Seven-day mean annual low flow and mean annual flow mapping of the Waipara River catchment, North Canterbury

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2 Seven-day mean annual low flow and mean annual flow mapping of the Waipara River catchment, North Canterbury Report No. U08/10 ISBN Frank Scarf October 2007

3 Report U08/10 ISBN Kilmore Street PO Box 345 Christchurch 8140 Phone (03) Fax (03) Church Street PO Box 550 Timaru 7940 Phone (03) Fax (03) Website: Customer Services Phone

4 Seven-day mean annual flow and mean annual low flow mapping of the Waipara River catchment, Executive Summary Mean flow and seven-day mean annual low flows (MALF(7d)) have been estimated at sites on the tributaries and mainstem of the Waipara River,. The work is based on a series of concurrent flow gaugings carried out at various times dating back to 1988 when a permanent flow recording site was established at White Gorge. The flow statistics for each of the tributaries and mainstem sites were calculated using regression equations, which were based upon a relationship with a primary flow site. The mean flow and MALF (7d) estimates have been used to produce separate isohydal maps covering the Waipara River catchment. The maps may be used to assess mean flow and MALF (7d) for any ungauged site within the Waipara River catchment. The report also describes the makeup of surface water flow throughout the catchment, including the contribution of spring flow emanating from the Omihi Stream. As part of the larger project to map the MALF (7d) s and update the current mean flow map for the entire Canterbury region, this report discusses the methods, results and limitations of the mapping of 7-day mean annual low flows and mean flows for the tributaries and mainstem of the Waipara River. Environment Canterbury Technical Report i

5 Seven-day mean annual flow and mean annual low flow mapping of the Waipara River catchment, ii Environment Canterbury Technical Report

6 Seven-day mean annual flow and mean annual low flow mapping of the Waipara River catchment, Table of Contents Executive Summary...i 1 Introduction The study Description of the Waipara River catchment Previous studies Hydrological data recording Water use and impacts on hydrological data records Consents issued to take water Method used to correct observed flow for upstream abstraction (naturalising flows) Calculating mean flow and mean annual low flow (MALF (7d)) for principal sites Mean flow Mean annual low flow MALF (7d) Estimating mean flow and MALF (7d) at tertiary sites Methodology Limitations Mean flow and MALF (7d) for tertiary sites Isohydal mapping of mean flow and MALF (7d) data Mean flow Mean annual low flow Make-up of flow in the Waipara River under mean and low flow conditions Conclusions and Recommendations Conclusions Recommendations Acknowledgements References...33 Appendix 1A: Listing of consented water takes from Waipara River and unconfined groundwater...34 Appendix 1B: Consented ground water takes considered not to be hydraulically connected to surface water resources...37 Appendix 2A: Waipara River at White Gorge - Mean monthly flow (l/s)...38 Appendix 2B: Waipara River at Teviotdale - Mean monthly flow (l/s) corrected for abstraction upstream...39 Environment Canterbury Technical Report iii

