Also utilize the Suggested Standards Map for English/Language Arts located in the Literacy Closet &/or the Gheens Website.

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1 Page 3 rd Grade ELA Curriculum Unit Map Weeks 7-12 Lesson Seeds Table of Contents Seed 1 Unit Overview #1 RL.3.5 Identify stanzas in a poem. Refer to parts of a poem when writing or speaking about a text. #2 RL.3.5 Describe how stanzas of a poem build on each other. #3 RI.3.2 Determine the main idea of an informational text. #4 RI.3.2 Identify the supporting details of an informational text. #5 RI.3.2 Explain how the key details support the main idea. #6 RI.3.4 Use context clues to determine the meaning of unknown words and phrases. #7 RL.3.2 Determine the central message of a folktale. Explain how the key details support this message. #8 RL.3.2 Determine the moral of a fable. Explain how the key details support this moral. #9 RL.3.3 Create a movie in my mind to help me understand the characters. #10 RL.3.3 Describe the main characters by paying attention to their actions (what they say, do, and think). #11 RL.3.3 Describe a character using traits and feelings. Use evidence from the text to support my thinking. #12 RL.3.3 Ask questions to determine the motives of the main characters. #13 RL.3.3 Explain how the actions of a character contribute to what happens next in the story. 30 Resources Also utilize the Suggested Standards Map for English/Language Arts located in the Literacy Closet &/or the Gheens Website.

2 Unit Title: Reading, Thinking, Talking, and Writing about Informational and Literary Text Overview: During this unit, students will read, think, talk and write about literary and informational texts. The first two Lesson Seeds are a continuation from the first unit where students were introduced to a daily routine of reading and discussing poetry. A different poem is chosen each week and is reread numerous times for a variety of purposes. Lesson seeds #3-#5 are a continuation from the previous unit for weeks 1-6 where students were learning how to recount the key details after reading small chunks of an informational text. This is a strategy that helps students to understand the main ideas the text is trying to teach as opposed to focusing on the interesting details that often distract readers. Once students are able to pull out the key details, then they can ask themselves How does this all fit together? and determine the main idea of the text. After determining the main idea, students will then learn how to identify supporting details and explain how these details support the main idea. While teaching these seeds students will need access to a variety of informational texts to practice the strategies taught during whole group lessons. Students will engage in reading stories such as fables, myths, and folktales while recounting key ideas and details. They will determine the central message, lesson or morals conveyed in these stories while using details from the story to explain their thinking. In the last part of this unit, students will be introduced to a variety of strategies to deepen their understanding of characters in the books they are reading. For instance, students will learn how visualizing the story helps to bring the characters to life. When readers are able to visualize the characters and their actions they begin to have a deeper understanding of the characters and why they act the way they do. Students will also learn how to pay close attention to the details in the story that describe the characters actions. They will think about these actions as choices the character makes, and infer what those actions tell them about the character. Finally, students will deepen their understanding of story structure by explaining how the actions of a character contribute to the series of events (cause/effect). Focus Standards: RL.3.2: Recount stories, including fables, folktales, and myths from diverse cultures; determine the central message, lesson, or moral and explain how it is conveyed through key details in the text. RL.3.3: Describe the characters in a story (e.g., their traits, motivations, or feelings) and explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events. RL.3.5: Refer to parts of stories, dramas, and poems when writing or speaking about a text, using terms such as chapter, scene, and stanza; describe how each successive part builds on earlier sections. RI.3.2: Determine the main idea of a text; recount the key details and explain how they support the main idea. RI.3.4: Determine the meaning of general academic and domain-specific words and phrases in text relevant to a grade 3 topic or subject area. Supporting Standards: RL.3.5, RI.3.5, RF.3.4a, RF.3.4b, L.3.3a, L.3.4a, L.3.5a, L.3.6, W.3.8, W.3.10, SL.3.1a, SL.3.1b, SL.3.1c, SL.3.1d, SL.3.2, SL.3.3, SL.3.3, SL.3.4, SL.3.6 Reading Workshop is the recommended framework for standards based reading instruction. The workshop framework is a cycle of differentiated support that begins with whole group instruction, 1

