Module 4: Building a Safe Place

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "Module 4: Building a Safe Place"

Transcription

1 Illustrations by Erich Ippen, Jr. Used with permission. Module 4: Building a Safe Place Resource Parent Workshop: Participant Handbook February

2 4-2 The National Child Traumatic Stress Network

3 Learning Objectives After completing this module, you should be able to: Describe the key components of a safety message and how to deliver an effective safety message to children who have experienced trauma. Define trauma reminders and give an example of a trauma reminder and reaction. List at least three ways you can help children to cope with trauma reminders. Resource Parent Workshop: Participant Handbook February

4 4-4 The National Child Traumatic Stress Network

5 Module 4: Building a Safe Place Illustrations by Erich Ippen, Jr. Used with permission. 1 Essential Element 2 2. Help your child to feel safe. 2 What Is Safety? (Group Activity) Pronunciation: \ sāf-tē\ Function: Noun From the Middle English saufte, from the Anglo-French salveté, saufté, from salf safe Definition: 1) the condition of being safe from undergoing or causing hurt, injury, or loss Mirriam-Webster Online Dictionary (2008). Retrieved April 27, 2008 from 3 Resource Parent Workshop: Participant Handbook February

6 Safety and Trauma Physical safety is not the same as psychological safety. Your child s definition of safety will not be the same as yours. To help your child feel safe, you will need to look at the world through his or her trauma lens. (Continued) 4 Safety and Trauma (Continued) Children who have been through trauma may: Have valid fears about their own safety or the safety of loved ones Have difficulty trusting adults to protect them Be hyperaware of potential threats Have problems controlling their reactions to perceived threats 5 When supper was over I saw that there were many biscuits piled high upon the bread platter, an astonishing and unbelievable sight to me.... I was afraid that somehow the biscuits might disappear during the night, while I was sleeping. I did not want to wake up in the morning,... feeling hungry and knowing that there was no food in the house. So, surreptitiously I took some of the biscuits from the platter and slipped them into my pocket, not to eat, but to keep as a bulwark against any possible attack of hunger... I did not break the habit of stealing and hoarding bread until my faith that food would be forthcoming at each meal had been somewhat established. Richard Wright Wright, R. (1945). Black boy. NY: HarperCollins Publishers, Inc The National Child Traumatic Stress Network

7 Promoting Safety Help children get familiar with the house and neighborhood. Give them control over some aspects of their lives. Set limits. Let them know what will happen next. See and appreciate them for who they are. Help them to maintain a sense of connection and continuity with the past. 7 Give a Safety Message Partner with the social worker or caseworker. Get down to the child s eye level. Promise to keep the child physically safe. Ask directly what the child needs to feel safe. Follow the child s lead. Let the child know that you are ready to hear what he or she needs. (Continued) 8 Give a Safety Message (Continued) (Group Activity) Take concerns seriously: Empathize. Acknowledge that the child s feelings make sense in light of past experiences. Be reassuring and realistic about what you can do. Be honest about what you do and don t know. Help your child to express his or her concerns to other members of the child welfare team. 9 Resource Parent Workshop: Participant Handbook February

8 Explain Rules When explaining household rules: Consider the child s history. Don t overwhelm the child. Emphasize protection. Be flexible when you can. 10 Be an Emotional Container (Continued) 11 I started cursing at the foster mom. I wanted her to lose control. I figured that sooner or later she would say something that would hurt me. I wanted to hurt her first... Later, I felt depressed. I knew I'd acted out of control. When I get angry I don't even realize what I do and I hurt the people around me.... I feel sad that I'm not good about expressing myself. I feel like a walking time bomb. I hope I can find a foster mom who can handle my anger, and help me take control of myself. A. M. Am I too angry to love? Represent. Nov./Dec Available at The National Child Traumatic Stress Network

9 Be an Emotional Container (Continued) Be willing and prepared to tolerate strong emotional reactions. Remember the suitcase! Respond calmly but firmly. Help your child identify and label the feelings beneath the outburst. Reassure your child that it is okay to feel any and all emotions. 13 Manage Emotional Hot Spots Food and mealtime Sleep and bedtime Physical boundaries, privacy, personal grooming, medical care 14 I made a list of things my sister and I eat so [our new foster mother] could buy our food, but she didn't buy exactly what we wanted. She bought the wrong kind of cereal, she put ginger in the juice even though I told her not to, and the bread was some damn thick... bread. All of these little things made me furious. I believed she thought it didn't matter what I told her, and that she could treat us how she wants. A. M. Am I too angry to love? Represent. Nov./Dec Available at 15 Resource Parent Workshop: Participant Handbook February

10 Food and Meals (Group Activity) Be aware of the child s history. Accommodate food preferences, if possible. Set consistent meal times. Involve child in planning and making meals. Keep mealtimes calm and supportive. 16 I woke up in a panic. I couldn't stay asleep. [My foster mother] came into my room. Honey, what's wrong?" I couldn't even tell her how I felt. I couldn't get the words out to say what was the matter. A. M. Learning to love again. Represent. July/Aug Available at 17 Sleep and Bedtime (Group Activity) (Continued) The National Child Traumatic Stress Network

11 Sleep and Bedtime (Continued) Help your child to own the bedroom. Respect and protect your child s privacy. Acknowledge and respect fears. Set consistent sleep and wake times with predictable, calming routines. Seek help if needed. 19 I don't think there was a time when I wasn't abused as a child. In order to survive the abuse, I made believe that the real me was separate from my body. That way, the abuse was happening not really to me, but just this skin I'm in. Still, my body sometimes betrayed me. Crying when I wanted to remain strong, becoming tired and refusing to obey my commands to stay awake, and, most horribly, physically responding to sexual advances. It seemed to me like my body had a mind of its own. I hated the thought of sexual contact, yet my body would respond to it, even when it was unwanted. C. M. My body betrayed me. Represent. Sept./Oct Available at 20 Physical Boundaries Children who have been neglected and abused may: Never have learned that their bodies should be cared for and protected Feel disconnected and at odds with their bodies See their bodies as vessels of the negative memories and experiences they carry, a constant reminder not only of what has happened to them but of how little they are worth Pughe, B., & Philpot, T. (2007). Living alongside a child s recovery. London, UK: Kingsley Publishers. 21 Resource Parent Workshop: Participant Handbook February

12 Physical Boundaries (Continued) (Group Activity) Respect your child s physical boundaries. Make the bathroom a safe zone. When helping younger children bathe, ask permission before touching and be clear about what you are doing and why. 22 Let s take a break! 23 Trauma Reminders People, situations, places, things, or feelings that remind children of traumatic events: May evoke intense and disturbing feelings tied to the original trauma Can lead to behaviors that seem out of place, but may have been appropriate at the time of the original traumatic event The National Child Traumatic Stress Network

13 Trauma Reminders Impact Frequent reactions to trauma reminders can: Keep a child in a state of emotional upset Be seen by others as overreacting to ordinary events Result in avoidance behaviors Isolate the child from peers and family Make a child feel ashamed or afraid of going crazy 25 Identifying Trauma Reminders When your child or adolescent has a reaction, make note of: When Where What When possible, reduce exposure. Share your observations with your child s caseworker and therapist. 26 What s the Reminder? (Group Activity) What situation or event did the child react to? Based on the child s trauma history, what was it a reminder of? What else could serve as trauma reminders? (Try to think of at least three for each child.) 27 Resource Parent Workshop: Participant Handbook February

