Literary Essay: Grade 4 Writing Unit 3

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1 Unit Title: Literary Essay Concepts: 1. Essayists analyze literary essays for reasoning and evidence. 2. Essayists read texts closely and respond to them in writing. 3. Writers learn strategies for revising their literary essays. 4. Writers learn strategies for editing their literary essays. 5. Writers publish and share their literary essays. Materials to be provided by the teacher: 1. On-Demand Literary Essay Pre/Post-Assessment 2. Writer s notebooks 3. Writing folders 4. Special paper for final drafts Duration: 3 weeks Professional Resources: 1. Lucy Calkins Units of Study for Teaching Writing, Grades 3-5, Book 5: Literary Essays: Writing About Reading, Lucy Calkins 2. A Curricular Plan for the Writing Workshop, Grade 4, , Lucy Calkins 3. Assessing Writers, Carl Anderson Materials to be produced by the teacher: 1. Anchor charts: Comparing Narratives and Essays Strategies for Writing a Literary Essay 2. Enlarged copies of the following: Be Yourself sample essay The Marble Champ, Gary Soto Boxes and bullets organizer Stray, Cynthia Rylant Slower Than the Rest, Cynthia Rylant Literary Essay Organizer 3. Individual copies of the following for each student: (Optional) Personal-sized anchor charts for students who would benefit from having their own copies Retired, Cynthia Rylant Taco Head, Viola Canales The Marble Champ, Gary Soto Stray, Cynthia Rylant Slower Than the Rest, Cynthia Rylant Literary Essay Organizer Literary Essay Revision/Editing Checklist Literary Essay Conferring Checklist Literary Essay Assessment Rubric Mentor Texts: 1. The Tequila Worm, Viola Canales 2. The Other Side, Jacqueline Woodson 3. Baseball in April and Other Stories, Gary Soto 4. Every Living Thing, Cynthia Rylant This document is the property of the Michigan Association of Intermediate School Administrators (MAISA). Revised 1/8/2013. Page 1

2 Notes: 1. Literary essay practice opens the door to many pathways for students. It offers a bridge between reading and writing. It helps students learn that writing can be a way to hold onto one s thinking about a subject or text and to elaborate on that thinking. 2. During this unit, students will move away from narrative writing and instead write logical thesis-driven opinion pieces that respond to a text with reasoned, well-crafted writing. 3. As always, immersion in a genre in the form of reading is essential before you begin teaching a unit on writing in the genre. Spend a few days having students read essays and compare them to narratives. Have students help you create a chart (provided in Session 1) to compare the content and structure of narratives and essays. 4. Administer the on-demand assessment prior to beginning this unit and score the students writing using the assessment rubric at the end of this unit. At the conclusion of the unit, administer the same on-demand assessment and look for improvements in your students development as writers. 5. Create permanent classroom anchor charts by adding new strategies as you go. If you choose to use a document camera to share the anchor charts from this unit, also create classroom anchor charts so students can refer to them later. 6. Use the Conferring Checklist located at the end of this unit. 7. Spend more than one day for a session if necessary. 8. A special thank you goes out to all authors of professional resources cited in this unit for their insights and ideas. This document is the property of the Michigan Association of Intermediate School Administrators (MAISA). Revised 1/8/2013. Page 2

3 Overview of Sessions Teaching and Learning Points Aligned with the Common Core Concept: Essayists analyze literary essays for reasoning and evidence. W.4.9 Session 1: Writers analyze narratives and essays to learn how they compare. W.4.9 Concept: Essayists read texts closely and respond to them in writing. W.4.1, W.4.1a, W.4.1b, W.4.1c, W.4.1d Session 2: Writers create a simple literary essay using transitions and evidence. W.4.1c Session 3: Writers create a second literary essay with more elaboration. W.4.1b Session 4: Writers create a conclusion that illustrates the significance of the thesis statement. W.4.1d Session 5: Writers learn how to create their own thesis statement and support it with evidence. W.4.1a, W.4.1b Concept: Writers learn strategies for revising their literary essays. W.4.1a, W.4.1b, W.4.5 Session 6: Writers learn how to elaborate with specific details and greater independence. W.4.1b, W.4.5 Session 7: Writers learn how to build stronger introductory paragraphs for their literary essays. W.4.1a, W.4.5 Concept: Essayists read texts closely and respond to them in writing. W.4.1a, W.4.5, W.4.9 Session 8: Writers plan a literary essay from the beginning using a literary essay organizer. W.4.5 Session 9: Writers choose a short story and plan their final literary essay. W.4.9 Session 10: Writers understand that essayists angle the evidence to support their thesis statement. W.4.1a This document is the property of the Michigan Association of Intermediate School Administrators (MAISA). Revised 1/8/2013. Page 3

4 Concept: Writers learn strategies for revising their literary essays. W.4.5 Session 11: Writers revise their literary essays for meaning. W.4.5 Concept: Writers learn strategies for editing their literary essays. W.4.5 Session 12: Writers use revision/editing checklists to edit their writing. W.4.5 Concept: Writers publish and share their literary essays. W.4.4, W.4.6 Sessions 13 and 14: A writing community celebrates. W.4.4, W.4.6 This document is the property of the Michigan Association of Intermediate School Administrators (MAISA). Revised 1/8/2013. Page 4