7 Seven-day mean annual flow and mean annual low flow mapping of the Waipara River catchment, List of Figures Figure 1-1: Waipara River Catchment boundaries, site locations and rainfall isohyets...3 Figure 2-1: Proportion of authorised average take assumed to be exercised each month...5 Figure 3-1: Correlation weekly mean flow Waipara River at White Gorge versus Waipara River at Teviotdale...7 Figure 4-1: Waipara River North Branch at Heathstock Road...9 Figure 4-2: Waipara River North Branch at Greys Road...10 Figure 4-3: Tommys Stream at Heathstock Road...10 Figure 4-4: Waipara River North Branch at Broxton Road Bridge...11 Figure 4-5: Waipara Middle Branch at MacDonald Downs Road...12 Figure 4-6: Waipara River South Branch at Karetu Downs...12 Figure 4-7: Waipara River at Laidmore Road Bridge...13 Figure 4-8: Boby Stream upstream from Waipara River confluence...14 Figure 4-9: Waipara River at Stringers Bridge...15 Figure 4-10: Weka Creek at Dam...16 Figure 4-11: Archers Stream at 900 m upstream from dam...17 Figure 4-12: Waipara River upstream from Omihi Stream confluence...19 Figure 4-13: Omihi Stream at Waipara River confluence...20 Figure 4-14: Waipara River downstream from Omihi confluence...21 Figure 4-15: Smothering Gully Stream at State Highway Figure 4-16: Home Creek at Kings Road...23 Figure 5-1: Waipara River Catchment mean flow isohydal map...28 Figure 5-2: Waipara River Catchment mean annual low flow (MALF (7d)) isohydal map...29 List of Tables Table 2.1: Waipara River Method used to correct observed flow for upstream abstraction...5 Table 3.1: Waipara River Seven day low flow series...7 Table 4.1: Waipara River North Branch at Heathstock Road...9 Table 4.2: Waipara River North Branch at Greys Road...10 Table 4.3: Tommys Stream at Heathstock Road...10 Table 4.4: Waipara River North Branch at Broxton Road Bridge...11 Table 4.5: Waipara River Middle Branch at MacDonald Downs Road...12 Table 4.6: Waipara River South Branch at Karetu Downs...12 Table 4.7: Waipara River at Laidmore Road Bridge...13 Table 4.8: Boby Stream at Upstream Waipara Confluence...14 Table 4.9: Waipara River at Stringers Bridge...15 Table 4.10: Weka Creek at Dam...16 Table 4.11: Archers Stream at 900 m upstream Dam...17 Table 4.12: Waipara River at Upstream Omihi Stream Confluence...19 Table 4.13: Omihi Stream at Waipara River Confluence...20 Table 4.14: Waipara River at Downstream Omihi Stream Confluence...21 Table 4.15: Smothering Gully Stream at State Highway Table 4.16: Home Creek at Kings Road...23 Table 5.1: Waipara River estimates of mean annual flow and MALF(7d) for sites included in this analysis...27 Table 5.2: Approximation of mean flow as provided through integration of the isohydal map...30 Table 5.3: Approximation of MALF (7d) as provided through integration of the isohydal map...31 iv Environment Canterbury Technical Report

8 Seven-day mean annual flow and mean annual low flow mapping of the Waipara River catchment, 1 Introduction 1.1 The study This report seeks to update: a) the low flow statistics for the Waipara River and tributaries, presented by Chater (2002), and b) the Mean Annual Low Flow (7 day) (MALF (7d)) mapping contained in Chater (2003) report. It also examines the surface water make-up in detail and maps the mean flow and MALF (7d) resources for the Waipara catchment. Figure 1-1 shows the catchment boundary and location of flow recording and flow gauging sites referred to in this study. 1.2 Description of the Waipara River catchment From its headwaters to the sea, the Waipara River is some 60 km long and drains a catchment area of approximately 726 km 2. Altitude ranges from sea level up to 1116 m at The Brothers in the headwaters of the Middle Branch. It is bounded by the Hurunui River catchment to the north and by the Ashley River catchment to the south. Lloyd (2002a) provides a comprehensive description of the Waipara River catchment. In summary, the upper catchment above Stringers Road Bridge (area 410 km 2 ) includes three main tributaries; namely the North, Middle and South branches. These drain moderately sloping downlands to steep hill country comprising greywacke and argillite overlain with medium to shallow soils. The North Branch emerges from its upper gorge onto Masons Flat, an inland basin of about 10 km 2. From there, the river becomes more entrenched as it again enters downlands country where it is joined in turn by Tommys Stream, the Middle Branch, and the South Branch before entering the Ohuriawa Gorge. The main flow recording site at White Gorge (catchment area 370 km 2 ) is located about 4 km downstream of this gorge. Boby Stream joins the river between this point and Stringers Road Bridge where the river flows out across a broad alluvial basin. The lower catchment is dominated by an alluvial basin of about 160 km 2 in area flanked by downlands and hill country of sedimentary geology (limestone, sandstone, mudstone and conglomerate). The soils in the basin area comprise a mixture of deep fertile clay loams and shallow stony silt loams. Much of the lower catchment basin is drained by the Omihi Stream, which joins the Waipara River about 9 km downstream from Stringers Bridge and 11 km from the coast. The fertile soils within the basin support a diverse range of farming activity ranging from lifestyle blocks to intensive pastoral farming, cropping and particularly viticulture. Vineyard expansion and increasing annual harvest over recent years now puts Waipara as one of the recognised wine producing areas of New Zealand. Extensive pastoral farming and forestry dominate throughout the steeper downlands and hill areas that surround the basin and valley floors. Environment Canterbury Technical Report 1

