5 The Beginning of Transcendental Numbers

Save this PDF as:
 WORD  PNG  TXT  JPG

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "5 The Beginning of Transcendental Numbers"

Transcription

1 5 The Beginning of Transcendental Numbers We have defined a transcendental number (see Definition 3 of the Introduction), but so far we have only established that certain numbers are irrational. We now turn to the beginnings of transcendental numbers. Our first theorem is Theorem. Transcendental numbers exist. Like many of our results so far, this will of course be a consequence of later results. The first proof that there exist transcendental numbers was given by Liouville. Before we give his proof, we give a proof due to Cantor. Proof. The essence of this proof is that the real algebraic numbers are countable whereas the set of all real numbers is uncountable, so there must exist real transcendental numbers. Define { n n } P (n) = f(x) = a j x j Z[x] : a j n. Observe that P (n) is finite. Also, every non-zero polynomial in Z[x] belongs to some P (n). By considering the real roots of polynomials in P (), P (2),... (at the kth stage, consider the real roots of polynomials in P (k) which have not occurred as a root of a polynomial in P (j) for j < k), we can order the algebraic numbers; hence, they are countable. Next, give the usual proof that the real numbers are uncountable. For Liouville s proof, we define Definition 4. A real number α is a Liouville number if for every positive integer n, there are integers a and b with b > such that 0 < α a < b b. n In a moment, we will show that Liouville numbers exist. The second proof of Theorem will then follow from our next result. Theorem 2. All Liouville numbers are transcendental. Lemma. Let α be an irrational number which is a root of f(x) = n a jx j Z[x] with f(x) 0. Then there is a constant A = A(α) > 0 such that if a and b are integers with b > 0, then α a > A b b. (6) n Proof. Let M be the maximum value of f (x) on [α, α+]. Let α, α 2,..., α m be the distinct roots of f(x) which are different from α. Fix A < min{, /M, α α, α α 2,..., α α m }. Assume (6) does not hold for some a and b integers with b > 0. Then α a A b b A < min{, α α, α α n 2,..., α α m }. 4

2 Hence, a b [α, α + ] and a b {α,..., α m }. By the Mean Value Theorem, there is an x 0 between a/b and α such that so that f(α) f(a/b) = (α a/b)f (x 0 ) α a = f(a/b) f(α) b f (x 0 ) = f(a/b) f (x 0 ). Since f(a/b) 0, we deduce that n f(a/b) = a j a j b n j /b n /b n. Thus, since f (x 0 ) M, we obtain α a b Mb > A α n b a, n b giving a contradiction. Thus, the lemma follows. Proof of Theorem 2. Let α be a Liouville number. First, we show that α must be irrational. Assume α = c/d for some integers c and d with d > 0. Let n be a positive integer with 2 n > d. Then for any integers a and b with b > and a/b c/d, we have that α a = c b d a b bd > 2 n b b. n It follows from the definition of a Liouville number that α is not a Liouville number, giving a contradiction. Thus, α is irrational. Now, assume α is an irrational algebraic number. By the lemma, there exist a real number A > 0 and a positive integer n such that (6) holds for all integers a and b with b > 0. Let r be a positive integer for which 2 r /A. Since α is a Liouville number, there are integers a and b with b > such that α a < b b n+r 2 r b A n b. n This contradicts (6) and, hence, establishes that α is transcendental. Example: We show that α = /2j! is a Liouville number. First, observe that the binary expansion of α has arbitrarily long strings of 0 s and so it cannot be rational. Fix a positive integer n and consider a b = n 0 < α a = b j=n+ 2 j! with a and b = 2n! > integers. Then 2 j! < j=(n+)! 2 = j 2 (n+)! 2 = n(n!) b. n This proves that α is Liouville and also gives a second proof of Theorem. 5

3 There are stronger versions of Theorem 2. In particular, we note (without proof) that Theorem 3 (Thué-Siegel-Roth). Let α be an algebraic number with α Q. Let ɛ > 0. Then there are at most finitely many pairs of integers (a, b) with b > 0 such that α a < b b. 2+ɛ It is not known whether or not the right-hand side above can be replaced by A/b 2 where A = A(α) is a positive constant depending only on α. Theorem 4. The set of Liouville numbers in [0, ] has measure 0. Proof. Let ɛ > 0. It suffices to show that the (Lebesgue) measure of the Liouville numbers in [0, ] is < ɛ. Let n be a positive integer for which b=2 4/bn < ɛ (observe that this is possible since b=2 4/bn < (4/2 n 3 ) b=2 /b2 ). If α is a Liouville number in [0, ], then there are integers a and b with b > such that α a < b b. n Since the right-hand side is /2 and α [0, ], we deduce that a/b ( /2, 3/2) so that b/2 < a < 3b/2 (a is in an open interval of length 2b). In particular, for a given integer b >, there are 2b possible values of a for which the above inequality can hold. For each b >, we get that α must be in one of 2b intervals of length 2/b n. Thus, the measure of the Liouville numbers must be 4b b < ɛ, n giving the desired result. Corollary. There are transcendental numbers which are not Liouville numbers. b=2 We now turn to a related discussion. Suppose that we have an sequence of positive integers {a k } k= with a < a 2 <. When will the argument given in the example above lead to a proof that k=0 /2a k is transcendental? It is not too difficult to see that what one essentially wants is that a k increases fast enough where fast enough means that lim inf k a k+ a k =. On the other hand, it can be shown that sequences which increase much slower also lead to transcendental numbers, an observation apparently first noticed by Erdős. The next theorem illustrates the basic idea by showing a certain number of this form is transcendental; it can be shown also that this number is not a Liouville number. Theorem 5. The number k=0 /22k is transcendental. To prove Theorem 5, for positive integers k and m, we define c(k, m) to be the number of m tuples (j,..., j m ) of non-negative integers for which k = 2 j + 2 j jm. 6

