CHAPTER 6. Chemical Bonds

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1 CHAPTER 6 Chemical Bonds

2 Valence Electrons 1. Electrons farthest away from the nucleus. The electrons in the highest occupied energy level of an atom of that element. 2. They play a key role in chemical reactions. They are used to form chemical bonds 3. The valence electrons increase from left to right in a period. 4. May be transferred from one atom to another or they may be shared between atoms. 5. The number of valence electrons in an atom can range from 1 to When the highest occupied energy level of an atom is filled with electrons (8 electrons except for H & He), the atom is stable and not likely to react. That is why the Noble Gases are not very reactive. Their highest energy level is filled with 8 valence electrons 7. Each element has a typical number of valence electrons.

3 Electron Dot Diagram (used to show how many valence electrons each element has) C O H! Ne A model of an atom in which the dots around each element symbol represent the number of valence electron that the element has in its highest energy level is called an Electron Dot Diagram. (Lewis dot diagram). Carbon has 4 valence electron therefore this is shown by 4 dots around C. Neon is stable- highest occupied energy level is full- it has 8 valence electrons.

4 Making Bonds Atoms are most stable when they have 8 valence electrons in the highest energy level, with the exception of Hydrogen and Helium, which are full with 2 VE in their one energy level. Typically, atoms gain, lose, or share electrons to achieve a stable electron configuration. Some elements achieve stable electron configurations through the transfer of electrons between atoms. This occurs between a metal and a nonmetal and the bond is called an ionic bond. The compound formed is called an Ionic compound. Some elements achieve stable electron configuration by sharing electrons. This occurs between a nonmetal and a nonmetal and the bond is called a covalent bond.

5 Forming Ionic Bonds Elements that transfer electrons form ionic bonds. Ionic Bonds Occur between metals & nonmetals Example: Na sodium (metal) has 1 VE Cl chlorine (nonmetal) has 7 VE Sodium can give its 1 valence electron to Chlorine then sodium would have no electrons in that shell, it would disappear and it highest occupied energy level would then have 8 and chlorine would have 8 and they would both be more stable. When an atom gains or loses an electron, the number of protons is no longer equal to the number of electrons. The charge on the atom is not balanced and therefore becomes a charged ION. An ion is an atom that has a net electric charge of either positive or negative. An ion with a negative charge is called an anion and an ion with a positive charge is called a cation.

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7 Ionization It takes energy to lose electrons and this energy is called Ionization energy. Cations (positive ions) form when electron gain enough energy to escape from the atom. The energy allows electrons to overcome the attraction of the protons in the nucleus. The amount of energy used to remove an electron is called ionization. Ionization increases from left to right on a Periodic Table. It takes more energy to remove an electron from a nonmetal than from a metal in the same period.

8 The positive ion (cation) is a metal element. The negative ion (anion) is a nonmetal element. A particle with a negative charge will attract a particle with a positive charge. So when an anion and cation are close together, a chemical bond forms between them and holds the compound together. A chemical bond is the force that holds atoms together. An ionic bond is the force that holds cations (+) and anions (-) together. An ionic bond forms when electrons are transferred from one atom to another. 4 steps to show formation of ionic bond: STEP 1: Electron Dot STEP 4: Show Neutral Compound NaCl STEP 2: Transfer of electrons STEP 3: Show ions formed

9 When more then one element is needed to transfer electrons: A magnesium atom cannot reach a stable electron configuration by reacting with just one chlorine. It must transfer 2 valence electrons that are in its highest energy level to become stable. Therefore it will need 2 chlorine atoms. The formula for the compound formed is MgCl 2 and is called magnesium chloride. The subscript 2 indicates that there are two chloride ions for each magnesium ion. MgCl 2

10 Ionic Bonding

11 IONIC COMPOUNDS Compounds that contain ionic bonds are ionic compounds, represented by a chemical formula. A chemical formula is a notation that shows what elements a compound contains and the ratio of the atoms or ions of these elements in the compound. The properties of an ionic compound can be explained by the strong attractions among ions within a crystal lattice. Ionic Compound Properties: 1. Conducts electricity in melted state or dissolved state ONLY (ions free to flow) 2. High melting points 3. Forms when electrons are transferred 4. Has crystal shape ( orderly, 3-dimensional, lattice structure) therefore tends to shatters when struck 5. Ionic bonds hold compound together 6. Bond between metal and nonmetal NaCl-Sodium Chloride is salt