9 Seven-day mean annual flow and mean annual low flow mapping of the Waipara River catchment, 1.3 Previous studies A number of hydrological studies have been completed throughout the past 20 years. Horrell (1992) report summarises the water resources of the Waipara River and neighbouring Kowai and Motunau catchments based on records to that date. Sanders (1996 and 2000) detail annual water use throughout Canterbury including the Waipara catchment. Chater (2002) summarises the surface water hydrology while, Chater (2003) provides preliminary mapping of MALF (7d) for the catchment. Loris (2000) and Lloyd (2002, a and b) detail the hydrogeology and groundwater availability within the catchment. 1.4 Hydrological data recording Flow has been recorded at White Gorge since February Flow has also been recorded at Teviotdale about 6 km from the mouth, since April Unlike White Gorge the flow record at the Teviotdale site is impacted by abstraction of water mainly for irrigation purposes occurring upstream from the recording site. The extent of that abstraction is addressed in the following section. 2 Water use and impacts on hydrological data records 2.1 Consents issued to take water Up to this time, there has been no abstraction of water upstream from White Gorge. However, consents to dam three unnamed small tributaries of the North Branch have recently been issued (Oct and Nov 2006) to Greys Road Ltd, together with consents to take water from those storages for irrigation purposes. Future hydrological analyses for the White Gorge site will need to consider the impacts, if any, relating to this consent. Appendix 1A summarises those consents authorised to take water from the Waipara River and its tributaries and their associated unconfined (generally from wells less than 30 m deep) groundwater resources. The summary partitions the consents to take from the river into four sections as follows: a) between White Gorge and the Omihi Stream confluence, b) from the Omihi Stream and its tributaries, c) between the Omihi Stream confluence and Teviotdale, and d) between Teviotdale and the sea. Appendix 1B lists consents granted to take from deep groundwater. Exercise of these consents is considered not to result in any immediate stream depletion effects on the surface water resources of the Waipara catchment. This appendix is included in this report solely for completion. Of interest are the low rates of take within this catchment compared to other catchments throughout Canterbury. This is a reflection of the scarcity of water resources generally throughout the catchment. Many of the irrigation consents authorised to date have been issued at low application rates of 0.02 to 0.38 l/s/ha associated with vineyard application. This is low by regional standards where 0.45 l/s/ha is seen as being conservative. Most takes are restricted to a daily or period (e.g. allowed to operate 8 days in any 14 day period) volume limit. For this reason both appendices list the maximum rate of take and the average rate of take. Some consents allow the holder to take more water in the winter period than during the more water competitive summer season. Generally this is for frost protection and to allow the holder to divert water into off river storage. 2 Environment Canterbury Technical Report

10 Seven-day mean annual flow and mean annual low flow mapping of the Waipara River catchment, Figure 1-1: Waipara River Catchment boundaries, site locations and rainfall isohyets Environment Canterbury Technical Report 3

