Doctor of Psychology, Clinical Psychology

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1 Doctor of Psychology, Clinical Psychology Admission Requirements 2 TOEFL or IELTS, International Credentials, and International Students 2 Applicant Notification 2 Policies 3 Transfer of Credit 3 Waiver of Courses 3 Residency Requirement 3 Satisfactory Progress 4 Program Length 4 Graduation Requirements* 4 The Program 5 Philosophy 5 Objectives 5 Ethical and Professional Behavior 5 Independent Practice 6 Clinical Psy.D. Department Educational Model and Goals 6 Clinical Psy.D. Department Competencies 7 Writing Assessment and Requirements 8 Student Learning Assessment 8 Grading and Performance Feedback 8 Professional Development Group and Academic Advisor Assignment 9 Student Disclosure of Personal Information 9 Independent Study 10 Auditing Courses 10 Track Transfer 10 Department Acceleration 10 Earning an Master of Arts Degree in Clinical Psychology 11 Academic Development Plans 11 Practicum 12 Permission to Apply to Practicum 12 CCE Grading 13 Internship 15 Permission to Apply for Internship 15 Permission to Rank Order Internships 15 The Curriculum 16 Department Requirements 16 Intervention Course Stream 16 Concentration Areas 17 Concentration Options 17 Generalist Concentration 17 Health Concentration 17 Multicultural/Community Concentration 18 Organizational Psychology Concentration 18 School Psychology Concentration 19 Child and Adolescent Concentration 19 Child and Adolescent Track 20 Certificate Option 20 Courses 21 Clinical Psy.D. Child and Adolescent Track Courses 22 Course Descriptions 23 APPENDIX 36 Psy.D. in Clinical Psychology 37 Psy.D. in Clinical Psychology: Child and Adolescent Track 38

2 Doctor of Psychology, Clinical Psychology The APA-accredited Clinical Psychology Doctoral Program bases its training on the practitioner-scholar model of education, integrating eight core competencies informed by the educational model of the National Council of Schools and Programs of Professional Psychology (NCSPP). Department faculty are actively engaged in practice and scholarship, and incorporate a wide variety of clinical examples into classroom activities. Students learn through rigorous course work, challenging practica, an integrative Internship and an innovative, applicable dissertation. The Clinical Psychology Doctoral Program has been nationally recognized for its excellent training in culturally competent service provision and offers students a remarkably wide variety of training opportunities. Admission Requirements Application to The Chicago School s Clinical Psychology Doctoral Program is open to any person who has earned a bachelor s degree from an accredited institution. The school admits students whom it judges to possess sufficient academic aptitude, as well as the emotional and social maturity to function effectively as professional psychologists. Applicants will be judged on their overall ability to do graduate work. Factors considered in admission are: GPA from undergraduate and any graduate schools, Graduate Record Examinations (GRE) scores, successful work history after completion of the baccalaureate degree, essays, and letters of recommendation from academic professors or supervisors from professional or volunteer experiences. Generally an undergraduate GPA of a 3.2 or higher on a 4.0 scale is required for admission to the Department. The Clinical Psychology Doctoral Program requires 18 semester hours of psychology credit, including three specific courses (Statistics, Abnormal Psychology, and Child/Human Development) that must be completed prior to enrollment with a grade earned of C or better (please see the application for admission for detailed requirements). Where an applicant is missing the required undergraduate coursework or hours, graduate coursework or hours may be substituted, provided that the student earned a grade of C or better in the course. Graduate coursework used to meet prerequisites will be considered for graduate transfer or waiver on a case-by-case basis, however. Based on the evaluation of these materials selected candidates may be invited to interview for further consideration of their application. Please see the application for detailed instructions and information regarding application requirements, application deadlines, and letters of recommendation. Applications must be submitted with a $50 (US) fee in order to be evaluated. The Clinical Psy.D. Department also offers additional training in child and adolescent psychology through its Child and Adolescent Track. Applicants who are interested in participating in the Child and Adolescent Track will be considered for admission into the Clinical Psychology Doctoral Department s Child and Adolescent Track based on their specified interest in working child and adolescents and their families (students who indicate the Child and Adolescent Concentration during the admission process), previous child-related volunteer, work, or research experience and 3.4 G.P.A. or higher on a 4.0 Scale. Based on these criteria and applicant interest, applicants may be invited to participate in the Child and Adolescent Track. TOEFL or IELTS, International Credentials, and International Students TOEFL or IELTS: If English is not your primary language, you must submit official TOEFL or IELTS scores with your application (TOEFL School Code: 7161). International students who received a bachelor s degree from an accredited United States institution are exempt from this requirement. The minimum scores are: TOEFL paper based, 213 computer based, 79 internet based; IELTS International credentials: Applicants with international credentials must obtain and submit an official course-by-course evaluation through an evaluation agency such as World Education Services ( or Educational Credential Evaluators Inc ( In addition to the agency evaluation, all official graduate and undergraduate transcripts must be submitted. International students: International students must submit a completed application by the general consideration deadline. In addition, once accepted, international students must submit the International Student Information form, a copy of their passport, and financial documentation showing sufficient funding for at least one year of study and all living expenses. This documentation must be submitted at least two months prior to the start of the semester in order to allow sufficient time for the school to issue an I-20 for the student to obtain an F-1 visa, if needed. An I-20 visa will not be issued without this documentation. Applicant Notification If, after initial review of all application materials and the Admission Committee so recommends, the applicant will be invited for an interview day with members of the Department faculty. Interviews are by invitation only and mandatory for full consideration. Post interview, the applicant will be notified of the Admission Committee s decision regarding his or her application. The Chicago School does not share information or provide any feedback regarding admission decisions. If a student is offered admission, in order to secure a place in the incoming class, a non-refundable tuition deposit of $500 will be required by the deposit deadline indicated in the offer of admission. The non-refundable deposit will be applied in full toward the student s tuition upon enrollment. While students are accepted into the Clinical Psy.D. Department, some interested applicants who meet additional criteria (see below) may be invited to study in the Child and Adolescent Track

3 Policies Transfer of Credit Prior graduate course work, if within the area of study may be eligible for transfer or waiver of credit. Students accepted to the Clinical Psy.D. Department may petition by submitting a Petition for Transfer/Waiver of Credit and all required documentation. Students wishing to petition for transfer of credit must comply with all requirements in the Student Handbook, and submit a completed Petition for Transfer of Credit Form to the Registrar for each course they wish to transfer. The Department will prioritize the processing of petitions received before the end of the second week of the Summer semester so as to notify students of the outcome well before the start of the Fall semester. This allows the School and Department sufficient time to review the petition and attached materials, determine and document the outcome of the petition, notify students, and advise students regarding their new registration choices if the petition is approved. Petitions submitted after the end of the second week of Summer will still be processed, but the outcome may not be determined prior to the start of the Fall semester. The decision to accept transfer credit is solely that of the school and the school reserves the right to require satisfactory performance on an examination before awarding a transfer of credit. Satisfactory completion of a competency examination is required before transfer of credit is awarded when the course in question has been taken more than five years prior to admission. No credit will be transferred for course work that is more than 10 years old. Transfer of credits is subject to the following conditions: A maximum of 21 semester hours of credit for course work completed prior to matriculation at The Chicago School may be transferred. Transferred course credit is restricted to graduate-level courses from a recognized, regionally accredited, graduate degree granting institution. Transfer of credit is awarded only for required courses. Transfer of credit is not granted for clinical practicum or for internship. Transfer of credit is granted only for courses in which the grade obtained was a B or higher. The school reserves the right to require satisfactory performance on an examination before awarding a transfer of credit. Satisfactory completion of a competency examination is required before transfer of credit is awarded for required clinical courses. The Chicago School normally may require satisfactory performance on a competency examination when the course in question has been taken more than five years prior to admission; transfer of credit cannot be granted for course work older than 10 years. Each hour of credit accepted for transfer will be assessed a fee of $75 per credit hour. The Petition for Transfer of Credit is available on The Chicago School s website under Student Services, Student Services Forms." Please submit all required documentation with the petition for each Transfer or Waiver course. Any credit approved for transfer will not be added to the student s academic record until after the second week of their first semester. Waiver of Courses An international student who has completed an undergraduate course(s) that, in the judgment of the department chair, is equivalent to a required course at The Chicago School may apply for the course to be waived. In addition, any student (domestic or international) with previous graduate course work who has already received the maximum transfer credit may request a waiver of additional course work to be completed at The Chicago School. Students may seek a waiver for a total of 21 credit hours. Those seeking both a waiver and transfer of credit hours may not exceed a total of 30 credit hours. Waiver will not apply to undergraduate courses offered by U.S. educational institutions. Residency Requirement It is expected that students will fulfill all degree requirements through courses offered at The Chicago School. Under unusual circumstances, and subject to the approval of the department chair, a student may be permitted to complete certain course requirements at another institution. The Clinical Psy.D. Department has an additional APA-mandated residency requirement as a condition for graduation. This requirement may be satisfied in either of the following ways: Completion of two consecutive semesters of full-time study (11 credit hours or more).excluding the summer semester, this may be either the fall and following spring semesters or the spring and following fall semesters. Completion of 30 credit hours within one 12-month period, including summer semester