3 narrows to small group and individual instruction based on student need, and concludes with whole group sharing. Assessment and intervention are embedded within the workshop framework. Classrooms that do not use a workshop framework are expected to implement research based reading instruction daily. Research based reading instruction provides daily opportunities for students to experience: interactive read alouds, shared reading, whole group mini lesson, small group instruction, conferring with a teacher, independent reading practice, thinking, talking and writing in response to reading, and closure. Teachers meet with small groups of students on a rotating basis and meet with the lowest achieving students daily. Targeted interventions are provided for students who need more support. Whole group, small group, and individual instruction should be standards based. This unit includes multiple lesson seeds. Lesson seeds include objectives, learning targets, sample activities, anchor charts, thinking stems, and formative assessment suggestions. Lesson seeds should be used to build or grow a learning experience, and are for the whole group mini lesson. A learning experience includes standards, learning targets, materials, formative assessment opportunities, minilessons (e.g., teach/model/demonstrate, guided practice), daily work time (e.g., guided reading, focus groups, and/or book clubs), and daily group sharing (reflection and evaluation of the learning). Some lesson seeds are designed to take multiple days. For example, the mini lesson might take one or two days, the guided practice would become the mini lesson for the following day, and possibly extend to the next day. In addition, based on formative assessment, if the majority of students do not understand the mini lesson concept, seeds may be repeated with different texts or excerpts. If some of the students do not understand the mini lesson concepts, small group instruction and teacher led conferences are utilized to re teach, reinforce, and support students who need additional help. Although it may take more than one day to get through one seed, always remind readers of the focused learning target at the end of the daily mini lesson. Then, send readers off to read on their own with a directive relating to the mini lesson for their independent reading and writing. After work time, readers are gathered again to discuss and share the strategies and thinking they used while reading and writing and how they might have grown as readers. Interactive read alouds, as well as on level shared reading experiences allowing students to see and hear fluent reading of the text, should be included daily in addition to the reading during the mini lessons. Many seeds revisit texts that have previously been read in prior experiences of shared reading and/or read alouds. Word Study should occur daily within the context of reading. The purpose is to promote understanding of how words work and how to use them to effectively communicate ideas. This may occur as the workshop mini lesson, as a focus group, during guided reading, during read aloud, during content area instruction, or as targeted word work instruction. Students will need the opportunity to apply the learning during authentic reading and writing. Writing Standards 1 6 and most Language Standards will be taught during Writing Workshop. However, these standards will reinforce and support the learning within these units. Handwriting Instruction During this six week unit, students in third grade should receive cursive writing instruction on a daily basis as part of their word study and writing times. Appropriate letter and word formations are expected and reinforced as students engage in authentic writing tasks. The JCPS Handwriting Map, which includes a link to resources to support instruction in letter formation, can be found on our website. 2

4 Objective: Students will refer to parts of poems when writing or speaking about text and describe how each successive part builds on the next. Lesson Seed # 1 Learning Targets: I can identify stanzas in a poem. (RL.3.5) I can refer to parts of a poem when writing or speaking about a text. (RL.3.5) Note: Lesson Seed #1 from weeks 1-6 introduced students to a daily routine of reading and discussing poetry. The same poem is used throughout the week allowing students to read closely and think deeply about a text. A sample daily routine for using poetry in the classroom is attached. On day 4, students are asked to think about how the stanzas build on each other (standard RL.3.5). This standard is addressed in more detail in the following two lesson seeds. Mini-lesson: (RL.3.5, RL.3.1, 3.4, 3.10; W.3.8, 3.10; RF.3.3c, 3.3d, 3.4b, 3.4c; L.3.4a, 3.4c, 3.5a; SL.3.1a, 3.1b, 3.1c, 3.1d, 3.3, 3.5, 3.6) This seed is intended to span more than one mini-lesson. Begin an anchor chart titled Characteristics of Poetry. Record what students already know about poetry and add these to the charts. You will continue to add to this chart as students discover new characteristics about poetry. Read aloud the poem Rainy Nights by Irene Thompson. You can find a copy of this poem in The Random House Book of Poetry for Children, which is a K-1 exemplar text. You can also find this poem and other poems about rain on the following link: Read the poem Rainy Nights once without stopping so that students can hear the rhythm of the poem. Before the second read, explain to students that the author has organized the poem into stanzas. Each stanza is made up of a group of lines. During the second read, stop after each stanza to discuss the meaning. Point out non-literal language and discuss the meaning. Model how to take brief notes about the meaning of each stanza and record on a large copy or projected copy of the poem. Next, have students recount the poem with a partner. Have students use the term stanza in their recount. For example, In the first stanza..in the second stanza and so on. Add new characteristics that students discovered to the anchor chart labeled Characteristics of Poetry. Have students begin brainstorming characteristics of the poem (see anchor chart below). Guided Practice: (this may occur during the next mini-lesson) Provide students with a poem to read with partners (grade 2-3 exemplar poem samples). Give explicit instructions for how to partner read the poem (i.e., stanza by stanza, chorally, etc.). Then have partners work together to record their thinking about each stanza. Finally, bring students back together to discuss the meaning of the poem. Use the thinking stems below to prompt students thinking. Encourage students to use the word stanza when discussing the poem. Work Time: Provide students with a variety of poems to choose from for independent reading. Have students choose 1 poem in which they will record their thinking about the meaning of each stanza. They will also read the poem several times to practice reading fluently. While students are working, circulate the room listening to students read and providing them with feedback about their reading. You will also want to confer with them about the meaning of poem. What do you think this poem is about? What do you think the author means by? Once students have annotated their poem and have practiced reading it several times, allow them to continue reading books of their choice. Provide small group instruction, focus groups and guided reading, during this time. 3

