Learning To Be (come) A Good European

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1 Learning To Be (come) A Good European A Critical Analysis of the Official European Union Discourse on European Identity and Higher Education Jonna Johansson Linköping Studies in Arts and Science No. 417 Linköpings universitet Department of Management and Engineering Linköping 2007

2 Linköping Studies in Arts and Science No. 417 Vid filosofiska fakulteten vid Linköpings universitet bedrivs forskning och ges forskarutbildning med utgångspunkt från breda problemområden. Forskningen är organiserad i mångvetenskapliga forskningsmiljöer och forskarutbildningen huvudsakligen i forskarskolor. Gemensamt ger de ut serien Linköping Studies in Arts and Science. Denna avhandling kommer från Statsvetenskapliga avdelningen på institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling. Distribueras av: Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling Linköpings universitet Linköping Jonna Johansson Learning To Be (come) A Good European A Critical Analysis of the Official European Union Discourse on European Identity and Higher Education Upplaga 1:1 ISBN ISSN Jonna Johannson Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling Tryckeri: LiU-tryck, Linköping

3 Linköping Studies in Arts and Science Dissertation No. 417 Learning To Be (come) A Good European A Critical Analysis of the Official European Union Discourse on European Identity and Higher Education Jonna Johansson Abstract During the year 2007, when this thesis was completed, the European Union could look back at fifty years of collaboration, which began with the signing of the Treaty of Rome in 1957 and which has developed from being mainly economic in character to incorporating a political as well as a social dimension at the European level. In 2007 the European Union also commemorated the twentieth anniversary of Erasmus, its higher education mobility programme. It is this relatively new political dimension which I have been interested in investigating in this thesis. More precisely it is the political construction of a common European identity which is analysed using a critical discourse analysis approach.the major aim of this thesis has been two-fold. The first aim has been to investigate how the European is constructed in the discourse contained within the official European Union policy documents. I have been interested in analysing the various structures, in the form of ideas and norms which are used in order to construct the European. The second aim has been to explore whether the role of higher education, as constructed in the official European Union discourse, is given a similar identity-making role as education is argued to have in the nation-state according to the theory on national identity. I argue that there are three version of European identity construction, i.e. cultural, civic, and neo-liberal, with their own relationship to higher education, present in the empirical material analysed, consisting of official European Union documents. Further, this thesis is also a study of the power of modern government. I argue that there is an increase in normative soft power where The Good European is not something you are but something you become by being a responsible active citizen. Through the use of critical discourse analysis I illuminate the power which resides in the language in the discourse analysed. Thus, I have been interested in investigating how the official European Union discourse on European identity and higher education works to both include and exclude individuals. Keywords: identity, higher education, Unity in Diversity, European dimension, language, citizenship, activity, mobility, neo-liberalism, competitiveness, Knowledge Economy, flexibility, Lifelong Learning, skills.

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5 Study is to study what cannot be studied. Undertaking means undertaking what cannot be undertaken. Philosophizing is to philosophize about what cannot be philosophized about. Knowing that knowing is unknowable is true perfection. - Chuang Tzu (c. 360 BC c. 275 BC) This is my story. It was at school that my interest for the world first developed. I loved reading about children my own age in other parts of the globe. Also, it was through one of my teachers that I got my first pen pal when I was around ten years old. It was a little freckled boy from Australia, who just like me lived on a farm and had his own horse. In the following years, as I learnt English at school, I would write to many more boys and girls from all around the world and learn about what their lives were like, what they liked to do in their spare-time, what their ambitions for the future looked like, etc. By writing to them I realised that even though their everyday lives might differ from mine we also had many things in common, such as hopes about the future and values, which made it possible, despite differences, for us to relate to each other. I can still remember the amazing feeling of receiving letters with exotic stamps from places far away. Remember, this was the time B.C., i.e. before computers. However, as I grew older reading about the world was no longer enough. This interest in the world outside Sweden brought me to England when I was twenty years old. I came across the North Sea with a dream of living and experiencing another culture and way of life first hand. After a few years there I decided that I wanted to study at the university, and why not in England. For the next three years I took advantage of coming from an European Union Member State and got to study there for free, and then a further year completing a Masters at my own expense. When I strated this research process I knew I wanted to write something about identity since it is a subject which has fascinated me since my undergraduate days, which was also when I first became intrigued by the relationship between the nation and the nation-state under the conditions of globalisation and how these new circumstances have affected the role and nature of national identity. However, with this thesis, I saw an opportunity to broaden my investigative horizon by moving outside the nation-state borders. Having lived in the European Union s two most Eurosceptic Member States, i.e. Sweden and Great Britain, I had followed the public debate on European Union membership which often contained critical arguments in relation to a common European identity which made me curious about what is actually meant by a European identity.