11 Seven-day mean annual flow and mean annual low flow mapping of the Waipara River catchment, The main points from Appendices 1A and 1B are summarised below: a) Currently the total consented maximum rate of takes from surface water resources and associated unconfined groundwater exercised within the Waipara River catchment for the Waipara River above Omihi Stream confluence, excluding the water taken by the Weka Scheme, is: 218 l/s in January to April; 150 l/s in May; 159 l/s in June to August; 146 l/s in September and 224 l/s in October to December. The total consented average rate of takes from surface water resources and associated unconfined groundwater exercised within this reach of the Waipara River, excluding the water taken by the Weka Scheme, is: 186 l/s in January to April; 117 l/s in May; 121 l/s in June to August; 107 l/s in September and 192 l/s in October to December. b) Currently the total consented maximum rate of takes from surface water resources and associated unconfined groundwater exercised within the Waipara River catchment for Omihi Stream above Waipara River confluence is: 166 l/s in May to September and 137 l/s in October to April. The total consented average rate of takes from surface water resources and associated unconfined groundwater exercised within the Omihi Stream catchment is: 114 l/s in May to September and 69 l/s in October to April. c) Currently the total consented maximum rate of takes from surface water resources and associated unconfined groundwater exercised within the Waipara River catchment for the Waipara River below the Omihi Stream confluence to Teviotdale is: 73 l/s in August to November and 28 l/s in December to July. The total consented average rate of takes from surface water resources and associated unconfined groundwater exercised within this reach of the Waipara River; 39 l/s in August to November and 24 l/s in December to July. d) In summer the average consented rate of take for all surface water and hydraulically connected ground water takes in the Waipara catchment for the headwaters to the coast currently is about 315 l/s. e) In winter the average consented take is about 295 l/s but little of this is utilised other than by a few consent holders who exercise a proportion of their consented take during periods of higher river flows to fill local storages. f) Currently the total consented average rate of takes from deep groundwater in the Waipara catchment from the headwaters to the coast is about 536 l/s. However some consents were issued based on projected well yields prior to drilling and whether those rates were finally realised is doubtful. The month-by-month columns in Appendix 1A represent the applied correction rates used in the method to correct observed flows for upstream abstraction, which will be discussed in the following section. 2.2 Method used to correct observed flow for upstream abstraction (naturalising flows) Not all consents are exercised at the same time. Furthermore demand varies over time, generally more water is taken in December to January than during the early spring months September and October and the late autumn months of March and April. To correct the observed gaugings for those sites affected, and most importantly the daily flows recorded at Teviotdale, it is necessary to make some assumptions regarding the exercise of take consents throughout the year. This is outlined in Table 2.1 and Figure 2-1. In case of takes that are used for public water supply or stock water only, it is assumed that the intake flow is continuous throughout the year. Therefore a constant rate is added back to the river flows. When takes are used for irrigation purposes, based on experience and previous studies by Sanders (1996), it was assumed that the actual take in September is about 25% of that authorised rising to 60% in the peak irrigation months December and January, and then reducing back to 25% in April. For the winter months it is assumed only 5% of the authorised take is abstracted, this being mainly for stock water and some filling of off-river storage ponds. Generally it is assumed that any water diverted to a storage facility occurs mainly in winter and during times of high flow. Environment Canterbury Technical Report 4

12 Seven-day mean annual flow and mean annual low flow mapping of the Waipara River catchment, The month-by-month columns in Appendix 1A show the corrections applied to gauged and recorded flows for the sites listed. When dealing with surface water abstractions, the correction amounts are based on the average take rates. In case of ground water abstractions the estimated stream depletion rates are used. During the summer of 2003/2004 compliance monitoring staff carried out a large scale monitoring exercise in the Waipara catchment. All consented water abstractions that were current at that time were monitored and measured. Some takes were continuously monitored, but most intakes and pumps were visited once and the instantaneous abstraction rates measured. All of the abstraction points could not be monitored on the same day, therefore the results obtained for the individual takes do not represent identical conditions. Irrigation practices and water application rates vary spatially, temporarily and with the method and system used. The results obtained from the one off monitoring exercise could not be used in correcting observed flows, because they do not represent general irrigation practices for all abstractors in the Waipara catchment over time. Table 2.1: Waipara River Method used to correct observed flow for upstream abstraction Month Proportion of take* Jul 0.05 Aug 0.05 Sep 0.25 Oct 0.35 Nov 0.50 Dec 0.60 Jan 0.60 Feb 0.55 Mar 0.45 Apr 0.25 May 0.05 Jun 0.05 Proportion of authorised take Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Figure 2-1: Proportion of authorised average take assumed to be exercised each month *Proportion of average consented take rate 5 Environment Canterbury Technical Report