12 Practice Ionic Bonding 1. Na + Cl! 2. Mg + O! 3. Na + F! 4. Li + O! 5. Mg + S! 6. Al + Cl

13 Sec 2 COVALENT BONDS Covalent bonds form when 2 atoms share a pair of valence electrons.this occurs between a nonmetal and a nonmetal. 1 paired shared is called a single bond. 2 pairs of electrons shared forms double bonds, and 3 pairs shared form triple bonds. (F- F O=O N N ) Covalent bonds are formed between 2 or more nonmetals. EX: F + F F:F or F-F (pair of dots, are 2 electrons; it is replaced by a line to represent a bond.) Now both F have 8 valence electrons. They have formed a molecule. A molecule is a neutral group of atoms that are joined together by one or more covalent bonds. Every atom can have 8 VE with the exception of hydrogen and helium. They can have no more than 2 electrons and form 1 bond. YouTube - Covalent Bond

14 Covalent Bonding

15 5 Steps to show covalent bonding: STEP 1: Electron Dot STEP 2: Place electrons to be shared between atoms STEP 3: Circle to show electrons being shared H-H STEP 4: Replace pair of shared electrons with bond line STEP 5: Write final Molecular compound H2 Cl-Cl Cl2 The attraction between the shared electrons and the protons in each nucleus hold the atoms together in a covalent bond. If 2 pair of electron ( 4 electrons) are sharing it forms Double Bonds (O 2 ) If 3 pair of electrons are shared it forms triple bonds (N 2 )

16 MOLECULAR COMPOUNDS (covalently bonded compounds) 1. Have low melting points 2. Poor conductors of electricity because they do not form charged ions. 3. Form when electrons are shared. 4. Force holding them together are weaker. 5. Are covalently bonded 6. Bond between nonmetal and nonmetal

17 Practice Covalent Bonding 1. H + O! 2. N + H! 3. C + O! 4. N + N! 5. O + O

18 In Covalent Bonds, where atoms share electrons, some atoms pull more strongly on the shared electrons than other atoms do. As a result, the electrons move closer to one atom causing the atoms to have a very slight electrical charge, forming a polar covalent bond. H-Cl Cl2 Electrons not shared equally the bond is POLAR covalent bond. Chlorine has a stronger attraction to the shared electrons. It is more electronegative. Atoms in a Polar covalent bond carry a slight electrical charge shown by a - Greek lowercase delta letter. + When electrons are shared and pulled equally bond is NON-POLAR covalent bond. There is NO slight charge. or

19 Attracting shared electrons: Electronegativity The larger the value of the electronegativity, the greater the atom s strength to attract a bonding pair of electrons. With a few exceptions, the electronegativity of an atom increase, from left to right, in a period, and decrease, from top to bottom, in a family. Decreasing Increasing

20 The covalent bonds between the hydrogen and oxygen atoms in a water molecule are called intramolecular bonds. (The prefix intra- comes from the Latin stem meaning "within or inside."

21 A long dash represents two electrons being shared

22 POLAR COMPOUNDS EX: water Has a stronger attraction between molecules than nonpolar molecular compounds. Slightly charged molecule The bonds between the neighboring water molecules in ice or water are called intermolecular bonds, from the Latin stem meaning "between." NONPOLAR COMPOUNDS Ex: oil Does not dissolve well in water No Charge The type of atoms in a molecule and its shape are factors that determine whether a molecule is polar or nonpolar. Polar and Nonpolar compounds usually do not mix well. Attractions between polar molecules are stronger than attractions between nonpolar molecules. Does not have strong attractions between the molecules

23 POLAR Molecules NONPOLAR Molecules

24 Polar molecular compounds, like water can dissolve Ionic compounds as well as other Polar Molecular Compounds Table Salt Dissolving in Water Any substance that is made up of ions (ionic compounds) or molecules that have polar covalent bonds can dissolve in water, due to waters polar properties (having a slight charge). This idea also explains why some substances do not dissolve in water. Oil, for example, is a nonpolar molecule. Because there is no net electrical charge across an oil molecule, it is not attracted to water molecules and therefore does not dissolve in water.

25 Compound Review Molecular Compounds have covalently bonded atoms. (shared electrons) Ionic Compounds have ionic bonds holding the atoms together.( electrons transferred) Forces holding molecular compounds together are weaker than forces holding ionic compounds together.

26 Molecular Compound Ionic Compound

27 Ionic compounds have a stronger force holding them together due to this opposite charge attraction, therefore they have a higher melting point and it would take a lot more energy to break their bonds than it would a molecular compound composed of covalent bonds.