5 On-Demand Literary Essay Pre/Post-Assessment Pre-Assessment Instructions: Students should be at their regular writing seats and will need loose-leaf paper and pencils. They need to be able to add pages if they want. Distribute copies of the short story, Retired, from the book Every Living Thing by Cynthia Rylant and read it aloud to the students. Explain that the story is about companionship. Tell students: Let s each write an essay about the big idea in this short story a piece that shows our best work. You will have an hour to write your thoughts about the big idea in this story and to use evidence from the story to support your thoughts. Use everything you know about good writing. Have students begin their literary essays. Note: This on-demand assessment shows what students know about essay writing to write about a short story. Score these essays using the Literary Essay Assessment Rubric located at the end of this unit. Pay close attention to what your writers can already do and almost do. This information will help you focus on goals for your students. Use the same rubric to score their published essays at the end of this unit to show what they have learned. Post-Assessment Instructions (optional): At the conclusion of this unit, administer the same on-demand assessment and look for improvements in your students development as writers. This document is the property of the Michigan Association of Intermediate School Administrators (MAISA). Revised 1/8/2013. Page 5

6 Concept Teaching Point Session 1 Essayists analyze literary essays for reasoning and evidence. Writers analyze narratives and essays to learn how they compare. References Lucy Calkins Units of Study for Teaching Writing, Grades 3-5, Book 5: Literary Essays: Writing About Reading, Lucy Calkins A Curricular Plan for the Writing Workshop, Grade 4, , Lucy Calkins The Tequila Worm, Viola Canales Materials Writer s notebooks Anchor charts: Comparing Narratives and Essays Taco Head, from The Tequila Worm An enlarged copy of the sample essay: Be Yourself Copies of a literary essay for partnerships (see notes) Note Before this session, make copies of a literary essay, such as, An Essay on Charlotte s Web, that you can download from the website for your students. Connection Writers, today we will begin a new unit of study. We have already written about our lives in personal narratives. Now we will write in a new way. We will be writing literary essays about short texts that you have read closely, reread, and discussed. In this session, we will compare the characteristics of narratives and essays. Demonstration/ Compare the structure of a narrative and an essay as you refer to the Comparing Teaching Narratives and Essays anchor chart. Explain that you are going to read aloud a short story and then a literary essay about that story so that students can analyze and understand how an essay is organized. Read aloud the short story, Taco Head, from the book The Tequila Worm. Summarize and discuss the content of the narrative. Refer to the anchor chart to discuss the structure of the narrative point by point. Active Engagement Link Read aloud the literary essay, Be Yourself. Summarize and discuss the content of the essay. Have partnerships refer to the anchor chart and discuss the structure of the essay point by point. Have one or two partnerships share their ideas with the class. Emphasize that reasoning and evidence are central to a literary essay. Writers, whenever we begin work in a new genre, we will want to study mentor texts to help us understand it. Today you will be working in partnerships to explore another literary essay. You will be reading it to analyze the structure of the essay point by point. Make sure that you understand the reasoning and evidence used by the author. (Distribute copies of a literary essay to student partnerships.) Support students efforts at analyzing the literary essay for reasoning and evidence. Writing and Conferring Teaching Share Convene students in the meeting area. Bring closure to today s workshop by having one or two partnerships share their ideas about the structure of the literary essay. You might also draw students attention to the fact that the introduction, each reason/ example, and the conclusion are all written as separate paragraphs. This document is the property of the Michigan Association of Intermediate School Administrators (MAISA). Revised 1/8/2013. Page 6

7 Comparing Narratives and Essays Narrative Essay Organized in sequence. Organized around an important idea. Begins with characters, setting, and Begins with an important idea and an conflict. opinion, or perspective. Develops the plot across the whole text Develops the important idea across the with the character s struggles and whole text with reasoning and evidence. motivation. Concludes with a resolution to the Concludes by returning to the important conflict. idea. Written so the reader can participate in the experience. Written so the reader can think about the important idea. This document is the property of the Michigan Association of Intermediate School Administrators (MAISA). Revised 1/8/2013. Page 7

8 This document is the property of the Michigan Association of Intermediate School Administrators (MAISA). Revised 1/8/2013. Page 8

9 This document is the property of the Michigan Association of Intermediate School Administrators (MAISA). Revised 1/8/2013. Page 9