13 Seven-day mean annual flow and mean annual low flow mapping of the Waipara River catchment, 3 Calculating mean flow and mean annual low flow (MALF (7d)) for principal sites 3.1 Mean flow Waipara River at White Gorge Appendix 2A summarises the monthly mean flow for the Waipara River at White Gorge. Based on the annual mean flows for the hydrological years 1988/89 to 2006/07, the mean flow at this site is 2790 l/s. From the sample of 19 annual mean flow values there is a 95% probability that the normal flow at White Gorge falls within the range /- 480 l/s. Draining a catchment area of 370 km 2, the 2790 l/s translates to a specific discharge of 7.5 l/s/km Waipara River at Teviotdale The Teviotdale site has a much shorter flow record with only 7 complete hydrological years to June Observed daily mean flows were corrected for abstraction as outlined in section 2.2 and the monthly mean and annual mean flow calculated. Those corrected values are shown in Appendix 2B. Mean flow for that period has been 3490 l/s. To obtain some measure of comparison between White Gorge and Teviotdale, the daily flow records for the period of common record were examined. From 8 April 2000 through to 31 August 2007, the flow at Teviotdale averaged 3440 l/s. For that same period the average flow at White Gorge was 2378 l/s. On a proportional basis this leads to the conclusion that the mean flow at Teviotdale for the past 19 years has been about 4035 l/s. 3.2 Mean annual low flow MALF (7d) Waipara River at White Gorge The daily flow record for the site was examined and the lowest moving average flow over 7 consecutive days in each water year noted. These data are shown listed in Table 3.1. The average for the 19 water years of record to date has been 107 l/s. This is slightly lower to that reported by Chater (2002) Waipara River at Teviotdale Annual minima for the Teviotdale site are also shown listed in Table 3.1. The MALF (7d) based on the 7 years of record to date is 313 l/s. For the period of common record, White Gorge over the past 7 years has an average of 110 l/s from which on a proportional basis it is assumed that the MALF (7d) for Teviotdale is about 304 l/s. To further check the low flow relationships between the two sites, average flow for each week commencing 15 April through to 15 October each year were calculated for the period of common record from 2000 to Only those pairs where the average flow for the week was less than 1000 l/s (~ median flow) at White Gorge were retained for subsequent correlation analysis. The decision to limit the data to the April-October period was an attempt to minimise irrigation abstraction impacts as they applied to the Teviotdale site data. Correlating the data pairs (Figure 3-1) gave the regression equation: Teviotdale = * White Gorge Inserting the MALF (7d) for White Gorge into this equation leads to the conclusion that MALF (7d) for Teviotdale is about 360 l/s. However, looking at the bottom end of the range, it appears that the trend line is riding high on the data pairs and from this it is considered that the 304 l/s previously concluded as the MALF (7d) for this site is about right. Inserting the mean flow for White Gorge (2790 l/s) into this equation leads to an estimated mean flow for the Teviotdale site of 3877 l/s which is slightly lower than the 4035 l/s obtained previously. Environment Canterbury Technical Report 6