5 Share: Explain to students that they will meet with their reading partner to take turns reading the poem they practiced and share their thinking about the meaning of the poem. Thinking Stems/Anchor Chart: What is the first stanza about? Second? In which stanza does the author? Formative Assessment Opportunities: Listen to students while they are sharing their thinking about the poem they read with their partner. Students should refer to the parts of the poem when sharing. For example, In stanza one. Lesson Seed # 2 Learning Target: I can describe how the stanzas of a poem build on each other (RL.3.5) Note: Before teaching this seed think about the following question: In what ways does the ability to describe how each successive part builds on earlier sections help readers comprehend and analyze a story, drama, or poem? For each poem you model, think aloud how being able to describe each successive part helps you to understand and analyze the poem. Mini-lesson: (RL.3.5, RL.3.1, 3.4, 3.10; W.3.8, 3.10; RF.3.3c, 3.3d, 3.4b, 3.4c; L.3.4a, 3.4c, 3.5a; SL.3.1a, 3.1b, 3.1c, 3.1d, 3.3, 3.5, 3.6) This seed is intended to span more than one mini-lesson. Choose a poem that students are familiar with to use in this seed. Explain to students that stanzas are like chapters in a book. Each stanza builds on the earlier one. Reread the poem aloud stopping at the end of each stanza to think aloud about how each stanza builds on the previous one. For example, if you choose to reread Rainy Nights from the previous seed you could point out how each stanza continues to build by providing the readers with explicit examples of why he likes rainy nights. Each stanza continues to build the image of rainy nights. Model how to respond to the following prompt: Describe how the stanzas of the poem build on each other. Record response on chart paper and post for students to use as a model example. Guided Practice: (this may occur during the next mini-lesson)- Provide students with a copy of a poem from The Random House Book of Poetry for Children. Read the poem aloud so that students can hear the rhythm of the poem. Then explain to students that they will be reading this poem several times with their partner. Today you are going to be reading the poem. You and your partner will both have a copy of poem to record your thinking about the meaning of each stanza. Then you and you partner will discuss how each stanza builds on the previous. After each stanza you might want to ask, Now what do we know? and then when you get to the end think about how you can connect this information. While students are working, listen to their conversation, prompting partnerships that need may more support. Bring students back together to share their thinking about how the stanzas build on each other. 4

6 Work Time: Provide students with a variety of poems to choose from for independent reading. Have students choose 1 poem in which they will record their thinking about the meaning of each stanza. Then have students respond to the following prompt in their reader s notebook: How do the stanzas in the poem build on one another? While students are working, circulate the room listening to students read and providing them with feedback about their reading. You will also want to pull small groups at this time. Share: For share time select 2-3 students to share the poem they read and their thinking about how the stanzas build on each other. Thinking Stems/Anchor Chart: What is the first stanza about? Second? In which stanza does the author? How does the second stanza build on the first? Describe how the stanzas build on each other? How does being able to describe how each successive part builds help you to understand the poem? Formative Assessment Opportunities: Performance task: Provide students with a poem and have them respond to the following prompt: Describe how the stanzas of the poem build on each other. Extension: Performing Poetry: Have students select one of their favorite poems to perform for the class. Model fluent reading including meaningful phrasing and expression. The following link includes a lesson plan for performing poetry html?tab=1#tabs Objective: Students will determine the main idea of a text; recount key details and explain how they support the main idea of text. Lesson Seed # 3 Learning Target: I can determine the main idea of an informational text. (RI.3.2) Interactive Read Aloud: In Lesson Seeds #3-9 the focus of instruction is on reading and understanding informational texts. During this time you will want to read aloud a variety of informational texts while demonstrating how readers navigate through texts. Informational texts often contain text structures that are unfamiliar to students so you will want to expose students to a variety of different types of text structures and how readers use these structures to build understanding. You will want to show students how to use the text features such as diagrams and photographs to help deepen their understanding or clarify their thinking. Informational texts are often packed full of information so it is important to stop periodically and think about the important ideas of what you just read. Model how to make notes in the margins or on sticky notes about what is important to remember. Demonstrate how readers learn new words modeling a variety of strategies such as using context clues, glossaries, and parts of words. Informational texts are sometimes challenging to read aloud and listen to because of the density of information. It will be important to keep the read aloud interactive by inviting students to turn and talk or to stop and jot. You could also ask students to turn and teach each other something they learned or to sketch what you just read adding details as you continue to read. 5

