which the metric is not positive definite. This yields vectors some of which have real length, some of which have an imaginary length and some of which have zero length while not being the zero vector (null vectors). THE dot product (between two displacement vectors) There is a specific geometric inner product, the dot product, defined for arrows or displacements. It is defined as the product of the magnitudes of the two vectors times the cosine of their relative angle: v u cos Note that in the case where we dot a vector with itself, the relative angle is zero and so the cosine is 1. Thus a vector dotted with itself yields the square of its magnitude. Orthonormal Basis Since the inner products are bilinear we can expand their action in terms of the action on basis elements. Once we know the dot products between all pairs of basis elements we can apply this to dot products between any vectors when expanded in terms of the basis. Observe: For and the linearity of the dot product gives us: Rather tedious but note we are just applying the regular algebra skills just as if we were expanding a product of two polynomials. (Recall that we can think of polynomials as vectors.) The main point here is

8 that we have expressed the original dot product as a sum of multiples of the dot products of basis elements. Once we know these we can calculate the dot product readily. In fact we will shortly show how to use matrix notation to help keep track of all the pieces of this calculation. But for now Recall our standard basis for displacements were the unit (length 1) displacements along the x, y, and z axes. So the angles between different basis elements are 90 which has cosine of 0. This gives us: 1 1 cos cos90 0 The above tedious dot product calculation then reduces to: So (having used the standard basis) The dot product is just the sum of the products of corresponding components. This is true only because of the form of the standard basis. Note that each basis element is of unit length and orthogonal (perpendicular) to all the others. This property of the basis is called orthonormality. That is to say it means we have an orthonormal basis. For arbitrary bases the dot product is a bit more complicated but not too bad if we use matrices consistently. We ll see that shortly. Adjoint and Transpose There s an easy way to express the dot product (given an orthonormal basis) in terms of matrices:, Their dot product can be written as a matrix product: Two points to note here. Firstly, to be consistent we need to express the operation of changing a column into a row. This (and the reverse) we call transposing a matrix. Secondly note that the action of taking the dot product with respect to a given vector defines a linear functional (linear mapping from vector to scalar). Let s take that second point first. We can consistently (re)interpret the dot product notation by grouping the dot symbol with the first vector and calling the result a dual vector: We take to be a dual vector or linear functional with a corresponding row vector representation., Another way of interpreting the dot product is as a linear transformation mapping vectors to dual vectors. This type of mapping is also known as an adjoint which we indicate using a dagger superscript: Hence we can write the dot product in the form:

9 We extend the adjoint to apply to both vectors and dual vectors (and later matrices) so that when we apply the adjoint twice we end up back where we started.. Now recall we have a very simple form because we used an orthonormal basis. In the matrix representation the adjoint is just the transpose. The transpose of a matrix is the matrix we obtain by reversing rows with columns. 1 Example: Side Note: When we generalize to complex vectors (and matrices) the adjoint will in fact be the complex conjugate of the transpose (which defines a Hermitian inner product). Finally note that the transpose when applied to products of two or more matrices will reverse the order of multiplication. This you can confirm by working out examples. Adjoint and Metric with non-orthonormal bases For real vectors, the metric representation of the inner product was, in the matrix representation multiplication by the transpose provided we had an orthonormal basis. To see how to work with a general basis we go back and consider how we expanded the vector in a basis using matrices. Recall that we used a row vector of basis elements for the ordered basis and used it as follows: Let s use an arbitrary basis expansion for two vectors., We express the dot product using the transpose or more properly the adjoint and applying matrix multiplication. Note that the adjoint of the basis vectors will be take the dot product with operations so we have: Now apply matrix multiplication between the basis column and row: So we have: M We end up with the transpose of the matrix for times a square matrix times the column vector for.

10 The matrix of basis dot products is called the metric. Note that when the basis is orthonormal it takes the simple form of the identity matrix For general cases it will be either symmetric (equal to its transpose) or when we generalize to complex vectors it will be Hermitian (equal to its complex conjugate transpose). Note then we can express the adjoint of a column matrix corresponding to a vector, expanded in an arbitrary basis by This tells us in a general basis how to expand the dot product of two vectors using the adjoint of one. But given the adjoint of the adjoint gets us back where we started we also have a dual metric defining a dot product for dual vectors. The dual metric also has a matrix representation (when we express dual vectors in terms of row vectors) and it will be the inverse transpose of the matrix representation of the metric. In short given a dual vector, we have Putting this all together we can then see that the adjoint of the adjoint gets us back where we started. For a vector : To follow this string of operations remember the transpose of a product is the reversed product of the transposes and that a matrix times its inverse is the identity matrix and so cancels. For a (real) square matrix we can also define an adjoint. If the matrix is complex we must also take the complex conjugate:. It is so much easier if we work in an orthonormal basis where both metric and dual metric matrices are the identity:. Thus you will usually find the adjoint defined simply as the conjugate transpose. This however is a basis dependent definition and when working in general bases we must remember to account for these extra metric factors. THAT S ALL FOR NOW I intend to add more later including for example how to define cross products in terms of matrices, tensors and tensor products,

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