4 Lemma. With the notation above, c(k, m) m 2m. Proof. We do induction on m. For m =, c(k, m) {0, } for all k, so the result is clear. Suppose m >. If k has more than m non-zero binary digits, then it is not too hard to see that c(k, m) = 0 (note that the sum of two like powers of 2 is a power of 2). If k has exactly m non-zero binary digits, then c(k, m) = m! m m m 2m (j can correspond to any one of the m non-zero digits, j 2 to any one of the remaining m non-zero digits, and so on). If k has fewer than m non-zero binary digits, then for some integers r and s with r < s m, j r = j s. Since in this case, 2 jr + 2 js = 2 jr+, we deduce that establishing the lemma. c(k, m) ( m 2 ) c(k, m ) m 2 (m ) 2m 2 m 2m, Lemma 2. Let t and m be positive integers. Then c(k, m) = 0 for every integer k (2 t t+m, 2 t+m+ ). Proof. This follows since each such k has > m non-zero binary digits (see the proof of Lemma ). Proof of Theorem 5. Let α = k=0 /22k. Let m be a positive integer. Then the definition of c(k, m) implies that ( ) m α m c(k, m) = =. 2 2k k=0 Let t be a positive integer. Using Lemma 2 and then Lemma, we obtain k= {2 2t t+m α m } 2 2t t+m 2 2t t+m 2 2t t+m m 2m k=2 t t+m + c(k, m) k=2 t+m+ k=2 t+m+ c(k, m) 2 2t t+m m 2m 2 2t+m+ + = 2 2t+ m 2m. If we view m as being fixed and let t approach infinity, we see that the binary expansion of α m has arbitrarily long strings of 0 s. By the same reasoning, we see that more generally if b 0, b,..., b m are non-negative integers, then the binary expansion of b 0 + b α + + b m α m has arbitrarily long strings of 0 s. In fact, if b 0, b,..., b m and c 0, c,..., c m are non-negative integers and if we have the following binary expansions {b 0 + b α + + b m α m } = (0.d d 2 d 3... ) 2 and {c 0 + c α + + c m α m } = (0.d d 2d 3... ) 2, 7

5 then for any positive integer N, there is a positive integer j for which d j+ = d j+2 = = d j+n = d j+ = d j+2 = = d j+n = 0. Furthermore, we can take N and j so that N = 2 t and j = 2 t t+m with t an integer as large (but perhaps not as small) as we wish. Now, assume α is a root of f(x) = n a jx j Z[x] with a n > 0 (which would be possible if α were algebraic). Then we can write f(x) in the form n n f(x) = b j x j c j x j, where the b j and c j are non-negative integers with b j c j = 0 for each j. In particular, b n = a n > 0 and c n = 0. Take m = n, and let N = 2 t where t is a positive integer to be chosen momentarily and j = j(t) is as above. Then 2 j+2t 2 n n b i α i and 2 j+2t 2 c i α i both differ from an integer by /2 N 2t 2 = /2 2t +2 t 2. If we write 2 j+2t 2 n n b i α i = m + θ and 2 j+2t 2 c i α i = m 2 + θ 2, where m and m 2 are the greatest integers in the above expressions, then we see that since f(α) = 0, 2 j+2t 2 b n α n = m 3 + θ 3 with m 3 Z and θ 3 = θ θ 2. (7) 2 2t +2 t 2 On the other hand, since j has the form given above, we get from the definition of c(k, m) that c(j + 2 t, n) and = 0 for all k (j + 2 t 2, j + 2 t ). For t sufficiently large, we have that and 2 j+2t 2 b n k=j+2 t j+2t 2 b n k=j+2 t 2 + = 2 j+2t 2 b n k=j+2 t 2 j+2t 2 b n n 2n 2 j 2t + = 2 2t 2 b n n 2n < 2 2t 3 2 j+2t 2 b n 2 j 2t = 2 2t 2 b n 2 2t 2. It follows that (7) cannot hold, giving a contradiction and completing the proof. Homework:. Prove that the set of Liouville numbers in [0, ] is uncountable. 8

APPLICATIONS OF THE ORDER FUNCTION

APPLICATIONS OF THE ORDER FUNCTION APPLICATIONS OF THE ORDER FUNCTION LECTURE NOTES: MATH 432, CSUSM, SPRING 2009. PROF. WAYNE AITKEN In this lecture we will explore several applications of order functions including formulas for GCDs and

More information

An example of a computable

An example of a computable An example of a computable absolutely normal number Verónica Becher Santiago Figueira Abstract The first example of an absolutely normal number was given by Sierpinski in 96, twenty years before the concept

More information

Discrete Mathematics: Solutions to Homework (12%) For each of the following sets, determine whether {2} is an element of that set.