14 Seven-day mean annual flow and mean annual low flow mapping of the Waipara River catchment, Table 3.1: Waipara River Seven day low flow series White Gorge Teviotdale Water Min Min flow Min flow Year flow commencing (obs) Correction (crt) commencing 1988/ Dec / Feb / Feb / Mar / Jan / Mar / Feb / Jan / Dec / Feb / Feb / Mar / Mar Apr / Jul Jul / Mar Mar / Jan Jan / Feb Feb / Feb Jan / Mar Mar-07 Average Waipara River at Teviotdale - weekly average flow during winter period 15 April - 15 October for the years 2000/2001 to 2006/2007 (l/s) y = x R 2 = 0.91 SE of equation= Waipara River at White Gorge - weekly average flow during winter period 15 April - 15 October for the years 2000/2001 to 2006/2007 (l/s) Figure 3-1: Correlation weekly mean flow Waipara River at White Gorge versus Waipara River at Teviotdale 7 Environment Canterbury Technical Report

15 Seven-day mean annual flow and mean annual low flow mapping of the Waipara River catchment, 4 Estimating mean flow and MALF (7d) at tertiary sites 4.1 Methodology To estimate the mean flow and MALF (7d) for sites other than the primary sites (long-term recorder sites), it is common practice to carry out a series of concurrent gaugings at the site followed by standard regression analyses to establish a relationship between that tertiary (spot gauging site) site and the nearest primary site. The regression equation is then used to estimate the mean flow and MALF (7d) values for the tertiary site. Generally throughout this study, the Waipara River at White Gorge was used as the primary site. Flow gaugings at various locations on the Waipara River and its tributaries have been carried out since March Earlier gaugings were often carried out at the nearest accessible site for the stream of interest and for that reason the numbers of gaugings are limited to only one or two measurements. In later years the demand for increased understanding of, in particular, the low flow resources of the catchment, has resulted in gaugings being carried out at permanent tertiary flow sites located in the main river near the confluence of the mainstem and tributaries. In all, gaugings have been undertaken at 81 different locations (excluding White Gorge and Teviotdale) within the catchment, of these only 27 sites have had 7 or more measurements. For the final analyses, the data for 16 sites were used, the remaining 11 being discarded for one or more of the following reasons: a) all or most of the gaugings were carried out prior to February 1988 and the establishment of the White Gorge recorder site; b) there was a nearby site with more gaugings on the same stream; or c) there were a number of zero flow observations within the data set. 4.2 Limitations Gauging accuracy where flows are less than 20 l/s The Waipara catchment is noted for its scarcity of natural water resources. During late summer and autumn, many of the tributaries exhibit little or no flow with flows less than 20 l/s being the norm for these streams. Within a natural stream environment and using standard Pygmy and Ott type current meters, it is extremely difficult, to the extent of being nigh impossible, to measure such flows within acceptable accuracy expectations, generally regarded as +/- 8%. The depth and velocities encountered under such flow conditions are often outside the range of depth and velocities used to calibrate the meter. Irregularities in bed and bank surfaces within the wetted perimeter and immediately upstream assume higher significance and because of the dimensions of the current meter it is impractical to undertake velocity measurements within the usual verticals expected without overlap and duplication. Gauging accuracy is often further compromised by the integrity of the site with at least a portion occurring as non-measurable subsurface flow. Generally measurements undertaken in such circumstance tend to underestimate the flow. Caution should be used when flows are in this range Correlation accuracy at higher flows Low flow conditions, by and large, tend to be relatively universal throughout the catchment. Generally the whole catchment has undergone a period of little or no rainfall for some time, and the low flow measured at any particular tertiary site is reflected in the low flow recorded concurrently in adjacent catchments and at the primary site. In establishing a relationship linking the two sites there is an inherent presumption that when the flow at the primary site is at or about MALF(7d), then the flow at the tertiary site is also at or about Environment Canterbury Technical Report 8