6 I would like to thank the people who have influenced me and encourage me over the years in my academic career. I would like to begin by thanking Dr. Christopher May, at University of the West of England in Bristol, who introduced me to the subject of International Relations and Dr. Hazel Smith, at Warwick University in Coventry, who furthered this interest and who has served as an inspiration, both as a scholar in International Relations and as a woman in academia. In addition I would like to thank Ben Rosamond whose course on European Integration I took during my Masters at Warwick University and who opened up my eyes to the wonderful world of European studies. I would also like to thank Peo Hansen who has not only read various versions of my script and commented on them but who has also shared with me his great knowledge on issues on the European Union and identity. I also have to pay gratitude to Marianne Winter Jörgensen for her perceptive comments on my script which gave me alot of food for thought and which forced me to think hard about what was the main issue that I wanted to purvey with my thesis. I am also grateful for the thorough reading and insightful comments I received from Jacob Westberg on my script which were of great help in finishing stages of the research process. I am also grateful for all the support and constructive criticism which I have received from all my colleagues during my years at the Politics department at Linköping University. I want to thank my supervisor Geoffrey Gooch for having confidence in me and giving me the opportunity to do what I dreamt of doing. Special thanks also goes out to Mikael Baaz, whom I consider to be both a colleague and a great friend, for giving me encouragement when I doubted myself and inspiring me to think about what I can and want to do career wise once this thesis was finished. I am also grateful that you lured me out of the office once in a while and was prepared to listen to me ranting on about my thesis and making me laugh over a beer or two. I also have to mention fellow PhD student Rickard Mikaelsson, with his rough Northern charm, whom I shared an office with for two years. I have missed our debating and bickering but I did get a lot more done once I got my own office. In addition, I would like to thank our department secretary, Kerstin Karlsson, who has been a fountain of knowledge and a great support in my role as a teacher during these years, which has meant one less thing to worry about on top of the thesis. Further, I am forever grateful for the indepth reading, encouragement and emotional support which I have received from my colleagues Elin Wiborg and Maria Alm. I am not sure how I would have reached the finishing line without you. I also want to thank Amanda Rafter for all the help she has given me in relation to the layout of the

7 thesis. It has been invaluable for a technically challenged person like me. I also want to thank Johanna Nählinder for taking time to listen to me, cheering me up and putting things in perspective. I have really appreciated our talks on life, love and literature. A special thank you also has to be given to the present and future doctors at the Economics department. I have treasured our spirited dinners, whether there has been quiche or cray-fish on the menu. I am still worried about inviting you back to my flat though in case I get evicted because of the loud laughter Whoever said that academics are boring? A final Hurray I would like to bestow upon my fellow PhD students at the (no longer existing) Economics Institution. I don t know how I would have survived the last five (well almost six) years without being able to share my highs and lows with you over lunch or a beer. Last but not least I would like to thank all those people who have reminded me of the fact that there is life outside the University and beyond this thesis. These include my darling friends Cina, Cilla, Linda and Sofia, whom I have known since we studied together for our Swedish equivalent of A-levels in Vänersborg many years ago. Thank you for being so forgiving and patient with me when I have been caught up in my work and been bad at keeping in touch. I hope we will get to see each other more often now that I have finally managed to complete this thesis. I also want to send my love to my sisters, Anna and Linn, whom have always been there to support me. Also, lots of hugs and kisses goes out to my nieces and nephew who have reminded me, when I have lost perspective, of what is really important in life. Thank you Tilda, Hannes and Siri! And finally, to those persons without whom I would not have been here, thank you Mum and Dad for always believing in me. You brought me up to be the curious, inquisitive, investigative and reflective person that I am today. I could not have done this without your love and support.