4 Satisfactory Progress Matriculated students must be continuously enrolled in the department until graduation; the department requires attendance during the fall, spring, and summer semesters. Each student must take a minimum of five semester hours of course work in the fall and spring semesters and three semester hours in the summer semester unless the student has fewer than the required number of hours of course work remaining or is on an approved Leave of Absence. Satisfactory progress semester hours do not include waiver or transfer credit hours. A student must maintain satisfactory academic progress by complying with the following requirements: Credit Hours per Semester: Clinical Psy.D. Department students must be enrolled for a minimum of 11 semester hours during the fall and spring semesters and a minimum of five semester hours in summer semester to be classified as full-time. All students must be enrolled for a minimum of five semester hours in the fall and spring semesters and three in the summer term. Additional requirements for Satisfactory Academic Progress are detailed in The Chicago School Student Handbook, published by the Office of Student Services, located on the website under Academics. Program Length The Clinical Psychology Doctoral Program is five years in length. Students must complete all requirements within seven years. Students in the Clinical Psy.D. Department with at least 12 semester hours of transferred graduate course work, an M.A. degree in psychology or a related field, or significant experience in the field may petition to accelerate the program to be completed in four years. Petitions are submitted to a student s academic advisor after the student has completed his or her first semester in the program. Child and Adolescent Track students are not permitted to accelerate due to the additional courses and training experiences required for this path which cannot be completed in a three-year period. Graduation Requirements* A doctoral degree can be awarded if the student completes all requirements for the Clinical Psychology Doctoral Program, including the Dissertation, within the designated program length. However, program duration may not exceed seven years. Students who meet the following requirements are eligible for a doctoral degree: Satisfactory completion of all department required credit hours Cumulative grade point average of 3.00 or higher Satisfactory completion of the Competency Exam prior to the beginning of internship Successful defense of the dissertation and submission of bindable copy Satisfactory completion of internship(s) Satisfactory completion of four semesters of practica, two of which are focused primarily on clinical assessment, and two of which are focused primarily on clinical therapy Satisfactory completion of two semesters of Advanced Practica (required for Child and Adolescent Track students only) Cumulative PPE average of 2.7 or higher *Detailed information and the Petition for Program Completion form is located on the website under Current Students > Student and Academic Services > Transfer of Credit

5 The Program Philosophy The Clinical Psy.D. Department has adopted the practitioner-scholar model and the NCSPP Core Competency model of training. These models are predicated on the belief that competent practitioners must have both a broad knowledge of scientific and theoretical principles at the core of psychology, which includes a solid understanding of a variety of scholarly work, as well as the ability to apply their knowledge to specific clinical situations. The doctoral department does not advocate any single theoretical orientation. Rather, students learn conceptualization and technique across four general theory areas, and then choose a theoretical orientation in which to specialize. Students are continually challenged to reflect on the art and craft of professional practice, as well as on its scientific basis. Objectives Regardless of the track, concentration, or intervention theory a student chooses, the Clinical Psy.D. Department articulates three primary goals for all of our students throughout all of our curriculum and training. The Chicago School strives to produce graduates who: Possess the scientific and theoretical knowledge base necessary to enter professional practice to serve multicultural and diverse populations Have strong clinical skills developed through graduated exposure to clinical work, reflective practice, and ethical reasoning Are informed, critical consumers of scholarship and will contribute to the profession in a scholarly manner Ethical and Professional Behavior The Chicago School expects that all Clinical Psy.D. students will be knowledgeable of and adhere to the APA Ethical Guidelines as published by the American Psychological Association. Sound ethical reasoning and accountability to the larger community for adherence to guidelines for ethical behavior are the two things that mark a profession as distinct from a career or job. As a result, several expectations of students are derived from the ethical code. First, no student shall obtain part-time or full-time employment that is beyond the scope of their cumulative training in the field of psychology. In accordance with Illinois state law, no student may serve under the title of "psychologist," "clinical psychologist," or any closely related title or job function until granted an appropriate license by the state after the awarding of the doctoral degree. Students may, however, work as psychological assistants, researchers, or psychometricians under the supervision of a professional psychologist who is duly licensed or certified by the appropriate state agency. A student shall not perform any function that exceeds his/her level of training. Students shall ensure that the appropriate malpractice insurance is in effect prior to their commencement of any clinical practice. In addition, a student may not establish or continue psychotherapy with any department or affiliate faculty member under any circumstances or with any adjunct faculty member while registered in his or her course or while under his or her supervision. A student who fails to adhere to this policy or otherwise fails to demonstrate the appropriate ethics required for practice in the field of professional psychology is subject to discipline. A second derivation of the ethical code is that of integrity. The Chicago School expects that all students demonstrate the highest form of academic integrity. This applies to all of their graduate work and studies ranging from course work, to general scholarship, to interactions with faculty, staff, and students. Further, given that graduate students as part of their training gain access to extremely sensitive clinical information, The Chicago School expects that students show the highest form of professional integrity in their training settings. These expectations range from client contact, to professional communications, to representation as a student of the school. Integrity is taken very seriously and a violation of academic and professional standards is grounds for remediation, suspension, or expulsion. A final derivation of the ethical code is that of professional suitability. As a field, our primary responsibility is to the public we serve. As a result, should a student show signs that he or she is likely to cause harm to those we serve, swift action will be taken to mitigate that risk for harm. Such action could range from requiring additional education and remediation for the student to disciplinary action such as suspension or expulsion. Should a student demonstrate, over time and despite efforts to remediate, that he or she is not able to assume the responsibilities of the profession, he or she may be dismissed from the school. Professional suitability is defined in part by the school, in part by the field of psychology and in part by the larger society. Should a student's ability to engage in professional practice change, for example through conviction of a crime that prevents licensure, the department may determine that completion of the program is not possible for the student