14 Coping with Trauma Reminders: What Parents Can Do Ensure safety Reorient Reassure Define what s happened Respect and normalize the child s experience Differentiate past from present 28 Coping with Trauma Reminders: What NOT to Do Assume the child is being rebellious Tell the child he or she is being dramatic or overreacting Force the child to face reminder Express anger or impatience 29 Coping with Trauma Reminders: What Children Can Do SOS Stop Stop and take several long, deep breaths. Orient Look around and take in immediate surroundings. Make note of physical reactions (breathing, heartbeat, etc). Seek Help Use a stress buster to help calm down. If needed, call a trusted friend or reliable adult The National Child Traumatic Stress Network

15 SOS: Identifying Stress Busters Activities (running, playing a particular song) Things (a toy, a stuffed animal, a picture, a favorite blanket, a particular food) Places (a spot in the yard or a park, a room) People A specific thought, phrase, or prayer 31 Coping with Trauma Reminders (Group Activity) How did the resource parents... Reorient the child and ensure safety? Help the child understand what happened? Differentiate past from present? Give the child new options for coping with a reminder? Would you have done anything differently? 32 I woke up in a panic. I couldn't stay asleep. [My foster mother] came into my room. Honey, what's wrong? I couldn't even tell her how I felt. I couldn't get the words out to say what was the matter. You're safe here, OK? If anyone tries to get through the door to hurt you I will get them." I was glad that she was so aggressive it made me feel like I could loosen up and let someone else protect me. I didn't have to worry anymore. A. M. Learning to love again. Represent. July/Aug Available at 33 Resource Parent Workshop: Participant Handbook February

16 Module 4: Wrap Up The National Child Traumatic Stress Network

17 Module 4 Supplemental Handouts Resource Parent Workshop: Participant Handbook February

18 4-18 The National Child Traumatic Stress Network

19 A.M. s Story Am I Too Angry to Love? My Foster Mom Kicked Me Out After Three Weeks This summer, ACS announced that it was closing the group home I ve lived in for the past three years. I found out that my twin sister and I would have to move to a foster home. Right before the house shut down, T. and I visited a foster mother in the Bronx. She asked us, What do you like to eat? I told her, You ll get a list if we come to live with you. Then she asked us to have something to drink and we agreed. She gave me a ginger drink that burned my mouth. I hated it. I text-messaged my sister saying, Don t drink it, but she did anyway and got a surprise. Then came our small room. I didn t like it. After that, it was time to go. On the train, we told our social worker we hoped that we didn t have to live there. But a week later we moved in. I was angry, and a little fearful. They re All the Same I would like foster parents who make me feel like I am a part of their lives, not an outsider or stranger, and who want me to be who I am and don t judge me on my past or file. But when I came into foster care four years ago, my sister and I lived with five different foster families in less than a year. One sweet foster parent was Joann. Like my sister and me, Joann was sexually abused by a relative when she was young. When she told me that, I felt a little sense of assurance that she might understand how I felt about myself-dirty-because of what my father did to me. Joann never thought of me as crazy. She believed that I was angry at the world and I was. The worst was our fifth foster home. There I was sexually abused by the foster mother s best friend. That experience still haunts me. He was so big and nasty. The foster mom ignored the abuse. I still wonder, Where was she? Did she even care about me? It s hard for me to imagine trusting another foster mom when my experiences make me think, They re all the same. Someone Has to Want Us It was a relief when my sister and I got placed in our group home. The group home became our own little environment with rules that we made for ourselves. We cooked for ourselves, washed our clothes, and prepared for our future on the mean streets of the world. It felt good to be my own boss. I got to make the decisions in my life. I took the blame for anything that went wrong or that I didn t like. Resource Parent Workshop: Participant Handbook February

20 But it hurt not to have anyone looking out for me. When friends would talk about fights they had with their parents, or when their parents would show up for school events, I would just sit and watch all the parents. When I heard people say, Twins are wonderful, I d think to myself, Someone out there has to want us. Treated Like Children When we moved in with that foster mom in the Bronx, I hoped she d try to be there for us. The first day she wasn t even there. I was angry and hurt. I guess that s because after I spoke up about the abuse and came into foster care, my mother and father wanted nothing to do with me. I began to believe that any adult who said they d care for me would be just like them. I wanted to leave that night. When the foster mom came home, she seemed to believe that my sister and I were little children who needed the world from her. She wanted me to call her Mom or Aunt. I have a bad relationship with my mom and my aunt. I thought, You want me to treat you like I treat them? Then she cooked for us and we didn t eat what she cooked. We waited until she was done and cooked what we wanted. I made a list of things my sister and I eat so she could buy our food, but she didn t buy exactly what we wanted. She bought the wrong kind of cereal, she put ginger in the juice even though I told her not to, and the bread was some damn thick Jamaican bread. So we bought our own food and she got mad. She said, I didn t really know what to buy. Then what the hell was the list for? I said. I was looking and I didn t find what was on the list, she said. Well, I found it, I told her. She sucked her teeth and walked away. No Stranger Controls Me All of these little things made me furious. I believed she thought it didn t matter what I told her, and that she could treat us how she wants. I don t want any stranger to try to take control of the life that my sister and I have built for ourselves. I m afraid that if I give up control even over what I eat then I will feel like I did when my dad was sexually abusing me: like a doll in someone else s playhouse being used for everything that person desires. Our first weekend there, we went AWOL. My foster mother kept calling me on my cell. When we came home, she said, I was worried. I said, I do have a sister who came along with me. Why do you keep addressing all of the problems as me? Then she got mad The National Child Traumatic Stress Network

21 It seemed like one minute she wanted to be my best friend and worry about me, the next she got angry, showing her dark side. I Wanted to Hurt Her First When foster mothers switch like that, I m reminded of my mom. One minute she was nice; then she would get so mean and hard to handle. My mother abused me even more emotionally than physically. I m afraid a foster mom will, too. Whenever I feel threatened I get this feeling that I want to hurt anybody who might try to harm me and my sister. So I started cursing at the foster mom. I wanted her to lose control. I figured that sooner or later she would say something that would hurt me. I wanted to hurt her first. When my emotions came out, she got to feel the hurt from my past. When she closed the door and I called her one last name. I won and she lost. Yelling at her made me feel powerful. I knew that no matter how much she might scare me or worry me, I could still get the last word or the upper hand. Later I felt depressed. I knew I d acted out of control. When I get angry I don t even realize what I do and I hurt the people around me. When I think of all the people I ve hurt because of my anger I feel bad. This pattern of abuse that I ve inherited from my parents is one I want to break. But I don t know how. Kicked Out After two weeks, the foster mom told my social worker that she wanted us out. She told my sister and me that we could never be a part of her family because we don t listen. That hurt me. I didn t want to live with her, but I didn t want her to reject me, either. That day, I wished I could be on my own. I thought I d feel better about myself if I didn t have anyone telling me what to do. But I also felt afraid of having no one to look over me. What if I m not stable enough to cope out in the real world? What if my anger gets the best of me? Who will I turn to? A Walking Time Bomb I hope that foster mother understood all of my troubles with foster homes, my past and my feelings toward myself. I fear myself sometimes. I m afraid that I may become like my mother a mean b-tch who couldn t control herself. I feel sad that I m not good about expressing myself. I feel like a walking time bomb. I hope I can find a foster mom who can handle my anger, and help me take control of myself. Reprinted with permission from Represent. Nov./Dec Available at org/fcyu-features/novdec2004/fcyu htm. Copyright Youth Communication. All rights reserved. Resource Parent Workshop: Participant Handbook February