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9 Contents CHAPTER ONE SETTING THE STAGE PLACING EUROPEAN IDENTITY AND HIGHER EDUCATION IN A CONTEXT INTRODUCTION IDEAS ON EUROPEAN IDENTITY AND HIGHER EDUCATION EVOLVING IN TANDEM RELEVANCY OF THE STUDY THE STRUCTURE OF THIS THESIS... 9 CHAPTER TWO - DISCOURSE, POWER AND THE ART OF SEDUCTION THEORETICAL FOUNDATION INTRODUCTION THE WORLD ACCORDING TO CONSTRUCTIVISM THE POWER OF DISCOURSE ANALYSIS THE DISCOURSE ON POWER The Nature of Power Modern Government as an Act of Attraction and Seduction Seducing the Soul Through the Power of the Gaze Governing Through Risk and Fear Governing Through Higher Education CONCLUSIONS CHAPTER THREE - CHALLENGING IDENTITY METODOLOGICAL CONSIDERATIONS AND REFLECTIONS INTRODUCTION THE MODERN STATE AND THE CONSTRUCTION OF IDENTITY Knowing Me, Knowing You The Process of Othering The Origins of the Nation and National Identity The Importance of Space The Power of Myths, Memories and Symbols in Identity Construction The Power and Symbolism of Education and Language The Myth of the Culturally Homogeneous Nation-State CONTEMPORARY CITIZENSHIP From Passivity and Rights to Activity and Responsibility THE RESEARCH PROCESS Discourse Analysis as a Methodological Tool The Nature of the Texts Analysed The Identification of Different Ideas Emerging CONCLUSIONS CHAPTER FOUR - EUROPEAN HIGHER EDUCATION SET IN A CONTEXT PAST, PRESENT, FUTURE INTRODUCTION THE DAWN OF THE UNIVERSITY AND INTERNATIONAL MOBILITY HIGHER EDUCATION INITIATIVES AT THE EUROPEAN LEVEL The Early Years (1957 to the mid-1970s) The Take-off Phase (the mid-1970s to the mid-1980s) The Speed-up Phase (the mid-1980s to the Maastricht Treaty) The Substantive Action Phase (1993 and onwards) THE EUROPEAN UNION HIGHER EDUCATION PROGRAMMES Erasmus - a Symbol for the European Integration Process Eurydice Higher Education Under Surveillance Socrates - An Umbrella Organisation for Education Lingua A Symbol of the Importance of Learning Languages HIGHER EDUCATION IN THE NEW MILLENNIUM A Europe of Knowledge for the Future The Bologna Process Dreaming of a European Higher Education Area

10 The Lisbon Strategy Aiming for Competitiveness The Open Method of Coordination A Softer European Union Higher Education Policy CONCLUSIONS CHAPTER FIVE - CULTURAL EUROPEAN IDENTITY AND HIGHER EDUCATION FROM UNITY TO DIVERSITY INTRODUCTION THE MYTHS AND SYMBOLS CONSTRUCTING CULTURAL EUROPEAN IDENTITY UNITY, DIVERSITY AND HIGHER EDUCATION A European Dimension in Higher Education Language as part of a European Dimension CONCLUSIONS CHAPTER SIX - CIVIC EUROPEAN IDENTITY AND HIGHER EDUCATION LEARNING FOR ACTIVE CITIZENSHIP INTRODUCTION EUROPEAN CITIZENSHIP TO THE RESCUE Dreaming of A European Imagined Community FROM SIMPLY RIGHTS TO EXPECTATIONS OF ACTIVITY What Have You Done For the European Union Lately? The development of Citizen s Rights and Duties at the European level EDUCATING THE MOBILE EUROPEAN The Active Citizen in Action The Mobile Student From Bilateral Agreements to a common European Higher Education Area The European Union Passport CONCLUSION CHAPTER SEVEN - NEO-LIBERAL EUROPEAN IDENTITY AND HIGHER EDUCATION LEARNING FOR LIFE AND THE MARKET INTRODUCTION FLEXICURITY - MORE THAN SIMPLY PAYING LIP SERVICE? When Knowledge Became King The Construction of A Europe of Knowledge When Quality Became Queen A Cult(ure) of Competitiveness THE CHANGING ROLE AND ORGANISATION OF HIGHER EDUCATION The Universities At the Heart of the Europe of Knowledge THE GOOD EUROPEAN AS A FLEXIBLE LIFELONG LEARNER The Importance of Being a Skilled and Competent European CONCLUSIONS CHAPTER EIGHT - CONCLUDING DISCUSSION AND REFELECTIONS INTRODUCTION EXPRESSIONS OF POWER IN THE OFFICIAL EUROPEAN UNION DISCOURSE IDEAS AND NORMS AS STRUCTURES WHO ARE THE EUROPEAN OTHERS? WHAT HAVE I LEARNT ABOUT USING DISCOURSE ANALYSIS AS A METHOD? WHAT ARE THE GENERAL IMPLICATIONS OF MY STUDY? POSSIBLE FURTHER RESEARCH BIBLIOGRAPHY BOOKS & ARTICLES EUROPEAN UNION SOURCES Documents Internet Sources Speeches Miscellaneous