10 Concept Teaching Point Session 2 Essayists read texts closely and respond to them in writing. Writers create a simple literary essay using transitions and evidence. References Lucy Calkins Units of Study for Teaching Writing, Grades 3-5, Book 5: Literary Essays: Writing About Reading, Lucy Calkins A Curricular Plan for the Writing Workshop, Grade 4, , Lucy Calkins Materials Writer s notebooks Anchor charts: Comparing Narratives and Essays Strategies for Writing a Literary Essay The Other Side, Jacqueline Woodson Notes Read aloud the picture book, The Other Side, by Jacqueline Woodson sometime before this session so that students have a chance to listen to and understand the story. Today, students will take a position and write about a narrative, creating a rudimentary first literary essay as a starting point. Connection Writers, yesterday we examined literary essays to analyze them for reasoning and evidence. Today we will work together to write a simple literary essay about the story, The Other Side. Demonstration/ Teaching Active Engagement Introduce the anchor chart, Strategies for Writing a Literary Essay. Explain that you are going to demonstrate how to write a simple literary essay using this format. Reread the picture book, The Other Side, aloud. Remind students that it is a story about two girls, one white and one black, who gradually get to know each other as they sit on a fence that divides their town. Explain that one important idea in the story, The Other Side, is that children find ways to connect even when grown-ups are trying to keep them apart. Write the following thesis statement on a chart and read it aloud: Jacqueline Woodson s picture book, The Other Side, teaches readers that children find ways to connect even when grown-ups are trying to keep them apart. Explain to the students that this will be the thesis statement, or claim, for the class essay that you will be writing together. You will be looking for relevant evidence in the form of reasons or examples from the story to support this thesis and composing the next parts of the essay verbally without recording the transitions or evidence. Refer to the anchor chart and continue composing the class essay verbally using the transition, Early in the story, the children connect with each other. For example, Locate evidence early in the text that supports this claim and provides an example: When the girls are on different sides of the fence, Annie asks Sandra and Clover if she can play with them. Continue composing the class essay verbally with the students by using the transition, as follows: Later in the story, the children connect with each other. For example, Have partnerships locate evidence later in the text that supports the claim and provides an example. Have one or two partnerships share their ideas with the class. Your goal is to demonstrate how a simple essay can be constructed and to help all This document is the property of the Michigan Association of Intermediate School Administrators (MAISA). Revised 1/8/2013. Page 10

11 Link Writing and Conferring Mid-Workshop Teaching Point students write simple essays today. You will want to be sure that they all grasp the basic structure of an essay and the importance of finding relevant evidence for each supporting paragraph. Summarize the process for the students. Writers, whenever you write a literary essay, you will want to begin with a thesis statement, or claim and then support it with relevant evidence. Today you will write a simple literary essay independently using the thesis statement that I provided. Build your essay by creating two supporting paragraphs using the transitions and evidence that we composed verbally in class. Refer to the anchor chart, Strategies for Writing a Literary Essay, to help you organize your writing. Support students efforts at writing their own simple literary essays. Remind students to indent each paragraph (introduction and two supporting paragraphs) and use transitions for each example they are using as evidence. Have students meet with their partners to share their literary essays. Have partners check each other s essay to make sure they have included the following: Introductory paragraph that includes the thesis statement Two supporting paragraphs with transitions and relevant examples as evidence. Have students make corrections if necessary. Teaching Share Bring closure to today s workshop by having one or two students share their essays. Explain that this is the first of four practice essays that students will write as they learn more and more about writing literary essays during this unit. After writing practice essays, students will begin work on their final literary essay. Strategies for Writing A Literary Essay Start the essay with a thesis statement/claim that includes a theme or big idea from the story. Locate evidence in the text that supports your claim. Begin each supporting paragraph with a transition: Early in the text, (restate your claim) For example, one time Later in the text, (restate your claim) For example, This document is the property of the Michigan Association of Intermediate School Administrators (MAISA). Revised 1/8/2013. Page 11

12 Concept Teaching Point Session 3 Essayists read texts closely and respond to them in writing. Writers create a second literary essay with more elaboration. References Lucy Calkins Units of Study for Teaching Writing, Grades 3-5, Book 5: Literary Essays: Writing About Reading, Lucy Calkins A Curricular Plan for the Writing Workshop, Grade 4, , Lucy Calkins Baseball in April and Other Stories, Gary Soto Materials Writer s notebooks Writing folders Anchor charts: Strategies for Writing a Literary Essay Enlarged copy of The Marble Champ, Gary Soto Enlarged copy of a boxes and bullets organizer Copies of the following short story for each student: The Marble Champ, Gary Soto Notes Put copies of the following short stories in students writing folders before today s session: The Marble Champ Stray Slower Than the Rest Students will be referring to them throughout the next several sessions. Post on the daily schedule or verbally ask students to bring their writer s notebook and a pencil to the meeting area. Connection Writers, yesterday we created simple literary essays. We started with the thesis statement, and then found evidence in the story to support our claim. Today we will write another literary essay and build stronger paragraphs by elaborating on the evidence we include. Demonstration/ Teaching Review the structure of an essay as you refer to the anchor chart Strategies for Writing a Literary Essay. Explain that you are going to read another short story, and the class is going to write another essay, this time with more elaboration. Introduce, The Marble Champ, from Baseball in April and Other Stories as a story about a girl who wants to be good at a sport. As you read the story aloud, students should pay attention to the character s motivations, struggles, and changes because they are central to the important ideas in stories. Discuss the character s motivation, struggles, changes, and the important ideas in the story. Explain that one important idea in the story, The Marble Champ, is that children find ways to succeed when they really want to win. Suggest the following thesis statement and record it in the box using a boxes and bullets organizer: Gary Soto s short story, The Marble Champ, teaches readers that children find ways to succeed when they really want to win. Provide one example as relevant evidence for this thesis statement and complete the following transition next to the first bullet on the boxes and bullets organizer: Early in the story, Lupe found ways to succeed. For example, Demonstrate how you elaborate on this example by including specific details. You are detailing only the part of the story that clearly supports your claim. Do not record these details on the boxes and bullets organizer at this time. This document is the property of the Michigan Association of Intermediate School Administrators (MAISA). Revised 1/8/2013. Page 12

