Encouraging Parent Involvement

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "Encouraging Parent Involvement"

Transcription

1 Building the Learning Team Chapter 2 Encouraging Parent Involvement 2006

2 Alberta Education Cataloguing in Publication Data Alberta. Alberta Education. Learning and Teaching Resources Branch. Individualized program planning (IPP) : ECS to grade 12. Chapter 2: Encouraging parent involvement. Series: Programming for students with special needs ISBN (for entire resource) 1. Individualized education programs Alberta. 2. Special education Alberta. I. Title. II. Series. LC A3.A For further information, contact: Alberta Education Learning and Teaching Resources Branch 8 th Floor, 44 Capital Boulevard Street NW Edmonton, Alberta T5J 5E6 Telephone: in Edmonton or toll-free in Alberta by dialing Fax: This resource is primarily intended for: Teachers Administrators Health-related professionals Counsellors Students Parents General Public A PDF version of this resource is available on the Alberta Education Web site at Print copies of this resource can be purchased from the Learning Resources Centre. Order online at or telephone Copyright 2006, the Crown in Right of Alberta, as represented by the Minister of Education. Alberta Education, Learning and Teaching Resources Branch, 44 Capital Boulevard, Street NW, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, T5J 5E6. Every effort has been made to provide proper acknowledgement of original sources. If cases are identified where this has not been done, please notify Alberta Education so appropriate corrective action can be taken. Permission is given by the copyright owner to reproduce this document, or any part thereof, for educational purposes and on a nonprofit basis, with the exception of materials cited for which Alberta Education does not own copyright.

3 Encouraging Parent Involvement TABLE OF CONTENTS Identifying strengths and areas of need... 1 Setting the direction... 2 Creating a plan... 3 Implementing the plan... 3 Reviewing and revising... 3 Planning for transition... 4 Getting Off to a Good Start... 4 Sample strategies for encouraging parental participation... 5 Sample strategies for increasing parents comfort levels at meetings... 7 Sample strategies for handling conflict and resolving differences with parents... 8 Resources for parents... 8 Other resources... 9 Appendices A Sample Parent Survey B Sample Permission Form for Specialized Assessment C The MAPS Planning System D Family Goal Setting Completed Sample of Family Goal Setting E Tips for Parents for Participating in the IPP Process F Solution-focused Meetings Sample Planner for Solution-focused Meeting Bibliography Index i

4

5 Chapter 2 Encouraging Parent Involvement The Standards for Special Education, Amended June 2004 clearly states that schools must invite meaningful involvement of parents in planning, problem solving and decision making related to their child s special education programming. Parents have unique knowledge about their children that provides an invaluable basis for the IPP process. Furthermore, research clearly demonstrates that parents who understand the school philosophy, know the school staff and participate in school activities are more likely to be satisfied with the education that their children are receiving. Parents need meaningful opportunities to participate in all facets of their child s schooling. They often want to be part of the decision-making process, and have access to information and ideas on a continuous, as-needed basis. For more information This chapter provides sample strategies for supporting meaningful parent involvement in the IPP process. Additional strategies to support parent participation are contained in other chapters in this resource, including: Chapter 8: Planning for Transitions Chapter 9: Infusing Assistive Technology for Learning into the IPP Process. There are opportunities for meaningful parent involvement at all stages of the IPP process. Consider the following six interrelated steps of the IPP process and how parent involvement can be part of each step. 1. Identifying strengths and areas of need Parents are an invaluable source of information regarding their child. They are their child s first teachers and have witnessed him or her in a variety of social and learning situations beyond the school setting. As a result, they can often provide unique insights and perspectives about their child s strengths and needs. Consider developing a simple survey or questionnaire to gather information from parents. Appendices See Appendix 2-A for a sample parent survey. Parents can provide information about their child in areas such as the following: strengths and areas of need family and educational history that impacts the child s present learning situation relevant medical history and health-care needs interests, talents and desires of their child aspirations and goals they have for their child assistance that the family can provide at home to practise, reinforce and maintain skills 1

6 Chapter 2 information about community services, after-school situations or caregivers which could impact their child s learning. Specialized assessments are often used to help identify a student s strengths and areas of need. Schools must request in writing the consent of parents to assess and evaluate children experiencing difficulties with their education program. Parents need to understand the importance of informed consent. To make an informed decision, parents need to consider: purpose of assessment nature of assessment intended use of results who has access to results. It may be helpful to state what particular test will be used to assess the student and any other informal or formal assessment tools which will be used. Notifying parents as to when the assessment will take place will help maintain trust between home and school. If delays arise, keep parents current on timelines. Appendices See Appendix 2-B for a sample permission form. If the student is receiving an assessment or support from outside agencies or medical service providers, this information may also be helpful in identifying needs and developing programming. In order for the learning team to have access to this information, parents will be asked to sign a permission form to release information from these professionals. Parents should be reassured that this information will be kept confidential. 2. Setting the direction Establishing priorities helps the learning team focus on what is critical for the student to learn this school year. The team establishes these priorities based on all the information that has been gathered to date. To determine the most important learning needs, parents can work with the learning team to consider: priority areas to focus on possibilities for using this new skill or knowledge in other areas and settings related areas of strength how this need affects overall learning and achievement transferability to other subject areas contribution to independence age appropriateness how long it will take to master this new skill how the skills and knowledge relate to the student s future goals. 2

7 Encouraging Parent Involvement 3. Creating a plan As members of their child s learning team, parents can offer ideas and information in the creation of long-term goals for their child. These goals are what the student might accomplish in one school year. It is important that the team identify what is manageable for the student. This is where a parent perspective can be especially helpful. All parents have hopes and dreams for their child. Their priorities for their child s learning may differ from those of the classroom teacher. It is important that parents perspectives are recognized and understood, and that all viewpoints are considered so that the learning team works collaboratively to make the most appropriate programming decisions for individual students. As part of the assessment process, the use of strategies such as the MAPS Planning System creates opportunities for parents to share information about their children. Appendices See Appendix 2-C for information on the MAPS Planning System. Some parents may wish to set additional goals that they will work on at home. These goals can either support classroom-based goals or focus on education-related skills and behaviours more specific to home and community. These goals may be incorporated into the IPP process but they should not be considered goals that need to be monitored by the classroom teacher or be formally reported in the IPP review. The role of the teacher is to support families in setting goals for their children and encourage parents to monitor, share and celebrate their successes. Appendices See Appendix 2-D for a sample goal-setting form to assist parents. Parents can often help identify effective accommodations for their child. Ask them about what strategies they use to help their child complete family jobs or homework assignments. 4. Implementing the plan As members of their child s learning team, parents can take an active role in the implementation process. One important way to involve parents is in reinforcing skills and strategies in out-of-school contexts. When parents understand what the long-term goals and short-term objectives of their child s program plan are, they can decide how to best support their child at home. 5. Reviewing and revising Review meetings are opportunities for parents to discuss their child s programming and consider possible revisions. The year-end review is especially important as the team reviews the education plan and adds written recommendations to the IPP. This is particularly true for students moving from one school to another or making any kind of transition. 3