22 Learning to Love Again: I Finally Found a Foster Mom I Could Trust The first time Yolanda saw my twin sister T. and me, we were cursing out our foster parent. Yolanda was going to be our next foster mom. Who knows what she had in her head about us? We were new to the agency, so the only things in our file were bad things: that we violated curfew, and didn t do our chores, that I smoked and that my sister liked to drink. I believed she thought, As soon as they act up once they re out of my home. That was the kind of attitude my sister and I had encountered at the other homes we d been in. From One Bad Home to Another T. and I entered care four years ago, after we told about being sexually abused by our father. The first year we lived with five different foster families. We lived with a woman who only seemed to care about how much money she was going to get for us. Another foster mother s main concern was that we wouldn t say anything bad about her home, which was sweet on the outside but salty on the inside. Those bad experiences made me think all foster moms were the same. I couldn t imagine trusting any of them. It was a relief when we were placed in a group home, but it hurt not to have anyone looking out for us. We ran free like little animals without an owner to watch us. Three years later ACS closed the group home and we went back to bouncing from one foster home to another. She Wasn t a Fake At the agency a few days before we moved into her home, the only thing Yolanda said was, There are chores and a curfew. I didn t know what to think of her, only that she was going to be my next victim. I was going to try to hurt her before she got rid of my sister and me. I thought it would be better to get kicked out for bad behavior than to have her reject us. My sister and I walked into Yolanda s home feeling sure that within the next month or two we would be on our way out. There was no need to get all attached to the room, the bed, or even the rules. But that first day at Yolanda s home my rabbit died. I started to cry. That rabbit was so small and defenseless. It needed me and I let it die. Then Yolanda hugged me. If that happened to my cat Jackie I would feel the same way that you do, she said. She wanted my rabbit to be buried and offered to buy me another one. That s how I realized she wasn t a fake. I felt different at that moment. It was like she felt the anger that I had inside of me, and was saying that it was OK to feel that way. That it was OK to be sad and for me to let my guard down, that not everyone in the world was out to harm me or my sister. That it was OK to let someone into my world and let them help me. It was just a hug, but it meant so much The National Child Traumatic Stress Network

23 Feeling More at Ease As the months passed, I began to feel a little bit more at ease. But memories of my past started to rise to the surface. I started having a lot of bad dreams about my dad, and I got so confused and scared. One day when I was feeling depressed, I told Yolanda I was feeling sad. She said, Why do you think that you are sad? I don t know, I replied. I just do. Then I looked at her and we just sat there and laughed. It was like we both knew that I wanted to talk but I wasn t to ready to let it all out. She didn t push me. Instead she told me, When you re ready to talk, text me on my cell phone. That was fine with me. I liked that. When I told her about my nightmares, Yolanda stayed with me in my room and tried to comfort me. I talked to her a little, but I couldn t get it all out so she just let me know that she was there for me. Any time you need me, come and knock on my door, she said, unlike other foster moms who just called 911 to have someone come and get me. When she left I was still a little bit scared, but more at ease. Talking Out My Fears Sometimes I talked to her about my dad, and how I was scared that he was going to come back and kill me, or how sometimes I could just feel him touching me, even though the abuse stopped years ago. Sometimes I d feel like Yolanda, T. and even our foster sisters had vanished from me, like the night devoured them and left me alone. I started staying up so that I could beat whatever might come and try to hurt my new family. I kept a knife to protect us. Yolanda had to take that away from me. When she did, she reassured me that she would never let anything happen to my sister or me. For some reason I believed her, I guess because she didn t seem to mind that she had to be there for me in the night. Or if she did, she had the perfect way of hiding it so that I didn t feel like I was bothering her. She Was There for Me Then, in November, my sister signed herself into a psychiatric hospital because she was feeling depressed. When I saw her at school, she was going to therapy and I was going home. That afternoon, Yolanda got a phone call from someone at the agency. T. was on her way to a hospital upstate. I couldn t believe it. Your sister cut herself, Yolanda told me. Is she really going to the hospital? Yes, that is what I was told. Resource Parent Workshop: Participant Handbook February

24 I rushed to the phone to call my law guardian to get T. out, but I couldn t get in contact with her. It didn t occur to me until later that T. wanted to be in the hospital. That still didn t stop me from becoming stressed out. For months, I pretty much stopped eating. Yolanda was there with me during everything. I know that you are stressed but you have to eat or you will get so sick, she told me. I miss her, I want my sister. I don t know why she wanted to hurt herself like that, but I guess that she needed help and she is going to get it now at the hospital, Yolanda told me. She hugged me and I just stayed like that, crying on her shoulder for a little while. I Didn t Have to Worry Anymore A few nights after that I woke up in a panic. I couldn t stay asleep. Yolanda came into my room. What s wrong? I couldn t even tell her how I felt. I couldn t get the words out to say what was the matter. You re safe here, OK? If anyone tries to get through the door to hurt you, I will get them. I was glad that she was so aggressive; it made me feel like I could loosen up and let someone else protect me. I didn t have to worry anymore. I m grateful to have Yolanda as a foster parent, because in a way she is more than just a foster parent; she s a lifesaver. When she tells me (and sometimes she has to tell me this over and over), You have to stop being the victim, I don t mind. She wants to go with me on my journeys and to help me find my way back home, to her home. I would love to stay with Yolanda until I age out. She has accepted me, my sister and all the baggage we brought to her home. Instead of pushing us away, she s taught herself how to help us deal with our problems, and whatever we might face in the future. Reprinted with permission from Represent. July/Aug, Available at org/fcyu-features/julyaug2006/ b.htm. Copyright Youth Communication. All rights reserved The National Child Traumatic Stress Network

25 The First Good Christmas: I Finally Found a Home for the Holidays Even as a young child at home with my family, I never had a good Christmas. I was told we were Muslims so we didn t celebrate Christmas. But we didn t celebrate anything else, either. When I came home from school with a toy from Santa Claus one year, my aunt said, Christmas is a lie! No wishes come true, especially not for naughty kids like you. That s when it came to my attention that Christmas must be a fairy tale. I think that s when the hopes my sister and I had for a true Christmas were smashed. We had believed that Christmas was supposed to be a time when you got a lot of nice things from your loved ones and sat around a big tree decorated with gifts, or even like a Christmas on TV where something wicked happens but good prevails. But our aunt let us know that wasn t for us. She acted like we were dirt, like we didn t matter. As I got older this was the reason the holidays seemed like days of torture. Alone for the Holidays In the last four years my sister T. and I have been in 11 foster homes and three group homes. We were always in a new home around the holidays. We were unexpected guests in people s homes, and they never had time to buy us anything. I would tell my sister Merry Christmas, or we would just try to forget about it. We did try to buy each other gifts, but we had hardly any money. We would buy a lot of cookies, ice cream and cakes and blame ourselves for telling about the abuse that put us in foster care. After all, if we hadn t talked we wouldn t be alone watching Lifetime for the holidays. We had no one but each other, and occasionally that was not enough. Over the holidays, we d be sitting in the group homes or foster homes with different people walking in and out, looking at us like we were some kind of disease. It was hard. Many of the kids in our group home had someone to come get them, but my sister and I had no one. All we could do was just stare out our window and wonder what it would be like to wake up on Christmas morning with gifts, hugs and smiles from everyone. I imagined a big breakfast with eggs, bacon, pancakes, waffles and fresh juice. The fantasy was so real. I could just smell the aroma, but then I would hear a voice: Wake up, come get breakfast. It s cereal. My dream was over. Just like that I had to wake up and face the real world. Those Damn Sweaters I remember one group home in particular that treated us on Christmas like we did not mean anything to anyone. The staff cooked the little we had in the house for our dinner and made rude comments about how they had better food at home, which made me mad. Resource Parent Workshop: Participant Handbook February

