Iterative Rounding and Relaxation

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1 Iterative Rounding and Relaxation 1 / 58 Iterative Rounding and Relaxation James Davis Department of Computer Science Rutgers University Camden February 12, 2010

2 Iterative Rounding and Relaxation 2 / 58 Iterative Rounding and Relaxation Ingredients: Linear Program Theorem about individual variable values in LP solution Technique: Solve LP Round some variables Remove variables, relax constraints Iterate

3 Iterative Rounding and Relaxation 3 / 58 Brief History Survivable Network Design Jain (1998) MBDST Goemans (2006) Singh and Lau (2007, 2008) Bansal, Khandekar, Nagarajan (2008)

4 Iterative Rounding and Relaxation 4 / 58 Introduction: Vertex Cover Outline 1 Introduction: Vertex Cover 2 LP Formulation 3 Algorithm 4 Analysis Bounding Cost Bounding Degrees 5 Main Theorem Laminar Lemma Proof 6 Improvement

5 Iterative Rounding and Relaxation 5 / 58 Introduction: Vertex Cover Vertex Cover Input: A graph G = (V, E) Non-negative costs on vertices c v Output: A minimum-cost collection of vertices so that each edge in G is incident on at least one vertex in the collection

6 Iterative Rounding and Relaxation 6 / 58 Introduction: Vertex Cover Vertex Cover min v V c v x v x u + x v 1 e = (u, v) x v 0 v V

7 Iterative Rounding and Relaxation 7 / 58 Introduction: Vertex Cover Vertex Cover: Main Theorem Theorem (Nemhauser-Trotter) In a basic optimal LP solution, each x v { 1 2, 1, 0} Simple 2-appx algorithm: Solve the Vertex Cover LP Include all vertices with x v 0 in our cover

8 Iterative Rounding and Relaxation 8 / 58 Introduction: Vertex Cover MBDST: Problem Statement Input: Output: A graph G = (V, E) Costs c e 0 for all e E A set W V Degree bounds b v for all v W Find a min-cost spanning tree (V, F) that doesn t violate degree bounds.

9 Iterative Rounding and Relaxation 9 / 58 Introduction: Vertex Cover Example MST MBDST Cost = 3 Cost = 7

10 Iterative Rounding and Relaxation 10 / 58 LP Formulation Outline 1 Introduction: Vertex Cover 2 LP Formulation 3 Algorithm 4 Analysis Bounding Cost Bounding Degrees 5 Main Theorem Laminar Lemma Proof 6 Improvement

11 Iterative Rounding and Relaxation 11 / 58 LP Formulation MBDST Properties Notation: S: any subset of vertices E(S): edges with both endpoints in S F: set of edges in MBDST Properties: Spanning: Acyclic: Degree Bounds: Exactly V 1 edges in F For S 2, at most S 1 edges of F in E(S) At most b v edges of F incident on v

12 Iterative Rounding and Relaxation 12 / 58 LP Formulation Integer Program x e = 1 if e F and x e = 0 otherwise min c e x e (Objective) e E x e = V 1 (1) e E e E(S) e δ(v) x e S 1 S V, S 2 (2) x e b v v W (3) x e {0, 1} e E

13 Iterative Rounding and Relaxation 13 / 58 LP Formulation Linear Program x e = 1 if e F and x e = 0 otherwise min c e x e (Objective) e E x e = V 1 (1) e E e E(S) e δ(v) x e S 1 S V, S 2 (2) x e b v v W (3) x e 0 e E

14 Iterative Rounding and Relaxation 14 / 58 LP Formulation LP Properties There are exponentially many constraints (2) Ellipsoid method Separation oracle (1) and (3) are easy to check (2) requires work Skip Oracle

15 Iterative Rounding and Relaxation 15 / 58 LP Formulation Separation Oracle: Flow Network

16 Iterative Rounding and Relaxation 15 / 58 LP Formulation Separation Oracle: Flow Network s t

17 Iterative Rounding and Relaxation 15 / 58 LP Formulation Separation Oracle: Flow Network s t

18 Iterative Rounding and Relaxation 15 / 58 LP Formulation Separation Oracle: Flow Network s 1/2 1/2 1/2 3/ t

19 Iterative Rounding and Relaxation 15 / 58 LP Formulation Separation Oracle: Flow Network s 1/2 1/2 1/2 3/2 0 1\2 1/2 0 1/2 t

