CAPCOG Regional Strategic Criminal Justice Plan

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1 CAPCOG Regional Strategic Criminal Justice Plan FY 2015 Prepared by the Capital Area Council of Governments for the Office of the Governor s Criminal Justice Division December, 2014

2 Table of Contents Executive Summary... Section 1 Regional Overview... Section 2 Population and Growth Further Components of Growth Demographic Characteristics Employment Characteristics Regional Uniform Crime Statistics... Section 3 Uniform Crime Statistics.3.1 Detailed Arrest Data..3.2 County by County Analysis Past Grant Funding to the Region... Section 4 Regional Criminal Justice Planning Process and Priorities... Section 5 Planning Process Stakeholder Participants Regional Priorities Needs Identified 5.4 1

3 Section 1: Executive Summary The Regional Strategic Plan encompasses the ten counties (Bastrop, Blanco, Burnet, Caldwell, Fayette, Hays, Lee, Llano, Travis, and Williamson counties) in the CAPCOG service region. The purpose of the Strategic Plan is to identify gaps in direct victim assistance, juvenile justice, mental health, and criminal justice issues so that services, existing programs, new initiatives, and funding opportunities may be reviewed and resources targeted accordingly. Planning Process Two regional stakeholder outreach meetings were conducted in November Participants were asked to identify needs within their area of expertise related to: Training; Direct Services; Education & Outreach; Investigation and/or Prosecution; Support Technology and Equipment; and Staffing and Personnel Support (direct or contractual). These needs were reviewed by the CAPCOG Criminal Justice Advisory Committee (CJAC) and recommended to the CAPCOG Executive Committee for adoption as regional priorities. Data sources were identified to best drive analysis of regional needs with consideration to resource gaps, trends in type of problem, and priorities of relevant funding sources. This Executive Summary lists the regional priorities in each of the following areas: Criminal Justice System Improvements; Juvenile Justice System Improvements; School-based Improvements; Direct Victim Services, and Mental Health/Substance Abuse Treatment identified in the regional planning process and approved by the CJAC. Criminal Justice System Improvements Technological Improvement projects that provide for tools, equipment, and technology purchases and upgrades for law enforcement, prosecution, and the courts. Re-entry Services intervention programs devoted to helping offenders re-enter society after incarceration. Internet-based Crimes programs to train and build the capacity of law enforcement and prosecution officials to identify and enforce internet-based crimes, such as cyber-stalking, dating violence, child abuse, and scams directed at the elderly. Language Access funding to improve law enforcement s ability to communicate with non-english speaking victims of crime. Awareness campaigns to promote community sensitivity for re-entry; educate the community on auto theft and other property crimes; and increase awareness of victim services for women, men, and children. Specialty Courts funding for drug alcohol, veterans, and mental health courts to direct offenders with specialized needs from jail while still holding them accountable for their actions. Juvenile Justice System Improvements Victimized Youth programs, including cultural competency and trauma-informed components, to train staff in attending to psychologically and physically traumatized youth who enter the juvenile justice system. Youth Transition Services additional services for youth ages transitioning from the juvenile probation system/criminal justice system to productive adulthood. Children of Incarcerated Parents (CIP) programs that provide direct assistance to CIPs. 2

4 Personnel funding for caseworkers to address school attendance and truancy in Justice of Peace Courts and prevent youth continuing in the criminal justice system. Employ programs with an emphasis on trauma informed care. School Based System Improvements Juvenile Delinquency Prevention early intervention services for low income, at-risk youth, and students in the school disciplinary system, including after-school and summer programming. Juvenile Mental Health increase availability of mental health crisis services in schools and train School Resource Officers in identifying and helping students experiencing mental illness. Internet safety education and advocacy for youth and families on internet safety to reduce victimization and crimes committed by juveniles. Direct Victim Services Personnel increase number of Sexual Assault Nurse Examiners (SANE) nurses and access to other medical personnel to document family and sexual violence, especially for outer counties in the region. Promote alternative, regionally coordinated SANE procedures, based on the type of incident, to shorten wait times for victims. Language Access expand language access programs that are available to multiple agencies/service providers and emphasize service to traditionally underserved communities. Comprehensive Service Locations programs that emphasize funding comprehensive all-in-one services at singular locations so that victims avoid the cost of moving between multiple victims assistance locations. Indirect Victim Assistance programs that provide information resources to indirect victims of crime (i.e., families of offenders who are left without primary income earner in the instance of incarceration). Affordable Housing Options program funding to increase the number of transitional non-emergency shelter and permanent supportive housing units in the region. Basic victim services maintain and expand basic services such as case management, crisis intervention, shelter for victims of domestic violence, legal advocacy, and counseling, with emphasis on culturally competent, traumainformed service. Mental Health/Substance Treatment Mental Health training to increase number of mental health officers and ability of LE officials to work with those diagnosed. Supportive Recovery Services resources allocated, in lieu of incarceration, to support treatment and recoverybased services, including programs to increase the number of transitional non-emergency shelter and permanent supportive housing units in the region; transitional, supportive and independent employment; and education and health services. Substance Abuse programs, research, or other initiatives to address the use and abuse of illegal and prescription/non-prescription drugs, tobacco, and alcohol. Programs will include control, prevention, and treatment. Direct Services increase the number of mental health professionals to provide peer support for clients in recovery, counseling, and services to victims and their families. Training development of additional/on-going training for rural crisis intervention teams, including regional trainers and experts. Crisis Respite Centers jail/emergency room diversion programs and regional support for overflows. Programs to provide facilities and services as soon as possible after law enforcement intervention. Mental Health Promotion strategies that enable people to increase control over their health, to cope with stress, be productive, and determine their own health outcomes. Strategies may move beyond a focus on individual behavior towards a wide range of social and environmental interventions. It is anticipated that this Strategic Plan will be reviewed and updated annually and that it will serve as a guide for continued improvement of Criminal Justice programs and services across the CAPCOG region. 3