26 On Christmas day, each girl was given a sweater. Only a sweater! T. and I were given the same damn color purple and the staff s excuse was, It s because you re twins. Those purple things were hideous; they were big and made you look like Barney or an old grandmother who sits all day knitting those sweaters. The girls got so mad that they started cursing, mainly because they had all written wish lists and were hoping to be getting at least one item from the list. I hate this insulting house. You people treat us like animals! All we get is a damn sweater! one of the girls yelled. Calm down or I will call the police! the staff yelled back. I m going to write you up. Don t make me go and get my book! That night, many of the girls violated curfew or ran back to their abusive parents homes. On Christmas you just don t want to be alone, be insulted or feel like you don t have family. No Home But the Group Home My sister and I were thinking about going home to see our family, too, but we had to stop and think of what could happen if we did. We wanted so much to have a safe place to go home to, but we really didn t have that. Our dad could abuse us physically and our mother could abuse us emotionally with her accusations about how we broke down a happy home. Our siblings could just reject us. We hadn t seen our brothers that entire year and our mother had brainwashed them to believe that my sister and I were either crazy or just wanted all of us kids to be taken away for no reason. We came to the conclusion that it was for the best that we stayed put. We had nowhere else to go, no home but the group home. A Precious Place The following year we were blessed to be placed in a foster home with Yolanda C., who I call Precious because she is just phenomenal. But when we first came to her home I thought I d be out of there in about two months. I was doubtful about her rules. Yolanda made me do different chores like cleaning the bathroom, kitchen and living room. Then she d be on my back about my education. I worried that if she was that strict, she wouldn t accept me as I was. I didn t realize that having someone care about my education would make me want to do more to pass. I didn t realize that I would wake up to the Christmas that I d wanted since I was a child. Actually, as the days of December came, I got a little anxious. Yolanda was talking about presents but I hadn t bought presents for people in years. I thought, What if they don t like them? I was scared. Yolanda never did tell me what to get her for Christmas. She just said, I want to make sure everybody is happy The National Child Traumatic Stress Network

New Beginnings: Managing the Emotional Impact of Diabetes Module 1

New Beginnings: Managing the Emotional Impact of Diabetes Module 1 New Beginnings: Managing the Emotional Impact of Diabetes Module 1 ALEXIS (AW): Welcome to New Beginnings: Managing the Emotional Impact of Diabetes. MICHELLE (MOG): And I m Dr. Michelle Owens-Gary. AW:

More information

Listen, Protect, and Connect

Listen, Protect, and Connect Page 1 Listen, Protect, and Connect PSYCHOLOGICAL FIRST AID FOR CHILDREN, PARENTS, AND OTHER CAREGIVERS AFTER NATURAL DISASTERS Helping you and your child in times of disaster. Page 2 As a parent or adult

More information

USVH Disease of the Week #1: Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

USVH Disease of the Week #1: Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) USVH Disease of the Week #1: Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Effects of Traumatic Experiences A National Center for PTSD Fact Sheet By: Eve B. Carlson, Ph.D. and Josef Ruzek, Ph.D. When people find

More information

Supporting your child after a burn injury

Supporting your child after a burn injury Royal Manchester Children s Hospital Supporting your child after a burn injury Information for Parents and Carers of Young Children 2 Contents Page Introduction 4 Trauma and children 4 Normal reactions

More information

Connectedness and the Emotional Bank Account

Connectedness and the Emotional Bank Account Connectedness and the Emotional Bank Account Directions This is a self-guided activity that can be completed by parents, teens or both. It contains five parts and should take about 45 minutes to complete.

More information

HELPING YOUNG CHILDREN COPE WITH TRAUMA

HELPING YOUNG CHILDREN COPE WITH TRAUMA HELPING YOUNG CHILDREN COPE WITH TRAUMA Disasters are upsetting to everyone involved. Children, older people, and/or people with disabilities are especially at risk. For a child, his or her view of the

More information

By Brianne Masselli and Johanna Bergan Youth M.O.V.E. National. A Guide for Youth. Understanding Trauma

By Brianne Masselli and Johanna Bergan Youth M.O.V.E. National. A Guide for Youth. Understanding Trauma By Brianne Masselli and Johanna Bergan Youth M.O.V.E. National A Guide for Youth Understanding Trauma For National Technical Assistance Center for Children s Mental Health Georgetown University Center

More information

"A Young Child's Point of View on Foster Care and Adoption"

A Young Child's Point of View on Foster Care and Adoption "A Young Child's Point of View on Foster Care and Adoption" Michael Trout Director, The Infant-Parent Institute Reprinted by permission Mr. Trout is a trainer and course leader in infant mental health,

More information

A Resource for Parents and Caregivers HELPING FAMILIES AFTER AN EMERGENCY. Other

A Resource for Parents and Caregivers HELPING FAMILIES AFTER AN EMERGENCY. Other A Resource for Parents and Caregivers HELPING FAMILIES 2009 Sesame Workshop. All Rights Reserved. S E S A M E ST R E E T. O RG Welcome A Resource for Parents and Caregivers DEAR PARENTS AND CAREGIVERS,

More information

Ididn t think I was an alcoholic. I thought my

Ididn t think I was an alcoholic. I thought my (2) FEAR OF FEAR This lady was cautious. She decided she wouldn t let herself go in her drinking. And she would never, never take that morning drink! Ididn t think I was an alcoholic. I thought my problem

More information

IN A SMALL PART OF THE CITY WEST OF

IN A SMALL PART OF THE CITY WEST OF p T h e L a s t L e a f IN A SMALL PART OF THE CITY WEST OF Washington Square, the streets have gone wild. They turn in different directions. They are broken into small pieces called places. One street

More information

12 Step Worksheet Questions

12 Step Worksheet Questions 12 Step Worksheet Questions STEP 1 We admitted we were powerless over alcohol that our lives had become unmanageable. The first time I took a drink I knew it wasn't for me. Every time I drank I got drunk

More information

Something Better Than Punishment

Something Better Than Punishment Alabama Cooperative Extension System, Alabama A&M and Auburn Universities HE-687 PRINCIPL E S OF Something Better Than Punishment When we think of discipline, we may think of threats and punishment. They

