The Guide Association Go For It! Be the change

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "The Guide Association 2013 www.girlguiding.org.uk Go For It! Be the change"

Transcription

1 Be the change

2 Welcome to Go For it! Be the change What s this Go For It! about? This Go For It! is all about how you can get involved and help to bring about change to the community in which you live. It gives you the opportunity to learn how the country is run, including who your local Member of Parliament (MP) is and how they can help you. Go For It! Be the change includes activities which enable your Patrol to learn about how to make your voice heard in the UK today. It will show you how to run a campaign about an issue that you feel strongly about. It also explores which qualities you need to develop to be a successful leader, and shows you how to identify the skills you already have. Go For It! Be the change has been written by members of The Senior Section and the Leader who went to the Girls World Forum To read their thoughts on this event visit You are all the politicians of the future! Where better to start than Go For It! Be the change? Get involved! How does it work? You should spend four Patrol times (including planning time) on this Go For It! to gain the badge. If you enjoy Go For It! Be the change check out the ideas in the Take it further section on page 24. There are a few optional extra activities for you to try at the end of the pack too. Team work You ll need to work together all the way on this Go For It! there are lots of decisions and plans to be made. How will you make sure everyone s voice is heard? Think about everyone s strengths and how best to use them. Go For It! Be the change badge When your Patrol has completed Go For It! Be the change you will each gain this great badge! 1

3 The activities in this GFI! are designed to help you make your voice heard, at all levels. Whether you want to change something in your local area, or become involved in a huge national campaign, this is the Go For It! for you it isn t just for those who want to be the next Prime Minister, it s for everyone. The pack is split into three sections. You can decide how you use your time during the four Patrol sessions you might like to split your time equally across the three sections, or spend more time on one section than another, but you must make sure you do at least one activity from each of the three sections. The three sections are: Role models and leadership (page 3) Decision-making (page 10) Being the change (page 16) You can either plan all four Patrol sessions in one go or allow time at the end of each one to plan the following session. Your Leaders will be able to help you with the planning. 2

4 Role models and leadership This section should get you thinking about the role models and leaders in your life and how they influence you. It should help you to understand why it is important to think about your role models and how this relates to leadership. You will also have the chance to develop your leadership skills and consider what it means to be a role model. Who s a leader? Work out the qualities that a good role model and leader should have. How are they different? Pens Large sheet of paper/lining paper 35 cards, each with a word from the grid below 1. Two Guides should lie down on the paper and two other Guides should draw around them. 2. Label one Guide outline leader and the other role model. 3. Take it in turns to pick up a word card. 4. As a group, discuss what the word or phrase means. Then decide whether it is a characteristic of a leader or a role model, or both, or neither. 5. Place it on the appropriate outline, or put it in between the two if you think the word applies to both. If you think a quality is irrelevant, put it to one side. 6. When you have sorted out all the words, see if you can choose your Patrol s top ten words that describe a role model, and ten words for a leader. Passionate Inspirational Committed Selfless Accepting Dependable Honest Loyal Moral Friendly Creative Good listener Caring Modest Generous Trustworthy Self-assured Approachable Old Persevering Positive Rich Popular Well-dressed Strong Ambitious Determined Motivated Problem solver Hard-working Adventurous Confident Pretty Cool Respectful Take it further Can you think of people who possess all the qualities required to be good role models or leaders? 30 minutes 3

5 Top tip If you don t want to cut up the word cards you could write the words directly on to your outlines. Powerful women How many powerful women can you name? What makes them appear powerful? Do people disagree on which women are powerful? Range of different newspapers and/or magazines Flipchart paper Pens Scrap paper Internet (optional) 1. Think of all the powerful women you can. It might be helpful to use categories, such as the following. Film industry/theatre, for example Angelina Jolie. Music industry, for example Adele or Lady Gaga. Politics, for example Theresa May. Literary, for example J K Rowling. Education, for example Malala Yousafzai. Health, for example Mary Seacole. Religion, for example Lucy Winkett. International, for example Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf. Women in history, for example Emmeline Pankhurst. Royalty, for example The Queen. If anyone hasn t heard of the women you come up with, explain who they are so that everyone is clear. You might want to spend some time researching them to learn more about them. 2. Make a mind-map of the characteristics of a powerful woman. Think about what makes a woman powerful. Is it because of her personality, her position, the opportunities she has had in her life, the actions she has taken or her education? Who is the most powerful woman you know (either personally or someone in the public eye)? Think about the type of power that she has and where that power comes from. 3. Make a collage of women who you feel are powerful. This activity is about highlighting the characteristics you associate with these women, so try to incorporate them into the poster. Display this poster in an appropriate place, such as your meeting place or local library, to encourage people to think about empowering girls and women to bring about change in their community and the wider world. 30 minutes 4