13 Active Engagement Link Writing and Conferring Mid-Workshop Teaching Point Then demonstrate how to link the evidence back to your claim using the following words: This shows that Add these steps to the Strategies for Writing a Literary Essay anchor chart. Distribute a copy of the short story, The Marble Champ, to each student. Have students locate a second example as relevant evidence for this thesis statement and complete the following transition on your boxes and bullets organizer: Later in the story, Lupe found ways to succeed. For example, Have partnerships say, rather than write, this part of the essay to their partners. Remind students to elaborate on this example by including specific details and to link the evidence back to their claim (refer to the anchor chart). Have one or two students share with the class. Writers, whenever we write in a new genre, we first learn how to support our thesis statement with relevant examples, and then to elaborate on those ideas. Today you will write your own literary essays independently. Essay writers take a moment to think over the writing that they are going to be doing and remind themselves of how this kind of writing goes. As you work, refer to the Strategies for Writing a Literary Essay anchor chart. Begin by using a boxes and bullets organizer to record your ideas. Then, start writing your essay in your writer s notebook. Remember; don t just say that a part supports your idea. Show how it supports your idea by including specific details, and then link the evidence back to your claim. Support students efforts at writing their own literary essays. Demonstrate that after writing an essay, writers need to shift from being writers to being readers. Read over your draft and check to make sure that each paragraph is well structured, referring to the Strategies for Writing a Literary Essay anchor chart. Rewrite parts that need revision. Have students read over their drafts in the same way and rewrite parts that need revision. Have students who finish early elaborate the ideas in their first essay. Teaching Share Bring closure to today s workshop by having one or two students share their essays. Point out that many essays have a more formal structure and style than personal narratives. The language must be precise and clear so the reader can follow your thinking. This document is the property of the Michigan Association of Intermediate School Administrators (MAISA). Revised 1/8/2013. Page 13

14 Strategies for Writing A Literary Essay Start the essay with a thesis statement/claim that includes a theme or big idea from the story. Locate evidence in the text that supports your claim. Begin each supporting paragraph with a transition: Early in the text, (restate your claim) For example, one time Later in the text, (restate your claim) For example, Elaborate by including specific details. Link the evidence back to your claim: This shows that (refer back to your claim) Boxes and Bullets This document is the property of the Michigan Association of Intermediate School Administrators (MAISA). Revised 1/8/2013. Page 14

15 Concept Teaching Point Session 4 Essayists read texts closely and respond to them in writing. Writers create a conclusion that illustrates the significance of the thesis statement. References Lucy Calkins Units of Study for Teaching Writing, Grades 3-5, Book 5: Literary Essays: Writing About Reading, Lucy Calkins A Curricular Plan for the Writing Workshop, Grade 4, , Lucy Calkins Baseball in April and Other Stories, Gary Soto Materials Writer s notebooks Writing folders Anchor charts: Strategies for Writing a Literary Essay Enlarged copy of The Marble Champ, Gary Soto Note Post on the daily schedule or verbally ask students to bring their writer s notebook and a pencil to the meeting area. Connection Writers, yesterday we wrote a second literary essay with more elaboration. Today, we create a conclusion that illustrates the significance of our thesis statement. Demonstration/ Review the structure of an essay as you refer to the anchor chart Strategies for Writing a Teaching Literary Essay. Explain that one way to create a conclusion is to think about what characters do, say, and think to determine what they are really like on the inside (their traits). Explaining a character s traits will often help to support the important ideas in a story. Read your own essay aloud. Demonstrate how to create a final paragraph that pulls the examples together. Consider using the character s trait (Lupe is determined) to help you bring your ideas to a close. You might start this paragraph using the following, Now, as I think about my idea that (restate your claim), I realize that Illustrate the significance of your thesis statement and relate it to real life. Think about the power of determination and how it relates to you or, in general, people in the world. Leave the reader with a powerful idea about determination. Use vocabulary that is wellsuited to the importance of this task. Add this step to the Strategies for Writing a Literary Essay anchor chart. Have students turn and tell a partner what you just demonstrated. Active Engagement Link Writing and Conferring Explain that students will now open their writer s notebooks and plan how they might create their final paragraph, referring to the Strategies for Writing a Literary Essay anchor chart. Have students turn and talk with their partners about their thoughts on how to effectively conclude their essays. Have them try to determine what the claim means to them or to others in the world. Writers, whenever we write a literary essay, we need to make sure to leave our reader with an important idea in the conclusion. Today we will add a conclusion to our literary essays. Refer to the Strategies for Writing a Literary Essay anchor chart to help you get started. Think about what your claim means to you or to others in the world. Make sure to indent this concluding paragraph. Support students efforts at writing their concluding paragraphs. This document is the property of the Michigan Association of Intermediate School Administrators (MAISA). Revised 1/8/2013. Page 15