16 Seven-day mean annual flow and mean annual low flow mapping of the Waipara River catchment, MALF(7d). In studies such as these, it is common to undertake a series of concurrent gaugings covering a range of flows extending from less than MALF (7d) up to about mean flow as recorded at the primary site. However in progressing from low to median and to mean flow conditions, the stability between data pairs becomes increasingly less reliable. This occurs due to the timing and spatial distribution of recent rainfall events and with that the timing and magnitude of stream or river flow reflected at both the tertiary and primary sites. A number of higher concurrent flows have been removed, and are listed. 4.3 Mean flow and MALF (7d) for tertiary sites Waipara River North Branch and Tommys Stream The Waipara River North Branch drains the southern slopes of the Cavendish Hills and the northern slopes of Double Tops both ranging up to about 850 m in altitude. Tommys Stream drains the southern faces of Double Tops. On emergence from its upper gorge, the North Branch flows out onto a broad basin known as Masons Flat. From there it continues for about 8 km through to Greys Road where the river again becomes more incised. Looking at the gaugings data it appears there is some loss from surface water to the surrounding streambed through this section. At Greys Road (Table 4.2) the specific discharge estimate for mean flow shows 3.3 l/s/km 2 ; well down on that for the Heathstock Road site (Table 4.1) where the specific discharge is 6.7 l/s/km 2. Tommys Stream (Table 4.3) at 5.8 l/s/km 2 appears consistent with the North Branch at Heathstock Road recognising that it drains an area of slightly lower altitude. At Broxton Road (Table 4.4), below its confluence with Tommys Stream the specific discharge is 4.8 l/s/km 2 indicating a partial recovery of flow between Greys Road and the confluence with Tommys Stream. It should be noted that these results are based on limited data, MALF(7d) and mean flow conditions are outside of the measured range and therefore the uncertainties are large. Table 4.1: Waipara River North Branch at Heathstock Road Catchment area 47.2 km 2 Date Waipara Waipara Nth White GorgeHeathstock 21-May May Jul Jul Sep Jan Apr * 5292* 11-Jun * 367* MALF(7d) mean flow Flow (l/s) sp discharge Note:* observations considered outliers and not used for correlation. White Gorge flows in bold are gauged flows, while remainder are Daily Mean flows. Waipara River North Branch at Heathstock Road (l/s) y = x R 2 = Waipara River at White Gorge (l/s) Figure 4-1: Waipara River North Branch at Heathstock Road 9 Environment Canterbury Technical Report

17 Seven-day mean annual flow and mean annual low flow mapping of the Waipara River catchment, Table 4.2: Waipara River North Branch at Greys Road Catchment area 99.4 km 2 Date Waipara Waipara Nth White GorgeGreys Road 21-May May Jul Jul Sep Apr * 4332* 11-Jun * 423* MALF(7d) mean flow flow (l/s) sp discharge Note:* observations considered outliers and not used for correlation. White Gorge flows in bold are gauged flows, while remainder are Daily Mean flows. Waipara River North Branch at Greys Road (l/s) Figure 4-2: y = x R 2 = Waipara River at White Gorge (l/s) Waipara River North Branch at Greys Road Table 4.3: Tommys Stream at Heathstock Road Catchment area 32.3 km 2 Date Waipara Tommys St White Gorge Heathstock 21-May May Jul Jul Sep Apr * 1690* 11-Jun * 203* Tommys Stream at Heathstock Road (l/s) y = x R 2 = Waipara River at White Gorge (l/s) MALF(7d) mean flow flow (l/s) sp discharge Note:* observations considered outliers and not used for correlation. White Gorge flows in bold are gauged flows, while remainder are Daily Mean flows. Figure 4-3: Tommys Stream at Heathstock Road Environment Canterbury Technical Report 10