11 Learning To Be(come) A Good European A Critical Analysis of the Official European Union Discourse on European Identity and Higher Education - Chapter One - Setting the Stage - Placing European Identity and Higher Education in a Context - All the world is a stage, And all the men and women merely players. They have their exits and entrances; Each man in his time plays many parts - William Shakespeare ( Jaques, As You Like It, Act II, Scene VII) Introduction When the finishing touches were added to this thesis in the spring of 2007 the European Union could look back at fifty years of collaboration, which began with the signing of the Treaty of Rome in 1957 and which has developed from being mainly economic in character to incorporating a political as well as a social dimension at the European level. 1 In 2007 the European Union also commemorated the twentieth anniversary of Erasmus, its higher education mobility program. 2 It is this relatively new political dimension which I am interested in investigating in this thesis. More precisely it is the political construction of a common European identity which is analysed using a critical discourse analysis approach. This study is critical in the sense that it does not take what it means to be European to be set in stone but rather views it as a continuous, never ending process of construction. To pinpoint the focus of this study further, it investigates which role higher education is given in the construction of European identity and in extension the European. Questions of identity are intimately linked to education, which is a fact which has informed me in my choice of research questions. 3 In the modern state school plays an important role as it reproduces power positions within society. 4 In addition, education is used as a tool to create and recreate national identity thus generating a sense of continuity from generation to generation. 1 For simplicity the term European Union is used consistently throughout this thesis even though I am aware that the term European Community was used up until the Maastricht Treaty came into force in 1993 after that the Maastricht meeting took place in 1991 and the Treaty was signed in CEC, A People's Europe, COM (88) 331/final, Communication from the Commission to the European Parliament, Brussels, 7 July 1988, pp For a European Union view of the achievements of the Erasmus programme see CEC, Erasmus Success Stories Europe Creates Opportunities, Office of Official Publications of the European Communities, Luxembourg, 2007, pp In Delgad-Moreira s mind European identity can be seen as a project or a desire among the political elite. For a discussion on the link between identity and citizenship see for example Delgado-Moreira, J.M., Cultural Citizenship and the Creation of European Identity, Electronic Journal of Sociology, Vol. 2, No.3, 1997, (http://www.sociology.org/content/vol /delgado.html, accessed ). 4 Sawyer, L. & Kamali, M., Inledning in Sawyer, L. & Kamali, M., (eds.), Utbildningens dilemma demokratiska ideal och andrafierande praxis, Rapport av Utredningen om makt, integration och strukturell diskriminering, SOU 2006: 40, Stockholm 2006, pp. 9-46, p

12 Setting the Stage Placing European Identity and Higher Education in a Context However, this does not mean that identity is fixed and constant. Rather, the nature of identity is fluid and sensitive to time and place; it is affected by political climate and prevailing norms. Hence, identity is an ongoing process of construction and reconstruction accomplished through social interaction in the form of language and communication. This means that while ideas, associated with identity, prevail their meanings can and do change over time which is due to constant discursive struggles taking place between different actors as to who gets to decide what is seen as true. I have been curious to investigate whether education is argued, in the European Union discourse analysed, to play the same role at the European level. In the nation-state education, in the form of compulsory primary and secondary levels, has been seen as an essential tool in shaping children into good citizens. In this thesis I have chosen to look at higher education rather than lower levels of education since it is post-compulsory education, which is increasingly being emphasised at the European level. According to the European Union [h]igher education plays a central role in the development of both human beings and modern societies as it enhances social, cultural and economic development, active citizenship and ethical values. 5 The European Union s reason for stressing higher education rather than lower levels, I argue, is due to practical problems. For mobility to work at the European level it requires the student for example to be able to speak a foreign language fluently and be comfortable and willing to spend time away from her/his family, which is a quality which is acquired with age. In addition, it might seem more effective to target students, rather than pupils, since students are on the brink of becoming workers and one of the main goals of the European Union and European integration is to make the common market work through the mobility of workers. The more precise purpose of this thesis is two-fold. The first aim is to investigate how the European is constructed in the discourse contained within official European Union policy documents. I am interested in analysing the various structures, in the form of ideas and norms, which define who the European is. Special attention is paid to the myths and symbols present in the discourse. The second aim is to explore whether the role of higher education, as constructed in the European Union policy documents analysed, is given a similar identitymaking role as education is argued to have in national identity discourse. Further, in relation to these aims, this study is concerned with the nature of power and how power is used to construct identities. Discourses can be seen as structures but they also shape structures. 5 European Union, Higher Education in Europe, (http://ec.europa.eu/education/policies/educ/higher/higher_en.html, accessed ). 4