6 Online safety tips P Avoid mentioning the specific time and place of your meetings. P If you use text or images from other sites you will need to seek permission. P If you want to include pictures of yourselves, you will need parental permission. P Always ask permission before uploading photos or videos of other people. P Don t publish any personal details such as your address or mobile number. P If you send pictures, be aware that these can be forwarded on to others. P Remember that online friends are really strangers, no matter how long you have been talking to them or how friendly they seem. Don t arrange to meet up with anyone you have been chatting to online. P Tell a trusted adult if something online upsets you. For more information on how you can stay safe on the web, take a look at the Guide web safe code at guides > Guides web safe code. Powerful women or not? Think about what prevents some girls and women from having power and what can be done to change it. Cup A bucket of water 2 empty buckets 1. Think about the factors that could stop some girls and women from having power. For example, being denied an education, lack of money, the secondary position of women in some countries or child marriage. 2. For each one you think of, fill the cup with water from the bucket and pour it into one of the other buckets. 3. Continue to do this until you have run out of ideas or the bucket is full of water. 4. Now think about the best ways to empower girls and young women, for example providing access to education, support aimed at women, laws protecting women s rights or better family planning services. 20 minutes 5

7 5. For each one of these, remove a cup of water from the first bucket and pour it into the empty bucket. 6. Continue to do this until you have run out of ideas or water. Top tip Don t forget to dispose of your water in a responsible way maybe you could use it to water the garden or to clean craft equipment such as paintbrushes if another group has used them. Votes for women This activity will help you find out about how and when women won the vote in the UK. It will also encourage you to talk about equality issues and to value your right to vote when you are old enough. This is something we know is still important to girls today. In our Girls Attitudes Survey, 74 per cent of you said you feel that the UK is a fair place to be a woman. Event cards (below) Date cards (below) Scissors Cut out the dates and events below and mix them up. Spread the dates and events out on the floor so that everybody can see all of them. Either take it in turns to match an event with the date, or discuss each event as a group before deciding which date to match it with. You might find it useful to sort the events roughly into the order in which you think they might have happened before matching them with precise dates. During the activity, think about how you would feel if you were living at various points along the timeline. How would you feel if women couldn t represent you in government? How would you feel if the suffragettes asked you to join them in direct action? How would you feel being one of the first women to vote with equal voting rights to men? Did you know? Both franchise and suffrage mean the right to vote. Women who campaigned for equal voting rights were often called suffragettes. Can you find out the difference between suffragists and suffragettes? 20 minutes 6

8 Dates Events The NUWSS campaigns for the first time in a general election, pressing candidates to pledge their support for women s suffrage. The Liberal Party wins a landslide victory, with a majority of MPs pledging support for women s suffrage. Women gain the vote in the Isle of Man. The voting age is lowered to 18 for both men and women. Women of property and aged 30 or over are granted the vote in the Representation of the People Act. Countess Constance Markiewicz stands as a Sinn Féin candidate for Parliament. She is elected but, as an Irish Nationalist, refuses to take up her seat in accordance with Sinn Féin policy. The Great Reform Act openly excludes women from the franchise by defining voters as male persons. 7

