TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION 11 AND 12 Carpentry and Joinery. Integrated Resource Package 2001 IRP 115. Ministry of Education

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1 TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION 11 AND 12 Carpentry and Joinery Integrated Resource Package 2001 Ministry of Education IRP 115

2 Copyright 2001 Ministry of Education, Province of British Columbia. Copyright Notice No part of the content of this document may be reproduced in any form or by any means, including electronic storage, reproduction, execution or transmission without the prior written permission of the Province. Proprietary Notice This document contains information that is proprietary and confidential to the Province. Any reproduction, disclosure or other use of this document is expressly prohibited except as the Province may authorize in writing. Limited Exception to Non-reproduction Permission to copy and use this publication in part, or in its entirety, for non-profit educational purposes within British Columbia and the Yukon, is granted to all staff of B.C. school board trustees, including teachers and administrators; organizations comprising the Educational Advisory Council as identified by Ministerial Order; and other parties providing direct or indirect education programs to entitled students as identified by the School Act or the Independent School Act.

3 TABLE OF CONTENTS PREFACE: USING THIS INTEGRATED RESOURCE PACKAGE Preface III INTRODUCTION TO TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION 11 AND 12 AND CARPENTRY AND JOINERY Rationale for Technology Education The Carpentry and Joinery 11 and 12 Curriculum Rationale for Carpentry and Joinery Curriculum Organizers Suggested Instructional Strategies Suggested Assessment Strategies THE CARPENTRY AND JOINERY 11 AND 12 CURRICULUM Carpentry and Joinery 11 and CARPENTRY AND JOINERY 11 AND 12 APPENDICES Appendix A: Prescribed Learning Outcomes A-2 Appendix B: Learning Resources B-3 Appendix C: Assessment and Evaluation C-3 Assessment and Evaluation Samples C-7 Appendix D: Acknowledgments D-3 Appendix E: Offering a Carpentry and Joinery Program in your School E-3 CARPENTRY AND JOINERY 11 AND 12 I

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5 PREFACE: USING THIS INTEGRATED RESOURCE PACKAGE This Integrated Resource Package (IRP) provides some of the basic information that teachers will require to implement the Technology Education 11 and 12: Carpentry and Joinery curriculum. The information contained in this IRP is also available through the Internet. Contact the Curriculum Branch s home page: curriculum THE INTRODUCTION The Introduction provides general information about the Technology Education 11 and 12 curriculum, as a whole, including special features and requirements. It also provides a rationale for the subject-why technology education is taught in BC schools-and an explanation of the curriculum organizers. THE TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION 11 AND 12: CARPENTRY AND JOINERY CURRICULUM The Carpentry and Joinery 11 and 12 IRP is structured in terms of curriculum organizers. The main body of this IRP consists of four columns of information for each organizer. These columns describe: provincially prescribed learning outcome statements for Carpentry and Joinery 11 and 12 suggested instructional strategies for achieving the outcomes suggested assessment strategies for determining how well students are achieving the outcomes provincially recommended learning resources Prescribed Learning Outcomes Learning outcome statements are content standards for the provincial education system. Learning outcomes set out the knowledge, enduring ideas, issues, concepts, skills, and attitudes for each subject. They are statements of what students are expected to know and be able to do in each grade. Learning outcomes are clearly stated and expressed in observable terms. All learning outcomes complete this stem: It is expected that students will..... Outcome statements have been written to enable teachers to use their experience and professional judgment when planning and evaluating. The outcomes are benchmarks that will permit the use of criterion-referenced performance standards. It is expected that actual student performance will vary. Evaluation, reporting, and student placement with respect to these outcomes depends on the professional judgment of teachers, guided by provincial policy. Suggested Instructional Strategies Instruction involves the use of techniques, activities, and methods that can be employed to meet diverse student needs and to deliver the prescribed curriculum. Teachers are free to adapt the suggested instructional strategies or substitute others that will enable their students to achieve the prescribed outcomes. These strategies have been developed by specialist and generalist teachers to assist their colleagues; they are suggestions only. Suggested Assessment Strategies The assessment strategies suggest a variety of ways to gather information about student performance. Some assessment strategies relate to specific activities; others are general. As with the instructional strategies, these strategies have been developed by specialist and generalist teachers to assist their colleagues; they are suggestions only. CARPENTRY AND JOINERY 11 AND 12 III