5 Section 2: An Overview of the CAPCOG Region 2.1 Population and Growth of the CAPCOG Region The CAPCOG region has grown steadily over the past four decades. Since 1970, the region s overall population has increased by 24.4%, from roughly 450,000 residents to just over 1.8 million residents by 2010, as shown below in Figure 1.1. Figure 2.1 Total Regional Population, ,000,000 1,800,000 1,600,000 1,400,000 1,200,000 1,000, , , , ,000 0 Regional Population, ,841, , Source: Bureau of Economic Analysis, Local Area Income, The population change has been unevenly distributed, as Table 1.1 below demonstrates. For instance, Travis County (as the primary county of the Austin Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA)) has consistently held the highest population of the region. However, as Figure 1.2 shows, Williamson County has shown by far the highest rates of increase across decades, followed by Hays County, which is largely to the south of the Austin city limits but contains significant portions of the Austin MSA. High growth in these two counties highlights the continuing expansion of population into the outlying areas of the Austin MSA. By contrast, counties such as Lee, Fayette, and Caldwell have shown a more steady growth rate. 4

6 Table 2.1 Population per County, Area Bastrop 17,446 25,082 38,260 58,234 74,347 Blanco 3,591 4,683 5,964 8,495 10,512 Burnet 11,567 17,905 22,654 34,505 42,802 Caldwell 21,208 23,779 26,277 32,378 38,084 Fayette 17,628 19,032 20,028 21,864 24,520 Hays 27,874 41,093 65,767 99, ,289 Lee 8,073 11,246 12,811 15,701 16,610 Llano 7,019 10,121 11,684 17,077 19,341 Travis 297, , , ,692 1,030,219 Williamson 37,558 77, , , ,722 Source: Bureau of Economic Analysis, Local Area Income, Figure 2.2: Change in Growth Rate Across CAPCOG Counties, % Percentage Change in Population by County % Change 100.0% 80.0% 60.0% 40.0% 20.0% 0.0% Bastrop Blanco Burnet Caldwell Fayette Hays Lee Llano Travis Williamson Source: Source: Bureau of Economic Analysis, Local Area Income, 5

7 2.2 Further Components of Change in Regional Population The information below allows for an analysis of gross population trends. However, it does not assess the source of population growth in the region. Through information provided by the Internal Revenue Service, net population change can be calculated based on total out-migration and in-migration on an annual basis, separate from total births and deaths and from in-migration from outside of the United States. The location of this migration can be mapped at the national level. For instance, Figure 1.3a compares the migration patterns for Fayette County from 2005 to As Figure 1.2 demonstrates, Fayette County has historically shown the lowest rate of population increase over the three-decade period. While 2005, 2007, and 2008 showed significant inbound migration, other years show inbound and outbound migration to be roughly equal. Furthermore, Figure 1.4b shows the counties from which and to which Fayette County residents have moved over the six-year period. Residents have migrated primarily from other counties in East Texas and migrated to counties in West Texas. Figure 2.3: Fayette County Migration Patterns, (Source for all migration data, 6

8 Figure 2.4: Fayette County Migration Location Patterns (orange = outbound; blue=inbound) Williamson County exhibited the fastest growth rate across all counties in the CAPCOG region. Williamson County data is detailed in the same manner in Figures 1.4a and 1.4b. As the figures demonstrate, inbound migration outpaced outbound migration substantially over every five year period. However, more interestingly, the geography of Williamson County s migration shows that its extent is much further reaching and more disperse than for Fayette County. While a significant portion of residents have migrated from other major metropolitan areas in Texas (notably the Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex and Houston-Harris County areas) many have migrated in from places such as the greater Chicago area, New York, Southern California, the Silicon Valley, Seattle and the greater Phoenix area. Figure 2.5: Williamson County Migration Patterns,

9 Figure 2.6: Williamson County Migration Location Patterns (orange = outbound; blue=inbound) 2.3 Demographic Characteristics of the Region As percentages in Table 1.2 and Figure 1.5 show, the proportions of each racial demographic in the CAPCOG area remained largely the same from 2000 to The only categories to increase by an entire percentage point were the Asian and Other categories. Despite this, as Figures 1.6a and 1.6b show, the proportional share of residents with a Hispanic/Latino ethnicity increased significantly, from 25% to 31%. Table 2.2: CAPCOG Regional and Ethnic Demographic Characteristics, Racial Demographics (# of residents) American Indian 7,596 14,215 Asian 44,291 82,885 African American 103, ,783 Native 913 1,398 Hawaiian/Pacific Other 165, ,383 Multiracial 34,323 56,796 Caucasian 991,080 1,349,543 TOTAL 1,348,834 1,832,014 Ethnic Demographics (# of residents) Non-Hispanic/Latino 1,006,230 1,271,278 Hispanic/Latino 340, ,725 TOTAL 1,346,833 1,830,003 8