Discrete Mathematics: Solutions to Homework (12%) For each of the following sets, determine whether {2} is an element of that set. Discrete Mathematics: Solutions to Homework 2 1. (12%) For each of the following sets, determine whether {2} is an element of that set. (a) {x R x is an integer greater than 1} (b) {x R x is the square

More information

CHAPTER II THE LIMIT OF A SEQUENCE OF NUMBERS DEFINITION OF THE NUMBER e.

CHAPTER II THE LIMIT OF A SEQUENCE OF NUMBERS DEFINITION OF THE NUMBER e. CHAPTER II THE LIMIT OF A SEQUENCE OF NUMBERS DEFINITION OF THE NUMBER e. This chapter contains the beginnings of the most important, and probably the most subtle, notion in mathematical analysis, i.e.,

More information

x a x 2 (1 + x 2 ) n.

x a x 2 (1 + x 2 ) n. Limits and continuity Suppose that we have a function f : R R. Let a R. We say that f(x) tends to the limit l as x tends to a; lim f(x) = l ; x a if, given any real number ɛ > 0, there exists a real number

More information

CONTINUED FRACTIONS AND PELL S EQUATION. Contents 1. Continued Fractions 1 2. Solution to Pell s Equation 9 References 12

CONTINUED FRACTIONS AND PELL S EQUATION. Contents 1. Continued Fractions 1 2. Solution to Pell s Equation 9 References 12 CONTINUED FRACTIONS AND PELL S EQUATION SEUNG HYUN YANG Abstract. In this REU paper, I will use some important characteristics of continued fractions to give the complete set of solutions to Pell s equation.

More information

HOMEWORK 5 SOLUTIONS. n!f n (1) lim. ln x n! + xn x. 1 = G n 1 (x). (2) k + 1 n. (n 1)!

HOMEWORK 5 SOLUTIONS. n!f n (1) lim. ln x n! + xn x. 1 = G n 1 (x). (2) k + 1 n. (n 1)! Math 7 Fall 205 HOMEWORK 5 SOLUTIONS Problem. 2008 B2 Let F 0 x = ln x. For n 0 and x > 0, let F n+ x = 0 F ntdt. Evaluate n!f n lim n ln n. By directly computing F n x for small n s, we obtain the following

More information

Undergraduate Notes in Mathematics. Arkansas Tech University Department of Mathematics

Undergraduate Notes in Mathematics. Arkansas Tech University Department of Mathematics Undergraduate Notes in Mathematics Arkansas Tech University Department of Mathematics An Introductory Single Variable Real Analysis: A Learning Approach through Problem Solving Marcel B. Finan c All Rights

More information

Series Convergence Tests Math 122 Calculus III D Joyce, Fall 2012

Series Convergence Tests Math 122 Calculus III D Joyce, Fall 2012 Some series converge, some diverge. Series Convergence Tests Math 22 Calculus III D Joyce, Fall 202 Geometric series. We ve already looked at these. We know when a geometric series converges and what it

More information

1. Prove that the empty set is a subset of every set.

1. Prove that the empty set is a subset of every set. 1. Prove that the empty set is a subset of every set. Basic Topology Written by Men-Gen Tsai email: b89902089@ntu.edu.tw Proof: For any element x of the empty set, x is also an element of every set since

More information

PART I. THE REAL NUMBERS

PART I. THE REAL NUMBERS PART I. THE REAL NUMBERS This material assumes that you are already familiar with the real number system and the representation of the real numbers as points on the real line. I.1. THE NATURAL NUMBERS

More information

13 Infinite Sets. 13.1 Injections, Surjections, and Bijections. mcs-ftl 2010/9/8 0:40 page 379 #385

13 Infinite Sets. 13.1 Injections, Surjections, and Bijections. mcs-ftl 2010/9/8 0:40 page 379 #385 mcs-ftl 2010/9/8 0:40 page 379 #385 13 Infinite Sets So you might be wondering how much is there to say about an infinite set other than, well, it has an infinite number of elements. Of course, an infinite

More information

k, then n = p2α 1 1 pα k

k, then n = p2α 1 1 pα k Powers of Integers An integer n is a perfect square if n = m for some integer m. Taking into account the prime factorization, if m = p α 1 1 pα k k, then n = pα 1 1 p α k k. That is, n is a perfect square

More information

Elementary Number Theory and Methods of Proof. CSE 215, Foundations of Computer Science Stony Brook University http://www.cs.stonybrook.

Elementary Number Theory and Methods of Proof. CSE 215, Foundations of Computer Science Stony Brook University http://www.cs.stonybrook. Elementary Number Theory and Methods of Proof CSE 215, Foundations of Computer Science Stony Brook University http://www.cs.stonybrook.edu/~cse215 1 Number theory Properties: 2 Properties of integers (whole

More information

CONTRIBUTIONS TO ZERO SUM PROBLEMS

CONTRIBUTIONS TO ZERO SUM PROBLEMS CONTRIBUTIONS TO ZERO SUM PROBLEMS S. D. ADHIKARI, Y. G. CHEN, J. B. FRIEDLANDER, S. V. KONYAGIN AND F. PAPPALARDI Abstract. A prototype of zero sum theorems, the well known theorem of Erdős, Ginzburg