13 Learning To Be(come) A Good European A Critical Analysis of the Official European Union Discourse on European Identity and Higher Education 1. Ideas on European Identity and Higher Education Evolving in Tandem The overreaching aim of this thesis has been to analyse how the European identity discourse has developed in tandem with European Union higher education policy field from the early 1970s up until the present day. I have been interested in investigating what, if any, relationship exists between European identity and higher education. The reason for taking the empirical starting point in the early 1970s is the fact that education was not mentioned in the Treaty of Rome but was solely in the hands of the Member States until the early 1970s when the European Union Member States began to discuss the issue. 6 However, Jean Monnet, one of the founding fathers of the European integration process, is rumoured to have said that if he had had the chance to start over again he would start with education. 7 After initial talks on cooperation in higher education had taken place further initiatives were put on the backburner as the Member States had more urgent tasks to deal with, such as the crisis relating to capitalist economics and structural changes. 8 The initiatives that were taken during the 1970s mainly dealt with transparency of degrees for specific professions, ranging from medicine to architecture, in other words vocational training rather than higher education generally. In the 1980s, the economic situation improved and the Single European Act (SEA) was adopted in 1986, and further actions were taken, such as the introduction of Erasmus, as mentioned above. 9 In the beginning of the 1990s cooperation in the area of higher education gained new momentum when both education and European citizenship were written into the Maastricht Treaty. In addition, during the 1990s there was an emphasis on the importance of a European dimension in education. At the end of the decade the Bologna Agreement, which deals with 6 See for example Neave, G., The EEC and education (Trentham Books: Trentham, 1984); and Beukel, E., Reconstructing Integration Theory: The Case of Educational Policy in the EC, Cooperation and Conflict, Vol. 29, No.1, 1994, pp According to Corbett a European law of education was initiated in the late 1960s and early 1970s, which was linked to the aim of a mobile labour force and the freedom of establishment but which did not really give any power to the European Union to act in the area of education. Corbett, A., Ideas, Institutions and Policy Entrepreneurs: towards a new history of higher education in the European Community, European Journal of Education, Vol. 38, No. 3, 2003, pp , p See for example Smith, J., The European Teaching Force: Conditions, Mobility and Qualifications, International Review of Education, Vol. 38, No. 6, 1992, p , p. 656; and Schwarz-Schilling, C., The Role of Education in Rebuilding Culture, State and Society, Lecture by the High Representative and EU Special Representative to BiH, University of Tuzla, 28 May, 2007, (http://dragon.untz.ba/promocije / /schwarzschilling/PredavanjeHR-a.pdf, accessed ), pp. 1-6, p. 1. At other times Monnet is argued to have said that if he started again he would start with culture. See for example Bourdan, J., Unhappy Engineers of the European Soul, International Communication Gazette, Vol. 69, No. 3, 2007, pp ; and the Council of Ministers, Informal meeting of the Ministers of Culture, 26 and 27 June 2005, the Luxembourg Presidency, Press release, (http://www.eu2005.lu/en/actualites/communiques/2005/06/27 cult/index.html, accessed ). However, Shore argues that this is a modern myth, that Monnet, or any of the other Founding Fathers, saw the importance of culture in hindsight. Shore, C., In uno plures (?) EU Cultural Policy and the Governance of Europe, Cultural Analysis, Vol. 5, 2006, pp. 7-26, p. 8. Further, according to Blitz, there is little proof that Monnet saw education and culture as part of European integration. Blitz, B.K., From Monnet to Delors: Educational Co-operation in the European Union, Contemporary European History, Vol. 12, No. 2, 2003, pp , pp Bieler, A. & Morton, A.D., A critical theory route to hegemony, world order and historical change: neo-gramscian perspectives in International Relations, Capital & Class, No. 82, Spring 2004, pp , p. 85. There were two oil crises during the 1970s, i.e. one in and another one in The first one was caused by the fact that the OPEC countries stopped their supply of oil to the West as a reaction to the USA taking the side of Israel in the Yom Kippur war. The second crisis occurred in the wake of the Iranian revolution. See Rubin, A., The Double-Edged Crisis: OPEC and the Outbreak of the Iran-Iraq War, Middle East Review of International Affairs (MERIA), Vol. 7, No. 4, December 2003, pp The SEA came into force on the 1 July