8 Chapter 2 Parents can also be encouraged to contact the school to request a review of the IPP at any time if they have concerns about their child s progress or if their child is experiencing significant changes in achievement, attitude, behaviour or health. This would allow the team to adjust the IPP to better meet that student s changing needs. 6. Planning for transition Planning for transition involves identifying the kinds of skills and attitudes that need to be in place for students to be successful in future settings, and developing a plan of action to ensure students acquire these skills and attitudes. It may also include specific plans for moving between education placements and programs. As a consistent presence in their child s life, parents play an essential role in planning for and dealing with transitions. In particular, parents may be involved in determining opportunities and supports that are available to the student in the community as he or she gains increased independence. Getting Off to a Good Start At the beginning of the year, some parents may be uncomfortable with formal school meetings, particularly if this is their first meeting. In challenging or difficult situations, parents care and concern for their child might show up as tension, anxiety or frustration. It s important that teachers remain nonjudgemental and don t make assumptions because the parents presenting behaviours might not necessarily reflect how they truly feel or how they are actually coping. Teachers need to keep in mind that most parents do not have a background in education and some have little or no experience in working with schools. There may also be emotional barriers and other issues that get in the way of creating an atmosphere of collaboration. These can include: parents who struggled at school themselves. They may find it uncomfortable to work in partnership with teachers a sense of guilt that they are in some way responsible for their child s difficulties. Some families may still be struggling with feelings of loss and grief as they try to come to terms with their child s special education needs family situations which can make participating in their child s education a challenge. These could include such things as being a single parent, shift work, language barriers or families that are dealing with more than one child with special education needs cultural beliefs that school and home are separate issues of trust. It takes time to develop a level of trust where parents feel comfortable talking about their child a lack of confidence in the school s ability to provide adequate support for a student with special education needs 4

9 Encouraging Parent Involvement denial. Some parents find it difficult to believe that their child has different needs than other children, particularly those students whose main difficulties are academic, so they may not experience the same degree of difficulty outside of the school environment. Ensuring parental involvement requires time, trust and a belief that parents are partners in the planning process. Teachers can take a guiding role, particularly in the early stages of parental involvement, to ensure that parents have positive and meaningful opportunities to become actively engaged and committed to the process. Teachers need to help parents understand the value of an IPP and the role that they can play in ensuring that it accurately reflects the strengths and areas of need of their child. Taking time at the onset to provide information and clarify expectations will foster a sense of openness and partnership with parents. As parents become more comfortable working with their child s learning team, they will more readily share information and perspectives that impact their child s learning. Sample strategies Sample strategies for encouraging parental participation Maintain an open door policy. Let parents know that they are welcome to visit the classroom to observe and participate in their child s learning. If there is a sign-in procedure at the office or other jurisdiction protocol, provide this information during the first open house of the school year or through the classroom newsletter. Encourage parents to participate in special day events, expertise sharing, displays and presentations, and other learning opportunities. Acknowledge parents role and contribution to the team. It s important that parents hear that their expertise and contributions are valued. Be prepared to answer parents questions. Consider the following types of sample questions that parents might ask. How will my input be used? Do we attend all IPP planning meetings about our child? If not, how do we keep informed about information shared and decisions made at those meetings? When are the meetings held and how long are they? How can our child be a part of the IPP process? What kind of special support will there be for my child? Will there be one-on-one support? If so, will this be with a teacher or teacher assistant? Will my child always need an IPP? How is the IPP different every school year? Can it be changed at any time during the school year? How will we know if the IPP is effective? How can I arrange to visit the classroom to see how my child is doing? 5

10 Chapter 2 What am I expected to do at home to support my child? What does our signature mean on the IPP document? What happens if we don t sign it? What are our options if we don t agree with the IPP? Will my child need to write provincial achievement tests? Will my child graduate with a Grade 12 diploma? We noticed a transition section on the IPP, but our child has just begun new programming. Why is transition an issue? Make print information about the IPP process, such as The Learning Team, available to parents. In addition to sharing the handbook (or Web link for a downloadable copy of the handbook), selected information can be used in school newsletters or displays. See the end of this chapter for ordering information. Organize an IPP information session to ensure that parents understand the IPP process. Schools that have a large number of students with special education needs may find an orientation session for parents to be an effective way to build understanding of and commitment to the IPP process. For example, an orientation session could be an opportunity to: introduce the stages of an IPP review a sample IPP discuss how the IPP should change from one year to the next answer common questions such as those listed above. Be sure the parameters of the session are clear and that parents understand it is an introduction to the process, not a time to discuss individual students and their specific needs. Use parent teacher meetings as opportunities for developing partnerships. When possible, offer parents a choice of meeting times and communicate directly with them through a written notice or phone call. Give them sufficient time to arrange their schedule. Make sure the meeting notice gets to parents. Even the most conscientious student may neglect to pass a message along and a follow-up phone call may be necessary. Always provide information on how to contact the school if the meeting needs to be rescheduled. If possible, consider including an agenda or brief overview of the planning meeting content. This is helpful for parents as they consider the kinds of questions they want to ask and the issues they would like to discuss. Make effective use of IPP meetings. Manage the IPP meetings so that there is time for questions and discussion. Use these meetings as an opportunity to share information about the child s special learning needs. The more knowledgeable parents are about their child s learning challenges, the better partners they can be. Resources might include: copies of articles of interest for them to read at home, information about upcoming conferences or relevant parent workshops, and new Web sites that might be of interest. Consider having someone keep notes of the action items and provide a copy to all team members. 6

11 Encouraging Parent Involvement Appendices Sample strategies Ensure that parents understand the kinds of decisions that need to be made when developing an IPP and then ask them to choose which areas of the IPP they would like to have input into. For example, parents may wish to share their child s strengths, areas of need, information about how he or she learns best, medical information, successful strategies used at home and goals they would like to see addressed in the IPP. Encourage parents to speak with their child about his or her strengths, areas of need and potential goals, and share this information as well. See Appendix 2-E for sample tips for parents for participating in the IPP process. Sample strategies for increasing parents comfort levels at meetings Arrange meetings at mutually convenient times in a comfortable and appropriate setting. Consider parents comfort level when determining the number of staff to attend meetings. Provide parents with an agenda a day or two in advance. This allows them time to think about the items to be discussed and to collect relevant information to bring to the meeting. Consider what information parents might have that could be of value. Include a list of questions with the meeting notice or proposed agenda, such as: Have there been changes at home that you want to share (such as a new family member, a change in a parent s work schedule, new afterschool activities or day-care arrangements)? Are there new supports in place for the child (such as a tutor or time spent with a mentor or older student)? Has there been a change in medication or dosage? Encourage parents to create a list of questions they want answered during the first and subsequent meetings. Use the arrangement of chairs and tables to establish an atmosphere of collaboration. Use chart paper and markers to record notes and decisions made during the meeting. Value the information which parents share, and allow adequate time within meetings for thoughtful reflection and discussion. School boards are required to make every reasonable effort at the school and jurisdiction level to resolve concerns collaboratively with parents. However, despite these efforts there may be differences of opinion about the education of children with special education needs between parents (or in some cases, an older student) and the school. When this happens, there are a number of strategies for successfully resolving these differences. The first course of action is to try and resolve issues directly with the people who are working with the student. This means meeting as a learning team and looking for win-win solutions. 7