More information

The Dirichlet Unit Theorem

The Dirichlet Unit Theorem Chapter 6 The Dirichlet Unit Theorem As usual, we will be working in the ring B of algebraic integers of a number field L. Two factorizations of an element of B are regarded as essentially the same if

More information

MATH10040 Chapter 2: Prime and relatively prime numbers

MATH10040 Chapter 2: Prime and relatively prime numbers MATH10040 Chapter 2: Prime and relatively prime numbers Recall the basic definition: 1. Prime numbers Definition 1.1. Recall that a positive integer is said to be prime if it has precisely two positive

More information

The fundamental group of the Hawaiian earring is not free (International Journal of Algebra and Computation Vol. 2, No. 1 (1992), 33 37) Bart de Smit

The fundamental group of the Hawaiian earring is not free (International Journal of Algebra and Computation Vol. 2, No. 1 (1992), 33 37) Bart de Smit The fundamental group of the Hawaiian earring is not free Bart de Smit The fundamental group of the Hawaiian earring is not free (International Journal of Algebra and Computation Vol. 2, No. 1 (1992),

More information

it is easy to see that α = a

it is easy to see that α = a 21. Polynomial rings Let us now turn out attention to determining the prime elements of a polynomial ring, where the coefficient ring is a field. We already know that such a polynomial ring is a UF. Therefore

More information

1 if 1 x 0 1 if 0 x 1

1 if 1 x 0 1 if 0 x 1 Chapter 3 Continuity In this chapter we begin by defining the fundamental notion of continuity for real valued functions of a single real variable. When trying to decide whether a given function is or

More information

x if x 0, x if x < 0.

x if x 0, x if x < 0. Chapter 3 Sequences In this chapter, we discuss sequences. We say what it means for a sequence to converge, and define the limit of a convergent sequence. We begin with some preliminary results about the

More information

FIRST YEAR CALCULUS. Chapter 7 CONTINUITY. It is a parabola, and we can draw this parabola without lifting our pencil from the paper.

FIRST YEAR CALCULUS. Chapter 7 CONTINUITY. It is a parabola, and we can draw this parabola without lifting our pencil from the paper. FIRST YEAR CALCULUS WWLCHENW L c WWWL W L Chen, 1982, 2008. 2006. This chapter originates from material used by the author at Imperial College, University of London, between 1981 and 1990. It It is is

More information

The Rational Numbers

The Rational Numbers Math 3040: Spring 2011 The Rational Numbers Contents 1. The Set Q 1 2. Addition and multiplication of rational numbers 3 2.1. Definitions and properties. 3 2.2. Comments 4 2.3. Connections with Z. 6 2.4.

More information

Notes: Chapter 2 Section 2.2: Proof by Induction

Notes: Chapter 2 Section 2.2: Proof by Induction Notes: Chapter 2 Section 2.2: Proof by Induction Basic Induction. To prove: n, a W, n a, S n. (1) Prove the base case - S a. (2) Let k a and prove that S k S k+1 Example 1. n N, n i = n(n+1) 2. Example

More information

1 = (a 0 + b 0 α) 2 + + (a m 1 + b m 1 α) 2. for certain elements a 0,..., a m 1, b 0,..., b m 1 of F. Multiplying out, we obtain

1 = (a 0 + b 0 α) 2 + + (a m 1 + b m 1 α) 2. for certain elements a 0,..., a m 1, b 0,..., b m 1 of F. Multiplying out, we obtain Notes on real-closed fields These notes develop the algebraic background needed to understand the model theory of real-closed fields. To understand these notes, a standard graduate course in algebra is

More information

Math212a1010 Lebesgue measure.

Math212a1010 Lebesgue measure. Math212a1010 Lebesgue measure. October 19, 2010 Today s lecture will be devoted to Lebesgue measure, a creation of Henri Lebesgue, in his thesis, one of the most famous theses in the history of mathematics.

More information

Mathematics Course 111: Algebra I Part IV: Vector Spaces

Mathematics Course 111: Algebra I Part IV: Vector Spaces Mathematics Course 111: Algebra I Part IV: Vector Spaces D. R. Wilkins Academic Year 1996-7 9 Vector Spaces A vector space over some field K is an algebraic structure consisting of a set V on which are

More information

CS 103X: Discrete Structures Homework Assignment 3 Solutions

CS 103X: Discrete Structures Homework Assignment 3 Solutions CS 103X: Discrete Structures Homework Assignment 3 s Exercise 1 (20 points). On well-ordering and induction: (a) Prove the induction principle from the well-ordering principle. (b) Prove the well-ordering

More information

God created the integers and the rest is the work of man. (Leopold Kronecker, in an after-dinner speech at a conference, Berlin, 1886)

God created the integers and the rest is the work of man. (Leopold Kronecker, in an after-dinner speech at a conference, Berlin, 1886) Chapter 2 Numbers God created the integers and the rest is the work of man. (Leopold Kronecker, in an after-dinner speech at a conference, Berlin, 1886) God created the integers and the rest is the work

More information

On the greatest and least prime factors of n! + 1, II

On the greatest and least prime factors of n! + 1, II Publ. Math. Debrecen Manuscript May 7, 004 On the greatest and least prime factors of n! + 1, II By C.L. Stewart In memory of Béla Brindza Abstract. Let ε be a positive real number. We prove that 145 1

More information

Math 345-60 Abstract Algebra I Questions for Section 23: Factoring Polynomials over a Field

Math 345-60 Abstract Algebra I Questions for Section 23: Factoring Polynomials over a Field Math 345-60 Abstract Algebra I Questions for Section 23: Factoring Polynomials over a Field 1. Throughout this section, F is a field and F [x] is the ring of polynomials with coefficients in F. We will

More information

Some Polynomial Theorems. John Kennedy Mathematics Department Santa Monica College 1900 Pico Blvd. Santa Monica, CA 90405 rkennedy@ix.netcom.