20 Iterative Rounding and Relaxation 15 / 58 LP Formulation Separation Oracle: Flow Network s 1/2 1/2 1/2 3/2 0 1\2 1/2 0 1/ t

21 Iterative Rounding and Relaxation 16 / 58 LP Formulation Separation Oracle:s-t cut Capacity =

22 Iterative Rounding and Relaxation 17 / 58 LP Formulation Separation Oracle The capacity across S is V + ( S 1) The capacity across S is at least V iff x e e E(S) e E(S) The max-flow from s to t is V iff (2) are satisfied x e S 1

23 Iterative Rounding and Relaxation 18 / 58 Algorithm Outline 1 Introduction: Vertex Cover 2 LP Formulation 3 Algorithm 4 Analysis Bounding Cost Bounding Degrees 5 Main Theorem Laminar Lemma Proof 6 Improvement

24 Iterative Rounding and Relaxation 19 / 58 Algorithm Main Theorem x =< x 1, x 2,..., x E >: solution to LP Support( x): set of edges s.t. x e > 0 Theorem For any basic solution x to the linear program either: 1 v with exactly one incident edge e Support( x) x e = 1 2 v W with at most 3 edges of Support( x) incident on v Condition 1 identifies a leaf in the tree Condition 2 identifies a vertex with sufficiently small number of nonzero incident edges

25 Iterative Rounding and Relaxation 20 / 58 Algorithm Algorithm F = While V > 1 x LP solution on < G, W > Remove all edges e with x e = 0 If condition 1 is satisfied by x Add (u, v) to F Remove v and (u, v) from G If u W reduce b u by 1 If condition 2 is satisfied by x Remove v from W

26 Iterative Rounding and Relaxation 21 / 58 Algorithm Linear Program min c e x e (Objective) e E x e = V 1 (1) e E e E(S) e δ(v) x e S 1 S V, S 2 (2) x e b v v W (3) x e 0 e E

27 Iterative Rounding and Relaxation 22 / 58 Algorithm LP Relationships In each iteration LP is in the same family Same separation oracle The Main Theorem applies to each LP If condition 1 is satisfied LP is incrementally modified: Delete an x e variable Modify (1) constraint Remove some (2) constraints Modify some (3) constraints If condition 2 is satisfied LP is incrementally modified: Remove a (3) constraint

28 Iterative Rounding and Relaxation 23 / 58 Analysis Outline 1 Introduction: Vertex Cover 2 LP Formulation 3 Algorithm 4 Analysis Bounding Cost Bounding Degrees 5 Main Theorem Laminar Lemma Proof 6 Improvement

29 Iterative Rounding and Relaxation 24 / 58 Analysis Bounding Cost Outline 1 Introduction: Vertex Cover 2 LP Formulation 3 Algorithm 4 Analysis Bounding Cost Bounding Degrees 5 Main Theorem Laminar Lemma Proof 6 Improvement

30 Iterative Rounding and Relaxation 25 / 58 Analysis Bounding Cost Bounding Cost Theorem The tree returned by our algorithm has cost at most LP OPT G' e 1 v IH: cost(f ) LP (G ) cost(f ) + c e LP (G ) + c e x e LP(G ) + c e x e LP: current lin. prog. LP : new lin. prog. F : MBDST in G = LP(G)

31 Iterative Rounding and Relaxation 26 / 58 Analysis Bounding Cost Bounding Cost Lemma LP(G ) is a feasible solution to LP (G ) Changes: 1 1 on RHS, 1 on LHS 2 Remove constraints 3 1 on RHS, 1 on LHS; Remove constraints x e = V 1 (1) e E e E(S) e δ(v) x e S 1 (2) x e b v (3)

32 Iterative Rounding and Relaxation 27 / 58 Analysis Bounding Cost Min-Cost Spanning Trees Recap: Spanning tree has optimal cost Degree bounds? Implications: Theorem For any basic solution x to the linear program either: 1 v with exactly one incident edge e Support( x) x e = 1 2 v W with at most 3 edges of Support( x) incident on v

33 Iterative Rounding and Relaxation 27 / 58 Analysis Bounding Cost Min-Cost Spanning Trees Recap: Spanning tree has optimal cost Degree bounds? Implications: Theorem For any basic solution x to the linear program either: 1 v with exactly one incident edge e Support( x) x e = 1 2 v W with at most 3 edges of Support( x) incident on v When W = we have OPT