9 The first militant action takes place: Christabel Pankhurst and Annie Kenny disrupt Sir Edward Grey s speech at a Liberal meeting in the Free Trade Hall, Manchester, and are arrested. They are fined, but their refusal to pay results in seven days imprisonment. The Equal Franchise Act is passed and women aged 21 or over gain the right to vote. Women have the same voting rights as men. The Kensington Society forms in London and advocates women s suffrage. Emily Davies, Barbara Bodichon and Elizabeth Garrett Anderson are active members. Flora Drummond and others chain themselves to the railings outside 10 Downing Street. On 21 June, the Women s Sunday procession takes place in London culminating in a rally in Hyde Park attended by 250,000 people. Women ratepayers win the right to vote in local elections. The Women s Social and Political Union (WSPU) is founded in Manchester, led by Emmeline and Christabel Pankhurst. Lady Astor wins the Plymouth by-election and is the first woman to take her seat in Parliament. On 9 February 3,000 women march from Hyde Park to the Strand in support of women s suffrage. The Mud March is the largest street protest held on the issue and attracts widespread press coverage. The Education Act permits women ratepayers to stand for, and vote in, elections for local school boards. Anne Knight works with Anne Kent to form the Sheffield Female Political Association, the first women s suffrage organisation in Britain. The Conciliation Bill, a women s suffrage bill, is debated in Parliament but fails. On 18 November, Black Friday, a women s deputation to Parliament turns into a riot: 120 protestors are arrested and the police assault many women. The National Union of Women s Suffrage Societies (NUWSS) is founded in London under the leadership of Millicent Fawcett. Its members become known as suffragists. John Stuart Mill MP presents a petition and franchise amendment to Parliament, which is defeated. The London National Society for Women s Suffrage forms. The Chartist movement demands universal suffrage, later altered to universal male suffrage. Turn to page 22 for the answers. 8

10 Take it further Talk about the following. How might the campaign have been different if it had taken place today? Do you think women value their vote today? The leader in you Are you a good leader? Think about your own leadership qualities and how to develop them, and your effectiveness when it comes to working with others. Pens Paper 1. Either individually or in pairs, make a list of all the different leadership roles you have. This could be within Brownies or Guides (for example, a Patrol Second or Brownie Helper) or outside of Guides (for example, captain of a sports team). 2. Think about the things that you find easy about being a leader make a list of your top five. 3. Think about the things that you find hard about being a leader and make a list of your top five. 4. If you are happy to do so, share your two lists with your Patrol and ask them if they can help you with any of the things you find the hardest. Try it this way If you find it difficult to think about this, start by making a list of the people that you think are good leaders and the skills they have. 9

11 Decision-making These activities will help you to understand how politics works. It is important to understand this first, in order to work out what you can do to get involved. What does it all mean anyway? Bust the jargon and make sense of some of the words commonly used in politics. The words and meanings grid below Match the words with their meanings. 20 minutes Houses of Parliament House of Commons House of Lords Prime Minister Member of Parliament (MP) Peer Democracy Honourable Friend Coalition National Assembly of Wales Member of European Parliament (MEP) Opposition Ballot Political party Scottish Parliament Ministers European Parliament Manifesto Where two parties form a government together because no single party gained sufficient votes to make a government. Upper house of the Parliament which double checks bills that have been approved by the House of Commons. Elected lower house of the Parliament of the UK. Member of the House of Lords. Way in which MPs address each other in Parliament. Leader of the ruling party. The House of Commons and the House of Lords. An elected person who represents the people of an area in the UK in the House of Commons. A form of government in which citizens participate equally either directly or through elected representatives. This is the paper you are given to vote with. The large political party which is not in power in the UK. These are published by political parties before elections to explain their points of view. A group of people who hold similar political views. Represents the Welsh people. An elected person who represents an area of the UK in the European Parliament. Based in Edinburgh to represent the people of Scotland. A decision-making body made up of MEPs from 28 countries and based in Brussels, Belgium. Members of Parliament who take on the responsibility for a specialist area such as education or health. See page 23 for answers. 10

12 Try it this way If this is too easy, why not turn it into a game of pairs or snap? Make multiple copies of the grid and cut out the rectangles to make playing cards. Ruling your desert island Building your society from scratch will help you gain a better understanding of political parties and what they do. Paper Pens 1. Imagine your Patrol is a group of strangers who, following a shipwreck, became stranded on a desert island. You are the only people on this island, and you are miles away from anywhere, with no means of escape. You have little or no food, water or shelter, and are struggling to survive. As this island is deserted, there are no laws, rules or regulations here, and so you are going to have to work to build your community from scratch. You have been on the island for a week now, and people aren t working together so things keep going wrong. No one is taking responsibility for decisions and you can t agree on a leader. You decide that you are going to hold elections for your leader so that decisions can be made faster. 2. Each member of the Patrol creates a manifesto or set of rules. This lists all the things they will do if they are elected as leader, and persuades people to vote for them. You should think about the following. a. How jobs on the island (collecting food and water, cooking, building shelters) should be shared out. b. How resources (food and water) should be shared out. c. What kind of education the children should have (for how long, what will they learn?). d. What should be illegal. e. How people who commit crimes will be punished. f. What the island s flag should look like. g. Whether there should be any differences in the roles of women and men. h. Whether there should be a specific time for waking up and going to bed. i. How you as a leader will involve others in the decision-making process, if at all. 3. Read each other s manifestos, and hold a vote for who you want your leader to be. 4. Why not get the whole unit to vote? Share your manifestos with the rest of your unit. Then hold a hustings where each candidate can talk to those voting to try to influence them. Did you know? A hustings is a meeting at which candidates present their policies to potential voters and try to win support. 1 hour 11