12 Chapter 2 Sample strategies Sample strategies for handling conflict and resolving differences with parents Establish that the child s interests must come first at all times. Express motivation to resolve the difference for future mutual benefit (e.g., I appreciate your willingness to or I m committed to finding a plan that will work for everyone ). Deal specifically with solutions to the identified issues and be prepared to offer alternatives. Focus on the issues, and not the emotions and the personalities involved. Give parents opportunities to state their understanding of the situation and then paraphrase what you have heard. Ensure your understanding of their concerns and perspectives is accurate. Sometimes a disagreement occurs as a direct result of misunderstanding. Always clarify exactly what the issue is before jumping ahead to solutions. Decide what you can compromise on. Effective resolution usually requires some form of compromise on both parties behalf. Be sure that your expectations are realistic and reasonable. Explicitly state you are committed to the agreed-upon solutions and encourage parents to also do this. Appendices See Appendix 2-F for more information on solution-focused meetings and a sample meeting planner. Resources for parents There are a number of Alberta Education print and online resources that can provide information and ideas that parents can use to participate more effectively in their child s IPP process. All of these resources are available for purchase from the Learning Resources Centre at or telephone The Learning Team: A handbook for parents of children with special needs (2003) provides practical information on building a learning team, the IPP process, transition planning, resolving differences and keeping informed. It can be downloaded as a PDF file from Alberta Education s Web site at: The Journey: A handbook for parents of children who are gifted and talented (2004) offers information and strategies that parents can use to nurture their child s learning and emotional well-being at home, in school, and in the community. It can be downloaded as a PDF file from Alberta Education s Web site at: /journey.asp. 8

13 Encouraging Parent Involvement A Handbook for Aboriginal Parents of Children with Special Needs (2000) provides Aboriginal parents with information about the education of their child with special education needs, as well as tips to enhance communication between home and school. It can be downloaded as a PDF file from Alberta Education s Web site at book.pdf. The Parent Advantage: Helping children become more successful learners at home and school, grades 1 9 (1998) includes strategies parents can use to help their child improve organizational, reading, writing, spelling, math, test-taking and project skills. Other resources Our Words, Our Ways: Teaching First Nations, Métis and Inuit Learners (2005) offers information and sample strategies that teachers can use to help their Aboriginal students be successful learners. This resource provides information on Aboriginal cultures and perspectives, and discusses the importance of family and community involvement. It includes shared wisdom from Elders and Aboriginal scholars, and related stories shared by teachers of Aboriginal students. It also includes information on learning disabilities and recognizing the gifts of individual students. It can be downloaded as a PDF file from Alberta Education s Web site at: 9

14 Chapter 2 10

15 Appendices Encouraging Parent Involvement These tools are available in PDF format at ab.ca/k_12/special needs/resource.asp and on the CD ROM packaged with the print version of this resource. The purpose of these sample tools is to enrich the IPP process. These tools should be used selectively and can be adapted to best meet the needs of individual students. Many of these tools will be used informally as part of the IPP development process and not as products for the student s permanent school record. 2-A Sample Parent Survey 2-B Sample Permission Form for Specialized Assessment 2-C The MAPS Planning System 2-D Family Goal Setting Completed Sample of Family Goal Setting 2-E Tips for Parents for Participating in the IPP Process 2-F Solution-focused Meetings Sample Planner for Solution-focused Metting 11

16 Chapter 2 Appendix 2-A Sample Parent Survey Name Parent s Name The following questions are designed to help your child s learning team begin the Individualized Program Planning (IPP) process. We value your input and invite you to think about the following questions in preparation for the learning team meeting. 1. What are your child s strengths and interests? Date 2. Describe successes your child had in school. 3. Describe any challenges your child had in school. 4. What are your child s learning needs for this school year? (These could be skills that your child needs to acquire or improve on.) 5. What type of learner is your child? How does your child learn best? 6. Does your child display any behaviours that are of concern to you? If so, please explain how you deal with this type of behaviour at home. 7. What are your goals and hopes for your child this year? 8. Where do you see your child five years from now? 9. Is there any other information that could help us gain a better understanding of your child? 10. Are there any specific concerns that you would like us to address at this meeting? If so, please explain. Thank you for sharing your ideas. 12

17 Encouraging Parent Involvement Appendix 2-B Sample Permission Form for Specialized Assessment Dear Parent: We are requesting your permission to schedule a specialized assessment for your child in the following areas. Educational (for reading, writing, spelling and math) Speech and language Fine and gross motor Behavioural Social-emotional Cognitive Other: These assessments will be conducted by our jurisdiction assessment team within the next six weeks. Each of the assessments will take approximately two hours and will be done in a one-to-one situation with your child. At that time we will talk with your child and explain why we are doing these assessments and how this information will help the teacher understand his or her learning needs better. Upon completion of the assessments, we will arrange a meeting with you and members of the assessment team to discuss the results and make plans for improving your child s school success. Please return the signed form below to the school office by October 30, 200_. Thank you for your ongoing support. Please feel free to contact me if you have additional questions or concerns about these assessments. The best time to reach me is in the morning between 10 and 11 a.m. at [phone number] or [ address]. Sincerely, Principal Permission for specialized assessment I give permission for my son/daughter to be assessed by the jurisdiction special education assessment team for the purpose of. I understand that the granting of my permission is voluntary and that I may withdraw it at any time. Parent s signature Date 13

18 Chapter 2 Appendix 2-C The MAPS Planning System MAPS is a seven-question process for planning for a child s school success. Usually all seven questions are the basis of the planning framework, although there may be some flexibility in the order of the questions or whether a question is used or not. The format will depend on the needs of the individual student and his or her family. This process takes a minimum of two hours and typically occurs in one or two sessions. Information and ideas are recorded on chart paper during the process and copies are made for team members as part of the follow-up. The Seven Questions 1. What is your child s history? (Parents input on this question is vital. Invite them to share their child s history, including key milestones.) 2. What is your dream for your child s future? (Invite parents to share the vision of their child s future, maybe five years from now, or in adulthood. This will help set direction and identify meaningful goals.) 3. What are your fears for your child s future? (It is important for everyone to understand these fears and potential barriers so the team can work together to overcome them.) 4. What are three key words that describe your child? (Parents identify what is most important about their child in their eyes.) 5. What are your child s strengths, gifts and abilities? (Ask parents to share examples of what their child can do, what he or she likes to do and what he or she does well.) 6. What are your child s needs? (Identify needs from the parents perspectives and then prioritize.) 7. What would an ideal day at school look like for your child, and what must be done to make it happen? Wrap-up As a group, identify specific actions to be initiated and prioritize them. Identify who will be responsible for what and set reasonable timelines. Adapted with permission from Mary A. Falvey et al., All My Life s a Circle: Using the Tools: Circles, MAPS and PATH (Toronto, ON: Inclusion Press, 1997) and from John O Brien and Jack Pearpoint, Person-Centred Planning with MAPS and PATH: A Workbook for Facilitators (Toronto, ON: Inclusion Press, 2002). MAPS is one of a family of Person-Centred Planning tools that focus on the capacities (gifts) of a person then turn it into a plan of action. Books, videos, DVDs and other support materials are available from Inclusion Press, 14