6 PREFACE: USING THIS INTEGRATED RESOURCE PACKAGE Provincially Recommended Learning Resources Provincially recommended learning resources are materials that have been reviewed and evaluated by BC educators in collaboration with the Ministry of Education according to a stringent set of criteria. These resources are organized as Grade Collections. A Grade Collection is the format used to organize the provincially recommended learning resources by grade and by curriculum organizer. It can be regarded as a starter set of basic resources to deliver the curriculum. With very few exceptions, learning resources listed in Grade Collections will be the only provincially evaluated and recommended learning resources. They are typically materials suitable for student use, but they may also include information primarily intended for teachers. Teachers and school districts are encouraged to select those resources that they find most relevant and useful for their students, and to supplement these with locally approved materials and resources to meet specific local needs. The recommended resources listed in the main body (fourth column) of this IRP are those that either present comprehensive coverage of the learning outcomes of the particular curriculum organizer or provide unique support to specific topics. Appendix B contains a complete listing of provincially recommended learning resources to support this curriculum. THE APPENDICES A series of appendices provides additional information about the curriculum, and further support for the teacher. Appendix A contains a listing of the prescribed learning outcomes for the curriculum. Appendix B consists of general information on learning resources, including Grade Collections, selecting learning resources for the classroom, and funding, followed by the Grade Collection(s) for the Carpentry and Joinery 11 and 12 IRP containing grade level organizational charts and alphabetical annotated lists of the provincially recommended resources. New resources are evaluated on an ongoing basis and the new provincial recommendations are posted on the Curriculum web site. Teachers are advised to check the web site on a regular basis. resources/lr/ resource/consub.htm Appendix C contains assistance for teachers regarding provincial evaluation and reporting policy. Prescribed learning outcomes have been used as the source for examples of criterion-referenced evaluations. Appendix D acknowledges the many people and organizations that have been involved in the development of this IRP. Appendix E provides information on provincially approved courses that may be offered as an extension to Carpentry and Joinery 11 and 12. IV CARPENTRY AND JOINERY 11 AND 12

7 PREFACE: USING THIS INTEGRATED RESOURCE PACKAGE Grade GRADE 11 Health & Safety Curriculum Organizer Prescribed Learning Outcomes The Prescribed Learning Outcomes column of this IRP lists the specific learning outcomes for each curriculum organizer or suborganizer. These aid the teacher in day-to-day planning. PRESCRIBED LEARNING OUTCOMES It is expected that students will: identify Workers Compensation Board and WHMIS regulations that apply to a carpentry and joinery work environment describe safety and accident prevention procedures for a carpentry and joinery work environment use safe work practices SUGGESTED INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES Engage students in a class discussion about the potential effects of a carpentry and joinery work environment on one s health. Have students brainstorm lists of specific health problems and safety hazards that could result from this work environment. In groups of two or three, have each group consider ways of improving or modifying the work environment (e.g., tools, equipment, accessories, ventilation, floor) that would inhibit the development of health problems and prevent accidents. Each group then presents its findings orally to the class or produces a written report. Invite a speaker from WCB to give a presentation on the wide range of shop-related accidents. Have students address any questions they may have. Following the presentation, have students break into groups and conduct a safety audit. Have groups share their information and then ask each group to develop a Shop Safety Guide that would apply to the class wood shop. Provide students access to the MSD sheets and WHMIS regulations related to hazardous materials commonly found in a carpentry and joinery work environment. Using ten clearly labelled containers, have groups of students research and then report on the hazards, handling methods, and first-aid procedures associated with the material in each container. Suggested Instructional Strategies The Suggested Instructional Strategies column of this IRP suggests a variety of instructional approaches that include group work, problem solving, and the use of technology. Teachers should consider these as examples that they might modify to suit the developmental levels of their students. Grade GRADE 11 Health & Safety Curriculum Organizer Suggested Assessment Strategies The Suggested Assessment Strategies offer a wide range of different assessment approaches useful in evaluating the Prescribed Learning Outcomes. Teachers should consider these as examples they might modify to suit their own needs and the instructional goals. SUGGESTED ASSESSMENT STRATEGIES As students work in the wood shop, observe the extent to which they are able to: - demonstrate safe use of tools and equipment - demonstrate safe handling of potentially hazardous materials - utilize safe and healthy work practices. Use multiple-choice and short-answer tests to assess students knowledge of safety regulations and of policies and procedures related to the use of equipment. Evaluate students knowledge of safe material handling by administering a WHMIS certification exam to the class. When students use MSD sheets, evaluate responses the based on questions such as: - What is the purpose of MSD sheets? - How are these sheets obtained? - What are the legal requirements? - What kinds of information do the sheets provide? - Where are these sheets kept for reference? - What products must be labelled? RECOMMENDED LEARNING RESOURCES Print Materials Exploring Woodworking Modern Cabinetmaking Modern Woodworking Trades Common Core Wood Technology and Processes Working Wood Video Large Wood Power Tools I Large Wood Power Tools II Preparing and Repairing Wood Stains and Polyurethane Wood Finishing Video Series: Lacquer and Varnish Wood Finishing Video Series: Oil and Wax Recommended Learning Resources The Recommended Learning Resources component of this IRP is a compilation of provincially recommended resources that support the Prescribed Learning Outcomes. A complete list including a short description of the resource, its media type, and distributor is included in Appendix B of this IRP. CARPENTRY AND JOINERY 11 AND 12 V