Some Polynomial Theorems. John Kennedy Mathematics Department Santa Monica College 1900 Pico Blvd. Santa Monica, CA 90405 rkennedy@ix.netcom. Some Polynomial Theorems by John Kennedy Mathematics Department Santa Monica College 1900 Pico Blvd. Santa Monica, CA 90405 rkennedy@ix.netcom.com This paper contains a collection of 31 theorems, lemmas,

More information

Continued Fractions and the Euclidean Algorithm

Continued Fractions and the Euclidean Algorithm Continued Fractions and the Euclidean Algorithm Lecture notes prepared for MATH 326, Spring 997 Department of Mathematics and Statistics University at Albany William F Hammond Table of Contents Introduction

More information

Ri and. i=1. S i N. and. R R i

Ri and. i=1. S i N. and. R R i The subset R of R n is a closed rectangle if there are n non-empty closed intervals {[a 1, b 1 ], [a 2, b 2 ],..., [a n, b n ]} so that R = [a 1, b 1 ] [a 2, b 2 ] [a n, b n ]. The subset R of R n is an

More information

Cardinality. The set of all finite strings over the alphabet of lowercase letters is countable. The set of real numbers R is an uncountable set.

Cardinality. The set of all finite strings over the alphabet of lowercase letters is countable. The set of real numbers R is an uncountable set. Section 2.5 Cardinality (another) Definition: The cardinality of a set A is equal to the cardinality of a set B, denoted A = B, if and only if there is a bijection from A to B. If there is an injection

More information

REAL ANALYSIS LECTURE NOTES: 1.4 OUTER MEASURE

REAL ANALYSIS LECTURE NOTES: 1.4 OUTER MEASURE REAL ANALYSIS LECTURE NOTES: 1.4 OUTER MEASURE CHRISTOPHER HEIL 1.4.1 Introduction We will expand on Section 1.4 of Folland s text, which covers abstract outer measures also called exterior measures).

More information

Homework 5 Solutions

Homework 5 Solutions Homework 5 Solutions 4.2: 2: a. 321 = 256 + 64 + 1 = (01000001) 2 b. 1023 = 512 + 256 + 128 + 64 + 32 + 16 + 8 + 4 + 2 + 1 = (1111111111) 2. Note that this is 1 less than the next power of 2, 1024, which

More information

2 Complex Functions and the Cauchy-Riemann Equations

2 Complex Functions and the Cauchy-Riemann Equations 2 Complex Functions and the Cauchy-Riemann Equations 2.1 Complex functions In one-variable calculus, we study functions f(x) of a real variable x. Likewise, in complex analysis, we study functions f(z)

More information

On fractional parts of powers of real numbers close to 1

On fractional parts of powers of real numbers close to 1 On fractional parts of powers of real numbers close to 1 Yann BUGEAUD and Niolay MOSHCHEVITIN Abstract We prove that there exist arbitrarily small positive real numbers ε such that every integral power

More information

3. Mathematical Induction

3. Mathematical Induction 3. MATHEMATICAL INDUCTION 83 3. Mathematical Induction 3.1. First Principle of Mathematical Induction. Let P (n) be a predicate with domain of discourse (over) the natural numbers N = {0, 1,,...}. If (1)

More information

MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 6.436J/15.085J Fall 2008 Lecture 5 9/17/2008 RANDOM VARIABLES

MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 6.436J/15.085J Fall 2008 Lecture 5 9/17/2008 RANDOM VARIABLES MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 6.436J/15.085J Fall 2008 Lecture 5 9/17/2008 RANDOM VARIABLES Contents 1. Random variables and measurable functions 2. Cumulative distribution functions 3. Discrete

More information

POLYNOMIAL RINGS AND UNIQUE FACTORIZATION DOMAINS

POLYNOMIAL RINGS AND UNIQUE FACTORIZATION DOMAINS POLYNOMIAL RINGS AND UNIQUE FACTORIZATION DOMAINS RUSS WOODROOFE 1. Unique Factorization Domains Throughout the following, we think of R as sitting inside R[x] as the constant polynomials (of degree 0).

More information

Some Notes on Taylor Polynomials and Taylor Series

Some Notes on Taylor Polynomials and Taylor Series Some Notes on Taylor Polynomials and Taylor Series Mark MacLean October 3, 27 UBC s courses MATH /8 and MATH introduce students to the ideas of Taylor polynomials and Taylor series in a fairly limited

More information

Our goal first will be to define a product measure on A 1 A 2.