13 Try it this way Take it in turns to propose a rule or policy for life on the island and vote on each policy individually. When you have finished voting, look at each policy and talk about the following questions. a. Which way is fairer? b. Which way leaves the most people happy? c. Which way is most efficient? What does the government look like? Get creative and understand the structure of the UK government. Flipchart paper 30 minutes Flipchart pens Coloured paper Newspapers Scissors Glue sticks Magazines and newspapers containing pictures of the key politicians (for example, Prime Minister, Deputy Prime Minister, Leader of the Opposition, cabinet members, your local MP etc) Internet (optional) you may need to download pictures of key politicians Printer Sticky labels 1. On scrap paper, map out what you know about the government. to work out what you know, what gaps there are in your knowledge, and how you are going to plug these gaps. It might be easier to focus on the three main parties Conservative, Labour and Liberal Democrat. Start with the Prime Minister, then work downwards, to MPs. There are lots of MPs, so you might want to look at these separately. 2. When you are ready, start cutting out your pictures of the MPs, write their different roles on to labels and show how everyone fits into the structure. Make it bright, colourful and clear. 3. When you have finished, present this to the rest of your unit so that they can understand the structure of the government. 12

14 Try it this way Why not try the same activity, but for the Welsh Assembly, Scottish Government, Northern Irish Assembly, European Parliament or the governing structure where you live. This will help you gain a better understanding of how decisions are made where you live. Let s get moving! Stretch your legs and get your Patrol to address their perceptions of political people. Whistle 1. Pick one person to be the caller. 2. Everyone else walks around the room. 3. The caller blows the whistle and says walk like you and then calls out one of the following: are the Prime Minister are on a protest march are the Queen have won an election are a defeated Parliamentary candidate are late for an important meeting. You can also use your own suggestions. 4. The caller picks the Guide that they think is the best at walking in the style of the person/people they suggested. This person then becomes the caller and chooses another person to walk in the style of. 5. Talk about the prejudices that you might have about politics. Can any of these be corrected? Do you see political leaders as men or women, or both? Why? How can this be changed? Motivate others to believe that they can be the change they wish to see in the world the key message of this Go For It!. Debating or not debating Learn about how discussions take place in the House of Commons and then hold a debate in the same way. Pens Paper Something to make a line on the floor with (such as a piece of rope) A chair for each person House of Commons debate When the MPs are having a discussion or debate in the House of Commons there is someone called the Speaker to chair the debates and ensure people don t speak out 10 minutes 40 minutes 13

15 of turn. The Speaker sits in a chair at the front of the House. Members supporting the government sit on his or her right, and those supporting the opposition on his or her left. To prevent any conflict, there is a red line on the floor that should not be crossed during a discussion. 1. Decide on a topic for the debate, for example the weekends should last longer or amusement parks should be free of charge. 2. Decide who will be a Speaker who will chair/lead the debate. 3. Divide into two teams the government and the opposition. You will also need to decide who is going to argue for and who will argue against. 4. Each team can take some time to plan their argument. 5. Arrange the chairs so that half are on the right and half on the left side and make a line with the rope on the floor. 6. Members of the government should be given three minutes to put forward their argument. They shouldn t be interrupted during this time. 7. Members of the opposition then have three minutes to put forward their argument. They also shouldn t be interrupted during this. 8. Each team can then ask questions of the other side. 9. Once each side has asked all its questions it s time to vote, just like they do in the House of Commons. Stand on the right side if you vote yes or move to the left side to vote no. The Speaker then counts up the results and declares them. Take care Consider other people s personal opinions during this activity remember that they might be adopting a point of view which isn t their own. 14