More information

Life With Hope I m Not An Addict I M NOT AN ADDICT 147

Life With Hope I m Not An Addict I M NOT AN ADDICT 147 I M NOT AN ADDICT How could I be an addict? My life is great. I live in a very good area of Los Angeles, drive a nice sports car, have a good job, pay all my bills, and have a wonderful family. This is

More information

GUIDANCE FOR CAREGIVERS: CHILDREN OR TEENS WHO HAD A LOVED ONE DIE IN THE EARTHQUAKE

GUIDANCE FOR CAREGIVERS: CHILDREN OR TEENS WHO HAD A LOVED ONE DIE IN THE EARTHQUAKE GUIDANCE FOR CAREGIVERS: CHILDREN OR TEENS WHO HAD A LOVED ONE DIE IN THE EARTHQUAKE Introduction to trauma The earthquake was a terrifying disaster for adults, children, families, and communities. The

More information

ROLES TO ASSIGN. 1. Judge. 2. Courtroom Deputy. 3. Prosecutor 1 opening statement. 4. Prosecutor 2 direct of Dana Capro

ROLES TO ASSIGN. 1. Judge. 2. Courtroom Deputy. 3. Prosecutor 1 opening statement. 4. Prosecutor 2 direct of Dana Capro ROLES TO ASSIGN 1. Judge 2. Courtroom Deputy 3. Prosecutor 1 opening statement 4. Prosecutor 2 direct of Dana Capro 5. Prosecutor 3 direct of Jamie Medina 6. Prosecutor 4 cross of Pat Morton 7. Prosecutor

More information

Speaker notes from Indigo Daya at the Borderline Personality Disorder What Works Conference, 2014.

Speaker notes from Indigo Daya at the Borderline Personality Disorder What Works Conference, 2014. Speaker notes from Indigo Daya at the Borderline Personality Disorder What Works Conference, 2014. 1 Talking about trauma can be difficult for everyone. The existence and scale of traumatic events can

More information

Brain Injury: Stages of Recovery

Brain Injury: Stages of Recovery Brain Injury: Stages of Recovery Recovery after brain injury is a process that occurs in stages. Some people move quickly through the stages, while others make slow, but steady gains. The Rancho Los Amigos'

More information

Parenting. Coping with DEATH. For children aged 6 to 12

Parenting. Coping with DEATH. For children aged 6 to 12 Parenting Positively Coping with DEATH For children aged 6 to 12 This booklet will help you to understand more about death and the feelings we all have when someone we care about, like a parent, a brother

More information

WHY DO WE GET ANGRY? EVERYONE FEELS ANGRY SOMETIMES

WHY DO WE GET ANGRY? EVERYONE FEELS ANGRY SOMETIMES FEELING ANGRY? WHY DO WE GET ANGRY? There are lots of things that can make us angry. Here are a few examples... EVERYONE FEELS ANGRY SOMETIMES It s normal and healthy to get angry when there is a good

More information

It s hard to know what to do when you know or suspect that a friend or family member is living with violence.

It s hard to know what to do when you know or suspect that a friend or family member is living with violence. How can you help? A B It s hard to know what to do when you know or suspect that a friend or family member is living with violence. How do I know what is the right thing to do? Should I say something or

More information

Sample Process Recording - First Year MSW Student

Sample Process Recording - First Year MSW Student Sample Process Recording - First Year MSW Student Agency: Surgical Floor, City Hospital Client System: Harold Harper, age 68, retired widower Date: November 18, 20xx Presenting Issues: Cardiologist observed

More information

ISI Debtor Testimonials. April 2015 ISI. Tackling problem debt together

ISI Debtor Testimonials. April 2015 ISI. Tackling problem debt together ISI Debtor Testimonials April 2015 ISI Tackling problem debt together The following are the words of debtors who have availed of the ISI s debt solutions and are real cases. They have reviewed and agreed

More information

Opening Our Hearts, Transforming Our Losses

Opening Our Hearts, Transforming Our Losses Preface Alcoholism is a disease of many losses. For those of us who are the relatives and friends of alcoholics, these losses affect many aspects of our lives and remain with us over time, whether or not

More information

[live] As young members, most of us didn t come to. World Service Office PO Box 9999 Van Nuys, CA 91409 USA

[live] As young members, most of us didn t come to. World Service Office PO Box 9999 Van Nuys, CA 91409 USA [ ] [live] Copyright 1983, 2008 by Narcotics Anonymous World Services, Inc. All rights reserved. World Service Office PO Box 9999 Van Nuys, CA 91409 USA TEL (818) 773-9999 FAX (818) 700-0700 WEB www.na.org

More information

Their stories are tragic. A new chapter starts now. now.

Their stories are tragic. A new chapter starts now. now. ! Their stories are tragic. A new chapter starts now. now.! Bully is a movie that tells powerful stories about children and their families dealing with extreme pain and tragic consequences related to bullying.

More information

Psychic Lotto Formula 3-Step Formula Secret Template To Lottery Secrets Module 3

Psychic Lotto Formula 3-Step Formula Secret Template To Lottery Secrets Module 3 Page 1 Table of Content The Psychic Lotto Formula Jackpot to Success System... 4 Part 1 Channeling the Power of Your Mind to Success... 6 Part 2 Visualization... 12 Part 3 Integrating Luck and Making it

More information

Forgotten Victims of Domestic Violence

Forgotten Victims of Domestic Violence Forgotten Victims of Domestic Violence Emily Catanzarite Domestic Violence Fall 2013 SLAM! Their bedroom door suddenly shuts and I hear the lock turn. The next thing I hear as I pull my blanket around

More information

That's the Way I Like It

That's the Way I Like It That's the Way I Like It Written, designed and set up by: Pat Neuman Illustrated by: Margie Hildebrand A book project of: Pembina Valley Learning Centre Funded by: The National Literacy Secretariat 2005

More information

LINA AND HER NURSE. SUNDAY-SCHOOL UNI0 N, 200 MULBERRY-STREET, N. Y.

LINA AND HER NURSE. SUNDAY-SCHOOL UNI0 N, 200 MULBERRY-STREET, N. Y. LINA AND HER NURSE. SUNDAY-SCHOOL UNI0 N, 200 MULBERRY-STREET, N. Y. LINA AND HER NURSE. SUNDAY-SCHOOL UNION, 200 MULBERRY-STREET, NEW YORK. LINA AND HER NURSE. L INA lived away in that land of the East

More information

Lesson One: Introduction to Customer Service

Lesson One: Introduction to Customer Service Student s Name: Date: / / Lesson One: Introduction to Customer Service 1. Customer service is a relatively complex puzzle. While engaging customers, we are attempting to offer services in a manner that

More information

Related KidsHealth Links

Related KidsHealth Links Grades 9 to 12 Personal Health Series KidsHealth.org/classroom Teacher s Guide This guide includes: Standards Related Links Discussion Questions Activities for Students Reproducible Materials Standards

More information

ONE DOLLAR AND EIGHTY-SEVEN CENTS.