7 Note: This seed is a continuation of Standard RI.3.2 from the previous unit for weeks 1 6. In the last Seed of that unit students were learning how to recount key details and to focus on the big ideas after reading a chunk of text. What is important for me to remember after reading this? Then, students take notes about the key details in the margins of the text. In this seed the teacher will model how to take the key details and put them together to come up with the main idea of the article. Mini-Lesson: (RI.3.2, RI.3.1, 3.4, 3.7, 3.10; W.3.8, 3.10; RF.3.4a, 3.4c; L.3.4a, 3.6; SL.3.1a, 3.1b, 3.1c, 3.2, 3.3, 3.4, 3.6) This seed is intended to span more than one mini-lesson. Project the article Polar Bears in Trouble. This should be the copy where you have modeled taking notes about the key details of each section. Start the lesson by reviewing your process for taking notes. After reading the title and previewing the text features I had a good idea of what I thought the article was going to be about. Then, after reading this section, I paused and asked myself, What is important to remember in this section? Finally, I made some notes in the margins. Today I want to teach you how to take your notes and to come up with one main idea for the whole article. Read through your notes and think aloud about how they fit together. In this section I wrote down that polar bears have to live where there is ice. In the next section I wrote that they hunt on ice but that the ice is melting. Then I wrote down some of the problems they are facing because the ice melting. At first I was thinking that the main idea is polar bears are in trouble but then I noticed it s really about how they re in trouble because the ice is melting. I think the main idea is the polar bears are in trouble because the ice is melting. Record the main idea on chart paper to use during the next seed (see anchor chart below). At this point you may want to have students turn and talk about what they noticed you did to determine the main the idea. First, preview the article and think I think this article will mostly be about Next, pause after reading each chunk or section and ask yourself What are the most important points of this section? and record your thinking in the margins. Finally, think about how each chunk fits together and come up with the main idea of the text (see anchor chart below). Guided Practice: (this may occur during the next mini-lesson) Provide students with a copy of the article Animal Dads from The Mini Page or another informational text for them to practice with. I chose this article because students will often say that the main idea is animal dads instead of thinking about what it is the author wants them to know about animal dads. Start by having students do a quick preview with their partner. Quickly preview the text. Talk to your partner about what you notice and begin thinking about what you think the article will be about. Read aloud the introduction. Have partners turn and talk about what they think is important to remember. What do you think is important to remember after reading this section? Yes, some animal dads don t take care of their babies while others do. Notice how we put this in our own words. Record this thinking in the margin. Next, have partners read the next section, Sea horse dads, with their partner and record what they think is important to remember in that section. Bring students back together to discuss their thinking. Then send students off to work time to finish reading the text and making notes about what is important to remember in each section. 6

8 Work Time: Have students work with their partners or independently to finish reading the article Animal Dads and make notes about the key details. Then have them record the main idea of the article. What does the author what you to know about (topic)? Remind students to think about how the big ideas of each section fit together as they are determining the main idea. While students are working, circulate the room providing students with specific feedback while listening in to their conversations. Some students may still have difficulty with sorting out the important information. Make note of these students and continue to scaffold their leaning by pulling them into a small focus group. Once students finish, have them begin reading informational books they have chosen at their independent reading level. Have students pause after reading small chunks of text and record the big ideas of that section on a sticky note or in their reader s notebook. While students are working you will want to conference with students, pull guided reading groups, or small focus groups. Share: Pair partnerships together to form groups of 4. In these small groups students will discuss what they think the main idea of the article Animal Dads is and why. Use the following thinking stem to prompt student s conversation: I think this article is mostly about because If partnerships disagree about the main idea of the text have them look back of the text and talk through their differences. Wrap up share time by pointing out some smart thinking you overheard while listening to students discussions and come to a consensus about what you think the article is about. Thinking Stems/Anchor Chart: What does the author want you to know about (insert topic)? What is the point the author is trying to make? What is the section mostly about? What is the main idea of the section? Polar bears are in danger because they are losing their habitat. (This organizer is from Lucy Calkins Units of Study. The main idea is written in the rectangle at the top of the page. The supporting details are listed with bullets under the main idea) Formative Assessment Opportunities: Analyze students notes from the article. Are students able to sort through the details to locate the big ideas? Can students put the big ideas in their own words? Are they able to identify the main idea of the text? Performance task: Provide students with an informational article to read independently. First, have students read the article while taking notes about the big ideas for small sections or chunks of the text. Then have them record the main idea of the text. Use this performance task to decide on you next steps for teaching. 7