6 Independent Practice Consistent with training department goals and the focus on ethical behavior, it is deemed inappropriate for Clinical Psy.D. Department students to engage in professional activities that may infringe upon a primary commitment to training, negatively affect quality of consumer mental health services, or are inconsistent with ethical and legal standards. Students' participation in outside work activities should be secondary to training and should also uphold and be consistent with the ethical and legal standards of the profession. Engaging in independent practice in psychology prior to appropriate licensure, as a result, is viewed as inconsistent with these training objectives, and unethical for doctoral-level students. The Illinois Clinical Psychology Licensing Act prohibits independent practice in clinical psychology by non-licensed individuals. Regardless of previous credentials, participation in a psychology training program indicates that the student is committed to developing a professional identity as a psychologist and to developing professional skills within a psychological framework. The development of this identity occurs throughout the course of graduate-level training. It is appropriate for graduate students, whatever their previous experience, to view themselves as psychologists-in-training. A student may hold a valid license in another profession (e.g., Licensed Clinical Professional Counselor or Licensed Clinical Social Worker) or may obtain such a license during her/his training at The Chicago School. Such students may practice within the scope of their license consistent with the following: The demands of the practice in time or other resources must not jeopardize the student's primary commitment to training in the department. The manner in which students represent themselves to colleagues, clients and the public (e.g. marketing materials and reports of service) should not create a belief that the practice is under the auspices of or sanctioned by The Chicago School, that the practice is part of the school's training, or that the practice is that of a trained and licensed clinical psychologist. A student who fails to comply with the requirements of this section will be referred to the department chair for intervention, remediation, or disciplinary action, or for referral to the Student Affairs Committee for disciplinary action and possible dismissal. Clinical Psy.D. Department Educational Model and Goals The Clinical Psy.D. Department bases its training on the practitioner-scholar model of psychology education. The practitioner-scholar model places primary emphasis on a student s development of the knowledge, skills, and attitudes required to provide high quality, entry level, and clinical services to a range of clientele. The model also places a significant emphasis on the development of skills to critically consume and produce of a variety of different types of scholarship associated with a range of intervention theories in a variety of different settings. In the Clinical Psy.D. Department, scholarship is broadly defined as a disciplined inquiry that satisfies intellectual curiosity, integrates the science and practice of psychology, and constitutes a contribution to the knowledge base of the field. Scholarship is not equated solely with experimental research. Instead, scholarship can be generated through individual case studies, qualitative or quantitative research, theoretical or treatment methodology innovations, and department development and evaluation. The Clinical Psy.D. Department envisions a reciprocal relationship between clinical practice and the use and production of scholarship. It is through the critical consumption of scholarship that practice is improved, and it is through innovative, high-quality practice that scholarship is produced. The link between practice and scholarship creates an ongoing feedback loop of assessment, evaluation, and revision of the current knowledge base of the field. Within the department, scholarly contributions can be made through presentation, publication, advocacy efforts, evaluation, research, innovation in service delivery, and leadership in the profession or the community. The Clinical Psy.D. Department s model of education emphasizes the development of a strong generalist base in the knowledge, skills, and attitudes of psychology. The provision of a strong generalist base requires exposure to a broad range of theoretical orientations, types of scholarship, and assessment and treatment approaches in order to effectively serve children and adults as individuals, families, and communities. The department does not endorse or require students to conceptualize clinical work through a particular theoretical orientation. Instead, it is believed that students will be most effective if exposed to a variety of theories, and assisted to identify and work through the theoretical orientation that best fits with their identity, beliefs regarding change and worldview. The Clinical Psy.D. Department s model of education also views the incorporation of issues of individual and cultural difference as a required component of all learning activities. Cultural awareness and an appreciation for the impact of culture and privilege on human behavior are critical components in becoming an effective clinician with clients of different backgrounds. It is the expectation that the majority of specialization will occur in the later stages of a student s academic career during advanced training opportunities (i.e., an optional Advanced Practicum and Internship) or during post-doctoral experiences. However, students in the department lay the groundwork for future specialization in their career by choosing an area of concentration (see below) for their elective courses. This allows the student to build a strong generalist foundation first, and then begin developing additional skills through courses focused upon, for example, Health Psychology, Multicultural and Community Psychology, or Forensic Psychology. Students also specialize their education by developing their own individual professional interests though scholarship that culminate in their dissertation, as described below

7 The Child and Adolescent Track is an enhancement of the Clinical Psy.D. Department s Child and Adolescent Concentration. The Child and Adolescent Track is grounded in the Department s model of education that is grounded in exposure to a variety of theories and treatment approaches. However, courses in this Track teach these foundational generalist principles primarily through focus on diverse child and adolescent populations. Child and Adolescent Track students curriculum is focused on training future child psychologists beginning in their first semester of coursework. The Track offers integrative course work, workshops, and seminars all focused on providing students with the information and expertise necessary to work with children and their families. Track student continue to receive a broad and general education in psychology. All Track students participate in a Research Clerkship that includes research coursework, research mentorship, on-going research and scholarship. Child and Adolescent Track students produce two to three scholarly products related to child and adolescent issues. This work may culminate in their dissertation.. Clinical Psy.D. Department Competencies Under the umbrella of the practitioner-scholar model, the Clinical Psy.D. Department organizes the knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary for high-quality clinical practice into six primary and two secondary competencies. The National Council of Schools and Programs in Professional Psychology (NCSPP) Core Competency Model (McHolland, 1992) offers the foundation upon which the program based its own articulation of competency. The six primary competencies are: 1) relationship, 2) assessment, 3) intervention, 4) research and evaluation, 5) cultural and individual difference, and 6) ethical and professional behavior. The Clinical Psy.D. Department has articulated two additional competencies, which include: 7) consultation/education and 8) management/supervision. Following are definitions of the Clinical Psy.D. Department competencies that are demonstrated in four key areas. Scholarship Research and Evaluation: Competency in research and evaluation is indicated by the ability to organize, synthesize, and interpret scholarly information; the incorporation of scholarly findings into clinical practice; awareness of limits of certainty in different types of clinical and scientific inquiry; the ability to design and critique approaches to systematic inquiry; an understanding of foundational scientific knowledge in the field; and the recognition of scholarly knowledge production as a social, cultural, and political process. Diversity Cultural and Individual Differences: Competency in cultural/individual differences is evidenced by the ability to articulate one s personal culture and its impact on held values, relationships, and worldview; an understanding of worldview and the psychological impact of privilege, prejudice, oppression, culture, and sociopolitical structures; the ability to differentiate between individual variation, characteristic variation across culture and pathology in development, attitudes, and reactions; and appreciation for the impact of culture on the historical and philosophical foundations of psychology. Professional Behavior & Ethics Ethical and Professional Behavior: Competency in ethical and professional behavior is evidenced by the ability to apply ethical and professional standards to interactions with clients and with others (peers, supervisors, faculty, professionals in other disciplines, etc); socialization into the profession through advisement, modeling, and education; an understanding of legal obligations that may or may not conflict with ethical guidelines; the development of skills in reflective practice and quality control; effective functioning in multiple professional roles; and a commitment to life-long learning. Professional Practice Relationship: Competency in relationship is indicated by the capacity to develop and maintain a constructive therapeutic alliance with clients and a constructive working alliance with others (including peers, faculty, supervisors, professionals in other disciplines, etc); openness to feedback and accurate self-reflection; an appreciation of the use of self in the therapeutic relationship; the development of empathy, respect for others, and interpersonal relatedness; and an understanding of cultural values, worldview, and history on cross cultural relationships. Assessment: Assessment is conceptualized to include both formal and informal assessment activities. Competency in assessment is indicated by proficiency in the administration, scoring, and interpretation of standard assessment tools; the collection and incorporation of information from multiple sources to inform decision making and diagnosis; effective clinical inference that links gathered data with resulting diagnosis and recommendations; effective communication of assessment results and recommendations; the identification and conceptualization of client strengths and limitations; and culturally sensitive choice of assessment tools or methods to constitute a battery. Intervention: Competency in intervention is indicated by the ability to develop and present plausible formulations for understanding psychological phenomenon using theory; the use of theory to guide formulations regarding the conditions that create, maintain, and change behavior or distress; effectively implement and revise treatment strategies; evaluate the effectiveness of a chosen intervention approach or strategy; recognize the limitations of theories as they relate to individual and system functioning and change; and adjust traditional models of treatment and treatment planning to better meet diverse clients needs