18 Seven-day mean annual flow and mean annual low flow mapping of the Waipara River catchment, Table 4.4: Waipara River North Branch at Broxton Road Bridge Catchment area 151 km 2 Date Waipara Waipara Nth White Gorge Broxton Rd 21-May Jul Jul Sep Jun * 132* 29-Apr * 635* MALF(7d) mean flow flow (l/s) sp discharge Note:* observations considered outliers and not used for correlation. White Gorge flows in bold are gauged flows, while remainder are Daily Mean flows. Waipara North Branch at Broxton Road Bridge (l/s) Figure 4-4: y = x R 2 = Waipara River at White Gorge (l/s) Waipara River North Branch at Broxton Road Bridge Waipara River Middle Branch and Waipara River South Branch The Middle Branch drains the eastern slopes of The Brothers, approximately 1000 m altitude. At its junction with the Waipara mainstem, this tributary (Table 4.5) exhibits an estimated specific discharge of 7.7 l/s/km 2 for mean flows. Bordering the Middle Branch to the south is the South Branch, which drains the southern slopes of the Brothers and the eastern slopes of the Okuku Range. The median elevation for this catchment is higher than that for the Middle Branch. At its junction with the Waipara mainstem just above the Ohuriawa Gorge, the specific discharge for the South Branch (Table 4.6) mean flow is estimated to be 9.4 l/s/km 2. During the period , a number of gaugings were carried out at the Laidmore Road Bridge, which is located immediately below the Ohuriawa Gorge and about 3.5 km upstream from the White Gorge recorder site. The mean flow at this site (Table 4.7) is assessed to be 2559 l/s with a specific discharge of 7.6 l/s/km Environment Canterbury Technical Report

19 Seven-day mean annual flow and mean annual low flow mapping of the Waipara River catchment, North Canterbury Table 4.5: Waipara River Middle Branch at MacDonald Downs Road Catchment area 58.8 km 2 Date Waipara Waipara Mid White Gorge MacDonald 29-Apr May May Jul Jul Jan Apr Sep Jun * 642* MALF(7d) mean flow flow (l/s) sp discharge Note:* observations considered outliers and not used for correlation White Gorge flows in bold are gauged flows, while remainder are Daily Mean flows. Waipara River Middle Branch at MacDonald Downs Road (l/s) y = x R 2 = Waipara River at White Gorge (l/s) Figure 4-5: Waipara Middle Branch at MacDonald Downs Road Table 4.6: Waipara River South Branch at Karetu Downs Catchment area 113 km 2 Waipara Waipara Sth Date White Gorge Karetu Downs 29-Apr May May Jul Jul Jun * 2445* Waipara River South Branch at Karetu Downs (l/s) 1000 y = x 900 R 2 = Waipara River at White Gorge (l/s) MALF(7d) mean flow flow (l/s) sp discharge Note:* observations considered outliers and not used for correlation. White Gorge flows in bold are gauged flows, while remainder are Daily Mean flows. Figure 4-6: Waipara River South Branch at Karetu Downs Environment Canterbury Technical Report 12

20 Seven-day mean annual flow and mean annual low flow mapping of the Waipara River catchment, Table 4.7: Waipara River at Laidmore Road Bridge Catchment area 347 km 2 Date Waipara Waipara White GorgeLaidmore 21-Sep Dec Mar Sep Dec Mar Nov Jan Feb Mar Apr Jun Sep Waipara River at Laidmore Road Bridge (l/s) y = x R 2 = Waipara River at White Gorge (l/s) 28-Jun * 1251* 21-Jun * 1947* 5-Dec * 351* MALF(7d) mean flow flow (l/s) sp discharge Note:* observations considered outliers and not used for correlation White Gorge flows in bold are gauged flows, while remainder are Daily Mean flows Figure 4-7: Waipara River at Laidmore Road Bridge Boby Stream Boby Stream drains the lower slopes of Mount Grey. The gaugings data (Table 4.8) tends to suggest the existence of a small spring of about l/s, possibly at or immediately upstream from its confluence with the Waipara River. In saying this, there is a great deal of uncertainty surrounding the correlation with only one of the 8 measurements in the mid flow range. There are no gaugings in Boby s Stream even close to mean flow conditions and therefore the mean flow has not been estimated here. 13 Environment Canterbury Technical Report

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