9 Lesson Seed # 4 Learning Target: I can identify the supporting details of an informational text. (RI.3.2) Interactive Read Aloud: See Lesson Seed #1. Mini-Lesson: (RI.3.2, RI.3.1, 3.4, 3.7, 3.10; W.3.8, 3.10; RF.3.4a, 3.4c; L.3.4a, 3.6; SL.3.1a, 3.1b, 3.1c, 3.2, 3.3, 3.4, 3.6) This seed is intended to span more than one mini-lesson. Yesterday, we determined the main idea of the article Polar Bears in Trouble Today we are going to look for the details that support the main idea. These are the sentences that tell us more about the main idea. Model by rereading the first section aloud and pulling out the details that support the main idea. For example, after reading But ice is melting, and polar bears have nowhere else to go, explain how this is a supporting detail because it tells more about how they are in danger and what is happening to the ice. Another detail you may pull out is There are about 20,000 to 25,000 polar bears in the world. This is not a supporting detail because it doesn t tell the reader how the polar bears are in danger or how they are losing their habitats. Explain to students that authors will often add details that may be interesting or give the reader more information about the topic but don t support the main idea. Add the supporting details to the anchor chart. Guided Practice: (this may occur during the next mini-lesson) Next, have students work with a partner to identify the supporting details in the next section. Which details tell us about why they are in danger? Walk around the room while students are working to support them as they determine the supporting details. Bring students back together to share out supporting details and why they support the main idea. If students need more practice with your support, have them move on to the next section while you provide support for students who need it. If not, have students finish identifying the supporting details during work time. (Students will need other opportunities to practice identifying supporting details. On the following day students could practice with the passage Animal Dads that was mentioned in Seed #1.) Work Time: Students read from informational texts that they have chosen. Before students begin reading have them set a purpose for their reading and record this purpose in their reader s notebook. Possible purposes for reading could include: Taking notes about the important detail or big ideas. This part teaches me Identifying the main idea and listing the supporting details. This was mostly about The author supports the main idea by Asking and answering questions before, during, and after reading. I wonder, Why, How, Where, When, Who, What While students are working, circulate the room to listen to or confer with them on their reading, or pull small groups to provide focus group instruction for students needing additional support. Guided reading groups are also to be pulled at this time. Share: Have a few students share what they have been working on during work time. This helps to hold students accountable and allows for other students to hear other strategies that students are using. Be sure to keep the discussion focused on the reading and the work, not summaries of their books. 8

10 Thinking Stems/Anchor Chart: Which sentences tell you more about the main idea? How do these details support the main idea? How do you know? Kentucky Core Academic Standards Curriculum Unit Formative Assessment Opportunities: During guided practice listen to students as they practice determining supporting details. Make a note of students who still need additional support. Collect students work from Animal Dads to identify students who are able to determine supporting details and students who may need additional support. Supporting Readers who Struggle with Pulling out the Main Idea and Supportive Details. Some readers may be struggling with understanding what they are being asked to do rather than the intellectual work. Provide students with pictures cut out of a magazine such as clothing or food. Have students generate the main idea for the pictures on the page. Have them record the main idea in a box at the top of the page. This picture is mostly about Then return students to the text, showing them the same work can be applied to informational texts. How are all of the ideas connected? Use texts where the main idea and supporting details are easily identified. If readers are struggling with pulling out supporting details start by showing them how this works with a familiar topic. For example, write the following main idea: When riding your bike it is important to follow safety rules. Then ask students to generate possible supporting details. Lesson Seed # 5 Learning Target: I can explain how the key details support the main idea. (RI.3.2) Interactive Read Aloud: See Lesson Seed #1. Polar bears are in danger because they are losing their habitat. Ice is melting and polar bears have nowhere to go. Polar bears spend most of their time on ice. Bears do most of their hunting on ice. Mini-lesson: (RI.3.2, RI.3.1, 3.4, 3.7, 3.10; W.3.8, 3.10; RF.3.4a, 3.4c; L.3.4a, 3.6; SL.3.1a, 3.1b, 3.1c, 3.2, 3.3, 3.4, 3.6) This seed is intended to span more than one mini-lesson. We have been learning to determine the main idea of a text and identifying the details that support the main idea. Point to the anchor chart that you created in the previous lesson. Today we are going to think, talk, and write about how the details support the main idea. Point to the anchor chart and reread the main idea. Watch as I think about how the details from the paragraph support the main idea. My first detail is that the ice is melting and the polar bears have nowhere to go. This supports my main idea because it helps me to understand what is happening to their habitat (the ice is melting) and why they are in danger (they have nowhere to go). Read the next supporting detail from the chart and have students turn and talk about how the detail supports the main idea. Record students thinking on the anchor chart (see anchor chart below). If students appear to understand how the details support the main idea then gradually release the work to them. Have them work with their partner recording how the rest of the details support the main idea. You can then have students share out their thinking and record on the chart. If students are struggling with how the details support the main idea then continue modeling and supporting students. 9