8 Management and Supervision: Competency in management and supervision is indicated by an understanding of the business aspects of psychological practice and the laws, standards, and regulations that effect practice; effective use of and openness to supervision and professional review; the development of supervisory skills or skills in mental health administration; effective case management of clients; awareness of contemporary professional issues related to the regulation and practice of the field; and incorporation of scholarship into quality control procedures for professional practice. Consultation and Education: Competency in consultation and education is indicated by effective presentation skills and the ability to teach others through oral or written presentation of material; the ability to provide feedback regarding a client or system issue to multiple sources; an understanding of the means of facilitating and evaluating the growth of knowledge, skills, and attitudes in a learner; effective peer consultation and constructive feedback; and the development of productive relationships with community helping networks. Writing Assessment and Requirements Believing that academic preparedness is a key to success in graduate school, The Chicago School of Professional Psychology requires new students to complete its innovative program, Foundations for Scholarship and Practice. This program, offered by the Center for Academic Excellence (CAE), is designed to turbo-charge students graduate experience by offering the skills they need to achieve their dreams. Foundations is an integral part of the first semester s curriculum and all students are required to complete the program successfully and in a timely manner. Foundations for Scholarship and Practice consist of three elements: 1. Writing Assessment Process Each student writes an essay in response to a question and submits it to CAE for scoring. Based on the student s performance, the school may waive the Academic Writing Course requirement (#2, below). Essay submission by the given date is considered successful completion of this element of Foundations. 2. Academic Writing Course This course is taken before or during the first semester at The Chicago School. A final grade of pass is considered successful completion of this element. 3. Academic Focus An online, tutorial-driven orientation to graduate academics. A final grade of pass is considered successful completion of this element. Student Learning Assessment To insure an effective and high quality educational experience, the Clinical Psy.D. Department faculty have developed a programmatic student learning assessment plan. Department faculty systematically evaluate the achievement of student learning objectives through assessment tools and outcome measurements to inform future planning and to generate creative, responsive solutions to improve student learning. Data are gathered through practicum and internship evaluations, exit interviews, competency examination results, dissertation ratings, course-based work samples, grades and PPEs, etc. Data are gathered, analyzed, and presented to the Clinical Psy.D. Department for review. Based on summative and formative measurements, the department revises its student learning assessment plan, the curriculum, and the approach to learning inside and outside the classroom as needed to improve the quality of student learning, as well as the applicability of what students learn to developments in the field of psychology. Student learning assessment offers the Clinical Psy.D. Department a critical opportunity to evaluate the effectiveness of the program of study and to develop innovative, student-focused learning environments. To optimize the learning environment offered by the Clinical Psy.D. Department, students are strongly encouraged to be active learners. Active student learners reflect on the conditions and activities that engage their learning style. They work independently, with peers, and with faculty and supervisors to enhance their personal and professional learning both inside and outside the classroom. Taking responsibility for their own learning, students participate in learning activities and reflective exercises, evaluate their own progress as objectively as they can, actively contribute to the learning process, and independently seek out resources to enhance their competence and mastery of the material. Grading and Performance Feedback Grades are assigned in all courses and students can review course grades online. Course grades assist the school, the student, and the student s academic advisor to monitor the student s progress and mastery of material deemed necessary by the department faculty to become proficient and competent psychologists. Students receive a letter grade, and faculty comments to the department. Once each semester, the department faculty meets to review student progress at a student review meeting. At student reviews, the faculty academic advisor summarizes a student s progress through the program to date. Other department faculty can elaborate on their contact with the student, expressing concerns or articulating areas of strength. Student review feedback offers students a comprehensive picture of their performance and learning. In student reviews, academic advisors document feedback for each of their advisees; the department chair forwards copies of the feedback to the student, the academic file, and, if a concern was raised, to the academic advisor. The Clinical Psy.D. Department does not accept grades of "C" or "F" as indicating student mastery of the knowledge, skills, or attitudes associated with any course. The Department requires students who receive a grade of "C" or "F" in a core curriculum course to replace these grades by retaking the same course. Students who receive a grade of "C" or "F" in an elective course must replace these grades - 8 -

9 either by taking the same course again, or by replacing the course with another elective course. In order for the student to meet Department requirements, the student must receive a grade of "B-" or better in the retaken/replacement course. To replace the "C" or "F" grade, the retaken/replacement course must be offered by The Chicago School. Only in the most unusual of circumstances is a student allowed to replace a grade with a retaken/replacement course offered by another institution. As indicated in the Student Handbook, both the original grade and the retaken/replacement grade will appear on the student's transcript and factor towards the cumulative GPA. Students may retake a course only once. Those who are unable to earn a grade of "B-" or better in the retaken course will be referred to the Student Affairs Committee for dismissal. No course in which a student receives a grade of B- or better may be retaken. For the general student, the core curriculum courses are as follows: Professional Development Group I (PY 415) and II (PY 416) Clinical and Diagnostic Interviewing (PY 429) Psychopathology I (PY 423) and II (PY 424) Intellectual (PY 425), Personality (PY 441), and Advanced (PY 453) Assessment History & Systems (PY 426) Social (PY 451), Cognitive-Affective (PY 447), and Biological Basis (PY 449) of Behavior Life Span I (PY 437) and II (PY 439) Diversity I (PY 443) and II (PY 446) Assessment Practicum Seminar I (PY 484), as well as II and III (PY 485 and PY 486, or PY 487) Basic Intervention: Psychodynamic (PY 462), Cognitive-Behavioral (PY 464), Existential-Humanistic (PY 466), and Systems (PY 468) Advanced Intervention I and II 1 Research Methods (PY 455) Therapy Practicum Seminar I (PY504), as well as II and III (PY505 and PY506, or PY507) Proposal Development Seminar (PY630) Introduction to Human Neuropsychology (PY479) Statistics II (PY428) Introduction to Psychopharmacology (PY481) Seminar in Professional Practice (PY483) Professional Issues and Ethics (PY445) Internship I (PY650), II (PY651), and III (PY652) 1 Please note: Advanced Intervention I and II are general names referring to several different courses. Students who receive a grade of "C" or "F" in an Advanced Intervention course are still required to replace these grades, but have two options to do so: The student may take an Advanced Intervention course from the same Intervention Track. The student may take an Advanced Intervention course from a different Intervention Track. However, to sit for the Clinical Competency Exam and to meet graduation requirements, the student must have received passing grades in two Advanced Intervention courses from the same Intervention Track. For the Child and Adolescent Track student, all courses are considered core courses, and grades of "C" or "F" may be replaced only by retaking the same course. Student Academic Development Professional Development Group and Academic Advisor Assignment All students are required to enroll in a Professional Development Group during their first two semesters in the program. A student's Professional Development Group instructor automatically becomes her/his academic advisor. Students maintain the same academic advisor during their first year in the program, but may request a new academic advisor after that time. Student Disclosure of Personal Information Self-reflection, introspection, and an ability to examine personal reactions to clinical material are considered critical skills in student development. Students will be required to examine their personal reactions and the impact of their personal histories on the clinical services they are training to provide. Students will not be required to disclose personal information related to sexual history, history of abuse or neglect, personal psychotherapy or in-depth information regarding intimate relationships in course or department related activities. However, students are expected to actively reflect upon and effectively manage their personal reactions to people who are different from themselves along these and other dimensions, especially when such personal reactions negatively impact clinical work, professional interactions, and ethical responsibilities. Such reflection may be required within the context of an advising relationship at School, or a supervising relationship on practicum

10 Independent Study Independent study hours are reserved for topic areas not covered in the standard curriculum. A maximum of three independent study hours can be credited toward the required degree credit hours. If a student opts to take more than a total of three independent study hours, only three semester hours may be credited toward the degree while any additional hours will not apply toward degree requirements. Students who wish to complete an independent study course should contact the department chair for approval. Auditing Courses Auditing a course refers to taking again a course that a student has already taken before. The previous course grade is not altered, and no additional credits are earned; however, the student can experience updated learning to maintain competency in an area. So as to give first choice of registration to students taking a course for the first time, students seeking to audit a course must petition the Department chair to do so. Course audit opportunities are on a space-available basis only. Track Transfer Students in the Child and Adolescent Track may petition to transfer out of the Track into the general Psy.D. Department. Students should first discuss this transfer with their academic advisor, and then complete a formal Petition for Transfer. Such a transfer before the summer of the second year of graduate school is less difficult to accomplish for students. However, after that point, Child and Adolescent Track students who transfer may find that not all of their Child and Adolescent Track courses have exact equivalents in the general department. As a result, they may be required to take course work that, while common for general department, is additional course work for them. Students are not permitted to transfer into the Child and Adolescent Track. This is because some general courses (i.e., Research Methods, Statistics I, and Statistics II) are not offered in the same sequence or on the same schedule as their Child and Adolescent Track equivalents (i.e., Research Clerkship I through VI). As a result, students who did not begin in the Child and Adolescent Track would have to take additional courses out of sequence, seriously delaying their completion of the program. Department Acceleration Department acceleration is available to students pursing a concentration. Child and Adolescent Track students are not permitted to accelerate due to additional courses and training experiences that are required cannot be completed in a three-year time period. Students with transferred graduate course work or significant experience in the field may petition to accelerate the program for completion in four years. Typically this refers to three years of study being on campus and the fourth year being off-campus at a clinical internship. Students without transferred graduate course work, or an M.A. degree in psychology or a related area, or significant experience in the field are not eligible to petition to accelerate. To petition for acceleration*, a student must meet the following criteria: 1. The student must be enrolled full-time. 2. The student may not obtain any grade below A- prior to petitioning. 3. The student must meet at least one of the following conditions: A minimum of two years full-time work in the field of psychology An M.A. degree in psychology or related clinically focused area Successful transfer / waiver of at least 12 semester hours of required course work Students wishing to accelerate should consult with their academic advisor following their first completed semester and submit a written request to their academic advisor that includes a description of their qualifications and a detailed proposal for completion of their remaining course work. Academic advisors present these requests to accelerate to the department faculty at student review meetings. Faculty will make a determination regarding each student s request. Students will be notified of the results. Regardless of their plan of study and regardless of their track, all students are required to complete all course work and training requirements within seven years. An Accelerated Student can request to complete the CCE later in the Fall or in early Spring semester of their Therapy Practicum Seminar if: o o the Therapy Practicum Seminar leader believes that the student has had sufficient experience with a client to gather all clinical information necessary to submit a completed CCE and to have a reasonable chance of demonstrating proficiency on the CCE requirements the Department Chair approves