16 Mid-Workshop Teaching Point Read over your draft and check to make sure that your concluding paragraph is well structured, referring to the Strategies for Writing a Literary Essay anchor chart. Rewrite parts that need revision. Have students read over their drafts in the same way and rewrite parts that need revision. Have students who finish early create a conclusion for their first essay. Teaching Share Bring closure to today s workshop by having one or two students share their essay conclusions. Strategies for Writing A Literary Essay Start the essay with a thesis statement/claim that includes a theme or big idea from the story. Locate evidence in the text that supports your claim. Begin each supporting paragraph with a transition: Early in the text, (restate your claim) For example, one time Later in the text, (restate your claim) For example, Elaborate by including specific details. Link the evidence back to your claim: This shows that (refer back to your claim) Conclude by pulling the examples and ideas together as follows: Now, as I think about my idea that (restate your claim), I realize that In my life OR In the world This document is the property of the Michigan Association of Intermediate School Administrators (MAISA). Revised 1/8/2013. Page 16

17 Concept Teaching Point Session 5 Essayists read texts closely and respond to them in writing. Writers learn how to create their own thesis statement and support it with evidence. References Lucy Calkins Units of Study for Teaching Writing, Grades 3-5, Book 5: Literary Essays: Writing About Reading, Lucy Calkins A Curricular Plan for the Writing Workshop, Grade 4, , Lucy Calkins Every Living Thing, Cynthia Rylant Materials Writer s notebooks Writing folders Anchor charts: Strategies for Writing a Literary Essay Enlarged copy of Stray, from Every Living Thing Copies of the following short story for each student: Stray, from Every Living Thing Note Post on the daily schedule or verbally ask students to bring their writer s notebook and a pencil to the meeting area. Connection Writers, yesterday we wrote conclusions for our essays that illustrated the significance of our thesis statement. Today we will be learning how to create our own thesis statements and support them with evidence. Demonstration/ Review the structure of an essay as you refer to the anchor chart Strategies for Writing a Teaching Literary Essay. Introduce the short story, Stray, from Every Living Thing as a story about a girl named Doris who desperately wants to keep a stray puppy that she found, even though her parents say they can t afford it. As you read the story aloud, demonstrate how you pay attention to the internal story as well as the external story. Discuss the story, the characters motivations/struggles/changes/traits, and the important ideas. Record the following questions: What is this story really about? What two examples best capture the story s meaning? What does the character learn in this story? What life lesson can I draw from this story? Explain that the purpose of the thesis statement is to establish one theme, or big idea, from the book that you intend to support with evidence from the story. You might suggest one or more of the following as possible themes for the story, Stray : Some things are more important than money. Nothing happens by chance. Characters in stories show empathy for others. Active Engagement Link Have partners turn and talk about the character s motivation/struggles/changes/traits and the important idea in the story. Have partners consider each question and determine what they think the theme of the story is. Have students state their idea as a thesis statement and record it in their writer s notebooks using a boxes and bullets organizer. Have one or two students share their ideas with the class. Writers, whenever you write a literary essay, you will want to begin by determining a theme in the story. Today you will write another literary essay with greater independence. Begin by determining a theme that you can support with evidence from the story. Then continue writing your essay by developing your supporting paragraphs. Remember to begin each supporting This document is the property of the Michigan Association of Intermediate School Administrators (MAISA). Revised 1/8/2013. Page 17

18 paragraph with a transition. As you work, refer to the Strategies for Writing a Literary Essay anchor chart. Writing and Support students efforts at creating relevant thesis statements and creating supporting Conferring paragraphs. Students who are ready can write their conclusions. Teaching Share Bring closure to today s workshop by having one or two students share their essays. Note Write your own essay about this story. Allow opportunity to build on your essay in Session 6. Strategies for Writing A Literary Essay Start the essay with a thesis statement/claim that includes a theme or big idea from the story. Locate evidence in the text that supports your claim. Begin each supporting paragraph with a transition: Early in the text, (restate your claim) For example, one time Later in the text, (restate your claim) For example, Elaborate by including specific details. Link the evidence back to your claim: This shows that (refer back to your claim) Conclude by pulling the examples and ideas together as follows: Now, as I think about my idea that (restate your claim), I realize that In my life OR In the world This document is the property of the Michigan Association of Intermediate School Administrators (MAISA). Revised 1/8/2013. Page 18