19 Encouraging Parent Involvement Appendix 2-D Family Goal Setting Student s Name Parent s Name My child has these five strengths: Date My child has these five areas of need: Goal #1 A. My first goal for my child this school year is: This is what I will do at home to help achieve this goal: How I will know my child has successfully accomplished this goal: 15

20 Chapter 2 Appendix 2-D Family Goal Setting (continued) page 2/4 Goal #2 B. My second goal for my child this school year is: This is what I will do at home to help achieve this goal: How I will know my child has successfully accomplished this goal: I would like to discuss these goals at each reporting period as part of the IPP process. Yes No Parent s signature Date I need more information! Please send home a sample of what a completed family goal setting sheet might look like. I need more ideas. Let s work on this together at the IPP meeting. 16

Creating a Network of Support

Creating a Network of Support Building the Learning Team Chapter 4 Creating a Network of Support 2006 Alberta Education Cataloguing in Publication Data Alberta. Alberta Education. Learning and Teaching Resources Branch. Individualized

More information

Requirements for Special Education in Accredited-Funded Private Schools

Requirements for Special Education in Accredited-Funded Private Schools Requirements for Special Education in Accredited-Funded Private Schools April, 2006 ALBERTA EDUCATION CATALOGUING IN PUBLICATION DATA Alberta. Alberta Education. Requirements for special education in accredited-funded

More information

Standards for the Provision of Early Childhood Special Education

Standards for the Provision of Early Childhood Special Education Standards for the Provision of Early Childhood Special Education September 2006 ACCESS APPROPRIATENESS ACCOUNTABILITY APPEALS ALBERTA EDUCATION CATALOGUING IN PUBLICATION DATA Alberta. Alberta Education.

More information

Chapter 4: Planning Support for Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders

Chapter 4: Planning Support for Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders Chapter 4: Planning Support for Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders Developing Individualized Program Plans (IPPs) There is considerable variability in how learning and behavioural characteristics

More information

Shared Solutions: An Overview Special Education Policy and Programs Branch Ministry of Education

Shared Solutions: An Overview Special Education Policy and Programs Branch Ministry of Education Shared Solutions: An Overview Special Education Policy and Programs Branch Ministry of Education Table of Contents 1. Shared Solutions: Overview 2. Understanding Conflict 3. Preventing Conflicts 4. Video:

More information

Family Matters PTIC Training Topics and Agendas

Family Matters PTIC Training Topics and Agendas RtI Family Matters PTIC Training Topics and Agendas Response to Intervention (RtI): Helping All Kids Succeed (Includes DVD on RtI) 1-Origin of RtI Within the IDEA and NCLB 2-Pyramid for Designing School-Wide

More information

WHAT HAPPENS IF MY CHILD IS HAVING TROUBLE LEARNING IN SCHOOL?

WHAT HAPPENS IF MY CHILD IS HAVING TROUBLE LEARNING IN SCHOOL? TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRODUCTION... 1 WHAT HAPPENS IF MY CHILD IS HAVING TROUBLE LEARNING IN SCHOOL?... 2 STEPS TO GETTING SERVICES... 3 ANSWERS TO FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS... 9 REQUEST FOR ASSISTANCE...

More information

Global engagement. An International Baccalaureate education for all

Global engagement. An International Baccalaureate education for all Learning stories Language and learning Inclusive education Global engagement Multiple programme schools Learning stories from the IB continuum share examples of good practice from IB World Schools in order

More information

Knowledge and Employability Studio Teacher Workstation. Programming for Students with Learning Disabilities Individualized Program Plans

Knowledge and Employability Studio Teacher Workstation. Programming for Students with Learning Disabilities Individualized Program Plans Individualized Program Plans (IPPs) are required for all students with special needs, including those with learning disabilities. IPPs are: written commitments of intent by education teams to ensure appropriate

More information

Parent Teacher Conference Tip Sheets for Principals, Teachers, and Parents

Parent Teacher Conference Tip Sheets for Principals, Teachers, and Parents Parent Teacher Conference Tip Sheets for Principals, Teachers, and Parents Harvard Family Research Project October 2010 For questions or comments about this paper, email hfrp_pubs@gse.harvard.edu 2010

More information

The Alberta Student Assessment Study Executive Summary

The Alberta Student Assessment Study Executive Summary The Alberta Student Assessment Study Executive Summary Charles F. Webber, University of Calgary Nola Aitken, University of Lethbridge Judy Lupart, University of Alberta Shelleyann Scott, University of

More information

Alberta. Alberta Education. Special Programs Branch. Essential components of educational programming for students with autism spectrum disorders.

Alberta. Alberta Education. Special Programs Branch. Essential components of educational programming for students with autism spectrum disorders. ALBERTA EDUCATION CATALOGUING IN PUBLICATION DATA Alberta. Alberta Education. Special Programs Branch. Essential components of educational programming for students with autism spectrum disorders. Series:

More information

Attribute 1: COMMUNICATION

Attribute 1: COMMUNICATION The positive are intended for use as a guide only and are not exhaustive. Not ALL will be applicable to ALL roles within a grade and in some cases may be appropriate to a Attribute 1: COMMUNICATION Level

More information

Professional Mentoring Program Information Guide & FAQs

Professional Mentoring Program Information Guide & FAQs Professional Mentoring Program Information Guide & FAQs Former PMP protégé Nilesh Bhagat, CHRP Former mentor TJ Schmaltz, LLB, BCL, CHRP Dear HRMA member, So you are interested in participating in our

More information

Afterschool and Students with Special Needs

Afterschool and Students with Special Needs Issue Brief No. 34 October 2008 Afterschool and Students with Special Needs The Disabilities, Opportunities, Internetworking and Technology Program (DO-IT) helped me become a better advocate for myself.