11 Earning an Master of Arts Degree in Clinical Psychology An M.A. in Clinical Psychology can be awarded following the successful completion of required coursework. At the beginning of the semester in which a student expects to be eligible for the master s degree, he or she is required to submit online a Petition for Program Completion to the Office of Academic Records. The petition is a request to conduct an audit to determine eligibility for the degree. Students who meet the requirements are eligible to participate in the next scheduled commencement. All students who file a Petition for Program Completion will be charged a fee. The specific requirements for award of a Master of Arts degree for the general department student are as follows: Good academic and professional standing in the Department Successful completion of practicum (PY484, PY485, and PY486 or PY484 and PY487) Successful completion of the following courses: o Professional Development Group I and II (PY415 and PY416) o Psychopathology I and II (PY423 and PY424) o Intellectual Assessment (PY425) o History and Systems of Psychology (PY426) o Clinical and Diagnostic Interviewing (PY429) o Psychology of the Lifespan I and II (PY437 and PY439) o Personality Assessment (PY441) o Diversity in Clinical Psychology I and II (PY443 and PY446) o Advanced Assessment (PY453) o Basic Intervention: Psychodynamic (PY462) o Basic Intervention: Cognitive-Behavioral (PY464) o Basic Intervention: Existential-Humanistic (PY466) o Basic Intervention: System (PY468) The specific course requirements for award of a Master of Arts degree for the Child and Adolescent Track student are as follows: Good academic and professional standing in the Department Successful completion of practicum (PC484, PC485, and PC486 or PC484 and PC487) Successful completion of the following courses: o Research Clerkship I through VI (PC200 through PC205) o Professional Development Group I and II (PC415 and PC416) o Psychopathology I and II (PC423 and PC424) o Psychological Assessment I and II (PC425 and PC441) o History and Systems of Psychology (PC426) o Clinical and Diagnostic Interviewing and Observation (PC429) o Psychology of the Lifespan I and II (PC437 and PC438) o Diversity in Clinical Psychology I and II (PC443 and PC446) o Advanced Seminar in Psychological Assessment and Psychopathology (PC453) o Basic Intervention: Psychodynamic (PC462) o Basic Intervention: Cognitive-Behavioral (PC464) o Basic Intervention: Existential-Humanistic (PC466) o Basic Intervention: System (PC468) Academic Development Plans Students experiencing difficulty meeting department requirements may be placed on an Academic Development Plan (ADP) by their academic advisor, by the department chair on behalf of the department faculty, or by the Office of Placement and Training (OPT). Students are encouraged to independently identify and address weaknesses in their behaviors, skills, and academic performance as early as possible. Informal remediation with the assistance of the academic advisor, or representatives from other departments and centers of the school, is possible. When such informal interventions ameliorate the identified concerns, no further action is required. If informal efforts have been unsuccessful or would likely not remedy the concerns, a student may be referred to his/her academic advisor, the department chair, the director of placement and training, or the Student Affairs Committee. In such circumstances, students will discuss the matter personally with the appropriate person. An academic advisor, department chair, or OPT representative may seek consultation from each other or a student s academic file to best inform academic development planning. Additional information may be solicited from the student s academic advisor, practicum seminar leader, department faculty members, training site supervisors, and/or any other party involved in the student s training as necessary and appropriate. Should a student refuse to participate in academic development planning or fail to successfully complete an ADP, that student may be referred to the department chair and then other school committees for further action

12 Practicum The practicum is an integral component of clinical training. It provides a closely supervised clinical experience in which students use the knowledge obtained in the classroom to understand their clients and to develop skills in assessment, psychotherapy, and other discipline related areas. As such, the practicum serves to integrate the theoretical and practical aspects of the education of the professional psychologist. It allows students to become familiar with professional collaboration and consultation in a clinical setting. All students are required to take six semester hours each of Assessment and Therapy Practica (please see the Clinical Psy.D. Master Practicum Cycle below). The first three-semester practicum sequence is primarily devoted to training in psychological assessment. The second three-semester sequence is primarily devoted to training in psychotherapy. Both practica require individual and group supervision offered by the practicum site, as well as small group seminars offered by the school. An advanced practicum is mandatory for Child and Adolescent Track students, but optional for other concentrations.. Advanced practicum is however strongly recommended for all students who have limited clinical experience, who are pursuing specialized training (e.g., Neuropsychology), or who require additional supervised training in either assessment and or psychotherapy. Students opting to complete an advanced practicum are required to apply for permission to do so (see below), and to complete four semester hours of advanced practicum. The director of placement and training awards grades for all practica based on the evaluation of the site supervisor, the student s performance in practica seminars, the completion of the required practicum hours, and the submission of all forms to the Office of Placement and Training. As noted earlier, complete adherence to ethical standards of the field is required of all students, especially those on practica. Should a student show unprofessional or unethical behavior, or signs that he or she lacks suitability for the profession, he or she may be dismissed from a training practicum. Dismissal from a practicum is considered extremely serious and will result in automatic referral to the Training and Community Engagement Committee and may result in dismissal from The Chicago School. Permission to Apply to Practicum Students must express their intent to apply for each practicum. Department faculty, during student review meetings, will review each student's progress in the Clinical Psy.D. Department, determining which students have met the necessary requirements to apply to practicum. Students must maintain a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or above, and in all other ways be a student in good standing at The Chicago School to be granted approval to first apply for, then to accept, a practicum position. Students will be initially reviewed in spring for permission to apply for practicum. Students approved to apply to Assessment and Therapy Practicum will be reviewed in summer (following the completion of the final prerequisites) for final permission to proceed to practicum. Students seeking advanced practicum training are also reviewed for permission to apply for and then to proceed to advanced practicum

13 Clinical Competency Evaluation (CCE) Every student is required to pass a Clinical Competency Examination (CCE). The aim of the CCE, broadly stated, is to evaluate the student's knowledge of the theory, research, and practice of a chosen theory of intervention, as well as competency to practice that theory in an ethical and culturally sensitive manner. Ultimately, the CCE allows the department to assess the student's abilities as a future clinical psychologist. The CCE consists of a written paper and an oral presentation of a case chosen by a student from her or his practicum caseload. This requirement is completed in the spring term of Therapy Practicum Seminar and the student must successfully pass the CCE in order to fulfill the Therapy Practicum Seminar requirements. Specific information regarding the format, case selection process and requirements of the CCE are detailed in the Therapy Practicum Seminar syllabus. The objectives of the CCE are to assess the students' competency in several areas: Basic clinical intervention and relationship-building skills Ability to conceptualize clinical material in a chosen theory of intervention consistent with the student's advanced course work and then to develop and implement treatment interventions that stem from the chosen theory and conceptualization Ability to reflect upon and critique their own clinical work and effectiveness Understanding of diversity and difference variables upon rapport, case conceptualization, treatment planning, and therapeutic intervention As scheduled by the seminar leader, students formally present their CCE cases within the spring semester of the Therapy Practicum Seminar. The seminar leader will provide additional information about specific guidelines and requirements in the course syllabus. The oral presentation should include an audio- or video-taped sample of the therapy with the client and an accompanying transcript. In the oral presentation, students should be prepared to aspects of the case, intervention, and conceptualization in many areas: The chosen theoretical model and its associated interventions The rationale for treatment plan design and selection of particular interventions The impact of diversity variables on rapport, conceptualization, treatment planning, and intervention selection The strategies used to assess the effectiveness of interventions The body of scholarly knowledge that supports the selection of the chosen theory for the client and the presenting problem The conceptualization changes if case data were altered for the CCE The ethical and legal issues related to the case CCE Grading The Therapy Practicum Seminar leader evaluates the CCE based upon the quality of the written paper and oral presentation. Specific grading criteria are provided in the Therapy Practicum Seminar syllabus. The possible CCE grades are: High Pass, Pass, Revision, and Fail : "High Pass" designates the student as having clearly exceeded the expectations for performance across all or most all areas "Pass" designates the student as having clearly met expected performance levels, although a few areas may be above or slightly below average If the written paper and/or oral presentation do not adequately demonstrate expected competencies, but the seminar leader believes revision to demonstrate expected competencies within the time allowed is feasible, the seminar leader may issue a grade of "Revision," which is a temporary grade that allows the student the opportunity to re-work aspects of the CCE with the Therapy Practicum Seminar Leader: o If a student s revisions are acceptable to the seminar leader, the temporary "Revision" grade is changed to "Pass" (a grade of High Pass cannot replace a grade of "Revision") o If a student s revisions are unacceptable to the seminar leader, a grade of "Fail" will then be awarded If the written paper and/or oral presentation do not adequately demonstrate expected competencies, and the seminar leader believes revision to demonstrate expected competencies is not feasible within the time allowed, the seminar leader will issue a grade of "Fail." If a grade of Revision is not resolved by the end of the semester in which the CCE was completed, the CCE grade automatically becomes a grade of Fail. If a grade of "Fail" is issued at any point the CCE as well as the Therapy Practicum Seminar grade automatically become grades of Fail. A CCE or Therapy Practicum Seminar grade of "Fail" necessitates a meeting with the department chair; a plan for further action will be developed. This plan may require the student to submit another CCE case to be reviewed by one or more faculty members, the completion of an Advanced Practicum or a second Therapy Practicum, a referral to the Student Affairs Committee or other alternative courses of action. Failure of two CCE case presentations prompts automatic referral to the Student Affairs Committee for decision regarding additional academic development or other action