10 Figure 2.7: Racial Composition in CAPCOG Region, 2000 & 2010 CAPCOG Area Racial Composition, Percentages in 2000 & % 80% 60% 40% 20% 0% Caucasian Multiracial Other Native Hawaiin/Pacific African American Asian American Indian Figure 2.8: CAPCOG Area Ethnic Composition, 2000 CAPCOG Area Ethnic Composition 2000 Hispanic/Latino 25% Non- Hispanic/Latino 75% Figure 2.9: CAPCOG Area Ethnic Composition,

11 CAPCOG Area Ethnic Composition 2010 Hispanic/Latino 31% Non- Hispanic/Latino 69% 2.4 Employment Characteristics The CAPCOG region hosts a high number and diversity of employers. Urban counties such as Travis and Williamson have higher professional and technical service employers, as these tech corridors host computer hardware and semiconductor manufacturing facilities, such as Dell Computers, National Instruments, Advanced Micro Devices (AMD), and Freescale. Rural counties, such as Caldwell, Burnet, and Lee tend to host higher proportions of construction and mining/quarry businesses. Table 1.3 below shows the number of private sector employment establishments throughout the region by North American Industrial Classification System (NAICS) code and description as of As the data show, most employers in the CAPCOG region are classified as Professional, Scientific, and Technical Services (NAICS Code: 54). Table 1.4 details the specific categories that fall under this designation. Table 1.5 further details the number of employers within each 2-digit NAICS code classification in the region, again for the year As this table shows, while professional, scientific and technical services provide a greater number of places of employment across the CAPCOG region, more individuals are employed within educational services in the region. These employees include not only primary, secondary, and higher learning institutional instructors, but also employees of standardized exam preparatory services, language schools, flight training, and cosmetology schools. 10

12 Table 2.3: Places of Employment in CAPCOG Region by NAICS category, NAICS Code NAICS Code Description # of Establishments % of Total Agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting % Mining, quarrying, and oil and gas extraction % Utilities % Construction 3, % Manufacturing 1, % Wholesale trade 1, % Retail trade 5, % Transportation and warehousing % Information 1, % Finance and insurance 3, % Real estate and rental and leasing 2, % Professional, scientific, and technical services 7, % Management of companies and enterprises % Administrative and support and waste management and remediation services 2, % Educational services % Health care and social assistance 4, % Arts, entertainment, and recreation % Accommodation and food services 4, % Other services (except public administration) 4, % Industries not classified % ---- TOTAL 44, % Source: U.S. Census County Business Patterns (http://www.census.gov/econ/cbp/). 1 County Business Pattern data does not include public sector employees. 11

13 Table 2.4: Professional, Scientific, and Technical Services NAICS 4-digit sub-categories 4-digit NAICS Code Category Description 5411 Legal Services 5412 Accounting Services 5413 Architectural and Engineering 5414 Specialized/Interior/Graphic Design 5415 Computer Systems Design 5416 Management, Scientific, & Technical Consulting 5417 Scientific Research & Development 5418 Advertising & Public Relations 5419 Other Professional, Scientific, and Technical Services Source: U.S. Census County Business Patterns (http://www.census.gov/econ/cbp/). 12

14 Table 2.5: Number of Employees by NAICS category in CAPCOG Region, 2011 NAICS # of Average # of Employees per % of Total Code NAICS Code Description Employees Establishment Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing and Hunting 1, Mining, Quarrying, and Oil and Gas Extraction 3, Utilities 7, Construction 45, Manufacturing 53, Wholesale Trade 43, Retail Trade 83, Transportation and Warehousing 12, Information 21, Finance and Insurance 33, Real Estate and Rental and Leasing 13, Professional, Scientific, and Technical Services 70, Management of Companies and Enterprises 5, Administration & Support, Waste Management 54, and Remediation Educational Services 154, Health Care and Social Assistance 94, Arts, Entertainment, and Recreation 13, Accommodation and Food Services 78, Other Services (excluding Public 28, Administration) 7 N/A Public Administration 65,745 N/A 7.4 TOTAL 885, Source: U.S. Census On the Map Data Imager (http://onthemap.ces.census.gov/) 2 Taken by dividing number employees by number of establishments in Table

15 Table 2.6: Unemployment by County in CAPCOG Area, December 2013 FIPS Code County Labor Force Employed Unemployed Unemployment Rate (%) 021 Bastrop County 36,662 34,854 1, Blanco County 5,130 4, Burnet County 22,780 21, Caldwell County 17,090 16, Fayette County 13,043 12, Hays County 89,675 85,696 3, Lee County 10,641 10, Llano County 8,142 7, Travis County 610, ,058 27, Williamson County 242, ,088 11, N/A TOTAL 1,055,910 1,008,005 47,