ONE DOLLAR AND EIGHTY-SEVEN CENTS. T h e G i f t o f t h e M a g i p T h e G i f t o f t h e M a g i ONE DOLLAR AND EIGHTY-SEVEN CENTS. That was all. She had put it aside, one cent and then another and then another, in her careful buying

More information

Personal Action / Crisis Prevention Plan

Personal Action / Crisis Prevention Plan Personal Action / Crisis Prevention Plan This Plan is meant to help clients/consumers, their support persons and providers prepare for times when life seems too hard to manage. This Plan is designed to

More information

Fact Sheet #1: Skills to Expect from 0 to 18 months

Fact Sheet #1: Skills to Expect from 0 to 18 months Fact Sheet #1: Skills to Expect from 0 to 18 months Mental Skills Remember people and objects that are not present Imitate other people s facial expressions, sounds, and actions Imitate what they see on

More information

Young homeless people on healthcare. The views of the National Youth Reference Group

Young homeless people on healthcare. The views of the National Youth Reference Group Young homeless people on healthcare The views of the National Youth Reference Group Introduction The Queen s Nursing Institute s Homeless Health Project visited the St Basil s Charity in Birmingham in

More information

A leaflet about death, bereavement and grief for young people

A leaflet about death, bereavement and grief for young people A leaflet about death, bereavement and grief for young people www.rd4u.org.uk What is bereavement? Bereavement simply means losing someone through death. It could be one of your parents, grandparents,

More information

Young people and drugs

Young people and drugs Young people and drugs Many parents worry about whether their son or daughter is taking illegal drugs, how they can tell, and what to do about it. While there s a lot of concern about illegal drugs in

More information

Common Time-Out Mistakes And Problems

Common Time-Out Mistakes And Problems If Your Child Rebels Against Time-Out Time-out Common Time-Out is not expected Mistakes And to work Problems if parents make more than 2 or 3 time-out mistakes. - Lynn Clark 99 Chapter 12 Common Time-Out

More information

LESSON TITLE: Jesus Visits Mary and Martha THEME: Jesus wants us to spend time with \ Him. SCRIPTURE: Luke 10:38-42

LESSON TITLE: Jesus Visits Mary and Martha THEME: Jesus wants us to spend time with \ Him. SCRIPTURE: Luke 10:38-42 Devotion NT249 CHILDREN S DEVOTIONS FOR THE WEEK OF: LESSON TITLE: Jesus Visits Mary and Martha THEME: Jesus wants us to spend time with \ Him. SCRIPTURE: Luke 10:38-42 Dear Parents Welcome to Bible Time

More information

Controlling Your Pain Without Medicine

Controlling Your Pain Without Medicine Controlling Your Pain Without Medicine The following information is based on the general experiences of many prostate cancer patients. Your experience may be different. If you have any questions about

More information

What Can I Do To Help Myself Deal with Loss and Grief?

What Can I Do To Help Myself Deal with Loss and Grief? What Can I Do To Help Myself Deal with Loss and Grief? There are certain tasks that help people adjust to a loss. Every person will complete these tasks in his or her own time and in his/her own way. The

More information

She Wants Out Part II. Female gang members are second-class citizens. The guys sometimes throw

She Wants Out Part II. Female gang members are second-class citizens. The guys sometimes throw Carol Adams Huntington Junior College Literary Dictation Material Marked in 20 Word Groups She Wants Out Part II Female gang members are second-class citizens. The guys sometimes throw parties and don

More information

PEOPLE V. HARRY POTTER

PEOPLE V. HARRY POTTER PEOPLE V. HARRY POTTER THE COURT: Members of the jury, the defendant, Harry Potter, is charged in a one-count information which reads as follows: On or about November 23, 2008, HARRY POTTER, did unlawfully

More information

Finding Balance in Your Grieving. Dr. Jo Christner, Psy.D. The death of your spouse most likely turned your whole world upside down

Finding Balance in Your Grieving. Dr. Jo Christner, Psy.D. The death of your spouse most likely turned your whole world upside down Finding Balance in Your Grieving Dr. Jo Christner, Psy.D. The death of your spouse most likely turned your whole world upside down out of balance. Everything seemed to change in your life especially you.

More information

Adjusting to Spinal Cord Injury

Adjusting to Spinal Cord Injury Adjusting to Spinal Cord Injury After a spinal cord injury, everyone copes differently with the journey toward psychological healing and adjustment. The topics below will explore common issues and concerns

More information

THEME: God desires for us to demonstrate His love!

THEME: God desires for us to demonstrate His love! Devotion NT320 CHILDREN S DEVOTIONS FOR THE WEEK OF: LESSON TITLE: The Gift of Love THEME: God desires for us to demonstrate His love! SCRIPTURE: 1 Corinthians 13:1-13 Dear Parents Welcome to Bible Time

More information

Get the Facts About. Disease

Get the Facts About. Disease Get the Facts About TB TUBERCULOSIS Disease What s Inside: 3 PAGE Get the facts, then get the cure 4 PAGE 9 PAGE 12 PAGE Learn how TB is spread Treatment for TB disease Talking to family and friends about

More information

Self Assessment: Substance Abuse

Self Assessment: Substance Abuse Self Assessment: Substance Abuse Please respond TRUE (T) or FALSE (F) to the following items as they apply to you. Part 1 I use or have used alcohol or drugs for recreational purposes. I use alcohol despite

More information

LEARNER OUTCOME 1 W-8.7:

LEARNER OUTCOME 1 W-8.7: GRADE 8 ABUSE LESSON 1 ABUSE Lesson 1 GRADE 8 LEARNER OUTCOME 1 W-8.7: Determine the signs, methods and consequences of various types of abuse (e.g., neglect, physical, emotional, sexual abuse). MATERIALS:

More information

0 3 Months. Smile spontaneously. By 2 3 months, your baby s social smiles are signs that she knows who you are.

0 3 Months. Smile spontaneously. By 2 3 months, your baby s social smiles are signs that she knows who you are. 0 3 Months Your baby was born relationship ready and in her first three months of life is actively trying to make sense of her world. Before she can even speak, your baby is communicating with her facial

More information

When a Parent Has Mental Illness Helping Children Cope

When a Parent Has Mental Illness Helping Children Cope When a Parent Has Mental Illness Helping Children Cope World Fellowship for Schizophrenia and Allied Disorders 124 Merton Street, Suite 507 Toronto, Ontario, M4S 2Z2, Canada Email: info@world-schizophrenia.org

More information

Walking a Tightrope. Alcohol and other drug use and violence: A guide for families. Alcohol- and Other Drug-related Violence

Walking a Tightrope. Alcohol and other drug use and violence: A guide for families. Alcohol- and Other Drug-related Violence Walking a Tightrope Alcohol and other drug use and violence: A guide for families Alcohol- and Other Drug-related Violence Alcohol and other drug use and family violence often occur together. Families

More information

A story of bipolar disorder

A story of bipolar disorder A story of bipolar disorder (manic-depressive illness) Does this sound like you? D E P A R T M E N T O F H E A L T H A N D H U M A N S E R V I C E S P U B L I C H E A L T H S E R V I C E N A T I O N A

More information

Are you feeling... Tired, Sad, Angry, Irritable, Hopeless?

Are you feeling... Tired, Sad, Angry, Irritable, Hopeless? Are you feeling... Tired, Sad, Angry, Irritable, Hopeless? I feel tired and achy all the time. I can t concentrate and my body just doesn t feel right. Ray B. I don t want to get out of bed in the morning

More information

Talking to our children about Violence and Terrorism: Living in Anxious times

Talking to our children about Violence and Terrorism: Living in Anxious times Talking to our children about Violence and Terrorism: Living in Anxious times Living in Anxious Times: Introductory Remarks Since the September 11 attack America has changed. Children and adults alike

More information

Cain and Abel. The children will hear that we can learn to love our brothers and sisters and to help take care of them.