14 Dissertation The dissertation is an essential aspect of a student s academic experience and clinical education at the school. The dissertation provides the school with the opportunity to formally evaluate the student's ability to contribute to the field by applying theory and research to areas of clinical psychology, thinking critically and creatively about professional psychology, and demonstrating self-direction and professional/scholarly writing. The dissertation should clearly and concisely demonstrate the student's command of the body of knowledge in a chosen area, as well as ability to critically evaluate and synthesize this knowledge. The student's Dissertation Committee is responsible for assessing the student's abilities and critical thinking, determining the professional standards the dissertation must meet, and giving final approval to the dissertation. Once students begin the dissertation process, they then have two years to complete the Doctoral Dissertation. In rare circumstances, however, students may petition the department chair before the end of the two years for an extension to complete the dissertation. The department chair's decision regarding the request for an extension is final. Students, in collaboration with the dissertation chair, must submit a formal request for extension and a detailed plan including all goals for completion during the extension period. If an extension is granted, the extended date is firm; no additional extensions will be granted and the extension plan will be considered violated if all goals and requirements detailed in the original extension request are not successfully completed. If the dissertation is not completed by the dissertation due date, students are subject to dismissal from the school. Students meeting the course requirements are required to begin their dissertation during the fall of their third year in the department in a three-semester-hour course called Proposal Development Seminar (PDS). The instructor of a student's PDS automatically becomes the chairperson of the dissertation. Registration for a PDS obligates a student to conduct a Dissertation within the Instructor's field of expertise in terms of scholarly area and method of inquiry. Once the dissertation is begun, students are expected to continue working on it every semester until its completion. Students who receive a grade of F in PDS will be immediately removed from the dissertation process and required to retake PDS the following Fall semester with a new dissertation chair. Since dissertation completion is required before a student is allowed to proceed to internship, this in effect delays a student's completion of the program for an additional year. Students who receive a grade of C in PDS in the fall will be required to repeat the same course in the spring semester with the same instructor. On rare occasions, a student begins the dissertation process, passes the PDS, but abandons their dissertation work due to hardship or difficulty. Such students may be required to begin the dissertation process over again. Such students start with a new PDS course, and must follow all policies and requirements in place at that time for students beginning the dissertation process. Credits earned in the original PDS class are not counted toward graduation requirements. To receive a grade of "B-" or better, students are required to have their Dissertation proposal approved by their chair by the end of their PDS. Each dissertation student is then required to successfully complete five separate sections of Dissertation Maintenance, beginning the semester after PDS. This includes required registration over the third and fourth year summer semesters. Criteria for successful completion of each course of Dissertation Maintenance are determined by the dissertation chair, and are not negotiable. All criteria must be completed in full for a student to pass the PDS or Dissertation Maintenance course. Dissertation Maintenance is graded on a "Credit/No Credit" basis. A student who receives a "NC" in any section of Dissertation Maintenance must retake that course of the Dissertation Maintenance sequence, as well as take all remaining courses in the sequence, so as to complete all five Dissertation Maintenance courses with grades of "Credit." A student who defends before the fifth Dissertation Maintenance course is still required to enroll in and complete all five Dissertation Maintenance courses. Multiple grades of "NC" across the Dissertation Maintenance course sequence will be handled as follows. The first grade of "NC" will result in referral of the student to the advisor for academic and solution planning. The second grade of "NC" will result in referral of the student to the Department Chair or designee for a formal Academic Development Plan. The third grade of "NC" will result in referral to a Faculty Council committee for review, which could result in dismissal. Any time students receive a grade of "NC", they may be placed on "academic watch" or "academic warning" by the Department. The cost of copyediting is built in to the Dissertation Maintenance courses. As a result, you do not need to register for a copyediting course. The far majority of students will complete copyediting by the end of Internship, and thus receive formal conferral of their degree in the semester after internship is completed. However, students who do not complete the copyediting process prior to the end internship will be required to register for "Continued Dissertation" each semester after internship until copyediting is completed, and must pay all costs resulting from the additional semesters of enrollment. Grades of "Incomplete" can only be awarded for Proposal Development Seminar and Dissertation Maintenance after extenuating circumstances beyond the student s control occur that significantly delay the delayed that student s progress. Grades of "Incomplete" are not given in cases where students did not reach course objectives and goals as a result of their own skill level or behavior. Grades of "Incomplete" must be resolved within the time requirements established by the department and the Office of Academic Records or the "Incomplete" will automatically convert to a non-negotiable grade of "F" (for PDS) and "NC" for Dissertation Maintenance. On rare occasions, a student may decide to defer application for Internship. This does not provide students with an additional year to complete the Doctoral Dissertation. As noted earlier, once started in Proposal Development Seminar, the dissertation must be completed within a two-year time period. Postponing internship then does not extend or alter in any way the dissertation due date. Semesters that occur while a student is on a department approved Leave of Absence do not count in the two year completion period. However, a student is not allowed to work with their dissertation chair while on a Leave of Absence

15 Internship All students are required to complete an Internship following the completion of all course work, practicum, and dissertation requirements. On internship, students integrate academic knowledge with clinical skills and demonstrate the effective and ethical use of these skills in clinical practice. Through intensive supervised training, students gain direct experience in applying their knowledge with a clinical population. The internship experience consists of a minimum of 2,000 hours of training over a month (full or part time, respectively) period. Appropriate sites for internship training include programs that are approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) and programs that are members of the Association of Psychology Pre-doctoral and Post-doctoral Internship Centers (APPIC) or The California Psychology Internship Council (CAPIC). The internship is a vital component of the educational department and is never waived or transferred. Students are required to register for Internship during each semester they are on internship. Registration for Internship automatically assigns full-time student status. The director of placement and training awards Pass/Fail grades for Internship based on the evaluation of the student's performance by their site supervisor as well as other documentation required by the Office of Placement and Training. Dismissal from an internship is considered extremely serious and will result in immediate referral to the appropriate committee (i.e., Student Affairs or Training and Community Engagement Committee), and may result in dismissal from the school. Further details regarding this area are found in the Guide to Clinical Internships distributed to all intern applicants. In addition to being required for the graduate degree, the internship is also required for licensure. As a result, there are certain requirements associated with approved internships, such as length and amount of clinical training as well as supervision, that are beyond the control of the school. These requirements may change over time, such as when state licensing laws change. To assure the student's readiness for the internship and to secure a reasonable potential for licensure for the student, the department may alter its expectations for students on internship on a case-by-case basis. As an example the department may require additional course work or learning experiences prior to leaving for internship, or may require additional training beyond the minimum expected by an internship site supervisor. Permission to Apply for Internship Students must be granted permission to apply to internship by the department faculty before they are allowed to do so. Each fall, faculty review all students that have requested to apply to internship and forward written feedback to students regarding their eligibility to apply. Permission to apply for internship is based on the following: Satisfactory completion of at least 76 credit hours, including transfer credits Satisfactory completion of two to four semesters of practicum Submission of an approved plan to complete all required course credit hours prior to Internship Attainment of the required level of dissertation completion Fulfillment of the residency requirement or submission of a plan to the department chair that is deemed satisfactory for completion of the residency requirement Cumulative GPA of 3.00 or higher Once a student has accepted an internship, he or she is not permitted to incur any grades of incomplete Permission to Rank Order Internships Before being permitted to rank order Internships in the national match process, or accept an internship offer outside of the match process, a student must at minimum be at the required level of completion of his/her dissertation and be deemed as making satisfactory progress toward the completion of his/her dissertation. Students who have not met the required level of dissertation completion by the rank order submittal date will not be permitted to rank order internships or accept an internship offer. Upon meeting the dissertation completion requirement, students who were restricted from rank ordering (or accepting) internships may request permission from the director of placement and training to reenter the internship search process. To rank order internships, students are required to have turned in a 100 percent complete draft of their dissertation to their chair by the stated due date. A 100 percent complete text dissertation includes a draft of all components of the dissertation. To progress to internship, students must have successfully defended their dissertation, have incorporated all required committee revisions, and been granted permission to proceed to copy editing