16 You as a political animal How many different ways are there to be involved in politics? Find one that suits you! Pen and paper 1. Make a set of cards, each with a political activity written on it from the list below. a. Vote in an election. b. Stand as a candidate in an election for a political party. c. Campaign door-to-door on behalf of a party or cause you believe in. d. Attend a protest. e. Go to a public meeting and ask a question. f. Write to your local representative. g. Set up a petition. h. Sign a petition. i. Submit a petition to Parliament. j. Join a pressure group. k. Join a political party. l. Get your MP or local councillor to visit your unit or school. m. Set up a campaign. n. Find out about the British Youth Council and get involved take a look at The Senior Section website > What can I do? > British Youth Council. o. Talk to an adult about the next time they will vote. 2. In your Patrol, discuss how much of a difference you think each activity would make. Sort them into three piles make a lot of difference, not make a lot of difference and don t know. 3. Discuss how easy or hard you think the make a lot of difference choices would be to do. 4. Are there some actions that would require little effort, but would make a big difference? Take care If you decide to do any of the activities on the cards, check with your Leader first some of the activities require you to be a certain age so you might not be able to do them all yourself. 20 minutes 15

17 Being the change This section will help you find out more about the different ways you can lead a political life and how you can be the change. You have the power to make changes so what are you waiting for? Get stuck in to these activities to find out more about some of the ways you can make a difference. Campaign posters How are campaigns run and how could you get involved? This activity will also get you thinking about the difference between informing and persuading. Paper Pens Card Scissors Glitter Paint Newspaper Other creative materials 1. Think about an issue that you are passionate about. It could be anything from cutting CO2 emissions in the UK to improving women s rights abroad or supporting a child s right to eat chocolate every day! 2. Design a poster that will grab people s attention and effectively communicate what you want them to know about the issue. You could do this as a Patrol, in small groups or individually. 3. Now think about how you might change the poster from being informative to being persuasive. 4. Talk about how you will make people share your point of view about the issue. Is it fair to bend the truth or use emotive language in campaigns? Take it further Why do you think women are much more likely to be involved in campaigns about a particular issue than campaign for a political party? Discuss this in your Patrol and then share your ideas with everyone. A campaign of your own Now you can start a campaign about something you feel strongly about. This could be a local, national or international issue, and be about people, rights, the environment or your community. It could be anything from changing an existing law to raising awareness or introducing a new law. to think about ways of engaging different types of people of all ages people who aren t interested in politics, people who have an extreme political view, and people who are very busy already. 40 minutes 2 meetings 16

18 Flipchart paper and pens Coloured paper (for making posters etc) National and local newspapers/other media Internet access (optional) Coloured pens/pencils/paints etc Other stationery as available Local newspapers Session one 1. People campaign to try to bring about change, to persuade people to adopt a particular way of thinking, to amend a policy, or bring in new policies. Decide what your campaign is going to be about. What does your Patrol feel strongly about? 2. Talk about which campaign groups you are aware of, for example international anti-poverty charities. These charities often have high-profile campaign methods, such as mass mailings to supporters, inserts in newspapers and magazines and advertisements (on TV, radio, billboards, direct marketing). 3. Now think about the local campaigning groups that you are aware of. Have a look in local newspapers. There are likely to be groups campaigning for local issues, for example against the closure of a hospital, or challenging the local council on issues such as traffic restrictions, council tax, parking fines etc. 4. On the flipchart paper, think of all of the issues you care about international, national and local. They really can be anything. Write all of these down on the paper. From your list, choose one of the topics to focus on. Write this in the middle of a fresh piece of flipchart paper. Make a spider diagram about it. 5. Now think about where you would like to bring about change, in relation to the issue you have chosen. 6. It s really important that when you start a campaign, you do some research so that you know the facts about what you are going to campaign on. 7. Spend some time researching the issue, gathering some statistics, and finding out more about what you want to campaign for. Take your findings to your next Guide meeting. Session two 1. Now that everyone has done some research, you will need to hone your idea and make decisions on the following. What you are going to campaign for (be specific)? Why you are going to campaign for it? What evidence are you going to use to show that there is a need to campaign for change? You could use statistics, testimony and media articles, for example. Always be aware of the balance of views and remember that some articles will be written in a biased way. 2. Are you able to link with other groups who are campaigning on similar issues? 3. How are you going to plan your campaign? Consider the following. Make placards. Make posters. 17