16 Section 3: An Overview of Crime in the CAPCOG Region 3.1 Uniform Crime Statistics All crime statistics in this section of the strategic plan report were taken from the Texas Department of Public Safety Uniform Crime Reporting program, referencing the Federal Bureau of Investigation s Uniform Crime Statistics. Table 3.1 presents the number of cases of seven different categories of crime that comprise two broader categories: violent crimes and property crimes. The table presents changes from a ten year period from 2003 to 2013, the most current available reporting period. Most categories reveal little change in the decade, but note that the region added over half a million people. The rate of crime is a better indication of criminal activity levels and is discussed later in this section. Table 3.1: CAPCOG Region Crime Statistics, 2003 and 2013 CAPCOG REGION Change Population 1,480,249 2,002, ,254 Total Violent Crime 4,899 5, Murder Rape Robbery Assault Total Property Crime Burglary ,377 Larceny ,735 Auto Theft Total Crime Table 3.2: Change in Uniform Crime Rates in CAPCOG Area, CAPCOG REGION Change Population 1,480,249 2,002, ,254 Total Violent Crime Murder Rape Robbery Assault Total Property Crime 4, , ,116 Burglary Larceny 3, , Auto Theft Total Crime 4, , ,183 15

17 Table 3.2 above details the rate of crime per 100,000 residents and the change in rates over the last 10 years for each crime sub-category. As the data shows, there is a clear pattern of a drop in crime rates over all categories. Year-to-year data exhibits the same trend, but some inconsistencies were noted. For example, the murder/manslaughter rate in 2010 saw the single highest increase across any one year period and for any sub-category, driven almost entirely by incidents reported by the Austin Police Department, where the number of these cases increased from 22 incidents in 2009 to 38 in This represented a 72% increase in incidents between years, where the overall population of the city saw only a 2.7% increase. While a definitive explanation for this increase is not currently available, officials of the APD have previously attributed this increase to the economic downturn that faced the city starting in 2009 and moving forward into Table 3.3 below provides further context for the reduced crime rates. The table compares the same regional crime rate data with the state numbers. The middle, darker-blue column subtracts column 2 (2013 state rates) from column 1 (2013 regional rates) to show that most crimes, with the exception of larceny, occur less-often in the CAPCOG region than they do in the state as a whole. The pink columns (columns 4 & 5) describe 10 year changes in the rates for the region and state. As detailed in the previous table, the regional rates have all dropped significantly. Note that the state change is even more dramatic. The far right column compares the rate changes of the region and state on a percentage basis. Although crime continues to decrease in the region and the rate of crime is lower than the state, crime dropped at a much faster pace across the state than in the region between the 2003 and 2013 reporting periods. For example, the region s reduction in violent crime was -135% of the state drop. In other words, the region s drop was less than half of the state reduction (66 fewer violent crimes per year out of 100,000 people in the region) versus (156 fewer violent crimes per year out of 100,000 people in the state). Multiple variables contribute to crime rates, and this report did not attempt to control for these various factors. The trends suggest that there is a baseline level of crime across the region and the state that creates a curve in the data towards the baseline. Note that several criminal categories, such as white collar crimes, drug crimes, and DWI are not included in the data. A more detailed description of all crimes is included in section

18 Table 3.3: State and Regional Crime Rate Comparisons Total Violent Crime 2013 Regional Rates (Crime/100,000) 2013 State Rates 2013 Regional versus State 10 yr Regional Rate Change 10 yr State Rate Change 10-yr change: Region vs State % Murder % Rape % Robbery % Assault % Total Property Crime 3,083 3, , % Burglary % Larceny 2,401 2, % Auto Theft % Total Crime 3,3478 3, , % 3.2 Detailed Adult and Juvenile Arrest Data Tables 3.1 and 3.2 details provides further detail for specific categories of arrest for all arrests made in the CAPCOG region for adult and juvenile offenders, respectively, in the year This year represents the most recent complete set of data collected via the Uniform Crime Statistics. Note that while these specific data are housed through Uniform Crime Statistics, they had to be accessed via the Texas Department of Public Safety Uniform Crime Statistics Office at the state level due to their specificity. 17

19 Table 3.4: Regional Arrest Information by Category for Offenders Age 17 and above, 2012 Classification of Offense # of Arrests Murder/Non-negligent Manslaughter 29 Manslaughter by Negligence 1 Forcible Rape 46 Robbery 226 Aggravated Assault 1,286 Burglary-Breaking or Entering 755 Larceny-Theft(Except Motor Vehicle) 6,027 Motor Vehicle Theft 105 Other Assaults 7,167 Arson 43 Forgery/Counterfeiting 397 Fraud 1,057 Embezzlement 14 Stolen Property(Buy,Receive, Possess) 23 Vandalism 535 Weapons (Carry/Possess,etc.) 660 Prostitution and Commercial Vice 203 Sex Offenses(Except Forcible Rape) 258 Drug Abuse Violations(Total) 8,512 Drugs-Sale/Manufacture (Subtotal) 323 Drugs-Sale/Manufacture (Opium, Cocaine, Morphine, Heroin, Codeine) 187 Drugs-Sale/Manufacture (Marijuana) 66 Drugs-Sale/Manufacture (Synthetic Narcotics) 33 Drugs-Sale/Manufacture (Other Dangerous) 37 Drugs-Possession (Subtotal) 8,189 Drugs-Possession (Opium, Cocaine, Morphine, Heroin, Codeine) 1,522 Drugs-Possession (Marijuana) 5,311 Drugs-Possession (Synthetic Narcotics) 580 Drugs-Possession (Other Dangerous) 776 Gambling(Total) 56 Gambling Bookmaking-Horse/Sports 0 Gambling Numbers and Lottery 1 Gambling All Other Gambling 55 Offenses Against Family and Children 297 Driving Under the Influence 10,578 Liquor Laws 2,267 Drunkenness 6,888 Disorderly Conduct 485 Vagrancy 5 All Other Offenses (Except Traffic) 27,869 TOTAL 92,869 18