19 Concept Teaching Point Session 6 Writers learn strategies for revising their literary essays. Writers learn how to elaborate with specific details and greater independence. References Lucy Calkins Units of Study for Teaching Writing, Grades 3-5, Book 5: Literary Essays: Writing About Reading, Lucy Calkins A Curricular Plan for the Writing Workshop, Grade 4, , Lucy Calkins Every Living Thing, Cynthia Rylant Materials Writer s notebooks Writing folders Anchor charts: Strategies for Writing a Literary Essay Enlarged copy of Stray, from Every Living Thing Note Post on the daily schedule or verbally ask students to bring their writer s notebook, writing folder, and a pencil to the meeting area. Connection Writers, yesterday we developed our own thesis statements for a new essay. Today we will be learning how to build stronger supporting paragraphs by including specific details from the story. Demonstration/ Review the structure of an essay as you refer to the anchor chart Strategies for Writing a Teaching Literary Essay. Explain that students are going to learn how to build even stronger supporting paragraphs by including specific details such as proper names, exact quotes, and precise actions from the story. Specifics really matter. Refer to the short story, Stray. Reread your own essay and identify your first example. Explain that you are going to revise your paragraph to make it even stronger. Demonstrate how you do the following: Locate and underline specific details such as proper names, exact quotes, and precise actions from the story that can help you build a stronger supporting paragraph. Decide where these specific details fit in your essay and use numbered inserts to add them. Demonstrate how to cite quotations from the text: When the narrator states, this shows that When (the character) says, this shows that Add this step to the Strategies for Writing a Literary Essay anchor chart. Active Engagement Link Have students refer to the first example in their own essays about the short story, Stray. Have students locate and underline specific details such as proper names, exact quotes, and precise actions from the story. Have partnerships share their ideas about how they might include these details in their essays. Have one or two students share their ideas with the class. Writers, whenever we write a literary essay, we build strong supporting paragraphs by including specific details. Today we will revise our essays by including specific details such as proper names, exact quotes, and precise actions from the story. Use numbered inserts to add specific details to your supporting paragraphs. As you work, you will need to refer to the Strategies for Writing a Literary Essay anchor chart. Writing and Support students efforts at including specific details in their literary essays. This document is the property of the Michigan Association of Intermediate School Administrators (MAISA). Revised 1/8/2013. Page 19

20 Conferring Teaching Share Bring closure to today s workshop by having one or two students share a supporting paragraph in their essays that includes specific details from the story. Strategies for Writing A Literary Essay Start the essay with a thesis statement/claim that includes a theme or big idea from the story. Locate evidence in the text that supports your claim. Begin each supporting paragraph with a transition: Early in the text, (restate your claim) For example, one time Later in the text, (restate your claim) For example, Elaborate by including specific details. Link the evidence back to your claim: This shows that (refer back to your claim) Conclude by pulling the examples and ideas together as follows: Now, as I think about my idea that (restate your claim), I realize that In my life OR In the world Underline specific details in the story such as proper names, exact quotes, and precise actions and add these to your essay. Cite quotations from the text as follows: When the narrator states, this shows that When (the character) says, this shows that This document is the property of the Michigan Association of Intermediate School Administrators (MAISA). Revised 1/8/2013. Page 20

21 Concept Teaching Point Session 7 Writers learn strategies for revising their literary essays. Writers learn how to build stronger introductory paragraphs for their literary essays. References Lucy Calkins Units of Study for Teaching Writing, Grades 3-5, Book 5: Literary Essays: Writing About Reading, Lucy Calkins A Curricular Plan for the Writing Workshop, Grade 4, , Lucy Calkins Every Living Thing, Cynthia Rylant Materials Writer s notebooks Writing folders Anchor charts: Strategies for Writing a Literary Essay Enlarged copy of Stray, from Every Living Thing Note Post on the daily schedule or verbally ask students to bring their writer s notebook and a pencil to the meeting area. Connection Writers, yesterday we learned how to build stronger supporting paragraphs by including specific details from the story. Today we will learn how to create a stronger introduction for our essays. Demonstration/ Review the structure of an essay as you refer to the anchor chart Strategies for Writing a Teaching Literary Essay. Explain that essayists write more than just their thesis statement, or claim, in their introduction. The introductory paragraph generally includes the following: The important ideas related to the theme of the story The title and gist, or a tiny summary, of the story The thesis statement Add these steps to the Strategies for Writing a Literary Essay anchor. Read your own essay introduction. Demonstrate how to write an introductory paragraph using the templates on the Strategies for Writing a Literary Essay anchor chart. Have students turn and tell a partner what you just demonstrated. Active Engagement Link Explain that students will now open their writer s notebooks, reread their thesis statement, and verbally create their own introductory paragraphs using the templates posted on the Strategies for Writing a Literary Essay anchor chart. Have partnerships share their ideas. Have one or two students share their ideas with the class. Writers, whenever we write a literary essay, we create strong introductions so that our readers will understand our purpose. Today we will revise our essays by expanding our introductory paragraphs. Refer to the Strategies for Writing a Literary Essay anchor chart to help you get started, and remember to indent your paragraphs. Support students efforts at writing their introductory paragraphs. Writing and Conferring Mid-Workshop Teach students how to use the correct conventions to indicate titles of picture books (use Teaching Point underlining for handwriting and italics for typing) and short stories (use quotation marks). Teaching Share Bring closure to today s workshop by having one or two students share their essay introductions. This document is the property of the Michigan Association of Intermediate School Administrators (MAISA). Revised 1/8/2013. Page 21