Our goal first will be to define a product measure on A 1 A 2. 1. Tensor product of measures and Fubini theorem. Let (A j, Ω j, µ j ), j = 1, 2, be two measure spaces. Recall that the new σ -algebra A 1 A 2 with the unit element is the σ -algebra generated by the

More information

Sample Induction Proofs

Sample Induction Proofs Math 3 Worksheet: Induction Proofs III, Sample Proofs A.J. Hildebrand Sample Induction Proofs Below are model solutions to some of the practice problems on the induction worksheets. The solutions given

More information

Homework # 3 Solutions

Homework # 3 Solutions Homework # 3 Solutions February, 200 Solution (2.3.5). Noting that and ( + 3 x) x 8 = + 3 x) by Equation (2.3.) x 8 x 8 = + 3 8 by Equations (2.3.7) and (2.3.0) =3 x 8 6x2 + x 3 ) = 2 + 6x 2 + x 3 x 8

More information

MA651 Topology. Lecture 6. Separation Axioms.

MA651 Topology. Lecture 6. Separation Axioms. MA651 Topology. Lecture 6. Separation Axioms. This text is based on the following books: Fundamental concepts of topology by Peter O Neil Elements of Mathematics: General Topology by Nicolas Bourbaki Counterexamples

More information

MODULAR ARITHMETIC. a smallest member. It is equivalent to the Principle of Mathematical Induction.

MODULAR ARITHMETIC. a smallest member. It is equivalent to the Principle of Mathematical Induction. MODULAR ARITHMETIC 1 Working With Integers The usual arithmetic operations of addition, subtraction and multiplication can be performed on integers, and the result is always another integer Division, on

More information

GREATEST COMMON DIVISOR

GREATEST COMMON DIVISOR DEFINITION: GREATEST COMMON DIVISOR The greatest common divisor (gcd) of a and b, denoted by (a, b), is the largest common divisor of integers a and b. THEOREM: If a and b are nonzero integers, then their

More information

Irreducibility criteria for compositions and multiplicative convolutions of polynomials with integer coefficients

Irreducibility criteria for compositions and multiplicative convolutions of polynomials with integer coefficients DOI: 10.2478/auom-2014-0007 An. Şt. Univ. Ovidius Constanţa Vol. 221),2014, 73 84 Irreducibility criteria for compositions and multiplicative convolutions of polynomials with integer coefficients Anca

More information

SOLUTIONS TO EXERCISES FOR. MATHEMATICS 205A Part 3. Spaces with special properties

SOLUTIONS TO EXERCISES FOR. MATHEMATICS 205A Part 3. Spaces with special properties SOLUTIONS TO EXERCISES FOR MATHEMATICS 205A Part 3 Fall 2008 III. Spaces with special properties III.1 : Compact spaces I Problems from Munkres, 26, pp. 170 172 3. Show that a finite union of compact subspaces

More information

MOP 2007 Black Group Integer Polynomials Yufei Zhao. Integer Polynomials. June 29, 2007 Yufei Zhao yufeiz@mit.edu

MOP 2007 Black Group Integer Polynomials Yufei Zhao. Integer Polynomials. June 29, 2007 Yufei Zhao yufeiz@mit.edu Integer Polynomials June 9, 007 Yufei Zhao yufeiz@mit.edu We will use Z[x] to denote the ring of polynomials with integer coefficients. We begin by summarizing some of the common approaches used in dealing

More information

Factoring Polynomials

Factoring Polynomials Factoring Polynomials Sue Geller June 19, 2006 Factoring polynomials over the rational numbers, real numbers, and complex numbers has long been a standard topic of high school algebra. With the advent

More information

Algebraic and Transcendental Numbers

Algebraic and Transcendental Numbers Pondicherry University July 2000 Algebraic and Transcendental Numbers Stéphane Fischler This text is meant to be an introduction to algebraic and transcendental numbers. For a detailed (though elementary)

More information

Kevin James. MTHSC 412 Section 2.4 Prime Factors and Greatest Comm

Kevin James. MTHSC 412 Section 2.4 Prime Factors and Greatest Comm MTHSC 412 Section 2.4 Prime Factors and Greatest Common Divisor Greatest Common Divisor Definition Suppose that a, b Z. Then we say that d Z is a greatest common divisor (gcd) of a and b if the following

More information

So let us begin our quest to find the holy grail of real analysis.

So let us begin our quest to find the holy grail of real analysis. 1 Section 5.2 The Complete Ordered Field: Purpose of Section We present an axiomatic description of the real numbers as a complete ordered field. The axioms which describe the arithmetic of the real numbers

More information

Chapter 4, Arithmetic in F [x] Polynomial arithmetic and the division algorithm.

Chapter 4, Arithmetic in F [x] Polynomial arithmetic and the division algorithm. Chapter 4, Arithmetic in F [x] Polynomial arithmetic and the division algorithm. We begin by defining the ring of polynomials with coefficients in a ring R. After some preliminary results, we specialize

More information

n k=1 k=0 1/k! = e. Example 6.4. The series 1/k 2 converges in R. Indeed, if s n = n then k=1 1/k, then s 2n s n = 1 n + 1 +...

n k=1 k=0 1/k! = e. Example 6.4. The series 1/k 2 converges in R. Indeed, if s n = n then k=1 1/k, then s 2n s n = 1 n + 1 +... 6 Series We call a normed space (X, ) a Banach space provided that every Cauchy sequence (x n ) in X converges. For example, R with the norm = is an example of Banach space. Now let (x n ) be a sequence