20 Table 3.5: Regional Arrest Information by Category for Offenders Age under Age of 17, 2012 Classifications of Offenses # of Arrests Murder/Non-negligent Manslaughter 3 Manslaughter by Negligence 0 Forcible Rape 14 Robbery 66 Aggravated Assault 131 Burglary-Breaking or Entering 290 Larceny-Theft (Except Motor Vehicle) 1,516 Motor Vehicle Theft 31 Other Assaults 1,725 Arson 15 Forgery/Counterfeiting 8 Fraud 29 Embezzlement 0 Stolen Property (Buy,Receive, Possess) 9 Vandalism 243 Weapons (Carry/Possess, etc.) 71 Prostitution and Commercial Vice 1 Sex Offenses (Except Forcible Rape) 52 Drug Abuse Violations (Total) 1,219 Drugs-Sale/Manufacture(Subtotal) 43 Drugs-Sale/Manufacture 7 (Opium, Cocaine, Morphine, Heroin, Codeine) Drugs-Sale/Manufacture (Marijuana) 22 Drugs-Sale/Manufacture (Synthetic Narcotics) 6 Drugs-Sale/Manufacture (Other Dangerous) 8 Drugs-Possession(Subtotal) 1,176 Drugs-Possession (Opium, Cocaine, Morphine, Heroin, Codeine) 57 Drugs-Possession(Marijuana) 1,002 Drugs-Possession (Synthetic Narcotics) 60 Drugs-Possession (Other Dangerous) 57 Gambling(Total) 0 Gambling Bookmaking-Horse/Sports 0 Gambling Numbers and Lottery 0 Gambling All Other Gambling 0 Offenses Against Family and Children 3 Driving Under the Influence 65 Liquor Laws 561 Drunkenness 104 Disorderly Conduct 778 Vagrancy 313 All Other Offenses(Except Traffic) 1,979 Curfew and Loitering Law Violations 976 Runaway 326 TOTAL 12,966 19

21 3.3 County by County Analysis County level crime statistics are reported in this section to give a better view of how criminal activity has occurred and trends have developed across the region in the last 10 years. It should be noted that the scope of this report did not include crime data for the years between 2003 and The rates of change are comparisons of two time periods and are not compounded rates. For county level analysis, especially smaller counties, statistical anomalies may skew the perceived trends. Figure 3.1 is a graph of the total crime rate per 100,000 people in 2013 for the state and each of the 10 counties in the CAPCOG region. The total crime rate is generally lower in the rural counties, although Williamson County has one of the lowest figures. The rate for Travis County is slightly higher than the state. Caldwell, Burnet, Hays, Bastrop, Llano, and Lee all have very similar rates. The data is represented in map form in Figure 3.2. Crime per 100,000 Figure 3.1: CAPCOG Total Crime Rates per 100,000 people,

22 Figure 3.2: Map of CAPCOG Total Crime Rates per 100,000 people, 2013 Numbers listed by each county represent total crime per 100,000 residents 21

23 Crime per 100,000 Figure 3.3: CAPCOG Violent Crime Rates per 100,000 people, Figure 3.3 (above) presents the rate of violent crime by county. The rates by county are similar to the total crime distribution, although Travis County has a lower rate than the state in the violent crime category. 22

24 Figure 3.4: Changes in Violent Crime Rates, , by CAPCOG County Crime per 100, Figure 3.4 (above) describes the rate of violent crime reduction in the last 10 years by county. As discussed in the previous section, the region s crime reduction rate is lower than the state s. It is notable that no county in the region experienced a reduction in crime similar to the state total. Figure 3.5 (next page) describes the rate of total crime reduction in the last 10 years by county. Travis County s decrease in total crime rate exceeded the state decrease. Comparing Figure 3.4 and 3.5, Lee and Llano saw an increase in total crimes, but a decrease in violent crimes. Blanco, Burnet, and Fayette experienced rising rates of violent crime and total crime, bucking state and national trends. A map of this data is included as Figure 3.6. The total rate of crime has increased in the outlying communities in the last decade. A growing concern among planners is the suburbanization of poverty rising housing costs in the urban core has driven people farther from where government and social services have traditionally located. Transportation and energy costs are also typically higher for these families. Poverty rates have increased in these areas, and criminal justice planners noted that this has corresponded to increased crime. Outlying communities are often not equipped to deal with rising crime rates, and as federal funding for crime prevention and law enforcement follow national trends of overall crime reduction, it becomes harder to find resources to handle increased crime rates in rural areas. 23

25 Crime per 100,000 Figure 3.5: Changes in Total Crime Rates, , by CAPCOG County Figure 3.6: Map of Changes in Total Crime Rates, , by CAPCOG County 24