22 Strategies for Writing A Literary Essay Start the essay with a thesis statement/claim that includes a theme or big idea from the story. Locate evidence in the text that supports your claim. Begin each supporting paragraph with a transition: Early in the text, (restate your claim) For example, one time Later in the text, (restate your claim) For example, Elaborate by including specific details. Link the evidence back to your claim: This shows that (refer back to your claim) Conclude by pulling the examples and ideas together as follows: Now, as I think about my idea that (restate your claim), I realize that In my life OR In the world Underline specific details in the story such as proper names, exact quotes, and precise actions and add these to your essay. Cite quotations from the text as follows: When the narrator states, this shows that When (the character) says, this shows that Include the following in the introductory paragraph: The important ideas related to the theme of the story The title and gist, or a tiny summary, of the story ; (Somebody) wants and so but in the end The thesis statement Use one of the following templates to state the big idea and your perspective in the introductory paragraph: I used to think. But now I believe Some people think But I believe When I first read I thought But now as I reread it, I realize This document is the property of the Michigan Association of Intermediate School Administrators (MAISA). Revised 1/8/2013. Page 22

23 Concept Teaching Point Session 8 Essayists read texts closely and respond to them in writing. Writers plan a literary essay from the beginning using a literary essay organizer. References Lucy Calkins Units of Study for Teaching Writing, Grades 3-5, Book 5: Literary Essays: Writing About Reading, Lucy Calkins A Curricular Plan for the Writing Workshop, Grade 4, , Lucy Calkins Every Living Thing, Cynthia Rylant Materials Writer s notebooks Writing folders Anchor chart: Strategies for Writing a Literary Essay Enlarged copies of the following: Slower Than the Rest, from Every Living Thing Literary Essay Organizer Copies of the following for each student: Slower Than the Rest, from Every Living Thing Literary Essay Organizer Note Post on the daily schedule or verbally ask students to bring their writing folder and a pencil to the meeting area. Connection Writers, yesterday we learned how to create stronger introductions for our literary essays. Today, we will begin a new literary essay based on another short story using a Literary Essay Organizer. Demonstration/ Review the structure of an essay as you refer to the anchor chart Strategies for Writing a Teaching Literary Essay. Introduce the story, Slower Than the Rest, as a story about a boy who has difficulty learning in school. Read the story aloud. Remind students to listen closely and think about the character s motivation, struggles, changes, traits, and the important ideas in the story. Demonstrate how you develop your own ideas about the story using the character s traits and the big ideas in the story. Introduce the Literary Essay Organizer as a way to plan your essay and organize your ideas. Refer to the Literary Essay Organizer and the anchor chart Strategies for Writing a Literary Essay. Demonstrate how you say, rather than write, your ideas about how you might begin your essay. Active Engagement Link Writing and Conferring Mid-Workshop Teaching Point Have partnerships refer to their copy of Slower Than the Rest and discuss their own ideas for a thesis statement for the story. Have two or three students share their ideas with the class. Writers, whenever you begin to create your ideas for a literary essay, it is best to plan and organize your ideas. Today, as you begin writing your essay, remember everything you have learned about creating an effective literary essay, one that communicates your thoughts clearly and powerfully. Underline parts in the story that support your thinking. Consider what is most important and how you can support your ideas. When you are ready to begin jotting your ideas, use a copy of the Literary Essay Organizer to help you stay focused on the structure of a literary essay. Support students efforts at planning and writing their literary essays. Reorient students who are struggling with this process to follow the steps on the This document is the property of the Michigan Association of Intermediate School Administrators (MAISA). Revised 1/8/2013. Page 23

24 Strategies for Writing a Literary Essay anchor chart. Teaching Share Bring closure to today s workshop by having one or two students share portions of their essays. Note Spend an additional day having students work on their essays. This is the last practice essay that students will write. It is not essential that everyone completes this essay. However, students should be most or all of the way through it, using everything they know about writing literary essays well, before moving on to the next session. This document is the property of the Michigan Association of Intermediate School Administrators (MAISA). Revised 1/8/2013. Page 24

25 Strategies for Writing A Literary Essay Begin each supporting paragraph with a transition: Early in the text, (restate your claim) For example, one time Later in the text, (restate your claim) For example, Elaborate by including specific details. Link the evidence back to your claim: This shows that (refer back to your claim) Conclude by pulling the examples and ideas together as follows: Now, as I think about my idea that (restate your claim), I realize that In my life OR In the world Underline specific details in the story such as proper names, exact quotes, and precise actions and add these to your essay. Cite quotations from the text as follows: When the narrator states, this shows that When (the character) says, this shows that Include the following in the introductory paragraph: The important ideas related to the theme of the story The title and gist, or a tiny summary, of the story ; (Somebody) wants and so but in the end The thesis statement Use one of the following templates to state the big idea and your perspective in the introductory paragraph: I used to think. But now I believe Some people think But I believe When I first read I thought But now as I reread it, I realize This document is the property of the Michigan Association of Intermediate School Administrators (MAISA). Revised 1/8/2013. Page 25

26 Introductory Paragraph Important Ideas: Literary Essay Organizer Title and gist of the story: Thesis statement: First Supporting Paragraph (include specific details) Early in the text For example This shows that Second Supporting Paragraph (include specific details) Later in the text For example This shows that Concluding Paragraph Restate your claim. Connect the claim to your life or the world. This document is the property of the Michigan Association of Intermediate School Administrators (MAISA). Revised 1/8/2013. Page 26