34 Iterative Rounding and Relaxation 28 / 58 Analysis Bounding Degrees Outline 1 Introduction: Vertex Cover 2 LP Formulation 3 Algorithm 4 Analysis Bounding Cost Bounding Degrees 5 Main Theorem Laminar Lemma Proof 6 Improvement

35 Iterative Rounding and Relaxation 29 / 58 Analysis Bounding Degrees Degree Bounds u 1 b v, b u 1 b v never violated b u adjusted v Algorithm x LP solution on < G, W > Remove e / Support( x) If condition 1 is satisfied by x Add (u, v) to F Remove v and (u, v) from G If u W reduce b u by 1 If condition 2 is satisfied by x Remove v from W

36 Iterative Rounding and Relaxation 29 / 58 Analysis Bounding Degrees Degree Bounds 1 u b v, b u 1 b v never violated b u adjusted v Algorithm x LP solution on < G, W > Remove e / Support( x) If condition 1 is satisfied by x Add (u, v) to F Remove v and (u, v) from G If u W reduce b u by 1 If condition 2 is satisfied by x Remove v from W

37 Iterative Rounding and Relaxation 29 / 58 Analysis Bounding Degrees Degree Bounds 1/2 1/4 0 v 0 1/4 Algorithm x LP solution on < G, W > Remove e / Support( x) If condition 1 is satisfied by x Add (u, v) to F Remove v and (u, v) from G b v 1 All 3 edges may be in F b v violated by at most 2 If u W reduce b u by 1 If condition 2 is satisfied by x Remove v from W

38 Iterative Rounding and Relaxation 29 / 58 Analysis Bounding Degrees Degree Bounds 1/2 1/4 0 v 0 1/4 Algorithm x LP solution on < G, W > Remove e / Support( x) If condition 1 is satisfied by x Add (u, v) to F Remove v and (u, v) from G b v 1 All 3 edges may be in F b v violated by at most 2 If u W reduce b u by 1 If condition 2 is satisfied by x Remove v from W

39 Iterative Rounding and Relaxation 29 / 58 Analysis Bounding Degrees Degree Bounds v 0 1 Algorithm x LP solution on < G, W > Remove e / Support( x) If condition 1 is satisfied by x Add (u, v) to F Remove v and (u, v) from G b v 1 All 3 edges may be in F b v violated by at most 2 If u W reduce b u by 1 If condition 2 is satisfied by x Remove v from W

40 Iterative Rounding and Relaxation 30 / 58 Analysis Bounding Degrees Analysis Summary Cost: Tree has cost no more than OPT Degree Bounds: No degree bound violated by more than 2 Theorem (Goemans) The algorithm for MBDST produces a spanning tree in which the degree of v is at most b v + 2 for v W and has cost no greater than OPT

41 Iterative Rounding and Relaxation 31 / 58 Main Theorem Outline 1 Introduction: Vertex Cover 2 LP Formulation 3 Algorithm 4 Analysis Bounding Cost Bounding Degrees 5 Main Theorem Laminar Lemma Proof 6 Improvement

42 Iterative Rounding and Relaxation 32 / 58 Main Theorem Main Theorem Theorem For any basic solution x to the linear program either: 1 v with exactly one incident edge e Support( x) x e = 1 2 v W with at most 3 edges of Support( x) incident on v

43 Iterative Rounding and Relaxation 33 / 58 Main Theorem Linear Program min c e x e (Objective) e E x e = V 1 (1) e E e E(S) e δ(v) x e S 1 S V, S 2 (2) x e b v v W (3) x e 0 e E

44 Iterative Rounding and Relaxation 34 / 58 Main Theorem Laminar Lemma Lemma For any basic LP solution x there is a Z W and a collection L of S V where: 1 S L, S is tight; v Z, v is tight 2 The vectors χ E(S) and χ δ(v) are independent 3 L + Z = Support( x) 4 L is laminar

45 Iterative Rounding and Relaxation 35 / 58 Main Theorem Characteristic Vector χ E(S) =< 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0 > 6 χ δ(v) =< 0, 1, 1, 0, 1, 0, 0 >

46 Iterative Rounding and Relaxation 36 / 58 Main Theorem Laminar Sets Intersecting Sets A B Laminar Sets No intersecting sets A B A B B A