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9 INTRODUCTION TO TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION 11 AND 12 AND CARPENTRY AND JOINERY RATIONALE FOR TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION Technology is embodied in devices that extend human capabilities. It provides the tools to extend our vision, to send and receive sounds and images from around the world, and to improve health, lifestyle, economies, and ecosystems. As technology assumes an increasingly dominant role in society, technological literacy is becoming as essential as numeracy skills and the ability to read and write. In providing the fundamentals of technological literacy, technology education helps young people prepare to live and work in a world of continuously evolving technologies. A technologically literate person uses tools, materials, systems, and processes in an informed, ethical, and responsible way. To be responsible members of society, students must be aware of the impact that everchanging technology has on their lives. They need to reflect critically on technology s role in society and consider its positive and negative effects. Technology education fosters the development of skills and attitudes that increase students abilities to responsibly address the social and ethical issues of technological advancements. To meet career challenges, students must be able to communicate effectively, make independent decisions, solve problems, work independently and cooperatively with individuals from diverse backgrounds, and become technically competent. Indeed, the Conference Board of Canada has identified these skills as critical to employment in the 21 st century (see the Board s Employability Skills brochure, available online at research.htm or from the Board at 255 Smyth Road, Ottawa ON K1H 8M7 Canada, Tel. (613) , Fax (613) ). In Technology Education 11 and 12 courses students have the opportunity to develop a variety of skills and abilities essential for employment in today s economy. Activities in Technology Education provide opportunities for students to develop, reinforce, and apply: numeracy skills as they calculate, estimate, and measure information skills as they identify, locate, gather, store, retrieve, process, and present information communication skills as they apply technology to communicate their design ideas, solutions, reflections, and products problem-solving skills as they identify, describe, and analyse problems, and test their ideas and solutions social and cooperative skills as they interact with others to solve problems and complete projects leadership and project-management skills as they set goals, plan, address challenges, and resolve conflicts physical skills as they carry out technological tasks using tools, equipment, and materials correctly, efficiently, and safely. Technology Education Objectives The aim of the Technology Education curriculum is to help students develop technological literacy and lifelong learning patterns that they need to live and work effectively in a changing technological society. To achieve this, the curriculum provides a framework for students to learn how to design and construct solutions to real-world problems and opportunities to put into practice what they have learned. CARPENTRY AND JOINERY 11 AND 12 1

10 INTRODUCTION TO TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION 11 AND 12 AND CARPENTRY AND JOINERY The Technology Education curriculum is guided by the following goals. Technology Education should provide students with opportunities to: develop the ability to solve technological problems develop the ability to make things and explore technology develop the ability to deal ethically with technology develop lifelong learning patterns needed to function effectively in a changing technological environment acquire skills and attitudes needed to work with technology both independently and as a cooperative member of a group develop appropriate attitudes and practices with respect to work safety and personal health gain competence in working with tools, materials, and processes to produce highquality work develop language and visual communication skills to investigate, explain, and illustrate aspects of technology apply and integrate skills, knowledge, and resources across disciplines and in technological activities explore and pursue technological careers and associated lifestyles become discerning users of materials, products, and technical services. THE CARPENTRY AND JOINERY 11 AND 12 CURRICULUM This Integrated Resource Package (IRP) sets out the provincially prescribed curriculum for the Technology Education 11 and 12: Carpentry and Joinery curriculum. Additional Technology Education 11 and 12 courses include: Automotive Technology (scheduled for 2001) Drafting and Design (scheduled for 2001) Electronics (scheduled for 2002) Industrial Design (released in 1997) Metal Work (scheduled for 2002) The development of this IRP has been guided by the principles of learning: Learning requires the active participation of the student. People learn in a variety of ways and at different rates. Learning is both an individual and a group process. Health and Safety Safe work practices and procedures, and creating an understanding of what is required for a healthy work environment, are absolutely essential. As students begin to work with tools and equipment, safety and practice procedures must be introduced and reinforced throughout. Correct safety practices must be established as soon as students begin their studies in technology education and must be maintained throughout the curriculum. It is essential that teachers address the following questions before, during, and after an activity: Has the instruction been sequenced progressively to ensure safety? Have students been given specific instruction about how to use and handle equipment and tools correctly? Have students been given specific instruction on how to use, handle, and dispose of hazardous materials? Are the tools and equipment in good repair, suitably arranged, and appropriately sized for students? 2 CARPENTRY AND JOINERY 11 AND 12