26 Section 4: Past Grant Funding to the Region 4.1 Available Data CJD records information provided by grant applicants on total funding, types of victims served, and activities performed with the grant funding. The data is available for the General Victim s Assistance and Violent Crimes Against Women programs from a six year period between 2008 and CAPCOG crosslinked funding with activity and victim information and provided analysis to criminal justice planners in the regional strategic planning workshops in order to inform the prioritization process. The purpose was to examine the balance between priority program activities and funding. Mismatches would suggest needed changes in the prioritization rankings. Regarding activities, it was determined that crisis services is often used to describe several of the other activity categories, making it difficult to make clear cut determinations. For example, legal services are sometimes provided by grantees under the crisis services label. Future data mining could attempt to more accurately report this data by manually reviewing funded applications. The criminal justice planners generally felt that the victims served and activities provided fell in line with the current state and regional priorities. However, peer support groups, shelter, technology improvements, and medical support and training are program activities that may not have received funding in the past in line with their current priority rankings. 25

27 Figure 4.1: General Victims Assistance Grants in the CAPCOG Region, Funding by Activity, $3,000,000 $2,500,000 Funding, $2,000,000 $1,500,000 $1,000,000 $500,000 $0 26

28 Figure 4.2: General Victims Assistance Grants in the CAPCOG Region, Funding by Victim Served,

29 Funding, Figure 4.3: Violent Crimes Against Women Grants in the CAPCOG Region, Funding by Activity, $900,000 $800,000 $700,000 $600,000 $500,000 $400,000 $300,000 $200,000 $100,000 $0 28

30 Figure 4.3: Violent Crimes Against Women Grants in the CAPCOG Region, Funding by Victim Served,

31 Section 5: Regional Criminal Justice Planning Process and Priorities 5.1 Planning Process CAPCOG facilitated the region s first ever criminal justice strategic plan in December Prior to last year s FY 2015 plan, community-based plans were used to determine regional priorities for the Office of the Governor, Criminal Justice Division (CJD) grants. After a year of funded projects and new issues to consider, the region initiated a new planning process. In November 2014, two Regional Stakeholder Outreach Meetings were conducted, one at the Williamson County Jester Annex on the 14 th, and one at CAPCOG on the 19 th. The goals of the meetings were to: a) Create a comprehensive list of all opinions on revisions to the previous plan; b) Develop consensus of discipline groups on needed changes; and c) Discuss grant-related issues for CJAC and CJD consideration. After a presentation of updated crime statistics and data on previous grant funding to the region, participants in the Williamson County meeting choose to work in small groups representing the following disciplines: Training; Direct Services; Education & Outreach; Investigation and/or Prosecution; Support Technology and Equipment; and Staffing and Personnel Support (direct or contractual). In the November 19 th meeting, participants were presented with a summary of findings from the previous meeting. They chose to work in cross-discipline teams to further analyze the regional priority suggestions and discuss other ideas about regional problems and potential solutions. Problem/solution sets and suggestions for priority revisions were compiled by CAPCOG staff as regional priorities specific to the four focus areas suggested by CJD. A fifth category was added by group consensus that reflected the need to differentiate juvenile justice system improvement needs with school-based, preventative priorities. 1. Criminal Justice System Improvements 2. Juvenile Justice System Improvements 3. Direct Victim Services 4. Mental Health/Substance Abuse Treatment 5. School Based System Improvements 30

32 The findings were reviewed by the CAPCOG Criminal Justice Advisory Committee (CJAC) on December 2, 2014 in preparation for the anticipated CJD Request for Applications. After the CJAC provided their input, these regional priorities were added to the state-level priorities and were recommended to the CAPCOG Executive Committee for adoption in its December 10, 2014 meeting. The feedback gathered from regional stakeholders was intended to address the following categories of criminal justice priorities, as identified by the CJD: Direct Victim Services (including Violent Crimes Against Women); Juvenile Justice Services; Mental Health Services ; and Law Enforcement Services. Where possible, data sources were identified to best drive analysis of regional needs with consideration to resource gaps, trends in type of problem, and priorities of relevant funding sources. 5.2 Regional Planning Stakeholder Meeting Participants The regional priorities identified in this Regional Strategic Plan were the result of direct input from the following stakeholders: Organization Asian Family Support Services of Austin ATCIC Travis County Austin Child Guidance Center Austin Children's Services Austin Free-Net Austin Police Department Austin Police Department Austin Police Department Austin Police Department Austin Police Department Austin Police Department Bluebonnet Trails CARY City of Austin City of Cedar Park City of Cedar Park City of Smithville Council on At-Risk Youth Del Valle ISD Diocese of Austin Family Crisis Center Name Catherina Conte Nancy Myers Russell Smith Armin Steege Juanita Budd Todd Gage Bob Miljenovich Katrina Pruitt Courtney Renfro Kachina Clark Kyran Fitzgerald Emily Hutchinson Shana Fox Darlene Lanham Darlene Lewis Cathy Bustos Jill Strube Adrian Moore Irma Guerra-Scott Doots Dufour Sherry Murphy 31