47 Iterative Rounding and Relaxation 37 / 58 Main Theorem Laminar Lemma Lemma For any basic LP solution x there is a Z W and a collection L of S V where: 1 S L, S is tight; v Z, v is tight 2 The vectors χ E(S) and χ δ(v) are independent 3 L + Z = Support( x) 4 L is laminar

48 Iterative Rounding and Relaxation 38 / 58 Main Theorem Property of L Lemma If all S L contain at least 2 vertices then L V 1 Use induction on V Base case: V = 2 Induction step Shrink smallest set to vertex Generates L and V L is laminar L = L 1 V V 1 L V 1 L V 1

49 Iterative Rounding and Relaxation 38 / 58 Main Theorem Property of L Lemma If all S L contain at least 2 vertices then L V 1 Use induction on V Base case: V = 2 Induction step Shrink smallest set to vertex Generates L and V L is laminar L = L 1 V V 1 L V 1 L V 1

50 Iterative Rounding and Relaxation 39 / 58 Main Theorem Property of Support( x) Lemma Support( x) < V + W Recall property 3 of Laminar Lemma: L + Z = Support( x) Support( x) = L + Z L + W < V + W (Previous Lemma)

51 Iterative Rounding and Relaxation 40 / 58 Main Theorem From Laminar Lemma to Main Theorem Theorem For any basic solution x to the linear program either: 1 v with exactly one incident edge e Support( x) x e = 1 2 v W with at most 3 edges of Support( x) incident on v Suppose Main Theorem wasn t true: For every v V there are at least 2 edges incident on it For every v W there are at least 4 edges incident on it Support( x) 1 2 (2( V W ) + 4( W )) = V + W (Contradiction!)

52 Iterative Rounding and Relaxation 40 / 58 Main Theorem From Laminar Lemma to Main Theorem Theorem For any basic solution x to the linear program either: 1 v with exactly one incident edge e Support( x) x e = 1 2 v W with at most 3 edges of Support( x) incident on v Suppose Main Theorem wasn t true: For every v V there are at least 2 edges incident on it For every v W there are at least 4 edges incident on it Support( x) 1 2 (2( V W ) + 4( W )) = V + W (Contradiction!)

53 Iterative Rounding and Relaxation 40 / 58 Main Theorem From Laminar Lemma to Main Theorem Theorem For any basic solution x to the linear program either: 1 v with exactly one incident edge e Support( x) x e = 1 2 v W with at most 3 edges of Support( x) incident on v Suppose Main Theorem wasn t true: For every v V there are at least 2 edges incident on it For every v W there are at least 4 edges incident on it Support( x) 1 2 (2( V W ) + 4( W )) = V + W (Contradiction!)

54 Iterative Rounding and Relaxation 41 / 58 Main Theorem From Laminar Lemma to Main Theorem Theorem For any basic solution x to the linear program either: 1 v with exactly one incident edge e Support( x) x e = 1 2 v W with at most 3 edges of Support( x) incident on v v S=V-v e E(S) x e V 2 e E x e = V 1 e δ(v) x e 1 x e 1 x e 1 x e = 1

55 Iterative Rounding and Relaxation 41 / 58 Main Theorem From Laminar Lemma to Main Theorem Theorem For any basic solution x to the linear program either: 1 v with exactly one incident edge e Support( x) x e = 1 2 v W with at most 3 edges of Support( x) incident on v v S=V-v e E(S) x e V 2 e E x e = V 1 e δ(v) x e 1 x e 1 x e 1 x e = 1

56 Iterative Rounding and Relaxation 41 / 58 Main Theorem From Laminar Lemma to Main Theorem Theorem For any basic solution x to the linear program either: 1 v with exactly one incident edge e Support( x) x e = 1 2 v W with at most 3 edges of Support( x) incident on v v S=V-v e E(S) x e V 2 e E x e = V 1 e δ(v) x e 1 x e 1 x e 1 x e = 1

57 Iterative Rounding and Relaxation 41 / 58 Main Theorem From Laminar Lemma to Main Theorem Theorem For any basic solution x to the linear program either: 1 v with exactly one incident edge e Support( x) x e = 1 2 v W with at most 3 edges of Support( x) incident on v v S=V-v e E(S) x e V 2 e E x e = V 1 e δ(v) x e 1 x e 1 x e 1 x e = 1

58 Iterative Rounding and Relaxation 41 / 58 Main Theorem From Laminar Lemma to Main Theorem Theorem For any basic solution x to the linear program either: 1 v with exactly one incident edge e Support( x) x e = 1 2 v W with at most 3 edges of Support( x) incident on v u v S={u,v} e E(S) x e V 2 e E x e = V 1 e δ(v) x e 1 x e 1 x e 1 x e = 1