14 Setting the Stage Placing European Identity and Higher Education in a Context streamlining of higher education structures to aid international mobility, was signed. 10 One of the main aims of the Bologna Agreement is to create a European Higher Education Area (EHEA). Higher education has been given an increasingly elevated position on the European Union political agenda, which can for example be seen by its prominent inclusion in the Lisbon Strategy, agreed on in 2001, is an example of a wider neo-liberal political rationality, which has become hegemonic in many parts of the world. This strategy is not solely concerned with educational questions but is rather interested in issues of increasing growth and the number as well as quality of jobs. It also puts an emphasis on the need for the citizen to be an active, flexible lifelong learner. One of the aims of the Lisbon Strategy is to make the European Union the world s leading and most dynamic Knowledge Economy by 2010, is included, a goal which the Member States today are far from realising. 11 This led the European Union decision makers to re-launch the Lisbon Strategy in However, the European Union has also been faced with problems and set-backs in the last few years, what the Economist referred to as a midlife crisis, such as the increasingly low turn out numbers in European Parliament elections and the rejection of the proposed Constitution by the French and Dutch public. 13 In the words of Barroso, the present President of the European Commission (hereafter the Commission), the latter stumbling block has undoubtedly cast a shadow over Europe. 14 These problems raise questions about the future governance of the European Union; in this context it has been suggested, by both academics and policy-makers, that a common European identity would add legitimacy to the European integration process generally and make the European Union institutions more democratic more specifically. However, it is not an all together easy task and European Union policy-makers are faced with a number of questions. How could/should this common European identity be constructed? This question raises further questions. Who is the European? Who should be able to claim 10 The Bologna Agreement is not a European Union initiative but was initiated by a group of European Union Member States and has later been signed by all Member States as well as a group of countries that are not part of the European Union. 11 Higher education is sometimes also referred to as tertiary education, i.e. the third level of education after the initial primary and secondary levels. 12 CEC, Working together for growth and jobs A new start for the Lisbon Strategy, COM (2005) 24/final, Communication from President Barroso in agreement with Vice-President Verheugen to the Spring European Council, Brussels, 2 February 2005, pp Also see CEC, Implementing the renewed Lisbon Strategy for growth and jobs A year of delivery, COM (2006) 816/final, Part 1, Communication from the Commission to the Spring European Council, Brussels, 12 December 2006, pp Leaders, Europe s mid-life crisis a successful club celebrates its 50 th birthday in sombre mode, The Economist, 15 March, (http://www.economist.com/research/articlesbysubject/displaystory.cfm?subjectid= &story_id= , accessed ). It has been suggested that the rejection of the Constitution had less to do with people s dissatisfaction with the proposed Constitution than it had with their disappointment in their political leaders. See for example O Hara, K., Politics and Trust, talk presented at the Deloitte Leadership Forum on Rebuilding Trust in Canadian Societies, Toronto, 2 June 2005, (http://eprints.ecs.soton.ac.uk/14290/01/torontoohara.pdf, accessed ), pp It has also been suggested that in other Member State, such as Great Britain, citizens were against the Constitution. See Baines, P. & Gill, M., The EU Constitution and the British Public: What the Polls Tell Us About the Campaign That Never Was, International Journal of Public Opinion Research, Vol. 18, No. 4, 2006, pp Barroso, J.M., Strengthening a Citizens Europe, 9 May Celebrations, Bélem Cultural Centre, 8 May 2006, SPEECH/06/283, (http://europa.eu/rapid/pressreleasesaction.do?reference= SPEECH/06/283&format=HTML&aged=0&language=EN&guiLanguage=en, accessed ), pp. 1-7, p. 3. 6

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