11 INTRODUCTION TO TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION 11 AND 12 AND CARPENTRY AND JOINERY Are students being properly supervised? Do the facilities provide adequate lighting and ventilation for the activity? Have students been made aware of hazards in the facility area? Have students been made aware of appropriate school-based and industrial safety standards and procedures? Teachers should select safe activities, techniques, and projects and ensure that the safety practices are implemented. The following is not an all-inclusive list, but a guide to help teachers establish a safe learning environment. Students should: wear appropriate attire and safety equipment follow established rules and routines select tasks that are within their abilities show self-respect for the safety of themselves and others recognize hazards in work areas. RATIONALE FOR CARPENTRY AND JOINERY This curriculum contains the fundamental skill sets that are common to the trades of carpentry and joinery. Students who successfully complete this curriculum will have attained the necessary skills expected by employers and post-secondary institutions, and will be prepared to pursue a career in either carpentry or joinery. Further, students will have the opportunity to enjoy the benefits of creating projects made with wood. Careful consideration has been given to the ease with which students may transfer to the workplace or further educational pursuits. The learning experiences help students acquire some of the skills and knowledge needed to pursue personal interests and/or post-secondary training for careers. Preparing for Transition to Post-secondary Education The Carpentry and Joinery 11 and 12 curriculum sets out the prescribed learning outcomes for an introductory Carpentry and Joinery program in a secondary school. These learning outcomes define the knowledge, skills and attitudes that will give students a solid foundation in this area as an avocation or as a preparation for a career. The scope of the knowledge required is such that students wishing to pursue carpentry and joinery, either for career or personal goals, require a broader knowledge base. Students should be given opportunities to increase their knowledge through additional courses. More advanced Carpentry and Joinery programs are designed to help students make career choices, and to develop the necessary marketable skills to expand their knowledge and education in the technology field. For example, students who wish to pursue careers in the carpentry and joinery field, may use their secondary school programs towards a number of options. One example is expanding their knowledge and skills into the area of residential construction. Preparing for the Workplace Students will have opportunities to understand the relationship of carpentry and joinery to a variety of career opportunities. The Carpentry and Joinery program provides knowledge, skills, and attitudes for related careers. Avocational Pursuits Students will have opportunities to understand the maintenance and operation of tools and equipment, and the use of a variety of materials and finishes. This knowledge will enable them to build, and enjoy the benefits of creating, projects made with wood. CARPENTRY AND JOINERY 11 AND 12 3

12 INTRODUCTION TO TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION 11 AND 12 AND CARPENTRY AND JOINERY CURRICULUM ORGANIZERS The prescribed learning outcomes for the courses described in this Integrated Resource Package are grouped under a number of curriculum organizers. These curriculum organizers reflect the main areas of Carpentry and Joinery that students are expected to address. They form the framework of the curriculum and act as connecting threads across both grade levels for each pathway. The organizers are not equivalent in terms of number of outcomes or the time that students will require in order to achieve these outcomes. The curriculum organizers are: Health and Safety Personal and Project Management Mathematical Applications Materials Hand Tools* Portable Power Tools* Stationary Equipment* *Note: In Grade 12, these areas* are encompassed in one curriculum organizer: Tools and Equipment. Health and Safety The focus in this area is on safe work practices and procedures and on what is required for a healthy work environment. As students begin to work with tools and equipment, the prescribed learning outcomes should be introduced and continuously reinforced. Personal and Project Management The focus in this area is on continuous development of the skills that are essential to success in any workplace, including a carpentry and joinery workplace. These skills include using, producing, and accurately interpreting information within documents used specifically in carpentry and joinery. It is also expected that exploration of career opportunities in these and other related areas will be applied, where appropriate. Mathematical Applications Numeracy is an important foundation for all learning in school. It is also important for people to function successfully in the workplace and community. The prescribed learning outcomes focus on the specific numeracy skills required in carpentry and joinery and on the development of mastery. Materials The list of different materials used in carpentry and joinery is wide and varied. The prescribed learning outcomes deal with hands-on aspects of the curriculum and with the wide range of materials used in building and finishing projects. Tools and Equipment This area deals primarily with hands-on aspects of the curriculum. The use and maintenance of hand tools, portable power tools and stationary equipment is a vital building block for the creation of skill sets used in more advanced operations and procedures. The prescribed learning outcomes focus on the development of safe and approved operational and maintenance skills associated with these tools and equipment. SUGGESTED INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES In this Integrated Resource Package, instructional strategies have been included for each curriculum organizer and grade. These strategies are suggestions only, 4 CARPENTRY AND JOINERY 11 AND 12