59 Iterative Rounding and Relaxation 42 / 58 Main Theorem Laminar Lemma Proof Outline 1 Introduction: Vertex Cover 2 LP Formulation 3 Algorithm 4 Analysis Bounding Cost Bounding Degrees 5 Main Theorem Laminar Lemma Proof 6 Improvement

60 Iterative Rounding and Relaxation 43 / 58 Main Theorem Laminar Lemma Proof Laminar Lemma Lemma For any basic LP solution x there is a Z W and a collection L of S V where: 1 S L, S is tight; v Z, v is tight 2 The vectors χ E(S) and χ δ(v) are independent 3 L + Z = Support( x) 4 L is laminar

61 Iterative Rounding and Relaxation 44 / 58 Main Theorem Laminar Lemma Proof LP Background min c i x i (Objective) a 11 x 1 + a 12 x a 1n x n b 1 (1) a 21 x 1 + a 22 x a 2n x n b 2 (2)... =... a m1 x 1 + a m2 x a mn x n b m (m) x i 0 (Non-Negative)

62 Iterative Rounding and Relaxation 45 / 58 Main Theorem Laminar Lemma Proof LP Background Linear Program Constraints define half-spaces Objective is a hyperplane Solution always a corner n tight constraints Constraints lin. ind. min c i x i a 11 x 1 + a 12 x a 1n x n b 1 (1) a 21 x 1 + a 22 x a 2n x n b 2 (2)... =... a m1 x 1 + a m2 x a mnx n b m (m) x i 0

63 Iterative Rounding and Relaxation 45 / 58 Main Theorem Laminar Lemma Proof LP Background MBDST LP Constraints define half-spaces Objective is a hyperplane Solution always a corner E tight constraints Constraints lin. ind. min c ex e e E x e = V 1 (1) e E x e S 1 (2) e E(S) x e b v (3) e δ(v) x e 0

64 Iterative Rounding and Relaxation 46 / 58 Main Theorem Laminar Lemma Proof Laminar Lemma Lemma For any basic LP solution x there is a Z W and a collection L of S V where: 1 S L, S is tight; v Z, v is tight 2 The vectors χ E(S) and χ δ(v) are independent 3 L + Z = Support( x) 4 L is laminar

65 Iterative Rounding and Relaxation 46 / 58 Main Theorem Laminar Lemma Proof Laminar Lemma Lemma For any basic LP solution x there is a Z W and a collection L of S V where: 1 S L, S is tight; v Z, v is tight 2 The vectors χ E(S) and χ δ(v) are independent 3 L + Z = Support( x) 4 L is laminar

66 Iterative Rounding and Relaxation 47 / 58 Main Theorem Laminar Lemma Proof Laminar Lemma Proof Lemma e E(S) x e is supermodular e E(S) x e + e E(T ) x e e E(S T ) x e + e E(S T ) x e S T

67 Iterative Rounding and Relaxation 48 / 58 Main Theorem Laminar Lemma Proof Laminar Lemma Proof Lemma S, T are tight, S and T cross, then S T, S T are tight and χ E(S) + χ E(T ) = χ E(S T ) + χ E(S T ) ( S 1) + ( T 1) = ( S T 1) + ( S T 1) x e + (feasibility) E(S T ) E(S T ) x e x e + x e (supermodularity) E(S) E(T ) Since S and T are tight, these are all equalities

68 Iterative Rounding and Relaxation 49 / 58 Main Theorem Laminar Lemma Proof Laminar Lemma Proof: Finding L Lemma L that is laminar and Span(T ) Span(L), where T contains all tight sets Let L be a maximal laminar collection of T Recall that χ E(S) + χ E(T ) = χ E(S T ) + χ E(S T ) S T Span(T ) Span(L) S (least int. in L) T (int. S) S T and S T S T and S T S T S T S T S T

69 Iterative Rounding and Relaxation 49 / 58 Main Theorem Laminar Lemma Proof Laminar Lemma Proof: Finding L Lemma L that is laminar and Span(T ) Span(L), where T contains all tight sets Let L be a maximal laminar collection of T Recall that χ E(S) + χ E(T ) = χ E(S T ) + χ E(S T ) S T Span(T ) Span(L) S (least int. in L) T (int. S) S T and S T S T and S T S T S T S T S T