More information

School-based Support Personnel

School-based Support Personnel L. SUPPORT SERVICES School-based Support Personnel Yukon Education provides both professional and paraprofessional support to schools to address the diverse learning of students. Learning Assistance Program

More information

Steps to Becoming an Inclusive Learning-Friendly Environment

Steps to Becoming an Inclusive Learning-Friendly Environment Steps to Becoming an Inclusive Learning-Friendly Environment Description of tool: This tool suggests steps that school staff (or a dedicated team) might take to create a more inclusive, learning-friendly

More information

Involving Parents in the School - Ministry of Education Tips http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/parents/involvement/gettingstarted.html

Involving Parents in the School - Ministry of Education Tips http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/parents/involvement/gettingstarted.html Involving Parents in the School - Ministry of Education Tips http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/parents/involvement/gettingstarted.html We believe that good schools are even better when parents are involved

More information

TOOL KIT for RESIDENT EDUCATOR and MENT OR MOVES

TOOL KIT for RESIDENT EDUCATOR and MENT OR MOVES Get to Know My RE Observe Collect Evidence Mentor Moments Reflect Review Respond Tailor Support Provide Provide specific feedback specific Feedback What does my RE need? Practice Habits Of Mind Share Data

More information

Short-Term Programs. A Vital Component for Students who are Blind or Visually Impaired ATLANTIC PROVINCES SPECIAL EDUCATION AUTHORITY

Short-Term Programs. A Vital Component for Students who are Blind or Visually Impaired ATLANTIC PROVINCES SPECIAL EDUCATION AUTHORITY Short-Term Programs A Vital Component for Students who are Blind or Visually Impaired ATLANTIC PROVINCES SPECIAL EDUCATION AUTHORITY Atlantic Provinces Special Education Authority Commission de l enseignement

More information

Model for Practitioner Evaluation Manual SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGIST. Approved by Board of Education August 28, 2002

Model for Practitioner Evaluation Manual SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGIST. Approved by Board of Education August 28, 2002 Model for Practitioner Evaluation Manual SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGIST Approved by Board of Education August 28, 2002 Revised August 2008 Model for Practitioner Evaluation Guidelines and Process for Traditional

More information

Vernon Park Primary School. Teaching and Learning Policy

Vernon Park Primary School. Teaching and Learning Policy Vernon Park Primary School Teaching and Learning Policy The school s approach to teaching and learning is based upon the school vision: At Vernon Park Primary School we aim to provide all children, parents,

More information

Charles G. Taylor Elementary School A Communication Guide for Parents

Charles G. Taylor Elementary School A Communication Guide for Parents Charles G. Taylor Elementary School A Communication Guide for Parents PHILOSOPHY OF THE CHARLES G. TAYLOR ELEMENTARY SCHOOL VISION STATEMENT The Charles G. Taylor Elementary School is committed to creating

More information

ILLINOIS PROFESSIONAL TEACHING STANDARDS (2013)

ILLINOIS PROFESSIONAL TEACHING STANDARDS (2013) ILLINOIS PROFESSIONAL TEACHING STANDARDS (2013) Standard 1 - Teaching Diverse Students The competent teacher understands the diverse characteristics and abilities of each student and how individuals develop

More information

This definition of special education comes from the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), Public Law 105-17.

This definition of special education comes from the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), Public Law 105-17. Questions Often Asked About Special Education Services By the National Dissemination Center for Children with Disabilities (NICHCY), 1999. Public Domain. I think my child may need special help in school.

More information

SPECIAL EDUCATION. you actively participate in the decisions made about your child s education; and

SPECIAL EDUCATION. you actively participate in the decisions made about your child s education; and SPECIAL EDUCATION Meeting the needs of students with disabilities and behaviour problems is one of the most difficult challenges facing the public education system in Ontario. The laws governing public

More information

MILLIKIN TEACHING STANDARDS

MILLIKIN TEACHING STANDARDS MILLIKIN TEACHING STANDARDS Millikin Teaching Standards are correlated to and modifications of Illinois Professional Teaching Standards. Modifications reflect Millikin s mission and the education unit

More information

Transitional Kindergarten Parent Engagement Toolkit

Transitional Kindergarten Parent Engagement Toolkit Transitional Kindergarten Parent Engagement Toolkit A Parent Outreach and Communications Resource for School Districts and Local Education Agencies Implementing Transitional Kindergarten The Kindergarten

More information

WHOLE SCHOOLING Education for a Democratic Society

WHOLE SCHOOLING Education for a Democratic Society WHOLE SCHOOLING Education for a Democratic Society School Assessment and Action Planning Tool Michael Peterson Renaissance Community Press Wayne State University 217 Education Building Detroit, Michigan

More information

Section Two: Ohio Standards for the Teaching Profession

Section Two: Ohio Standards for the Teaching Profession 12 Section Two: Ohio Standards for the Teaching Profession 1 Teachers understand student learning and development and respect the diversity of the students they teach. Teachers display knowledge of how

More information

What is special education?

What is special education? P arents play an important role in their children s education. When a child has a disability and needs special education, parents are their most important advocates. If you believe that your child has

More information

Competencies for Early Childhood Professionals Area II: Understanding Child Growth and Development

Competencies for Early Childhood Professionals Area II: Understanding Child Growth and Development Competencies for Early Childhood Professionals Area II: Understanding Child Growth and Development Rationale: Child development is the foundation upon which early childhood practice is based. Because the

More information

Contents. Letter from the Commissioners... 3. 1. Introduction... 5. 2. What Areas Should Be Considered for Improvement?... 9

Contents. Letter from the Commissioners... 3. 1. Introduction... 5. 2. What Areas Should Be Considered for Improvement?... 9 Contents Letter from the Commissioners... 3 1. Introduction... 5 2. What Areas Should Be Considered for Improvement?... 9 3. Who Are the Partners in School Improvement Planning?... 11 4. How Do We Begin?...

More information

Quality Standards. All children will learn, grow and develop to realize their full potential.

Quality Standards. All children will learn, grow and develop to realize their full potential. Quality Standards All children will learn, grow and develop to realize their full potential. Vision > > All children will learn, grow and develop to realize their full potential. Mission > > To provide

More information

Looking After Children framework for children and young people living in out-of-home care arrangements. A guide for disability service providers

Looking After Children framework for children and young people living in out-of-home care arrangements. A guide for disability service providers Looking After Children framework for children and young people living in out-of-home care arrangements A guide for disability service providers If you would like to receive this publication in an accessible

More information

EARLY CHILDHOOD TRANSITION GUIDEBOOK. What You Need to Know Before Your Child s Third Birthday

EARLY CHILDHOOD TRANSITION GUIDEBOOK. What You Need to Know Before Your Child s Third Birthday EARLY CHILDHOOD TRANSITION GUIDEBOOK What You Need to Know Before Your Child s Third Birthday Early Childhood Transition Guidebook What You Need to Know Before Your Child s Third Birthday PACER Center

More information

Family Engagement and Ongoing Child Assessment

Family Engagement and Ongoing Child Assessment Family Engagement and Ongoing Child Assessment The partnership between parents and Head Start staff is fundamental to children s current and future success and their readiness for school. This relationship

More information

Suite Overview...2. Glossary...8. Functional Map.11. List of Standards..15. Youth Work Standards 16. Signposting to other Standards...