19 Come up with a slogan. Write letters to local councillors or your MP. Write to the local or national press. Organise a protest (speak to your Leaders about how to do this). Start a newsletter. Make T-shirts. 4. Think about how you are going to fundraise for your campaign and make a more detailed campaign plan to include: specific actions timescales roles and responsibilities within the group. Take it further Start campaigning! It s important to have a call to action when trying to encourage people to support your campaign, even if it s something which seems quite small, for example, forwarding an to a friend. Then there are bigger actions, such as writing to your MP. It s really important that you evaluate your campaign. Consider what worked, what didn t work and why, and how you would do things differently. Keep track of your campaign s progress by considering the following. 1. Have people responded to the call to action how many have signed up to the newsletter, or responded to your letters? 2. And, most importantly, has your campaign brought about change? How? Then either celebrate your success, or discuss why it didn t work, and what you re going to do next. Try it this way If you aren t sure on a topic you would like to cover, take a look at the Girlguiding website for details of our current campaigns and consider how you can join in. Take care Talk to your Leader about your plans before carrying them out to check that they are safe. Don t be disheartened if you don t see the changes you are campaigning for happen straight away some things take time. 18

20 A little extra activity Patrol message Can you think of a message which explains why it is important that girls your age are leading political lives and how they can get involved? You can do this as a Patrol. Pens Paper 1. Talk about what you have done for Go For It! Be the change. a. Why do you think it is important for you to be involved with decisions which affect you and the community around you? b. Why is it important to understand the basics about politics? c. Why is it important that you have positive female role models and good leadership skills? 2. As a group, agree a sentence which summarises the most important thing you have done, for example challenges you have undertaken, discoveries you have made and facts you have learned. 3. Write it down so you don t forget it this is your Patrol message which you will need for the rest of this session. Pass it on Now you have decided on your Patrol message you should share it with others. The following activities will help you. Decide if your whole Patrol works on an activity or if you want to work in smaller groups on different activities. Don t forget to allow for time at the end of your meeting to share what you have all done make sure each Patrol message is heard. Read all about it! Pens Paper Magazines or newspapers containing interviews (optional) Computer (optional) 1. Take it in turns to interview members of your Patrol about the Patrol message. You could ask questions, such as the following. a. Why do you think your Patrol message is important? b. What was the best thing about Go For It! Be the change and why should other Guides pick this Go For It!? c. From doing this Go For It!, what changes would you like to see in the world? 2. Use this information to put together an article for a newspaper or magazine. If you have some newspapers or magazines use them to research the different ways 15 minutes 30 minutes 19

THIS IS ABUSE. Discussion Guide

THIS IS ABUSE. Discussion Guide THIS IS ABUSE Discussion Guide This is Abuse Discussion Guide 2 Contents Introduction Background to the This is Abuse campaign Note to facilitators Key messages Section One: Preparing for the sessions:

More information

Parents as partners. in their children s learning REPRESENTED. Toolkit CHOICE

Parents as partners. in their children s learning REPRESENTED. Toolkit CHOICE Parents as partners in their children s learning Toolkit CHOICE ED REPRESENTED IBUTING Parents as partners in their children s learning Toolkit Scottish Executive, Edinburgh 2006 Crown copyright 2006 ISBN:

More information

Community Event toolkit

Community Event toolkit Community Event toolkit 1 About this toolkit This toolkit will help you to plan and run an event that helps to change the way that people in your community think about, and behave towards, people with

More information

together we can change our world

together we can change our world together we can change our world A Toolkit on Advocacy Supporting and encouraging young people to speak out, educate, and take action This publication has been realized with the financial support of the

More information

H.I.P.P. HAVE INFLUENCE ON PUBLIC POLICY A MANUAL AND TOOL KIT ON HOW VOLUNTARY ORGANIZATIONS CAN INFLUENCE PUBLIC POLICY

H.I.P.P. HAVE INFLUENCE ON PUBLIC POLICY A MANUAL AND TOOL KIT ON HOW VOLUNTARY ORGANIZATIONS CAN INFLUENCE PUBLIC POLICY Be H.I.P.P. HAVE INFLUENCE ON PUBLIC POLICY A MANUAL AND TOOL KIT ON HOW VOLUNTARY ORGANIZATIONS CAN INFLUENCE PUBLIC POLICY Prepared by YMCA Canada with the assistance of Human Resources Development Canada