16 The Curriculum Department Requirements The Clinical Psy.D. Department is a 106 to 107 credit program that includes four years of intensive course work, one year of required practica focused on clinical assessment, one year of required practica focused on clinical therapy, a third year of advanced practicum is required for Child and Adolescent Track students but optional for other students in the department, a dissertation, and a year of clinical internship. Students are able to individualize their clinical training to address their own professional and developmental interests, however, through the choices they make in several areas, each of which is described below. Intervention Course Stream The first way that students can individualize their training is through their choice of Intervention Course Stream. The Clinical Psy.D. Department does not advocate any single theoretical intervention. Rather, all Clinical Psy.D. students receive an excellent generalist base in theory, conceptualization and technique by completing a basic Intervention course in each of the four Intervention Course Streams. They then select one Intervention Course Stream in which to specialize, and take advanced course work in that theory. The department assists students in identifying the Intervention theory that most closely aligns with their own beliefs regarding what creates, maintains, and alters psychological distress and health. Department faculty believe that it is through this alignment with one's own beliefs that a student s potential as a future professional psychologist is best actualized: The Psychodynamic Intervention Course Stream Students who choose this intervention begin in the Basic Intervention course studying the development of major psychodynamic theories from historical, clinical, and conceptual perspectives. Through readings and case studies, students learn about the nature of the psychotherapeutic relationship, and the connection between theory and practice. They then progress to Advanced Intervention: Intrapsychic and study contemporary versions of intervention models that focus on intrapsychic dynamics in psychopathology and treatment process, and the role of culture, race, and gender in therapy. They then progress to Advanced Intervention: Interpersonal and study contemporary models of interpersonal dynamics in psychopathology and treatment. The Cognitive-Behavioral Intervention Course Stream Students who choose this intervention begin in the Basic Intervention course studying the basic assumptions of cognitive-behavioral theory, the major theorists, and the basics of treatment planning, case conceptualization, and evaluation of treatment efficacy. They then progress to Advanced Intervention: Behavioral and study contemporary behavioral models of assessment and intervention, as well as their theoretical and research foundations. They then progress to Advanced Intervention: Cognitive and develop skills in contemporary cognitive therapy models and techniques, as well as study their theoretical and research foundations. The Existential-Humanistic Intervention Course Stream Students who choose this intervention begin in the Basic Intervention course studying the core elements of humanistic theory including the existential basis of meaning and choice, present-centered awareness, authenticity and genuineness as therapist provided conditions, and mindfulness and body awareness. They then progress to Advanced Intervention: Group and study major theoretical aspects of group therapy theory and technique, including the use of process comments and multiple interactions in real time, in part by participating in an experiential class-based group process. They then progress to Advanced Intervention: Advanced Existential-Humanistic and more deeply explore person-centered therapy, existential therapy, and transpersonal psychology. The Systems Intervention Course Stream Students who choose this Intervention begin in the Basic Intervention course studying basic conceptualization and intervention skills to recognize and counter forces in a system, differentiate problematic and normal functioning in a context, and deliver culturally sensitive treatment. They then progress to Advanced Intervention: Couples and learn concepts, assumptions, and techniques of four major models of couples therapy, and the ethical and culturally sensitive application of these theories. They then progress to Advanced Intervention: Family and learn concepts, assumptions and techniques of four major models of family therapy in ethical and culturally sensitive work with diverse families, in part through personal study of one's own family of origin structure. The Clinical Competency Examination (explained above) requires a thorough understanding of a client's presenting condition, the choice of treatment approach, and the understanding of change using both basic and advanced theory and technique from the student's chosen Intervention Course Stream. The resulting conceptualization is presented to students and a seminar leader aligned with the same or a related theory

17 Concentration Areas The second way that students can individualize their training is through their choice of concentration area. All Clinical Psy.D. students focus their study and lay the groundwork for future specialization in their particular area of interest. The Department offers the Child and Adolescent Concentration or Child and Adolescent Track for students interested in child and adolescent psychology. Students must choose from one of seven concentration areas or the certificate in Applied Behavior Analysis. Since the Child and Adolescent Track is an intensified concentration itself, students enrolled in this course of study cannot choose an additional concentration area. Concentration Options General department students must choose from several concentration areas: Generalist, Health, Multicultural/Community, Forensic, Organizational, School, and Child & Adolescent. Generalist Concentration The hallmark of the Clinical Psy.D. Department is the Generalist Concentration. This concentration offers students the opportunity to develop a broader base of knowledge regarding alternative theories and interventions, clinical work with diverse populations, and professional responsibilities. Students best suited to the Generalist Concentration seek to: Broaden their areas of professional interest to develop greater preparation for entry-level clinical practice Sample from a variety of courses in an effort to explore possible areas of professional interest Prepare for broad-based professional work; for example, in a rural practice or in community mental health systems Build additional skills to apply in multidisciplinary clinical settings such as hospitals, wellness centers, and community centers Prepare for clinical work with underserved populations Build additional skills to support their plans for current and future scholarship Through the Generalist Concentration, students can gain additional expertise in teaching, supervision, and administration; learn applied behavior analysis; take a series of courses in trauma, loss, or expressive therapies; develop an additional theoretical area of specialty; or design a unique area of independent study. There are no specific required courses for the Generalist Concentration; any of the electives listed below can be used to meet the Concentration requirement of eight credit hours: PY427 Statistics I PY556 Psychology, Creativity, and Community PY Independent Study I-III PY558 Introduction to Drama Therapy PY527 Qualitative Methods of Research PY568 Trauma Therapy in Clinical Practice PY533 Psychology of Women PY570 Applied Neuropsychology PY535 Separation, Loss, and Mourning PY565 Psychotherapy and Spirituality PY542 Introduction to Expressive Therapies PY586 Supervision PY544 Interdisciplinary Arts Studio PY588 Learning to Teach PY548 Therapeutic Uses of Dance/Movement in Psychology PY5881 Learning to Teach Seminar I PY551 Brief Psychotherapy PY5882 Learning to Teach Seminar II PY550 International Perspective on Mental Health I PY595 International Perspective on Mental Health II Students may also take Advanced Intervention courses in an additional Intervention Course Streams, as well as any of the following concentration or certificate courses, and count these toward their Generalist Concentration requirements. Health Concentration Health psychology specializes in the application of psychological principles and techniques to the problems of health, especially in a clinical context of working with people whose primary problems are medical in nature. Health psychologists use the base skills of professional psychology to assess the impact of psychosocial factors in the origin and course of many physical conditions, illnesses, and disabilities. They also use a variety of interventions aimed at helping people prevent illness, recover quickly, or live with chronic conditions in a way that maximizes their functional capacities for living. Professional psychology is not just a mental health profession; it is a health care profession that can address the whole person, mind, and body. Students in the Health Psychology Concentration gain an overall awareness of the role of professional psychologists as researchers, clinicians, patient-educators, and above all, as members of inter-disciplinary treatment teams that work with a specific disease or health related problems. Upon completion of the course sequence, students should be prepared to enter into an advanced practicum or internship opportunities in the field for supervised exposure and experience in treatment of health related problems. Course requirements for this concentration, which total 8 hours, are below: All of the following are required: Two credit hours from the following are required: PY 540 Wellness, Health, and Prevention PY 547 Hypnotherapy PY 546 Biopsychosocial Aspects of Medical Conditions PY 557 Substance Abuse PY 564 Applied Stress Management PY 571 Psychology of Aging PY 582 Prenatal and Neonatal Stress and Adjustment