13 INTRODUCTION TO TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION 11 AND 12 AND CARPENTRY AND JOINERY designed to provide guidance for generalist and specialist teachers planning instruction to meet the prescribed learning outcomes. The strategies may be either teacherdirected, student-directed, or both. There is not necessarily a one-to-one relationship between learning outcomes and instructional strategies, nor is this organization intended to prescribe a linear means of course delivery. It is expected that teachers will adapt, modify, combine, and organize instructional strategies to meet the needs of students and to respond to local requirements. Teachers should include as many instructional methods as possible to present technical information. Blending real-life woodwork with simulated (i.e., instructorprepared) tasks will maximize learning. For optimum learning, a combination in-shop and in-class approach is recommended. The suggested instructional strategies may be undertaken by individual students, partners, or small groups. Carpentry and Joinery 11 and 12 emphasizes skills needed in a changing society. Thus, ephasis is given to the following strategies: Strategies that develop applied skills. In order to see technology education, in general, as relevant and useful, students must learn how it can be applied to a variety of real workplace situations. Students learn more quickly and retain their learning better when they are actively involved in the learning process. Using a variety of activities with built-in learning situations will help students to understand and interpret their world, and to identify, analyse, and solve problems that occur in life and in the workplace. Strategies that foster the development of individual and group skills. In the workplace, people need to know how to work effectively, individually and with others, to solve problems and complete tasks. Students need opportunities to work independently to enhance their organizational and selfevaluation skills. Students also need to experience the dynamics of group work to enhance their understanding of group problem-solving processes. Group work focuses on such skills as collaboration, communication, leadership, and cooperation. Strategies that foster research and critical-thinking skills. In order to make informed and responsible choices about the appropriate use of technology, students need to receive and process information critically. To develop decision-making and problem-solving skills, students need to be challenged to identify problems and develop solutions. Strategies that use technology. The ability to use technology to solve problems is a necessary skill in the workplace and in post-secondary education. Students use technology to access information, to perform calculations, and to enhance the presentation of ideas. Other ways to enhance the program include: forming a carpentry and joinery club offering a career preparation program offering apprenticeship programs (some may include corporate sponsorship) arranging field trips holding a contest. CARPENTRY AND JOINERY 11 AND 12 5

14 INTRODUCTION TO TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION 11 AND 12 AND CARPENTRY AND JOINERY Problem-Solving Models To develop decision-making and problemsolving skills, students need to be challenged to identify problems and develop solutions. Models that describe problem-solving processes should be developed with students so they understand the recurring nature of solving real-world problems (as part of a problem is solved, new problems arise and some steps in the processes recur). It is expected that students will produce two or three projects (one of which will be a major project) in each course. These projects will form the basis upon which student learning will be assessed. The comprehensive nature of the project allows the students to experience a sense of accomplishment and to demonstrate skills acquired in relation to a range of learning objectives. SUGGESTED ASSESSMENT STRATEGIES Teachers determine the best assessment methods for their students. The assessment strategies in this document describe a variety of ideas and methods for gathering evidence of student performance. The assessment strategies column for a particular organizer always includes specific examples of assessment strategies. Some strategies relate to particular activities, while others are general and could apply to any activity. These specific strategies may be introduced by a context statement that explains how students at this age can demonstrate their learning, what teachers can look for, and how this information can be used to adapt further instruction. About Assessment in General Assessment is the systematic process of gathering information about students learning in order to describe what they know, are able to do, and are working toward. From the evidence and information collected in assessments, teachers describe each student s learning and performance. They use this information to provide students with ongoing feedback, plan further instructional and learning activities, set subsequent learning goals, and determine areas requiring diagnostic teaching and intervention. Teachers base their evaluation of a student s performance on the information collected through assessment. Teachers determine the purpose, aspects, or attributes of learning on which to focus the assessment; when to collect the evidence; and the assessment methods, tools, or techniques most appropriate to use. Assessment focuses on the critical or significant aspects of the learning to be demonstrated by the student. The assessment of student performance is based on a wide variety of methods and tools, ranging from portfolio assessment to pencil-and-paper tests. Appendix C includes a more detailed discussion of assessment and evaluation. Integration of Cross-Curricular Interests Throughout the curriculum development and revision process, the development team has done its best to ensure that relevance, equity, and accessibility issues are addressed in this IRP. Wherever appropriate for the subject, these issues have been integrated into the learning outcomes, suggested instructional strategies, and suggested assessment strategies. Although it is neither practical nor possible to include an 6 CARPENTRY AND JOINERY 11 AND 12