More information

How to make your own radio shows: Youth Radio Toolkit

How to make your own radio shows: Youth Radio Toolkit How to make your own radio shows: Youth Radio Toolkit Published in 2011 by: UNICEF www.unicef.org/southafrica UNICEF & Children s Radio Foundation All rights reserved. Without limiting the rights under

More information

Paul Kloosterman. > What do I want/need to learn? > How can I learn it? > When will I learn? > Who can help me learn it?

Paul Kloosterman. > What do I want/need to learn? > How can I learn it? > When will I learn? > Who can help me learn it? 30 B1 How to support learning Paul Kloosterman This chapter aims to help you get to grips with the term learning in relation to concrete activities in the Youth in Action Programme. Different methods and

More information

Setting Up a Community-Managed Not-For-Profit Organisation. A guide to the steps and the benefits

Setting Up a Community-Managed Not-For-Profit Organisation. A guide to the steps and the benefits Setting Up a Community-Managed Not-For-Profit Organisation A guide to the steps and the benefits The Office for the Community Sector (OCS) was established as part of the Department of Planning and Community

More information

KEEPIN IT REAL A RESOURCE FOR INVOLVING YOUNG PEOPLE IN DECISION-MAKING

KEEPIN IT REAL A RESOURCE FOR INVOLVING YOUNG PEOPLE IN DECISION-MAKING KEEPIN IT REAL A RESOURCE FOR INVOLVING YOUNG PEOPLE IN DECISION-MAKING This resource is a revised edition of 2003 Keepin It Real. We would like to thank all the young people, local councils, community

More information

How to choose your key stage 4 options

How to choose your key stage 4 options Which way now? 2010-2011 PARENTS &CARERS SUPPLEMENT INCLUDED How to choose your key stage 4 options Help Your choices SupportYour future Advice Name Contents Getting started Who can help you?... 2-3 Your

More information

Speaking Up for Library Services to Teens

Speaking Up for Library Services to Teens The Campaign for America s Libraries presents Speaking Up for Library Services to Teens A Guide to Advocacy Prepared by yalsa @ your library Contents Introduction 3 Getting Started 4 Everyday Advocacy

More information

ENGAGING WITH THE MEDIA A COMPANION TO THE ADVOCACY TOOLKIT FOR INFLUENCING THE POST-2015 DEVELOPMENT AGENDA

ENGAGING WITH THE MEDIA A COMPANION TO THE ADVOCACY TOOLKIT FOR INFLUENCING THE POST-2015 DEVELOPMENT AGENDA ENGAGING WITH THE MEDIA A COMPANION TO THE ADVOCACY TOOLKIT FOR INFLUENCING THE POST-2015 DEVELOPMENT AGENDA PRODUCED BY DAVID THOMAS MEDIA LTD UNDER THE SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT 2015 PROGRAMME MAY 2014

More information

Information for parents living apart from their child

Information for parents living apart from their child Information for parents living apart from their child a child maintenance decisions guide Understand your child maintenance choices Tools to help you set up a child maintenance arrangement Ideas from other

More information

HOW DO WE DO IT? At the end of this component learners will be able to: Demonstrate a range of effective verbal and non-verbal communication skills.

HOW DO WE DO IT? At the end of this component learners will be able to: Demonstrate a range of effective verbal and non-verbal communication skills. 38 National Youth Council of Ireland HOW DO WE DO IT? INTRODUCTION Component 5 introduces volunteers to the nuts and bolts of youth work practice. Having been introduced to the role of the volunteer in

More information

Stand for what you believe in. be a councillor. www.beacouncillor.org.uk

Stand for what you believe in. be a councillor. www.beacouncillor.org.uk Stand for what you believe in. be a councillor. www.beacouncillor.org.uk Cover images top: Councillor Awale Olad, Labour Camden, London, bottom: Councillor Emma Will, Conservative Kensington & Chelsea,

More information

First Steps Providing for the Early Years in museums

First Steps Providing for the Early Years in museums First Steps Providing for the Early Years in museums Contents 02 Foreword 03 Using this handbook 04 Early Years children in museums 06 The Early Years context Developing high quality 09 Catering for unique