Suite Overview...2. Glossary...8. Functional Map.11. List of Standards..15. Youth Work Standards 16. Signposting to other Standards... LSI YW00 Youth Work National Occupational Standards Introduction Youth Work National Occupational Standards Introduction Contents: Suite Overview...2 Glossary......8 Functional Map.11 List of Standards..15

More information

Effective Communication Between Parents and Teachers

Effective Communication Between Parents and Teachers Effective Communication Between Parents and Teachers Center for Assessment and Intervention Fischler School of Education and Human services Nova Southeastern University The Importance of Parental Involvement

More information

Performance Management

Performance Management Performance Management WORKSHOP HANDOUTS Facilitated by: Tara Kemes, Vantage Point Knowledge Philanthropist June 2013 Page 1 of 16 Handout 1 Performance Management System Overview What is performance management?

More information

Special Education Policy

Special Education Policy Special Education Policy Website References Website references contained within this document are provided solely as a convenience and do not constitute an endorsement by the Department of Education of

More information

Board Development PARTICIPANT WORKBOOK

Board Development PARTICIPANT WORKBOOK Board Development (Not bored of development) PARTICIPANT WORKBOOK Created and facilitated by: Lynda Gerty, Engagement Director Last update March 2014 2014 Property of Vantage Point Not to be reproduced

More information

Australian Professional Standard for Principals

Australian Professional Standard for Principals AITSL is funded by the Australian Government Australian Professional Standard for Principals July 2011 Formerly the National Professional Standard for Principals 2011 Education Services Australia as the

More information

EXCEPTIONAL NEEDS SPECIALIST

EXCEPTIONAL NEEDS SPECIALIST IMPORTANT NOTICE TO CANDIDATES: The assessment information in this document is aligned with NBPTS Exceptional Needs Standards, Second Edition (for teachers of students ages birth 21+). If you applied for

More information

Recruiting for Diversity

Recruiting for Diversity GUIDE Creating and sustaining patient and family advisory councils Recruiting for Diversity Let s make our health system healthier WHO IS HEALTH QUALITY ONTARIO Health Quality Ontario is the provincial

More information

Social and Emotional Wellbeing

Social and Emotional Wellbeing Social and Emotional Wellbeing A Guide for Children s Services Educators Social and emotional wellbeing may also be called mental health, which is different from mental illness. Mental health is our capacity

More information

Building on Success: Helping students make transitions from year to year

Building on Success: Helping students make transitions from year to year Building on Success: Helping students make transitions from year to year Alberta Education Cataloguing in Publication Data Alberta Alberta Education Learning and Teaching Resources Branch Building on success

More information

Each SBT should have a thorough understanding of the District Problem Solving Approach and Process.

Each SBT should have a thorough understanding of the District Problem Solving Approach and Process. BEST PRACTICES Each school in School District No. 22 should have an active, functioning School Based Team (SBT). Each SBT should have a thorough understanding of the District Problem Solving Approach and

More information

Alberta Accredited International Schools. Handbook

Alberta Accredited International Schools. Handbook Alberta Accredited International Schools Handbook Alberta Accredited International Schools Handbook 2013 The Alberta Accredited International Schools Handbook is an Alberta Education publication for the

More information

A GUIDEG SPECIAL PRESCHOOL EDUCATION FOR CHILDREN TRANSITIONING FROM EARLY INTERVENTION DRAFT

A GUIDEG SPECIAL PRESCHOOL EDUCATION FOR CHILDREN TRANSITIONING FROM EARLY INTERVENTION DRAFT A GUIDEG TO PRESCHOOL SPECIAL EDUCATION FOR CHILDREN TRANSITIONING FROM EARLY INTERVENTION 2010 Early Childhood Direction Center c/o Women & Children s Hospital of Buffalo 219 Bryant Street Buffalo, New

More information

April 2009 Child Care Orientation Course Session Overviews

April 2009 Child Care Orientation Course Session Overviews Children and Youth Services Child Development Branch 6 th floor, Sterling Place 9940-106 Street Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T5K 2N2 Telephone 1-800-661-9754 Fax 780/427-1258 Child Care Orientation Course

More information

Internship Guide. M.Ed. in Special Education

Internship Guide. M.Ed. in Special Education Internship Guide M.Ed. in Special Education Together We Shape the Future College of Education Qatar University Draft - December 2007 The conceptual framework of the College of Education at Qatar University

More information

Communicating with Your Child s School Through Letter Writing

Communicating with Your Child s School Through Letter Writing Communicating with Your Child s School Through Letter Writing A publication of the National Dissemination Center for Children with Disabilities Throughout your child s school years, there is always a need

More information

SCHOOL DISTRICT COMMUNICATION GUIDELINES

SCHOOL DISTRICT COMMUNICATION GUIDELINES SECTION E: COMMUNICATION SCHOOL DISTRICT COMMUNICATION GUIDELINES INDIVIDUAL TRUSTEE SCHOOL STAFF MEMBER PARENT SCHOOL COUNCIL TEACHER PRINCIPAL AREA SUPERINTENDENT CHIEF SUPERINTENDENT BOARD OF TRUSTEES

More information

Shell Mentoring Toolkit

Shell Mentoring Toolkit Shell Mentoring Toolkit A reference document for mentors and mentees Human Resources LEARNING 25/07/2007 Copyright: Shell International Ltd 2006 CONTENTS What is Mentoring? 4 The Mentor s Role The Role

More information

Special Education For Preschoolers

Special Education For Preschoolers C A L I F O R N I A E A R L Y S T A R T Special Education For Preschoolers A G U I D E F O R P A R E N T S Early Intervention services system encouraging partnerships between families and professionals,

More information

A Framework for School Counselling Programs in the Northwest Territories January 2004

A Framework for School Counselling Programs in the Northwest Territories January 2004 A Framework for School Counselling Programs in the Northwest Territories Honouring the Spirit of Our Children A Framework for School Counselling Programs in the Northwest Territories ISBN 0-7708-0098-X

More information

Colorado Professional Teaching Standards

Colorado Professional Teaching Standards Colorado Professional Teaching Standards Standard I: Teachers demonstrate knowledge of the content they teach a. Teachers provide instruction that is aligned with the Colorado Academic Standards and their

More information

FINAL REPORT 2005 08 RESEARCH GRADE 7 TO 12 PROGRAMS. Frontier College would like to thank the Ontario Ministry of Education for their support.

FINAL REPORT 2005 08 RESEARCH GRADE 7 TO 12 PROGRAMS. Frontier College would like to thank the Ontario Ministry of Education for their support. FINAL REPORT 2005 08 RESEARCH GRADE 7 TO 12 PROGRAMS Frontier College would like to thank the Ontario Ministry of Education for their support. 1 Introduction For the past three years, Frontier College

More information

Performance Factors and Campuswide Standards Guidelines. With Behavioral Indicators

Performance Factors and Campuswide Standards Guidelines. With Behavioral Indicators Performance Factors and Campuswide Standards Guidelines With Behavioral Indicators Rev. 05/06/2014 Contents PERFORMANCE FACTOR GUIDELINES... 1 Position Expertise... 1 Approach to Work... 2 Quality of Work...