More information

Real Roots of Univariate Polynomials with Real Coefficients

Real Roots of Univariate Polynomials with Real Coefficients Real Roots of Univariate Polynomials with Real Coefficients mostly written by Christina Hewitt March 22, 2012 1 Introduction Polynomial equations are used throughout mathematics. When solving polynomials

More information

Integer roots of quadratic and cubic polynomials with integer coefficients

Integer roots of quadratic and cubic polynomials with integer coefficients Integer roots of quadratic and cubic polynomials with integer coefficients Konstantine Zelator Mathematics, Computer Science and Statistics 212 Ben Franklin Hall Bloomsburg University 400 East Second Street

More information

The Mean Value Theorem

The Mean Value Theorem The Mean Value Theorem THEOREM (The Extreme Value Theorem): If f is continuous on a closed interval [a, b], then f attains an absolute maximum value f(c) and an absolute minimum value f(d) at some numbers

More information

Math 115A HW4 Solutions University of California, Los Angeles. 5 2i 6 + 4i. (5 2i)7i (6 + 4i)( 3 + i) = 35i + 14 ( 22 6i) = 36 + 41i.

Math 115A HW4 Solutions University of California, Los Angeles. 5 2i 6 + 4i. (5 2i)7i (6 + 4i)( 3 + i) = 35i + 14 ( 22 6i) = 36 + 41i. Math 5A HW4 Solutions September 5, 202 University of California, Los Angeles Problem 4..3b Calculate the determinant, 5 2i 6 + 4i 3 + i 7i Solution: The textbook s instructions give us, (5 2i)7i (6 + 4i)(

More information

784: algebraic NUMBER THEORY (Instructor s Notes)*

784: algebraic NUMBER THEORY (Instructor s Notes)* Math 784: algebraic NUMBER THEORY (Instructor s Notes)* Algebraic Number Theory: What is it? The goals of the subject include: (i) to use algebraic concepts to deduce information about integers and other

More information

Collinear Points in Permutations

Collinear Points in Permutations Collinear Points in Permutations Joshua N. Cooper Courant Institute of Mathematics New York University, New York, NY József Solymosi Department of Mathematics University of British Columbia, Vancouver,

More information

Notes on metric spaces

Notes on metric spaces Notes on metric spaces 1 Introduction The purpose of these notes is to quickly review some of the basic concepts from Real Analysis, Metric Spaces and some related results that will be used in this course.

More information

Mathematics for Econometrics, Fourth Edition

Mathematics for Econometrics, Fourth Edition Mathematics for Econometrics, Fourth Edition Phoebus J. Dhrymes 1 July 2012 1 c Phoebus J. Dhrymes, 2012. Preliminary material; not to be cited or disseminated without the author s permission. 2 Contents

More information

We give a basic overview of the mathematical background required for this course.

We give a basic overview of the mathematical background required for this course. 1 Background We give a basic overview of the mathematical background required for this course. 1.1 Set Theory We introduce some concepts from naive set theory (as opposed to axiomatic set theory). The

More information

8.1 Makespan Scheduling

8.1 Makespan Scheduling 600.469 / 600.669 Approximation Algorithms Lecturer: Michael Dinitz Topic: Dynamic Programing: Min-Makespan and Bin Packing Date: 2/19/15 Scribe: Gabriel Kaptchuk 8.1 Makespan Scheduling Consider an instance

More information

Georg Cantor and Set Theory

Georg Cantor and Set Theory Georg Cantor and Set Theory. Life Father, Georg Waldemar Cantor, born in Denmark, successful merchant, and stock broker in St Petersburg. Mother, Maria Anna Böhm, was Russian. In 856, because of father

More information

Unique Factorization

Unique Factorization Unique Factorization Waffle Mathcamp 2010 Throughout these notes, all rings will be assumed to be commutative. 1 Factorization in domains: definitions and examples In this class, we will study the phenomenon

More information

SHARP BOUNDS FOR THE SUM OF THE SQUARES OF THE DEGREES OF A GRAPH

SHARP BOUNDS FOR THE SUM OF THE SQUARES OF THE DEGREES OF A GRAPH 31 Kragujevac J. Math. 25 (2003) 31 49. SHARP BOUNDS FOR THE SUM OF THE SQUARES OF THE DEGREES OF A GRAPH Kinkar Ch. Das Department of Mathematics, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302, W.B.,

More information

INDISTINGUISHABILITY OF ABSOLUTELY CONTINUOUS AND SINGULAR DISTRIBUTIONS

INDISTINGUISHABILITY OF ABSOLUTELY CONTINUOUS AND SINGULAR DISTRIBUTIONS INDISTINGUISHABILITY OF ABSOLUTELY CONTINUOUS AND SINGULAR DISTRIBUTIONS STEVEN P. LALLEY AND ANDREW NOBEL Abstract. It is shown that there are no consistent decision rules for the hypothesis testing problem

More information

Elementary Number Theory We begin with a bit of elementary number theory, which is concerned

Elementary Number Theory We begin with a bit of elementary number theory, which is concerned CONSTRUCTION OF THE FINITE FIELDS Z p S. R. DOTY Elementary Number Theory We begin with a bit of elementary number theory, which is concerned solely with questions about the set of integers Z = {0, ±1,