18 Multicultural/Community Concentration The Multicultural/Community Concentration augments basic psychological paradigms by integrating clinical, political, economic and social information that must be considered when working with clients, regardless of their membership in cultural/ethnic groups. Moreover, students are introduced to external factors (e.g. such as privilege, power, and worldview) that influence the manner in which students, clients, and others express and view their lives and the lives of others. Students will develop clinical and teaching skills through a series of courses and supervised training that will enhance their ability to be culturally sensitive and aware. Course requirements for this concentration, which total 8 hours, are below: PY 578 Diversity in Clinical Practice III PY 597 Underserved Adults: Cultural Considerations PY 580 GLBT Clients: Cultural Considerations PY 598 Gender and Transgender PY 596 Underserved Youth: Cultural Considerations PY 599 International Populations: Cultural Considerations Forensic Concentration Forensic Psychology is a rapidly growing field... that focuses on the application of the science and profession of psychology to questions and issues relating to law and the legal system. The Forensic Concentration course work provides students with basic knowledge regarding psychologists roles in the legal system, including employment options in the field, mental health law, and the treatment and evaluation of offenders. Students will also be introduced to testifying as an expert witness and forensic report writing. Those specializing in this area will be among the highest in demand for the delivery of services to correctional facilities, law enforcement agencies, courts, attorneys, and lawmakers. Organizations, administrations, and development of programs in those organizations will be enhanced by the employment of those trained in the area of forensic psychology. Course requirements for this concentration, which total nine credit hours, are listed below: PY 523 Mental Health Law PY 520 Treatment and Assessment of the Offender PY 537 Forensic Documentation PY 519 Violence and Risk Assessment Organizational Psychology Concentration Clinical psychologists increasingly find themselves assuming consulting management roles within organizational settings, serving as: Administrators in community agencies, hospitals and managed care organizations Management consultants to corporations, non-profit agencies, and family firms Managers of human resources, diversity programs, EAPs, wellness and outplacement programs, and training and organizational development departments within corporations In addition to clinical skills, these roles require familiarity with organizational and group dynamics, corporate language and culture, business literacy, application of assessment and intervention strategies to organizational issues, and the unique aspects of a consultant role. The Chicago School s curriculum in organizational psychology has been designed to provide this training. Ethical issues and current issues and topics within organizational psychology are addressed. Particular attention is given to individual differences/diversity issues as they relate to organizational structure and processes. Course requirements for this concentration, which total eight hours, are listed below: PY 534 Organization Behavior PY 538 Mental Health Administration PY 536 Organizational Consulting Skills Students in this concentration have the opportunity to complete an advanced practicum in organizational psychology

19 School Psychology Concentration Working within a school system offers psychologists an opportunity to impact learning environments and families lives for the better. Through interaction with parents, children, teachers and school administrators, psychologists can help communities and school systems impact the quality and effectiveness of student learning and cognitive development. Psychologists can develop programs to train teachers and parents, develop effective techniques to manage behavior at home and in the classroom, work with students with disabilities or with special talents, and assist schools to prevent and manage crises. The School Psychology Concentration offers the opportunity to learn how to work with students individually and in groups in public and private school settings. This concentration does not meet eligibility requirements to sit for a school psychologist license/certification, but will introduce basic issues and intervention approaches for use in school settings and with school aged clients. Course requirements for this concentration, which total eight hours, are listed below: PY 509 Consulting in Schools PY 517 Prevention and Crisis Intervention in Schools PY 516 Effective Educational Models and Literacy Child and Adolescent Concentration The Child and Adolescent Concentration enhances the preparation of students interested in serving the mental health needs of children and adolescents. Throughout the course work and related practicum experiences, emphasis is placed on developing a conceptual and experiential background in working with children and adolescents representing a wide range of family and cultural life styles. The concentration provides students with opportunities to study child and adolescent psychopathology, diagnostic evaluation, and therapeutic interventions. In addition to working with diverse economic, social, and ethnic/racial populations, students have opportunities to explore a full range of professional experiences through practica, including hospital inpatient and outpatient clinics, community and/or school-based centers, forensic settings, and private practice settings. Students are also able to work with children representing the full-age spectrum, from early childhood through adolescence. This concentration requires eight hours from the courses listed below:, PY460 Child and Adolescent Neuropsychological Assessment PY552 Developmental Disabilities PY489 Seminar in Pediatric Psychopharmacology PY573 Child Trauma PY 539 Introduction to Child and Adolescent Treatment PY 574 Play Assessment and Treatment PY541 Expressive Therapies with Children PY 575 Child and Adolescent Psychopathology PY543 Advanced Play Therapy PY583 Pediatric Health Psychology PY549 Divorce and Child Custody PY596 Underserved Youth: Cultural Considerations Students who wish to supplement their course work in this concentration are encouraged to also enroll in related electives, including Advanced Intervention: Family Therapy, Treatment of Underserved Youth or Juvenile Offenders, Prevention and Crisis Intervention in Schools, and Mental Health Administration

20 Child and Adolescent Track The Child and Adolescent Track is an innovative enhancement of the Clinical Psy.D. Department s Child and Adolescent Concentration. As a result, Track students do no chose a concentration because their concentration on child and adolescent issues begins in the first year of study. Students are considered well-suited to this track if they desire A broad and general training in a variety of theories and treatment approaches through focus on diverse child and adolescent populations Preparation for broad-based professional work with children and adolescents in a variety of health, community, and educational treatment settings Additional training and preparation for future collaborative, multidisciplinary professional work with diverse and underserved youth Intensified and comprehensive child focused coursework in child development, assessment, psychopathology, health, and interventions Research-focused coursework and mentoring resulting in production of scholarship products such as intensive literature reviews, research design, program development, evaluation, presentations, and publications. The Child and Adolescent Track goes beyond its concentration roots by rearranging and expanding the Department s base curriculum in many ways. For example: The Research Clerkship: The Child and Adolescent Track Research Clerkship is a required research 6-semester course sequence focusing on statistics and research design during students first two years in the Track. The Research Clerkship provides a comprehensive foundation in research and statistics that support the expectation of the development of scholarly products that may culminate in student s dissertation. Students are required to engage in additional research with a research mentor during the Research Clerkship sequence. The Life Span Sequence: The Child and Adolescent Track expands the department s coverage of lifespan into three courses that allow for extended focus on prenatal and genetic, cognitive/intellectual, physical, emotional, and social development in the first course, Life Span I. The second course, Life Span II, covers adolescent development issues including substance use, the impact of physical health on cognitive and emotional development, depression and suicide, peer and family relations, gang involvement and violence, and gender differences. The third course, Life Span III, allows students to more specifically examine life span issues unique to adulthood. The Pediatric Health and Neuropsychology Sequence: The Pediatric Health and Neuropsychology Sequence is built on the Department s biological foundational courses (Biological Basis of Behavior, Introduction to Neuropsychology, and Psychopharmacology) into a sequence of six courses by adding Pediatric Health Psychology, Advanced Child and Adolescent Neuropsychological Assessment, and Seminar in Pediatric Pharmacology. Child and Adolescent Intervention Sequence: The Child and Adolescent Track builds upon the Department foundation of therapeutic intervention streams and offers additional extensive coursework in child and adolescent treatment by providing the following courses: Introduction to Child and Adolescent Treatment, Expressive Therapies with Children, Advanced Play Therapy. Additional Courses and Seminars: The Child and Adolescent Track includes a number of special courses. Examples include many of the same courses offered in the Child and Adolescent Concentration, as well as Divorce and Child Custody, Child Trauma, and Developmental Disabilities. The Child and Adolescent Track also includes two to three Speakers Series over the course of the year featuring workshops and seminars by guests speaks and experts on a wide range of topics. Certificate Option The third way that students can individualize their training is through the option to earn certification. Applied Behavior Analysis Students in the department may also choose to use their concentration hours as part of a larger professional plan to obtain a certificate in Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA). To complete an ABA certificate, a student must successfully complete 15 semester hours of behavioral course work. Behavioral courses include, but are not limited to: PY 403 Theory of Conditioning and Learning PY 408 Behavioral Consultation in Organizations PY 404 Analysis and Treatment of Developmental Disabilities PY 493 Advanced Intervention: Behavioral PY 405 Observation and Measurement No additional practicum experience is required to earn the certificate; however, to be eligible for certification as a Board Certified Behavior Analyst, an ABA practicum is required. 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