27 Concept Teaching Point Session 9 Essayists read texts closely and respond to them in writing. Writers choose a short story and plan their final literary essay. References Lucy Calkins Units of Study for Teaching Writing, Grades 3-5, Book 5: Literary Essays: Writing About Reading, Lucy Calkins A Curricular Plan for the Writing Workshop, Grade 4, , Lucy Calkins Materials Writer s notebooks Writing folders and writing paper Anchor chart: Strategies for Writing a Literary Essay Enlarged copies of the following: Literary Essay Organizer Copies of the following for each student: Literary Essay Organizer Notes Post on the daily schedule or verbally ask students to bring their writer s notebook and a pencil to the meeting area. Today, students will choose which short story they want to use for their final literary essay. They may use a new story of their own choosing, a new one from several that you recommend, or one they have already written in partial form. Giving students a choice will allow them to have stronger feelings about their essay ideas. Students will begin writing on notebook paper and keep their work in their writing folders starting today. Connection Writers, yesterday we learned how to plan and organize our ideas for a literary essay. Today we are going to choose which short story we want to use for one last literary essay one that we are going to make a commitment to stick with and develop it into our very best work. Demonstration/ Teaching Active Engagement Link Review the structure of an essay as you refer to the anchor chart Strategies for Writing a Literary Essay. Explain that students can choose a short story they want to use for their final essay and make suggestions from picture books or short stories. Demonstrate how you decide whether or not a picture book or short story includes ideas that are powerful enough for a literary essay. Choose a story for your own literary essay. Refer to the Literary Essay Organizer and the anchor chart Strategies for Writing a Literary Essay. Demonstrate how you say, rather than write, the ideas that you might include in your literary essay. Distribute short stories or picture books to partnerships. Have them take turns reading the story and decide whether or not it includes ideas that are powerful enough for a literary essay. Have partnerships discuss the ideas they might include in a literary essay. Have two or three students share their ideas with the class. Allow time for students to read two or three more stories today in preparation for making a decision about which short story they want to use. Writers, whenever you write a literary essay, you must be careful to choose stories that have important ideas that are powerful enough for a literary essay. Today, you will want to read one or two other stories in preparation for making a decision about which short story you want to use for your final essay. When you have made a decision, jot your ideas on your Literary Essay Organizer. This document is the property of the Michigan Association of Intermediate School Administrators (MAISA). Revised 1/8/2013. Page 27

28 Writing and Conferring Remember to include everything you know about writing powerful essays and begin writing your essay introduction on notebook paper when you are ready. You will be keeping your work in your writing folders instead of writing in your writer s notebooks for the rest of this unit. Support students efforts at choosing stories and organizing their ideas for their literary essays. The goal for today is to make sure that every student has decided on a short story and Teaching Share Bring closure to today s workshop by having one or two students share their essays. Note You might decide to allow an extra day for students to make their choices if necessary. This document is the property of the Michigan Association of Intermediate School Administrators (MAISA). Revised 1/8/2013. Page 28

29 Concept Teaching Point Session 10 Essayists read texts closely and respond to them in writing. Writers understand that essayists angle the evidence to support their thesis statement. References Lucy Calkins Units of Study for Teaching Writing, Grades 3-5, Book 5: Literary Essays: Writing About Reading, Lucy Calkins A Curricular Plan for the Writing Workshop, Grade 5, , Lucy Calkins Materials Writing folders Anchor chart: Strategies for Writing a Literary Essay Note Post on the daily schedule or verbally ask students to bring their writing folders and a pencil to the meeting area. Connection Writers, yesterday we chose a short story and began organizing ideas for our literary essays. Today, we are going to learn how to angle the evidence from the story in our supporting paragraphs. Demonstration/ Teaching Active Engagement Link Share your essay ideas from your Literary Essay Organizer. Explain that essay writers angle the evidence they are using by writing in such a way that brings forth the elements of the example that support their ideas. They are not just retelling a part of the story. Demonstrate how to you angle the evidence to support one of your own examples. Summarize the process for the students. Have students refer to their own Literary Essay Organizers and stories. Have them refer to their first example and think about how they might angle the evidence for one of their examples. Have them share their ideas with their partners. Have one or two students share their ideas with the class. Writers, whenever you create a supporting paragraph to present evidence from a story in a literary essay, you will want to think about whether to storytell or paraphrase the example. Remember that when you angle the evidence, you are writing in such a way that brings forth the elements of the example that will support your ideas. Essay writers always angle their evidence to support their thesis statement. Conduct individual conferences to support students efforts at angling their evidence to support their thesis statements. Writing and Conferring Teaching Share Bring closure to today s workshop by having one or two students share the way they angled their supporting paragraphs. Notes Allow one or two additional days for students to continue writing their literary essays, as necessary, following the framework on the Strategies for Writing a Literary Essay anchor chart and their own Literary Essay Organizers. Use your own essay writing as a model for the work that you want your students to do. This document is the property of the Michigan Association of Intermediate School Administrators (MAISA). Revised 1/8/2013. Page 29

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