More information

Evidence for Success. The guide to getting evidence and using it August 2014

Evidence for Success. The guide to getting evidence and using it August 2014 Evidence for Success The guide to getting evidence and using it August 2014 Contents: Foreword 03 Introduction 04 Part 1: Generating useful evidence 06 Part 2: Using evidence 16 Section 1: Using evidence

More information

The World We Want After 2015. What should come after the Millennium Development Goals? A discussion pack for children and young people

The World We Want After 2015. What should come after the Millennium Development Goals? A discussion pack for children and young people The World We Want After 2015 What should come after the Millennium Development Goals? A discussion pack for children and young people Contents Section 1: What are the Millennium Development Goals? An introduction

More information

How to set up a Workers Co-op

How to set up a Workers Co-op How to set up a Workers Co-op Third edition - June 2012 www.radicalroutes.org.uk How to set up a Workers Co-op First edition written by Catalyst Collective Ltd. 1994 Updated by Radical Routes Ltd. 2003

More information

The Most Significant Change technique

The Most Significant Change technique Equal Access Participatory Monitoring and Evaluation toolkit The Most Significant Change technique A manual for M&E staff and others at Equal Access Developed by June Lennie February 2011 Contents Acknowledgements

More information

Joanne Evans Office for National Statistics

Joanne Evans Office for National Statistics Findings from the National Well-being Debate Joanne Evans Office for National Statistics July 2011 Supplementary Paper: Findings from the National Well-being Debate Official Statistics ONS official statistics

More information

OPG602. Making decisions A guide for family, friends and other unpaid carers. The Mental Capacity Act

OPG602. Making decisions A guide for family, friends and other unpaid carers. The Mental Capacity Act OPG602 Making decisions A guide for family, friends and other unpaid carers The Mental Capacity Act Making decisions A guide for family, friends and other unpaid carers Helping people who are unable to

More information

MAKE A. Strategies for Nonprofit Engagement in Legislative Advocacy

MAKE A. Strategies for Nonprofit Engagement in Legislative Advocacy MAKE A Strategies for Nonprofit Engagement in Legislative Advocacy TABLE OF CONTENTS About CLPI 2 About This Resource and Discussion Guide 5 CLPI Road Map for Engagement in Legislative Advocacy 6 The Power

More information

How to make Relationships Matter for Looked After Young People

How to make Relationships Matter for Looked After Young People How to make Relationships Matter for Looked After Young People A handbook Mary Ryan [Blank page] How to make Relationships Matter for Looked After Young People A handbook Mary Ryan NCB s vision is a society

More information

How reading can help children escape poverty

How reading can help children escape poverty How reading can help children escape poverty Front cover: Alexandra enjoys reading with a volunteer helper each week. Her school is part of the Born to Read programme. (Photo: Jo Metson Scott/Save the

More information

Play It Fair! Play it Fair! Acknowledgement. Index of Reference Sheets. Play it Fair! Human Rights Education Toolkit for Children

Play It Fair! Play it Fair! Acknowledgement. Index of Reference Sheets. Play it Fair! Human Rights Education Toolkit for Children Play It Fair! Human Rights Education Toolkit for Children Acknowledgement This program is made possible thanks to the support of: The City of Montreal through its Direction de la diversité sociale; Ministère

More information

The European Parliamentary elections and the local government elections in England and Northern Ireland May 2014

The European Parliamentary elections and the local government elections in England and Northern Ireland May 2014 The European Parliamentary elections and the local government elections in England and Northern Ireland May 2014 Report on the administration of the 22 May 2014 elections July 2014 Translations and other

More information

As Good As They Give. Providing volunteers with the management they deserve. Workbook Two Attracting and Selecting Volunteers

As Good As They Give. Providing volunteers with the management they deserve. Workbook Two Attracting and Selecting Volunteers As Good As They Give Providing volunteers with the management they deserve Workbook Two Attracting and Selecting Volunteers Volunteering takes many forms - traditional service giving, mutual aid and self-help,

More information

Monitoring and Evaluation

Monitoring and Evaluation OVERVIEW Brief description This toolkit deals with the nuts and bolts (the basics) of setting up and using a monitoring and evaluation system for a project or an organisation. It clarifies what monitoring

More information