33 Family Crisis Center Hays County Hays County DA Hays-Caldwell Women's Center Hays-Caldwell Women's Center Hill Country MHDD Hill Country MHDD Veteran Services Hill Country Veteran Services Hope Alliance Kyle Police Dept Lakeway PD Leander Police Dept LifeSteps Council on Alcohol/Drugs Llano County Marble Falls PD Marble Falls PD Marble Falls PD Pflugerville PD Round Rock Police Department Safe Place Safe Place San Marcos PD Seedling Foundation TCSO Travis County Atty's Office Travis County CJP Travis County Criminal Courts Travis County SO Travis County/COA Williamson County Children's Advocacy Center Williamson County Williamson County Williamson County Juvenile Services Williamson County Sheriff/VA Unit YWCA Greater Austin YWCA Greater Austin Lauren Jones Margaret Buentello John Roppolo Marla Johnson Elva Gonzalez Jim Strakos Laly Cholak Ada Castillo Patty Conner Samantha Dean David Crowder Billy Fletcher Julie Stevens Rebecca Lange Stacy Baker Glenn Hanson Steve Eckstein Chuck Hooker Willie Richards Yvette Mendoza Rouen Hosie Washington Penny Dunn Shira Ledman Amy Durall Erin Martinson Efrain Davila Margaret Terronez Karen Maxwell Jerome Schmidt Kelly Forister Melissa Hightower Wanda Ivicic Dominique Simmons Dean Higginbotham Laura Gomez-Horton Diana Gorham 32

34 5.3 Regional Priorities The following are the regional priorities that CAPCOG identified with the assistance of the CJAC from its two Regional Stakeholder Outreach Meetings. Where possible or necessary, CAPCOG has provided additional research for identified regional priorities. Note that regional priorities may or may not be allowable activities under the eligibility criteria established by the funding source. Please refer to the official RFA for eligibility and allowable activity. Criminal Justice System Improvements Regional Priorities Technological Improvement projects that provide for tools, equipment, and technology purchases and upgrades for law enforcement, prosecution, and the courts. Re-entry Services intervention programs devoted to helping offenders re-enter society after incarceration. Internet-based Crimes programs to train and build the capacity of law enforcement and prosecution officials to identify and enforce internet-based crimes, such as cyber-stalking, dating violence, child abuse, and scams directed at the elderly. Language Access funding to improve law enforcement s ability to communicate with non- English speaking and deaf victims of crime. Awareness campaigns to promote community sensitivity for re-entry; educate the community on auto theft and other property crimes; and increase awareness of victim services for women, men, and children. Specialty Courts funding for drug, alcohol, veterans, and mental health courts to direct offenders with specialized needs from jail while still holding them accountable for their actions. Juvenile Justice System Improvements Regional Priorities Victimized Youth programs with cultural competency and trauma-informed components to train staff in attending to psychologically and physically traumatized youth who enter the juvenile justice system. Youth Transition Services additional services for youth ages transitioning from the juvenile probation system/criminal justice system to productive adulthood. Children of Incarcerated Parents (CIP) programs that provide direct assistance to CIPs. Personnel funding for caseworkers to address school attendance and truancy in Justice of Peace Courts and prevent youth continuing in the criminal justice system. Employ programs with an emphasis on trauma informed care. School Based System Improvements Regional Priorities Juvenile Delinquency Prevention early intervention services for low income, at-risk youth, and students in the school disciplinary system, including after-school and summer programming. Juvenile Mental Health increase availability of mental health crisis services in schools and train School Resource Officers in identifying and helping students experiencing mental illness. Internet safety education and advocacy for youth and families on internet safety to reduce victimization and crimes committed by juveniles. 33

35 Direct Victim Services Regional Priorities Personnel increase number of Sexual Assault Nurse Examiners (SANE) nurses and access to other medical personnel to document family and sexual violence, especially for outer counties in the region. Promote alternative, regionally coordinated SANE procedures, based on the type of incident, to shorten wait times for victims. Language Access expand language access programs available to multiple agencies/service providers and emphasize service to traditionally underserved communities. Comprehensive Service Locations programs that emphasize funding comprehensive all-inone services at singular locations so that victims avoid the cost of moving between multiple victims assistance locations. Indirect Victim Assistance programs that provide information resources to indirect victims of crime (i.e., families of offenders who are left without a primary income earner in the instance of incarceration). Affordable Housing Options program funding to increase the number of transitional nonemergency shelter and permanent supportive housing units in the region. Basic victim services maintain and expand basic services such as case management, crisis intervention, shelter for victims of domestic violence, legal advocacy, and counseling, with emphasis on culturally competent, trauma-informed service. Mental Health/Substance Treatment Regional Priorities Mental Health training to increase number of mental health officers and ability of LE officials to work with those diagnosed. Supportive Recovery Services resources allocated, in lieu of incarceration, to support treatment and recovery-based services, including programs to increase the number of transitional non-emergency shelter and permanent supportive housing units in the region; transitional, supportive and independent employment; and education and health services. Substance Abuse programs, research, or other initiatives to address the use and abuse of illegal and prescription/non-prescription drugs, tobacco, and alcohol. Programs will include control, prevention, and treatment. Direct Services increase the number of mental health professionals to provide peer support for clients in recovery, counseling, and services to victims and their families. Training development of additional/on-going training for rural crisis intervention teams, including regional trainers and experts. Crisis Respite Centers jail/emergency room diversion programs and regional support for overflows. Programs to provide facilities and services as soon as possible after law enforcement intervention. Mental Health Promotion strategies that enable people to increase control over their health, to cope with stress, be productive, and determine their own health outcomes. Strategies may move beyond a focus on individual behavior towards a wide range of social and environmental interventions. 34