More information

Stand Up for Standards. A companion resource to the CARNA Nursing Practice Standards

Stand Up for Standards. A companion resource to the CARNA Nursing Practice Standards 1 2 Stand Up for Standards 3 4 A companion resource to the CARNA Nursing Practice Standards The purpose of this document is to increase awareness and understanding among registered nurses of the CARNA

More information

Standards for the School Social Worker [23.140]

Standards for the School Social Worker [23.140] Standards for the School Social Worker [23.140] STANDARD 1 - Content The competent school social worker understands the theories and skills needed to provide individual, group, and family counseling; crisis

More information

FAQ regarding IEP s. Does a Special Ed teacher (Service Coordinator) have to be present at IEP meeting? Yes. At least 1 must be present.

FAQ regarding IEP s. Does a Special Ed teacher (Service Coordinator) have to be present at IEP meeting? Yes. At least 1 must be present. FAQ regarding IEP s What is an IEP? IEP stands for Individualized Education Program. It s a legal document which is a written agreement between the parent and the school. Think of it as a map of the student

More information

Early Childhood Education. Early Education Practicum Manual ECED 460/465 Theory and Practice

Early Childhood Education. Early Education Practicum Manual ECED 460/465 Theory and Practice Vanguard University School of Education Early Childhood Education Early Education Practicum Manual ECED 460/465 Theory and Practice And whatever you do, do it heartily, as to the Lord and not to men, knowing

More information

Leadership Development Handbook

Leadership Development Handbook Leadership Development Handbook Presented by: Langara College Human Resources Prepared by: Jackson Consulting Group Aim of the Handbook is to provide: Leadership Development Handbook - Introduction help

More information

Clinton County Early Intervention Services

Clinton County Early Intervention Services Clinton County Early Intervention Services Page 1 of 13 CLINTON COUNTY BOARD OF DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES Dear Families, Welcome to Early Intervention Services! We look forward to getting to know you

More information

Humber College Institute of Technology & Advanced Learning. Program Advisory Committee. Procedure Manual

Humber College Institute of Technology & Advanced Learning. Program Advisory Committee. Procedure Manual Humber College Institute of Technology & Advanced Learning Program Advisory Committee Procedure Manual Message from the President On behalf of Humber College Institute of Technology & Advanced Learning,

More information

MODULE 10 CHANGE MANAGEMENT AND COMMUNICATION

MODULE 10 CHANGE MANAGEMENT AND COMMUNICATION MODULE 10 CHANGE MANAGEMENT AND COMMUNICATION PART OF A MODULAR TRAINING RESOURCE Commonwealth of Australia 2015. With the exception of the Commonwealth Coat of Arms and where otherwise noted all material

More information

Onboarding Program. Supervisor s Guide

Onboarding Program. Supervisor s Guide Onboarding Program Supervisor s Guide Supervisor s Guide Introduction This guide has been developed for supervisors to support an effective and successful onboarding process for new employees. As a supervisor,

More information

NEWS INFORMATION and BEST PRACTICES FOR INCLUSION IN MARYLAND

NEWS INFORMATION and BEST PRACTICES FOR INCLUSION IN MARYLAND Introductory Issue JUNE 2001 All Inclusive NEWS INFORMATION and BEST PRACTICES FOR INCLUSION IN MARYLAND A Collaborative Effort from the MARYLAND STATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION, Division of Special Education

More information

Section Five: Instructional Programs 510R SCHOOL COUNSELING (REGULATIONS)

Section Five: Instructional Programs 510R SCHOOL COUNSELING (REGULATIONS) 510R SCHOOL COUNSELING (REGULATIONS) ROLE DESCRIPTION SCHOOL COUNSELOR 1. Major Responsibility: To assist the school with the implementation of counselling services. 2. Reporting Relationship: The counsellor

More information

A Guide to Preschool Special Education

A Guide to Preschool Special Education A Guide to Preschool Special Education The Mid-State Early Childhood Direction Center Syracuse University 805 South Crouse Avenue Syracuse, NY 13244-2280 2280 1-800-962-5488 315-443 443-44444444 http://ecdc.syr.edu

More information

All About Me Guidance and tools to support person centred planning

All About Me Guidance and tools to support person centred planning All About Me Guidance and tools to support person centred planning Contents 1. Introduction 2. Person Centred Planning Tools a. A Relationship circle b. What is important to me? What is important for me?

More information

A GUIDEG EDUCATION FOR CHILDREN SPECIAL PRESCHOOL TRANSITIONING FROM EARLY INTERVENTION

A GUIDEG EDUCATION FOR CHILDREN SPECIAL PRESCHOOL TRANSITIONING FROM EARLY INTERVENTION A GUIDEG TO PRESCHOOL SPECIAL EDUCATION FOR CHILDREN TRANSITIONING FROM EARLY INTERVENTION 2013 1 Early Childhood Direction Center c/o Women & Children s Hospital of Buffalo 219 Bryant Street Buffalo,

More information

u Field Experience Handbook for Supervising Library Media Teacher or Teacher Librarian

u Field Experience Handbook for Supervising Library Media Teacher or Teacher Librarian u Field Experience Handbook for Supervising Library Media Teacher or Teacher Librarian Revised 2010 Dear Supervising Teacher Librarian: Thank you for your willingness to have a student perform fieldwork

More information

Daily Physical Activity Survey Report

Daily Physical Activity Survey Report Daily Physical Activity Survey Report Accountability and Reporting Division, 10155 102 Street NW, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, T5J 4L5 ALBERTA EDUCATION CATALOGUING IN PUBLICATION DATA Alberta. Alberta Education.

More information

Lay Supervision Team. A Guide

Lay Supervision Team. A Guide Lay Supervision Team A Guide The United Church of Canada L Église Unie du Canada SME 222/2010 Copyright 2007, 2010 The United Church of Canada L Église Unie du Canada The content of this resource is licensed

More information

Chapter 6: Individualized Education Programs (IEPs)

Chapter 6: Individualized Education Programs (IEPs) 33 Chapter 6: Individualized Education Programs (IEPs) In this chapter you will: learn the parts of an IEP learn who is on an IEP team discover tips and things to remember when working on the IEP understand

More information

Preparing for the Vice-Principal Selection Process

Preparing for the Vice-Principal Selection Process Preparing for the Vice-Principal Selection Process 2014-15 Education Centre Aurora, 60 Wellington Street West, Aurora, Ontario, L4G 3H2 MESSAGE FROM THE DIRECTOR Dear Colleagues: Congratulations on aspiring

More information

Please complete this form and return it ASAP by fax to (519)675-7772, attn: Rebecca Warder

Please complete this form and return it ASAP by fax to (519)675-7772, attn: Rebecca Warder Child Welfare Assessment Screening Information Form Please complete this form and return it ASAP by fax to (519)675-7772, attn: Rebecca Warder Today s Date: Case Name: Referring Agency: Worker s Name:

More information

TELL them FROM me Student Survey Year in Review 2010 2011

TELL them FROM me Student Survey Year in Review 2010 2011 TELL them FROM me Student Survey Year in Review 2010 2011 TELL them FROM me Year in Review We believe that the same process of inquiry that invigorates classrooms also breathes life into school reform.