15 INTRODUCTION TO TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION 11 AND 12 AND CARPENTRY AND JOINERY exhaustive list of such issues, teachers are encouraged to continue ensuring that classroom activities and resources also incorporate appropriate role portrayals, relevant issues, and exemplars of themes such as inclusion and acceptance. The Ministry, in consultation with experienced teachers and other educators, has developed a set of criteria for evaluating learning resources. Although the list is neither exhaustive nor prescriptive, most of these criteria can be usefully applied to instructional and assessment activities as well as learning resources. Brief descriptions of these criteria, grouped under the headings of Content, Instructional Design, Technical Design, and Social Considerations, may be found on pages 30 through 45 of Evaluating, Selecting, and Managing Learning Resources (2000), document number RB0065. This Ministry document has been distributed to all schools. Additional copies may be ordered from Office Products Centre, or (250) , if in Victoria. Gender Issues in Technology Education The education system is committed to helping both male and female students succeed equally well. This is particularly important in the area of technology education, where female participation is low. Teaching, assessment materials, learning activities, and classroom environments should place value on the experiences and contributions of all people and cultivate interest and access for female students. Teachers should consider the diversity of learning styles and watch for gender bias in learning resources, and bias in interaction with students. The following instructional strategies for technology education are provided to help teachers deliver gendersensitive programs. Feature women who make extensive use of technology in their careers perhaps as guest speakers or subjects of study in the classroom. Acknowledge differences in experiences and interests between young women and young men. Demonstrate the relevance of technology education to careers and to daily life in ways that appeal to a variety of students in the class or school. Successful links include environmental issues, architecture and design, and current affairs. Provide practical learning opportunities designed specifically to help young women develop confidence and interest in technology education and non-traditional roles. Adapting Instruction for Diverse Student Needs Technology education, particularly activitybased technology education, has traditionally been a significant area for preemployment skill-development opportunities and an ideal area for students with special needs. Technology education, with its focus on the benefits of concrete, real-world experiences, provides students with opportunities to work effectively in group situations, focusing on observation and experimentation, and alternative methods of evaluation. For students with exceptional gifts or talents, this curriculum area is also ideal for creative learning experiences and critical-thinking activities. Opportunities for extension and acceleration are rich in technology education, and, for some students with special needs, this curriculum can provide opportunities to apply personal experiences to enrich their learning. CARPENTRY AND JOINERY 11 AND 12 7

16 INTRODUCTION TO TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION 11 AND 12 AND CARPENTRY AND JOINERY When students with special needs are expected to achieve or surpass the learning outcomes set out in the Technology Education 11 and 12 curriculum, regular grading practices and reporting procedures are followed. However, when students are not expected to achieve the learning outcomes, modifications must be noted in their Individual Education Plans (IEPs). Instructional and assessment methods should be adapted to meet the needs of all students. When students require adaptations in order to meet the regular learning outcomes, these, too, should be noted in an IEP. The following strategies may help students with special needs succeed in technology education. Adapt the Environment cluster-group students with particular gifts or needs make use of preferential seating to enhance learning create a space with minimum distractions change the location of the learning activity to optimize concentration make use of cooperative grouping or pairing of learners Adapt Presentation or Instruction make extensions of activities for students with special gifts and talents offer choices for self-directed learning provide advance organizers of key technology education concepts demonstrate or model new concepts adjust the pace of activities as required change the wording of questions or instruction to match the student s level of understanding provide functional, practical opportunities for students to practise skills use bilingual peers or volunteers to help ESL students (e.g., clarify safety rules) Adapt Materials and Equipment use techniques to make the organization of activities more explicit (e.g., colour-code the steps used to solve a problem) use manipulatives provide large-print charts or activity sheets use opaque overlays to reduce the quantity of visible print highlight key points in written material provide software that defaults to a larger font size use adapted computer technology hardware and appropriate software provide alternative resources on the same concepts at an easier comprehension level use translated material for information (e.g., safety rules) provide or arrange opportunities for independent research (e.g., CD-ROM) Adapt Methods of Assistance train and use peer tutors to assist students with special needs arrange for teacher assistants to work with individuals or small groups collaborate with support teachers to develop appropriate strategies for individual students with special needs Adapt Methods of Assessment allow students to demonstrate their understanding of technology education concepts in a variety of ways (e.g., through murals, displays, models, oral presentations) match assessment tools to students needs (e.g., oral or open-book tests, tasks performed without time limits, teacher and student conferencing) set short-term achievable goals with frequent feedback provide opportunities for students to do self-assessment and individualized goal setting 8 CARPENTRY AND JOINERY 11 AND 12

17 SUGGESTED ASSESSMENT STRATEGIES RECOMMENDED LEARNING RESOURCES CURRICULUM Carpentry and Joinery 11 and 12 CARPENTRY AND JOINERY 11 AND 12 9

18 GRADE 11 Health and Safety PRESCRIBED LEARNING OUTCOMES It is expected that students will: identify Workers Compensation Board and WHMIS regulations that apply to a carpentry and joinery work environment describe safety and accident prevention procedures for a carpentry and joinery work environment use safe work practices SUGGESTED INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES Engage students in a class discussion about the potential effects of a carpentry and joinery work environment on one s health. Have students brainstorm lists of specific health problems and safety hazards that could result from this work environment. In groups of two or three, have each group consider ways of improving or modifying the work environment (e.g., tools, equipment, accessories, ventilation, floor) that would inhibit the development of health problems and prevent accidents. Each group then presents its findings orally to the class or produces a written report. Invite a speaker from WCB to give a presentation on the wide range of shop-related accidents. Have students address any questions they may have. Following the presentation, have students break into groups and conduct a safety audit. Have groups share their information and then ask each group to develop a Shop Safety Guide that would apply to the class wood shop. Provide students access to the MSD sheets and WHMIS regulations related to hazardous materials commonly found in a carpentry and joinery work environment. Using ten clearly labelled containers, have groups of students research and then report on the hazards, handling methods, and first-aid procedures associated with the material in each container. 10 CARPENTRY AND JOINERY 11 AND 12