Cain and Abel. The children will hear that we can learn to love our brothers and sisters and to help take care of them. Cain and Abel Teacher Pep Talk: Everyone understands sibling rivalry. Even the youngest child can relate to being upset with a brother or sister. Cain and Abel are the first example of this enmity. Cain

More information

Healing the Trauma of Adoption:

Healing the Trauma of Adoption: : Juli Alvarado, MA, LPC, NCC Coaching for LIFE 866-570-0604 Most adults with whom I work, as clinicians or adoptive parents, tend to see adoption as a blessing, and in most ways it is. But for the adopted

More information

Rock-a-bye baby: Quad-City couple fosters infants

Rock-a-bye baby: Quad-City couple fosters infants Home / Lifestyles Rock-a-bye baby: Quad-City couple fosters infants Story Discussion Kay Luna Posted: Monday, December 15, 2008 12:00 am (2) Comments Font Size: Default font size Larger font size Andrew

More information

Mental Health Role Plays

Mental Health Role Plays Mental Health Role Plays Goals: To discuss various mental health issues and mental illnesses. To discuss stigma, support and treatment options surrounding mental health issues and mental illnesses. Requirements:

More information

INSPIRING POSSIBILITIES

INSPIRING POSSIBILITIES INSPIRING POSSIBILITIES Skills for Independent Living: Parents Help Build Social Skills Many youth with disabilities have difficulty understanding social situations or navigating interpersonal events such

More information

SOS FOR EMOTIONS TOOLS FOR EMOTIONAL HEALTH

SOS FOR EMOTIONS TOOLS FOR EMOTIONAL HEALTH SOS FOR EMOTIONS TOOLS FOR EMOTIONAL HEALTH NYUStudentHealthCenter BE WELL. CARE FOR YOUR EMOTIONAL HEALTH! The one thing we all have in common as people is that we are emotional creatures. This is both

More information

HOW WOULD I KNOW? WHAT CAN I DO?

HOW WOULD I KNOW? WHAT CAN I DO? HOW WOULD I KNOW? WHAT CAN I DO? How to help someone with dementia who is in pain or distress Help! 1 Unusual behaviour may be a sign of pain or distress If you are giving care or support to somebody with

More information

S. No. WHAT KIDS WANTS THEIR PARENTS TO KNOW. 1 Encourage me when I do a good job ! " #$ % & "

S. No. WHAT KIDS WANTS THEIR PARENTS TO KNOW. 1 Encourage me when I do a good job !  #$ % & 1 Encourage me when I do a good job 2 Let me teach you some things. Don't always be the teacher! " #$ % & " '()&% 3 Don't show too much affection in public ( # &% 4 Let me take some risks; you did when

More information

Why Is Daddy Like He Is?

Why Is Daddy Like He Is? Why Is Daddy Like He Is? A Book For Kids About PTSD by Patience Mason with help from Sally Parker Patience Press High Springs, Florida PP Patience Press 1992 by Patience Mason revised 2011 All rights reserved.

More information

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder - PTSD

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder - PTSD Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder - PTSD Introduction Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, or PTSD, is a common disorder in which a person experiences disabling anxiety after a traumatic event. People with PTSD

More information

Personal Information This Wellness Recovery Action Plan belongs to: Name Address City State Zip Telephone E-Mail Special instructions

Personal Information This Wellness Recovery Action Plan belongs to: Name Address City State Zip Telephone E-Mail Special instructions My WRAP Plan 1995-2005 Mary Ellen Copeland, MS, MA All Rights Reserved P.O. Box 301, West Dummerston, VT 05357 www.mentalhealthrecovery.com Copeland Center for Wellness & Recovery P.O. Box 6464, Chandler,

More information

Helping Children When a Family Member Has Cancer: Dealing With a Parent s Terminal Illness

Helping Children When a Family Member Has Cancer: Dealing With a Parent s Terminal Illness Helping Children When a Family Member Has Cancer: Dealing With a Parent s Terminal Illness For most people this is a painful and personal topic, and the information shared here may be hard to read at times.

More information

Trauma and the Family: Listening and learning from families impacted by psychological trauma. Focus Group Report

Trauma and the Family: Listening and learning from families impacted by psychological trauma. Focus Group Report Trauma and the Family: Listening and learning from families impacted by psychological trauma Focus Group Report A summary of reflections and remarks made by Baltimore City families impacted by trauma and

More information

THE EFFECTS OF FAMILY VIOLENCE ON CHILDREN. Where Does It Hurt?

THE EFFECTS OF FAMILY VIOLENCE ON CHILDREN. Where Does It Hurt? THE EFFECTS OF FAMILY VIOLENCE ON CHILDREN Where Does It Hurt? Child Abuse Hurts Us All Every child has the right to be nurtured and to be safe. According to: Family Violence in Canada: A Statistical Profile

More information

To assist educators in teaching children how to prevent or reduce the risk of sexual abuse.

To assist educators in teaching children how to prevent or reduce the risk of sexual abuse. Teaching Touching Safety Kindergarten Lesson Plan 1: Touching Safety Rules Scripture: Guidelines Reference: Catechism: Goal: Objective: Overview: Activity: If the whole body were just an eye, how would

More information

Parenting. Coping with A Parent s Problem Drug or Alcohol Use. For children. aged 6 to 12

Parenting. Coping with A Parent s Problem Drug or Alcohol Use. For children. aged 6 to 12 Parenting Positively Coping with A Parent s Problem Drug or Alcohol Use For children aged 6 to 12 The information in this booklet is meant to help children who are living with harmful parental drug or

More information

Psychological First Aid Red Cross Preparedness Academy 2014

Psychological First Aid Red Cross Preparedness Academy 2014 Caring for Survivors of Trauma and Disaster: An Introduction to Psychological First Aid Biographical Information Rev. William F. Engfehr III LutheranChurch MissouriSynod DisasterResponseChaplain Senior

More information

Part 3 focuses on ways families can help keep teens from using or abusing alcohol and tobacco.