70 Iterative Rounding and Relaxation 49 / 58 Main Theorem Laminar Lemma Proof Laminar Lemma Proof: Finding L Lemma L that is laminar and Span(T ) Span(L), where T contains all tight sets Let L be a maximal laminar collection of T Recall that χ E(S) + χ E(T ) = χ E(S T ) + χ E(S T ) S T Span(T ) Span(L) S (least int. in L) T (int. S) S T and S T S T and S T S T S T S T S T

71 Iterative Rounding and Relaxation 49 / 58 Main Theorem Laminar Lemma Proof Laminar Lemma Proof: Finding L Lemma L that is laminar and Span(T ) Span(L), where T contains all tight sets Let L be a maximal laminar collection of T Recall that χ E(S) + χ E(T ) = χ E(S T ) + χ E(S T ) S T Span(T ) Span(L) S (least int. in L) T (int. S) S T and S T S T and S T S T S T S T S T

72 Iterative Rounding and Relaxation 49 / 58 Main Theorem Laminar Lemma Proof Laminar Lemma Proof: Finding L Lemma L that is laminar and Span(T ) Span(L), where T contains all tight sets Let L be a maximal laminar collection of T Recall that χ E(S) + χ E(T ) = χ E(S T ) + χ E(S T ) T Span(T ) Span(L) S (least int. in L) T (int. S) S T and S T S T and S T S T S T S T S T

73 Iterative Rounding and Relaxation 49 / 58 Main Theorem Laminar Lemma Proof Laminar Lemma Proof: Finding L Lemma L that is laminar and Span(T ) Span(L), where T contains all tight sets Let L be a maximal laminar collection of T Recall that χ E(S) + χ E(T ) = χ E(S T ) + χ E(S T ) T Span(T ) Span(L) S (least int. in L) T (int. S) S T and S T S T and S T S T S T S T S T

74 Iterative Rounding and Relaxation 50 / 58 Main Theorem Laminar Lemma Proof Laminar Lemma Proof: Finding Z Lemma For any basic LP solution x there is a Z W and a collection L of S V where: 1 S L, S is tight; v Z, v is tight 2 The vectors χ E(S) and χ δ(v) are independent 3 L + Z = Support( x) 4 L is laminar (T, Y ) spans R Support( x) (L, Y ) spans R Support( x) To obtain (L, Z ) remove v Y that are dependent

75 Iterative Rounding and Relaxation 51 / 58 Main Theorem Laminar Lemma Proof Recap LP formulation Main Theorem Algorithm Cost no more than OPT Degree bounds violated by at most 2 Main Theorem Proof Laminar Lemma Proof

76 Iterative Rounding and Relaxation 52 / 58 Improvement Outline 1 Introduction: Vertex Cover 2 LP Formulation 3 Algorithm 4 Analysis Bounding Cost Bounding Degrees 5 Main Theorem Laminar Lemma Proof 6 Improvement

77 Iterative Rounding and Relaxation 53 / 58 Improvement Improved Main Theorem Theorem If x is a basic solution to LP where W then there is a v, s.t. δ(v) Support( x) b v + 1

78 Iterative Rounding and Relaxation 54 / 58 Improvement Algorithm Phase 1: While W x LP solution on < G, W > For all x e = 0, remove e from E Remove v from W if there are at most b v + 1 edges of δ(v) in Support( x) Phase 2: Run algorithm on < G, >

79 Iterative Rounding and Relaxation 55 / 58 Improvement Analysis Theorem (Singh and Lau) The improved algorithm for MBDST produces a spanning tree in which the degree of v is at most b v + 1 for v W and has cost no greater than OPT

80 Iterative Rounding and Relaxation 56 / 58 Improvement References Kamal Jain. A factor 2 approximation algorithm for the generalized Steiner network problem. Combinatorica, 21:39-60, Michel X. Goemans. Minimum bounded-degree spanning trees. FOCS 06 Mohit Singh and Lap Chi Lau. Approximating minimum bounded degree spanning trees to within one of optimal. STOC 07.

81 Iterative Rounding and Relaxation 57 / 58 Improvement Acknowledgements Thanks to David Shmoys and David Williamson for letting us use the manuscript of their forthcoming book, The Design of Approximation Algorithms.

82 Iterative Rounding and Relaxation 58 / 58 Improvement Thank You! Return to Oracle

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