11 Guided Practice: (this may occur during the next mini-lesson) Provide students with another informational article that they are familiar with such as Animal Dads (see Seed #1). Provide students with a copy of the main idea and supporting details of the article (should have been done in a previous lesson). Explain to students that they are going to work with a partner to practice explaining how the details listed on the organizer support the main idea. Using the first supporting detail, provide students with two explanations; an example of a detailed explanation and a non-example that is unclear. Have students read both explanations and then discuss which explanation is a better example of why this detail supports the main idea. Next, students share out their thinking; explaining which explanation is better and WHY. Finally, students choose two details from the list and practice explaining how the details support the main idea. Encourage students to talk it through first before writing. While students are working circulate the room to provide students with support. How does this detail support the main idea? How do you know? Work Time: Choose 3-4 different informational articles for students to choose from for independent reading. Possible resources for articles are the Toolkit Texts by Harvey and Goudvis, Time for Kids, or (offers printable articles). Today you are going to choose one of the following articles to read. While reading, you will want to take notes about the important ideas after reading chunks of texts. Then in your reader s notebook you will complete the following sentence frame for your article: The main idea of (text title) is because (text-based evidence). is a supporting detail because. Once students are finished reading their articles, have them read other informational texts that they have chosen. While students are working, circulate the room to listen to or confer with them on their reading, or pull small groups to provide focus group instruction for students needing additional support. Guided reading groups are also to be pulled at this time. Share: Place students in small groups of 3-4, based on the article they chose to read. Have each student share the main idea of the article and one supporting detail including their evidence to support their thinking. After each person shares, encourage the other members in the group to respond by using one of the following conversation prompts: I thought that too because I thought something different because What in the text makes you say that Can you say more about that? Listen while students are sharing. Make note of students who need more support. At the end of share, collect students sentence frames and use to guide your next steps in teaching. Thinking Stems/Anchor Chart: Which sentences tell you more about the main idea? How do these details support the main idea? How do you know? 10

12 Formative Assessment Opportunities: Analyze and provide feedback to students as they practice explaining how the detail supports the main idea. Provide scaffolds for students who need more support. For example, have students work with a partner to discuss how the detail supports the main idea before writing. It also may help to provide students with non-examples or details that don t support the main idea. Collect and analyze student s sentence frames from work time. Use the following continuum to plan for focus groups and next steps in whole class instruction. Continuum Progressions toward the intent of the standard. Prompts to support student s thinking. Student can identify the topic. What is this article about? Student can identify key details and information that is important to remember. What is important to remember in this section? Student can identify the main idea. What does the author want you to about (topic)? What is this mostly about? Student can identify supporting details. Which details tell you more about the main idea? Student can explain how the details support the main idea. How does this support the main idea? Objective: Students will determine the meaning of general academic and domain-specific words and phrases in a text relevant to a grade 3 topics or subject area. Lesson Seed # 6 Learning Target: I can use context clues to determine the meaning of unfamiliar words and phrases. (RI.3.4) Interactive Read Aloud: At this point in the year, you may want to evaluate the types of texts chosen for read aloud. Are you reading aloud both literature and informational texts? Are you exposing students to a variety of different genres? You will also want to make sure that you are exposing students to digital texts as well. Digital texts can often be challenging for students because of their unfamiliar layout. During the read aloud think aloud for students how a reader might navigate through the text using the text features as a guide. Digital texts, such as on-line encyclopedias are often challenging because they are so densely packed with information. Model for students that when using this type of text we often have questions in mind about that topic and are reading to look for answer to our questions. Note: In the first unit, weeks 1 6, students used the strategy of asking questions to help them determine the meaning of unfamiliar words. In this seed, students will use the strategy of inferring to help them figure out unfamiliar words and phrases. If your students have not had exposure to the strategy of inferring you will want to teach them what this means. Start by giving students real-world examples of how they use this strategy. For example, they may infer how someone is feeling based on their actions. Another example is to show them a bag packed with random items such as a newspaper, sunscreen, glasses, gum, diet soda, etc. Then hold up one product at a time while students make inference about the person who owns the bag. Point out to students that we base our inferences on the clues (the items in the bag) and our background knowledge. 11