Part 3 focuses on ways families can help keep teens from using or abusing alcohol and tobacco. W Part 3: Alcohol and Tobacco Rules Are Family Matters elcome to Part 3 of FAMILY MATTERS Alcohol and Tobacco Rules Are Family Matters. FAMILY MATTERS is a program to help families prevent young teens

More information

Photocopy Masters. Learning for Life: Classroom Activities for HIV and AIDS Education

Photocopy Masters. Learning for Life: Classroom Activities for HIV and AIDS Education Education International Internationale de l Education Internacional de la Educación Education International - Education Development Center - World Health Organization Learning for Life: Photocopy Masters

More information

Occupational Therapy Handout

Occupational Therapy Handout Occupational Therapy Handout SENSORY STRATEGIES FOR PARENTS Reacting to different sensations and activities Different children notice and respond to different things from the world around them. Your child

More information

Back to School: Working with Teachers and Schools

Back to School: Working with Teachers and Schools Back to School: Working with Teachers and Schools Starting school each fall is a challenge for the student and parents. The following article offers some valuable suggestions as your child starts a new

More information

The Little Lost Lamb

The Little Lost Lamb The Little Lost Lamb Inspired by Luke 15:4-6 Written by Wendinne Buss Pictures by Marguerite Acton 2004 General Church Office of Education The Little Lost Lamb from the Office of Education s Early Childhood

More information

Learning to make good decisions and solve problems

Learning to make good decisions and solve problems Learning to make good decisions and solve problems Contents Skills and qualities for making decisions What does problem solving involve? How decision-making skills develop Children s brain development

More information

Using coping statements to avoid common thinking traps

Using coping statements to avoid common thinking traps Using coping statements to avoid common thinking traps Did you know that your thoughts affect how you see yourself and the world around you? You may look at a situation one way, even though there are many

More information

S OAPY MOVED RESTLESSLY ON HIS SEAT

S OAPY MOVED RESTLESSLY ON HIS SEAT T h e C o p a n d t h e A n t h e m p The Cop and the Anthem S OAPY MOVED RESTLESSLY ON HIS SEAT in Madison Square. There are certain signs to show that winter is coming. Birds begin to fly south. Women

More information

Mammon and the Archer

Mammon and the Archer O. H e n r y p Mammon and the Archer OLD ANTHONY ROCKWALL, WHO HAD MADE millions of dollars by making and selling Rockwall s soap, stood at a window of his large Fifth Avenue house. He was looking out

More information

Surviving A Relationship Break-Up - Top 20 Strategies

Surviving A Relationship Break-Up - Top 20 Strategies Surviving A Relationship Break-Up - Top 20 Strategies Surviving a relationship break-up can be one of the most difficult things we ever do and on an emotional level can be one of the most painful processes

More information

The most frequently asked questions from parents about their children s sexual education:

The most frequently asked questions from parents about their children s sexual education: CHILDREN AND SEXUAL EDUCATION By Ilze van der Merwe-Alberts, educational psychologist and presenter of the wellknown talk, How and When to Tell Your Children About the Birds and the Bees. She is also the

More information

A guide for children who are having a stem cell transplant (SCT) www.leukaemia.org.au

A guide for children who are having a stem cell transplant (SCT) www.leukaemia.org.au Ben s Stem Cell Transplant A guide for children who are having a stem cell transplant (SCT) www.leukaemia.org.au About you This booklet is yours to help you to understand why you need a stem cell transplant

More information

For parents and carers of children with autism

For parents and carers of children with autism For parents and carers of children with autism The NSPCC helps parents and carers talk to their children about staying safe. It s part of our work to prevent abuse from happening to any child. And it

More information

Anxiety and breathing difficulties

Anxiety and breathing difficulties Patient information factsheet Anxiety and breathing difficulties Breathing is something that we all automatically do and we often take this for granted. Some chronic health conditions, for example asthma

More information

WHAT IS PTSD? A HANDOUT FROM THE NATIONAL CENTER FOR PTSD BY JESSICA HAMBLEN, PHD

WHAT IS PTSD? A HANDOUT FROM THE NATIONAL CENTER FOR PTSD BY JESSICA HAMBLEN, PHD WHAT IS PTSD? A HANDOUT FROM THE NATIONAL CENTER FOR PTSD BY JESSICA HAMBLEN, PHD Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is an anxiety disorder that can occur following the experience or witnessing of a

More information

THEME: God has a calling on the lives of every one of His children!

THEME: God has a calling on the lives of every one of His children! Devotion NT298 CHILDREN S DEVOTIONS FOR THE WEEK OF: LESSON TITLE: Paul s First Missionary Journey THEME: God has a calling on the lives of every one of His children! SCRIPTURE: Acts 12:25 13:52 Dear Parents

More information

Grandpa, Do You Know Who I Am? With Maria Shriver

Grandpa, Do You Know Who I Am? With Maria Shriver DISCUSSION GUIDE Grandpa, Do You Know Who I Am? With Maria Shriver A 4-PART DOCUMENTARY SERIES CHANGING THE WAY AMERICA THINKS ABOUT ALZHEIMER S DISEASE Grandpa, Do You Know Who I Am? With Maria Shriver

More information

How to set limits on your child s behaviour... and stick to them A guide for parents

How to set limits on your child s behaviour... and stick to them A guide for parents How to set limits on your child s behaviour... and stick to them A guide for parents West Lothian Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS) Introduction Children have to be helped to learn how

More information

Purpose: To acquire language and the ability to communicate successfully with others

Purpose: To acquire language and the ability to communicate successfully with others Purpose: To acquire language and the ability to communicate successfully with others The language development and communication domain involves the development of the ability to use language to communicate

More information

My Fresco HANDOUT. Snapshots from Today. 1. Elementary School 2. Middle School 3. High School. Snapshots for Tomorrow

My Fresco HANDOUT. Snapshots from Today. 1. Elementary School 2. Middle School 3. High School. Snapshots for Tomorrow My Fresco Snapshots from Today 1. Elementary School 2. Middle School 3. High School Snapshots for Tomorrow 4. College 5. 20s & 30s 6. 40s & 50s 7. 60s I NEED WISDOM What advice would you offer to the following

More information

ESOL Customer Service Training: Unit 1 1: 1 Student Book. Unit 1: Talking With Your Customer

ESOL Customer Service Training: Unit 1 1: 1 Student Book. Unit 1: Talking With Your Customer ESOL Customer Service Training: Unit 1 1: 1 Unit 1: Talking With Your Customer ESOL Customer Service Training: Unit 1 1: 2 What are your goals? Note to Instructor: If you have permission, use Stand Out

More information

Positive Behavior Management: Practical Tips for Parents. Jonathan Tarbox, PhD Center for Autism and Related Disorders Temecula, February 2006

Positive Behavior Management: Practical Tips for Parents. Jonathan Tarbox, PhD Center for Autism and Related Disorders Temecula, February 2006 Positive Behavior Management: Practical Tips for Parents Jonathan Tarbox, PhD Center for Autism and Related Disorders Temecula, February 2006 Introductions My name is Jonathan Tarbox I am the co-director

More information

Role Plays for Teacher Classroom Management

Role Plays for Teacher Classroom Management Role Plays for Teacher Classroom Management Collaboration, Workshop 1 After Vignette #4 Making connection with quiet child Practice making a connection with a child who is quiet, shy, or sad. Think about

More information

Interview With A Teen. Great Family. Outstanding Education. Heroine Addict

Interview With A Teen. Great Family. Outstanding Education. Heroine Addict Interview With A Teen. Great Family. Outstanding Education. Heroine Addict I recently had the incredible opportunity to interview a young man, Gregor, who very quickly fell into a dependent situation with

More information

Time Management & Stress Reduction

Time Management & Stress Reduction Time Management & Stress Reduction What is stress? Stress is your body s reaction to the things which you perceive as pressures. Stress occurs when you feel that you cannot cope with those pressures. Our

More information

Maine Parenting Relatives Mental Health and Substance Abuse Project A Generations United-Funded Project Article Series # 3

Maine Parenting Relatives Mental Health and Substance Abuse Project A Generations United-Funded Project Article Series # 3 Maine Parenting Relatives Mental Health and Substance Abuse Project A Generations United-Funded Project Article Series # 3 A Grandmother Describes Her Adjustment to Parenting Her Grandchildren Anonymous

More information