19 GRADE 11 Health and Safety SUGGESTED ASSESSMENT STRATEGIES As students work in the wood shop, observe the extent to which they are able to: - demonstrate safe use of tools and equipment - demonstrate safe handling of potentially hazardous materials - utilize safe and healthy work practices. Use multiple-choice and short-answer tests to assess students knowledge of safety regulations and of policies and procedures related to the use of equipment. Evaluate students knowledge of safe material handling by administering a WHMIS certification exam to the class. When students use MSD sheets, evaluate responses based on questions such as: - What is the purpose of MSD sheets? - How are these sheets obtained? - What are the legal requirements? - What kinds of information do the sheets provide? - Where are these sheets kept for reference? - What products must be labelled? RECOMMENDED LEARNING RESOURCES Print Materials Exploring Woodworking Modern Cabinetmaking Modern Woodworking Trades Common Core Wood Technology and Processes Working Wood Video Large Wood Power Tools I Large Wood Power Tools II Preparing and Repairing Wood Stains and Polyurethane Wood Finishing Video Series: Lacquer and Varnish Wood Finishing Video Series: Oil and Wax CARPENTRY AND JOINERY 11 AND 12 11

20 GRADE 11 Personal and Project Management PRESCRIBED LEARNING OUTCOMES It is expected that students will: interpret orthographic and pictorial drawings identify residential framing types identify and adhere to building codes and standards applicable to projects produce sketches and technical drawings prepare a bill of materials and a cutting list identify and utilize employability skills describe career and education opportunities in carpentry, joinery, and other constructionrelated areas describe the impact of current and future technologies on construction-related occupations SUGGESTED INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES Provide students with a simple plan containing a few errors and/or omissions. Have students work in groups to analyse it. Engage students in a class discussion based on their analyses. Have students describe the plan s errors, omissions, or inaccuracies and the possible ramifications of building a given project, where the working drawings contain errors or incomplete information. Suggest a simple project (e.g., jewellery box) and have each student produce one or more sketches for it. Encourage students to create and maintain a photographic record of completed projects (e.g., portfolio, set of electronic files, scrapbook, photo album). Provide students with the plans for a basic project, and have them produce: - a bill of materials - a cutting list of all component parts Present the Conference Board of Canada s list of Employability Skills This is available online at research.htm or from the Board at 255 Smyth Road, Ottawa, ON K1H 8M7 Canada, Tel. (613) , Fax (613) Ask students to suggest how the various employability skills might be applicable in a carpentry and joinery work environment. Have students brainstorm a list of occupations related to carpentry and joinery. Working in pairs, students select two occupations and research the required training, financial compensation, and related responsibilities. Challenge students to use a variety of resources in their research (e.g., the Internet, job-shadowing or work experience contacts). Have students, in groups, generate a list of five significant historical technological changes and five projected technological changes in construction-related trades. Conduct a class discussion on these lists of changes. 12 CARPENTRY AND JOINERY 11 AND 12

21 GRADE 11 Personal and Project Management SUGGESTED ASSESSMENT STRATEGIES As part of an assigned project, have students prepare a bill of materials and a cutting list. Have them assess their results with those prepared by the instructor in terms of: - completeness of information - format of information - accuracy of information. Once students have rendered a sketch of a displayed object, consider the extent to which they have incorporated: - correct orthographic projection - all required dimensions - accurate information. During the early stages of work on a group project, discuss with the students the various criteria that could be used to assess their work (including making effective use of time, cooperating in groups, using correct terminology). Upon completion of the project, have them use a simple five-point rating scale to assess their own project management skills in relation to these criteria. RECOMMENDED LEARNING RESOURCES Print Materials Exploring Woodworking Modern Cabinetmaking Modern Woodworking Trades Common Core Wood Technology and Processes Working Wood Video Wood Finishing Video Series: Oil and Wax CARPENTRY AND JOINERY 11 AND 12 13

22 GRADE 11 Mathematical Applications PRESCRIBED LEARNING OUTCOMES It is expected that students will: demonstrate the ability to use a variety of measuring instruments demonstrate proficiency in using fractions and decimals to solve problems related to carpentry and joinery convert between Imperial and SI units solve technical problems using ratio, proportion, and geometry SUGGESTED INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES Provide each student with a set of measurements (include both metric and non-metric systems of measure). Have each student lay out the distances using a variety of measuring instruments. Provide students with a list of tasks involving measurement. Have students select the measuring instrument(s) they need to complete each particular task, explaining the reason for their selection(s). From a prescribed floor plan, have students in small groups of two or three lay out a basic kitchen at full scale. Have students use given information about ratios, proportions, or geometric properties to calculate area, volume, and perimeter for a variety of geometric shapes that have an actual industrial application. Students then report their findings to the class. Have students calculate the diagonal distance across various rectangles (i.e., using Pythagorean Theorem). Then have them lay out a rectangle (e.g., for speaker boxes), using a straight edge and trammel points. Provide students with a list of projects. Have each student select a project and prepare a cost estimate of required materials. 14 CARPENTRY AND JOINERY 11 AND 12