13 Mini-lesson: (RI.3.4, RI.3.1, 3.7, 3.10; W.3.8, 3.10; RF.3.3c, 3.4c; L.3.4a, 3.4d, 3.6; SL.3.1a, 3.1b, 3.1c, 3.6) This seed is intended to span more than one mini-lesson. For this lesson you will want to use a text that has general academic and domain-specific words (content words, e.g., sedimentary). In this seed I will be referring to the article Life On Earth in the Foss Science Stories, Structures of Life. Today we are going to begin reading an article about different environments on Earth. Take 2 minutes to preview the article and then turn and talk about what you noticed. Before we read this article I am already thinking that there are going to be some words and ideas that may be unfamiliar to me. Today I am going to show you how you can use the strategy of inferring to help you figure the meaning of unfamiliar words. To do this we will have to use clues in the text such as the words and pictures to help us figure out the meaning. Project a copy of the four column organizer labeled Word, Text Clues, Inferred Meaning, and Sentence. As I read I am going to write the unfamiliar word in the first column. In the second column I will write down the clues that helped me figure out what the word means. In the third column I will record the inferred meaning and in the last column I will write a sentence using this word. Read aloud the introduction section, stopping after words that you think may be unfamiliar to your students. For example, after reading the first sentence stop and think aloud about how to determine the meaning of the word diversity. As I read this sentence I noticed a word that I am not quite sure about, diversity, so I need to look for clues to help me infer the meaning. I know that the author is talking about how the life on Earth is diverse but I am still not sure what this means. I am going to read a few more sentences to see if I can find some more clues. Read aloud a few more sentences. Well now I know that the author is referring to the plants and animals on Earth and that they live in many different types of places. Now I am going to read the first sentence again. Now, I am thinking that diversity means a lot of different types of something. I am going to write this under Inferred Meaning. The clue that helped me was that how the author described all of the different places these plants and animals live. When I think about all of these different places I begin to think about all kinds of different animals and plants. I am going to record this clue under the heading Text Clues. Now I am going to try a sentence. The diversity of plants at the garden shop was really colorful (see anchor chart below). Guided Practice: (this may occur during the next mini-lesson) Provide students with a copy of the four-column organizer. Explain to students that you will read the next section together. Read the section aloud to students, stopping at unfamiliar words for students to practice inferring the meaning of these words. For example, you may want stop and infer the meaning of predator or defense. Allow students to work with partners as they try and infer the meaning of the word. Then have students share out their thinking including the clues they used to help them figure out the meaning of the word. Once the class has reached a consensus, fill out the organizer together. Work Time: For the first part of work time have students choose a new section from the article to read. Have students read their selected section using the four-column organizer to record their inferred meaning of unfamiliar words. Once students finish reading their section, have them practice this strategy with books they have chosen. While students are working, circulate the room and listen to or confer with them on their reading, or pull small groups to provide focus group instruction for students needing additional support. Guided reading groups are also to be pulled at this time. 12

14 Share: While conferring with students select 2-3 students to share. During share they will share a word that they didn t understand and then describe how they inferred the meaning. What clues helped you to infer the meaning of this word? What strategies did you use? Add students strategies to an anchor chart titled: Readers have strategies to help them figure out words they don t know! Thinking Stems/Anchor Chart: What can you try to help yourself figure out the meaning of the word? How can you use the text features to help you? Are there any clues in the text around the word that will help you? Formative Assessment Opportunities: Listen in to students during the guided practice part of the lesson. Make note of students who may need additional support. Collect and analyze student s four-column organizers. Were they able to: o indentify unknown words? o make reasonable inferences about word meaning? o use context clues to infer the meaning of unfamiliar words? o use new vocabulary in a sentence to demonstrate understanding? Objective: Students will determine the central message of a story, including folktales, fables, and myths and explain how it is conveyed through the key details in the text. Lesson Seed # 7 Learning Targets: I can determine the central message of a folktale. (RL.3.2) I can explain how the key details support this message. (RL.3.2) Note: In this Lesson Seed students will begin to explore the genre of folktales. These are stories that were told orally and were passed down from generation to generation. There are many types of folktales, such as myths, fairytales, legends, and fables. Each type includes specific characteristics. See the attached table that lists in more detail the characteristics of each type. (LINK Characteristics of Folktales) The texts that are listed under Resources are folktales from around the world. You can substitute these texts with fables, legends, or myths depending on the genre you want your class to study. Interactive Read Aloud: The purpose of your interactive read aloud over the next few days will be to introduce students to the genre of folktales. Folktales often follow a predictable pattern that you will want your students to discover. They usually begin by quickly introducing the setting, characters, and the goal or quest of the main character. All of this is usually done by the first page. During the middle of the story the main characters usually have to overcome various difficulties while trying to reach their goal. The folktale usually ends happily with the main characters reaching their goal or solving their problem. Using the Frayer Model, provide students with a description or definition of a folktale. Also, give students some examples and non-examples of folktales but leave the characteristics blank. After each read aloud have students begin to generate a list of common characteristics. 13