More information

Systemic or school wide, coordinated efforts designed to create a climate for learning

Systemic or school wide, coordinated efforts designed to create a climate for learning Systemic or school wide, coordinated efforts designed to create a climate for learning What is this? A positive school climate is one that evidences norms, values and patterns of behavior that support

More information

CONDUCTING EFFECTIVE MEETINGS WORKBOOK A BASIC BUSINESS VICTORY GUIDE

CONDUCTING EFFECTIVE MEETINGS WORKBOOK A BASIC BUSINESS VICTORY GUIDE CONDUCTING EFFECTIVE MEETINGS WORKBOOK A BASIC BUSINESS VICTORY GUIDE This book was developed by James H. Saylor Copyright 2006. All rights reserved. Printed in the United States of America. Except as

More information

Parent and Community Engagement Framework

Parent and Community Engagement Framework Department of Education, Training and Employment Parent and Community Engagement Framework Working together to maximise student learning 140187 Great state. Great opportunity. Purpose Parents * and the

More information

Belmont Public Schools Special Education Programs

Belmont Public Schools Special Education Programs Belmont Public Schools Special Education Programs Preschool Program School: Belmont system wide Population Served: Special Education Students Aged 3 5 Grade: Pre K Program Description: This program is

More information

Illinois Professional Teaching Standards

Illinois Professional Teaching Standards Illinois Professional Teaching Standards Preamble: We believe that all students have the potential to learn rigorous content and achieve high standards. A well-educated citizenry is essential for maintaining

More information

DESCRIBING OUR COMPETENCIES. new thinking at work

DESCRIBING OUR COMPETENCIES. new thinking at work DESCRIBING OUR COMPETENCIES new thinking at work OUR COMPETENCIES - AT A GLANCE 2 PERSONAL EFFECTIVENESS Influencing Communicating Self-development Decision-making PROVIDING EXCELLENT CUSTOMER SERVICE

More information

SPECIAL EDUCATION IN MASSACHUSETTS

SPECIAL EDUCATION IN MASSACHUSETTS SPECIAL EDUCATION IN MASSACHUSETTS Children's Law Center of Massachusetts 298 Union Street Lynn, MA 01901 (781) 581-1977 *updated February 2013 Introduction.1 When is a student eligible for special education

More information

A GUIDE TO PRESCHOOL SPECIAL EDUCATION

A GUIDE TO PRESCHOOL SPECIAL EDUCATION A GUIDE TO PRESCHOOL SPECIAL EDUCATION Early Childhood Direction Center c/o Women & Children s Hospital of Buffalo 219 Bryant Street Buffalo, New York 14222 716-880-3875 Toll Free 1 (800) 462-7653 www.wchob.org/ecdc

More information

PRINCIPAL POSITION DESCRIPTION

PRINCIPAL POSITION DESCRIPTION 400-20 Administrative Procedure 430 Background PRINCIPAL POSITION DESCRIPTION The Principal is responsible for overall supervision and operation of his/her individual school. This responsibility includes

More information

TOWARD BETTER COMMUNICATION. A Report from MLA Jane Thornthwaite, Parliamentary Secretary for Student Support & Parent Engagement

TOWARD BETTER COMMUNICATION. A Report from MLA Jane Thornthwaite, Parliamentary Secretary for Student Support & Parent Engagement TOWARD BETTER COMMUNICATION A Report from MLA Jane Thornthwaite, Parliamentary Secretary for Student Support & Parent Engagement STARTING WITH COMMUNICATION We all want our children to be successful in

More information

R e p o r t i n g S t u d e n t L e a r n i n g. Guidelines for Effective Teacher-Parent-Student Communication

R e p o r t i n g S t u d e n t L e a r n i n g. Guidelines for Effective Teacher-Parent-Student Communication R e p o r t i n g S t u d e n t L e a r n i n g Guidelines for Effective Teacher-Parent-Student Communication 2 0 1 0 Contents ParT 1: The Importance of Effective Teacher-Parent-Student 2 Communication

More information

GUIDANCE AND COUNSELING SERVICES PROGRAM GUIDE

GUIDANCE AND COUNSELING SERVICES PROGRAM GUIDE GUIDANCE AND COUNSELING SERVICES PROGRAM GUIDE 2013 COLTS NECK TOWNSHIP PUBLIC SCHOOLS COLTS NECK, NJ Colts Neck Schools Guidance Philosophy School Guidance Counselors provide a wide range of services

More information

Kindergarten. Catholic School Version. Curriculum Express for Parents

Kindergarten. Catholic School Version. Curriculum Express for Parents 2013 2014 Kindergarten Catholic School Version Curriculum Express for Parents Curriculum Express for Parents 2013 2014 Catholic School Version Alberta Education The Alberta Education website contains

More information

Evaluation System for Classified & Management Support Staff

Evaluation System for Classified & Management Support Staff Evaluation System for Classified & Management Support Staff August 2012 Grant Wood Area Education Agency extends equal opportunities in its employment practices, educational programs and services, and

More information

Laura A. Riffel and Ann P. Turnbull

Laura A. Riffel and Ann P. Turnbull Laura A. Riffel and Ann P. Turnbull Beach Center on Disabilities University of Kansas Technical Assistance Center on Positive Behavior Support www.beachcenter.org www.pbis.org Incorporating Positive Behavior

More information

CHAPTER 1: The Preceptor Role in Health Systems Management

CHAPTER 1: The Preceptor Role in Health Systems Management CHAPTER 1: The Preceptor Role in Health Systems Management Throughout the nursing literature, the preceptor is described as a nurse who teaches, supports, counsels, coaches, evaluates, serves as role model

More information

EARLY LEARNING CHILD PSYCHOLOGISTS (Existing positions)

EARLY LEARNING CHILD PSYCHOLOGISTS (Existing positions) Edmonton Catholic Schools is now accepting applications for the position of EARLY LEARNING CHILD PSYCHOLOGISTS (Existing positions) Edmonton Catholic Schools is a large urban school district whose mission

More information

ILLINOIS CERTIFICATION TESTING SYSTEM

ILLINOIS CERTIFICATION TESTING SYSTEM ILLINOIS CERTIFICATION TESTING SYSTEM FIELD 188: ASSESSMENT OF PROFESSIONAL TEACHING (PK 12) June 2011 ILLINOIS CERTIFICATION TESTING SYSTEM FIELD 188: ASSESSMENT OF PROFESSIONAL TEACHING (PK 12) June

More information

BUILDING CURRICULUM ACCOMMODATION PLAN

BUILDING CURRICULUM ACCOMMODATION PLAN BUILDING CURRICULUM ACCOMMODATION PLAN 2014-2015 ERIC STARK, PRINCIPAL KATE PERETZ, ASSISTANT PRINCIPAL Alone we can do so little; together we can do so much. Helen Keller FRANKLIN PUBLIC SCHOOLS VISION

More information