36 5.4 Needs Identified by Stakeholders The following is a compilation of the needs identified by subject matter experts during the two Regional Stakeholder Outreach Meetings. The needs that were identified most often were entered onto the CJD Applicant Scoring Instrument as the regional priorities. They will be used to provide extra points to applicants who meet those priorities. The following list builds on the findings of last year s plan. Juvenile Services Direct Services 1. Problem: Children of Incarcerated Parents (CIPs) are not receiving support services. Potential Solutions: Direct more educational and health based services to this population. Develop a shared database that accurately identifies and maintains data on children of incarcerated parents. 2. Problem: Truancy rates for vulnerable youth continue to rise. Potential Solution: Programs should focus on 3rd party interventions and GED course enrollment. Technology 1. Problem: There isn t currently an effective IT system to identify CIPs. Potential Solution: Funding should be devoted to create an online database to identify CIPs. Training 1. Problem: There is a lack of trauma-trained professionals and volunteers to intervene in victimized youth entering juvenile system. Potential Solution: Provide training or recruit already trained professionals and volunteers. 2. Problem: There is a lack of staff training for youth who transition into adult corrections systems. Potential Solution: Provide training or recruit already trained professionals and volunteers. Education and Outreach 1. Problem: Children of incarcerated parents are a little understood population within school systems. Potential Solution: Provide awareness education to school officials. 2. Problem: There is a lack of a strategy to target and offer job training to transitional youth (i.e., those between 16 and 24 years of age). Potential Solution: The regional business community leadership should work together to provide a strategy and become actively involved in vocational training for youth offenders. 35

37 Crimes against Women Staffing-Personnel Support 1. Problem: There is currently a shortage of Sexual Assault Nurse Examiners (SANEs). Potential Solution: Develop employment retention strategies. 2. Problem: Long waits for SANE services by sexual assault victims results in re-victimization. Potential Solution: Promote an abbreviated SANE exam based on the history of the assault to reduce the length of the exams and burden on victims. Employ a regional website where law enforcement and advocates log-on when a SANE exam is needed, notify SANE, and proceed to a hospital with availability. 3. Problem: Communication between law enforcement personnel and non-english speaking victims of sexual assault is deficient. Potential Solution: Provide bilingual training to law enforcement officials. Direct Services 1. Problem: The co-morbidity of mental health and substance abuse issues in victims of domestic abuse and sexual assault often stretch the resources available or rural areas. Potential Solution: Comprehensive services to address these issues should extend beyond urban boundaries in our region, perhaps through business development grants. Technology 1. Problem: Service Providers have difficulty tracking and demonstrating the effectiveness of direct services via online databases, which can lead to greater difficulty acquiring grants. Potential Solution: Newer technology and training. 2. Problem: Some service providers lack network databases to track victims of assault and domestic violence. Potential Solution: Newer software to track these services. Training 1. Problem: In the case of protective orders, there is no regional uniform process for surrendering firearms to law enforcement officials, compromising the safety of victims. Potential Solution: Create a temporary task force to create a model protocol to this end. 2. Problem: Cybercrime as it relates to the online victimization of women is a little understood phenomenon that victims services professionals are ill-equipped to handle. Potential Solution: Train staff on how to verify and authenticate evidence of cyber-crimes against women. 3. Problem: State laws have updated evidence collection protocols following sexual assaults. 36

38 Potential Solution: Increase training to hospital staff to gain evidence. Education and Outreach 1. Problem: There is a lack of collaboration between victim services, law enforcement and prosecution. Potential Solution: Collaboration can be enhanced through the formation of a Coordinated Community Response (CCR) plan. 2. Problem: Victims often do not receive services because they are either unaware of the available services and how to obtain them or they do not trust the criminal justice process. Potential Solution: Staffing should be provided to train and educate victims, as well as their friends and family, regarding victims services. Investigation and Prosecution 1. Problem: Spanish speaking victims have difficulty communicating with law enforcement officials who do not speak Spanish. Potential Solution: Expand bilingual services for law enforcement. 2. Problem: Insufficient forensic evidence is gathered to proceed with prosecution of perpetrators. Potential Solution: Victims should be better educated about the difference between a SANE certified exam and other kinds of exams that do not yield evidence that is sufficient in a court of law to prosecute. 3. Problem: Legal services for victims can be cost prohibitive. Potential Solution: Make more resources available to defray this cost for victims. Mental Health Staffing-Personnel Support 1. Problem: A lack of affordable housing and associated onsite service staff for those with a mental illness. These people often have problems with substance abuse and also they are also often combat veterans. Potential Solution: Funding should be made available to support both the structure and onsite service for these types of housing arrangements. 2. Problem: Mentally ill individuals do not receive proper courts services because they often don t thoroughly understand court procedures. Potential Solution: Specifically dedicate resources to mental health court cases. 3. Problem: Those returning from combat often face mental health and substance abuse problems that may lead to arrest and criminal charges. 37

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