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29 Sec 3 Naming Ionic Compounds When naming ionic compounds the positive ion comes first followed by the negative ion. The negative ion s name ending changes to---ide. If the negative ion is a single element, the end of its name changes to ide. Ex: MgO contains magnesium and oxygen. Its name is Magnesium Oxide. The metal (cation) is named first followed by the nonmetal (anion). But If the negative ion (anion) is polyatomic, its name is unchanged. Ex: Na 2 CO 3 is sodium carbonate. Polyatomic ions- are made up of more then one element that is covalently bonded and acts as a unit.) Carbonate, CO 3 is a polyatomic acting as the nonmetal bonding with the metal sodium (Na). Most polyatomic ions are anions (negative ions), acting as a nonmetal unit EX: OH -, NO 3-, SO 4 2- ( see table on page 173) Formulas of ionic compounds are used to describe the ratio of the ions in the compound. We use element symbols with subscripts added to indicate the ratio of the ions in the compound. A compound made from only 2 kind of elements is a binary compound. EX: NaCl, BaCl 2, KCl,

30 Writing Binary Formulas for Ionic Compounds Write the element symbol(s) for the cation on the left and the anion on the right. Now balance the formula out so that there is a net charge of zero. A simple way to balance out an equation is to use the! Criss-Cross method.!! For Example: Al +3 O -2! Aluminum has a charge of 3+ and Oxygen has a charge of-2! Criss-Cross each charge Al2O3 Aluminum Oxide Li +, Br - would be LiBr! Fe +3, O -2 would be Fe2O3

31 Naming Binary Molecular Compounds (covalent) When naming Binary Compounds of Covalently bonded Molecular compounds you use the prefix method. Examples: H 2 O two hydrogen and one oxygen-named dihydrogen monoxide! SO 2 there is one sulfur and two oxygen atoms in this compound. the name would be monosulfur dioxide---the prefix mono often is not used for the first element in the name, so a more common name for this compound would be----sulfur Dioxide! N 2 O 5 there are two nitrogen atoms and 5 oxygen atoms in this compound, the name would be Dinitrogen Pentoxide

32 Naming Molecular Compounds The element that is most metallic (of the nonmetallic compound) is read first. If both are in the same group the more metallic element is the one closer to the bottom of the group. The second element s ending is changed to ide. EX: Carbon Dioxide. CO 2 Since there are 2 oxygens the prefix Di- is used. The name and formula of a molecular compound describes the type and number of atoms in a molecule of the compound. Greek Prefixes for Naming Molecular Compounds 1. Mono- 7 Hepta- 2. Di- 8 Octa- 3. Tri- 9 Nona- 4. Tetra- 10 Deca- 5. Penta- 6. Hexa- (covalent compounds)

33 Sec 4 Properties of Metals The properties of metals are related to the bonds within the metals. Normally metals achieve stable electron configuration by losing electrons and a nonmetal accepts it. But what if there is no nonmetal around to accept the electrons? In metals, the valence electrons are free to move among the metal atoms. They are referred to as a pool of shared electrons. A metallic bond will form between the metal cation and this pool of shared electrons that surround it. Even though the pool of electrons are moving the number of electron do not change. So the metal atoms remain neutral. The more valence electrons a metal has to contribute to this pool of electrons the stronger the bond will be. Alkali metals only have 1 valence electron to contribute so they form weak metallic bonds between each of their atoms. These metals are very soft. Transition metal have more valence electrons to contribute and therefore are harder and have higher melting points than other metals. The mobility of electrons within a metal lattice explains some of the properties of metals. Because this pool of electrons can flow from one place to another it makes metals good conductors of electricity. An electric current can be carried through a metal by the free flow of these electrons. This also helps explain why metals are malleable and ductile.

34 Metallic Bonding

35 Al Aluminum ion Pool of valence electrons In a metal, cations are surrounded by shared valence electrons. If a metal is struck by a hammer the ions are still surrounded by electrons and it will not shatter. In a metal, valence electrons are free to move among the atoms.

36 Alloys A substance composed of two or more metals or of a metal and a nonmetal united usually by being fused together and dissolving in each other when molten (melted state). Alloys have properties of metals. An alloy is used to make tools become strong and non reactive to water and air. In every alloy at least one of the elements is a metal. Copper Alloys- Bronze made of copper and tin. Together the metals are much harder and stronger than by themselves. Iron Alloys- Brass- made of copper and zinc. It is shinier and softer than bronze. Steel is an alloy of mainly iron and carbon. Stainless steel- alloy of iron and chromium almost no carbon. Aluminum alloys- aluminum mixed with manganese or copper makes aluminum stronger.! Scientists can design alloys with specific properties by varying the types and amounts of elements in an alloy.

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