23 GRADE 11 Mathematical Applications SUGGESTED ASSESSMENT STRATEGIES Use multiple-choice tests to determine students proficiency in calculating various math problems involving: - Pythagorean Theorem (a 2 = b 2 + c 2 ) - ratio and proportion. During the early stages of assigned projects that require the use of mathematical calculation, question students and check their plans to ensure they have correctly identified and applied the needed mathematical operations. Once students have 1) converted a metric drawing of a project to Imperial measure and 2) calculated the quantity of material required to build the project, evaluate the extent to which each student has: - converted the measurements accurately - accurately calculated the quantities of material needed - arranged the information in a coherent and intelligible manner (e.g., neat, legible) - provided complete information. RECOMMENDED LEARNING RESOURCES Print Materials Applied Mathematics Exploring Woodworking Modern Cabinetmaking Modern Woodworking Trades Common Core Wood Technology and Processes Working Wood CARPENTRY AND JOINERY 11 AND 12 15

24 GRADE 11 Materials PRESCRIBED LEARNING OUTCOMES It is expected that students will: describe the characteristics of wood and different methods used to process it identify and describe defects in wood identify and select wood species appropriate for a given project identify, describe, and use abrasives identify, describe, and apply common adhesives identify, describe, and apply brushed-on and hand-rubbed wood finishes identify, describe, and install basic hardware (hinges and knobs/pulls) and basic fasteners (nails, brads, and screws) describe and demonstrate initial material preparation SUGGESTED INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES In the context of constructing a project, have each student: - assemble project components using appropriate adhesive and fasteners - prepare surfaces for finishing using appropriate abrasives - install necessary hardware - apply finish. Give each student a piece of wood (wood samples are of various species and sizes). Have each student do a quick analysis of the wood and: - describe its characteristics - identify and describe any defects - identify the wood species - determine processing procedures used - suggest possible uses for the piece of wood. Supply students with a set of plans for a given project and an assortment of miscellaneous hardware and fasteners. Have students select the hardware and fasteners required to complete the project. 16 CARPENTRY AND JOINERY 11 AND 12

25 GRADE 11 Materials SUGGESTED ASSESSMENT STRATEGIES Assess students lists of materials required to build a specific project. Consider the extent to which they have: - complete lists - selected appropriate wood species - selected appropriate adhesives - selected appropriate finishes - selected appropriate hardware - selected appropriate fasteners. Following each student s preparation of materials for a specific project, assess the student s effectiveness according to the following criteria: - sequence of machining - use of a cutting list - appropriate machines used - economical use of material - material is appropriately marked. RECOMMENDED LEARNING RESOURCES Print Materials Exploring Woodworking Modern Cabinetmaking Modern Woodworking Wood Technology and Processes Working Wood Video Engineered Wood Products Preparing and Repairing Wood Stains and Polyurethane Wood Finishing Video Series: Lacquer and Varnish Wood Finishing Video Series: Oil and Wax CARPENTRY AND JOINERY 11 AND 12 17

26 GRADE 11 Hand Tools PRESCRIBED LEARNING OUTCOMES It is expected that students will: identify, maintain, and use the following hand tools: - layout and measuring tools - cutting tools - boring tools - shaping tools - finishing tools - fastening tools identify and construct the following basic woodworking joints: - dado - mitre - rabbet - butt - half-lap - cross-lap construct a project using hand tools prepare wood surfaces for application of finish SUGGESTED INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES Have students use hand tools to build small items (e.g., knick-knack shelf, spice rack) out of a softwood. The projects should involve the use of basic woodworking joints (including mitre, butt, half-lap, cross-lap, dado, and rabbet joints) and some boring and shaping details. Provide students with seven to nine 1 x 1 x 10 strips of various species of woods. Have students use only hand tools to create the necessary face surfaces required to glue these strips into a panel. After the panel is glued together, have students: - hand plane the panel to given thickness (e.g., 5/8 ) - lay out a specified geometric shape into which the panel will be cut - cut the panel - hand plane the edges smooth - prepare the surface using surface preparation tools - sand and finish with a food-safe finish. The panel can be used as a small serving tray. Through a written or oral quiz, have students identify the basic wood joints, describe each joint type in terms of appropriate use, and describe how each joint is made. Then give students the opportunity to construct basic woodworking joints. Using plane irons that have been ground too short for use in hand planes, have each student practise grinding a new edge and honing it sharp. 18 CARPENTRY AND JOINERY 11 AND 12

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