15 Description Characteristics Examples Folktales Non-examples The following is an example read aloud using the African folktale A Story A Story by Gail E. Haley (K-1 exemplar text). Read aloud the first two pages and then have students turn and talk about what they know so far. For example, they will know the narrator, the two main characters, the problem, and the setting (which can be inferred through the illustrations). Using the Folktale Graphic Organizer (see attached link) add what students have learned so far. Continue reading aloud, stopping at planned places to add to the graphic organizer. Another stopping place is after Ananse traps the hornets. Have students turn and talk about what kind of person they think Ananse is. When students share out their thinking, be sure to ask them What makes you think that? After reading, have students use the graphic organizer to recount the story with a partner. Note: This seed was written with the intention that students have already had some practice with determining the lesson or message of a story. In the first unit for weeks 1-6 students practiced finding the messages in the story Our Gracie Aunt by Jacqueline Woodson. They paid close attention to the characters actions, what they said and did, to help them determine the messages in the story. Mini-lesson: (RL.3.2, RL.3.3, 3.5, 3.10; RF.3.4a; RL.3.6, SL.3.1a, 3.1b, 3.1c; W.3.8; 3.10) This seed is intended to span more than one mini-lesson. Explain to students that folktales were often told for a variety of purposes. For example, people would often tell stories as a form of entertainment. They were also told to teach a lesson or send a message. Today we re going to reread A Story A Story by Gail E. Haley. Your job as listeners is to determine the message or lesson of this story. What is one strategy that we can use to help us determine the message of the story? Yes, we pay attention to the character s actions. So as I read aloud, we are going to pay careful attention to Ananse s actions. As you read aloud, stop in strategic places to invite students to turn and talk about the character s actions. What do we notice about the character so far? What does the character do when? What lesson do you think this teaches? After reading have students turn and talk about what they think the message of this folktale is and why. Select a few students to share out their thinking and record their responses on a chart paper divided into two columns labeled Message and Evidence (see anchor chart below). After each student shares, be sure to ask them How do you know? It is important that they can take it back to the text locating specific parts in the text to support their thinking. Guided Practice: (this may occur during the next mini-lesson) During guided practice students will work with partners, or in small groups, to determine the messages and lessons in a familiar text. For example, provide students with a familiar folktale. Have partners reread the story paying close attention to the characters actions. Listen in to students as they reread the story. Use the following prompts to focus students thinking on the character s actions and the message and or lesson of the story. What do you know about the character so far? What does the character do when? How does the character reach their goal? Finally have students fill in the following sentence frame on an index card: I think the message is because Collect student s index cards and use as a formative assessment to guide your next steps in instruction. 14

16 Work Time: Provide students with baskets of folktales to read. If you are unable to find enough books, you can use the following links to print off folktales for students to read. Have students read the folktale twice. During the first read they will add to the Folktale Graphic Organizer (attached). During the 2 nd read they will focus in on the characters actions, thinking about how their actions help them to determine the message or lesson of the story. Students can draw a two-column chart in their reading notebooks labeled Messages/Lessons and Evidence. While students are working, circulate the room and listen to or confer with them on their reading, or pull small groups to provide focus group instruction for students needing additional support. Guided reading groups are also to be pulled at this time. Share: Bring students together to share the thinking they did during work time. What are some of the lessons and/or messages you found while reading today? What makes you think that? When students are sharing the messages of a text, be sure that they are able to support their thinking with evidence from the text. After students have had time to read several folktales and add to their Folktales Graphic Organizer, for share time have students discuss other similarities or characteristics of this genre. What do you notice about the characters? How do they overcome challenges? What do you notice about the settings? What can we say about the lessons/messages of these stories? Do you notice any similarities? What about folktales from the same countries? Extension: To meet the full-extent of this standard students have to be able to explain how the lesson/message is explained through the key details. Using the anchor chart from this seed model how to write a response that explains how the key details support the message/lesson of the story. The message or lesson of is. I think this because Thinking Stems/Anchor Chart: Who are the main characters? What is their quest or goal? What difficulties did they encounter? How did they reach their goal? What do you think is the central message or lesson of the story? What key details in the story help the reader to understand this message? What lesson(s) do you think the author hopes the reader will take away from the story? Why? How do the character s actions help the reader to understand the message/lesson in the story? Formative Assessment Opportunities: Listen as students are working in small groups to indentify the messages in the story. Are students able to identify the central message of a story? Are students able to use evidence to support their thinking? Make note of students who may need more support and pull those students in a small group. If you notice that most students are having difficulty, model again using a new text. 15

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