More information

Subsets of Euclidean domains possessing a unique division algorithm

Subsets of Euclidean domains possessing a unique division algorithm Subsets of Euclidean domains possessing a unique division algorithm Andrew D. Lewis 2009/03/16 Abstract Subsets of a Euclidean domain are characterised with the following objectives: (1) ensuring uniqueness

More information

Zeros of Polynomial Functions

Zeros of Polynomial Functions Review: Synthetic Division Find (x 2-5x - 5x 3 + x 4 ) (5 + x). Factor Theorem Solve 2x 3-5x 2 + x + 2 =0 given that 2 is a zero of f(x) = 2x 3-5x 2 + x + 2. Zeros of Polynomial Functions Introduction

More information

Winter Camp 2011 Polynomials Alexander Remorov. Polynomials. Alexander Remorov alexanderrem@gmail.com

Winter Camp 2011 Polynomials Alexander Remorov. Polynomials. Alexander Remorov alexanderrem@gmail.com Polynomials Alexander Remorov alexanderrem@gmail.com Warm-up Problem 1: Let f(x) be a quadratic polynomial. Prove that there exist quadratic polynomials g(x) and h(x) such that f(x)f(x + 1) = g(h(x)).

More information

(x + a) n = x n + a Z n [x]. Proof. If n is prime then the map

(x + a) n = x n + a Z n [x]. Proof. If n is prime then the map 22. A quick primality test Prime numbers are one of the most basic objects in mathematics and one of the most basic questions is to decide which numbers are prime (a clearly related problem is to find

More information

9 More on differentiation

9 More on differentiation Tel Aviv University, 2013 Measure and category 75 9 More on differentiation 9a Finite Taylor expansion............... 75 9b Continuous and nowhere differentiable..... 78 9c Differentiable and nowhere monotone......

More information

AREA AND CIRCUMFERENCE OF CIRCLES

AREA AND CIRCUMFERENCE OF CIRCLES AREA AND CIRCUMFERENCE OF CIRCLES Having seen how to compute the area of triangles, parallelograms, and polygons, we are now going to consider curved regions. Areas of polygons can be found by first dissecting

More information

Mathematical Induction

Mathematical Induction Mathematical Induction (Handout March 8, 01) The Principle of Mathematical Induction provides a means to prove infinitely many statements all at once The principle is logical rather than strictly mathematical,

More information

Taylor Polynomials and Taylor Series Math 126

Taylor Polynomials and Taylor Series Math 126 Taylor Polynomials and Taylor Series Math 26 In many problems in science and engineering we have a function f(x) which is too complicated to answer the questions we d like to ask. In this chapter, we will

More information

Putnam Notes Polynomials and palindromes

Putnam Notes Polynomials and palindromes Putnam Notes Polynomials and palindromes Polynomials show up one way or another in just about every area of math. You will hardly ever see any math competition without at least one problem explicitly concerning

More information

DEGREES OF ORDERS ON TORSION-FREE ABELIAN GROUPS

DEGREES OF ORDERS ON TORSION-FREE ABELIAN GROUPS DEGREES OF ORDERS ON TORSION-FREE ABELIAN GROUPS ASHER M. KACH, KAREN LANGE, AND REED SOLOMON Abstract. We construct two computable presentations of computable torsion-free abelian groups, one of isomorphism

More information

1 Homework 1. [p 0 q i+j +... + p i 1 q j+1 ] + [p i q j ] + [p i+1 q j 1 +... + p i+j q 0 ]

1 Homework 1. [p 0 q i+j +... + p i 1 q j+1 ] + [p i q j ] + [p i+1 q j 1 +... + p i+j q 0 ] 1 Homework 1 (1) Prove the ideal (3,x) is a maximal ideal in Z[x]. SOLUTION: Suppose we expand this ideal by including another generator polynomial, P / (3, x). Write P = n + x Q with n an integer not

More information

Solving epsilon-delta problems

Solving epsilon-delta problems Solving epsilon-delta problems Math 1A, 313,315 DIS September 29, 2014 There will probably be at least one epsilon-delta problem on the midterm and the final. These kind of problems ask you to show 1 that

More information

Prime Numbers and Irreducible Polynomials

Prime Numbers and Irreducible Polynomials Prime Numbers and Irreducible Polynomials M. Ram Murty The similarity between prime numbers and irreducible polynomials has been a dominant theme in the development of number theory and algebraic geometry.

More information

Applications of Fermat s Little Theorem and Congruences

Applications of Fermat s Little Theorem and Congruences Applications of Fermat s Little Theorem and Congruences Definition: Let m be a positive integer. Then integers a and b are congruent modulo m, denoted by a b mod m, if m (a b). Example: 3 1 mod 2, 6 4

More information

STUDENT S SOLUTIONS MANUAL ELEMENTARY NUMBER THEORY. Bart Goddard. Kenneth H. Rosen AND ITS APPLICATIONS FIFTH EDITION. to accompany.

STUDENT S SOLUTIONS MANUAL ELEMENTARY NUMBER THEORY. Bart Goddard. Kenneth H. Rosen AND ITS APPLICATIONS FIFTH EDITION. to accompany. STUDENT S SOLUTIONS MANUAL to accompany ELEMENTARY NUMBER THEORY AND ITS APPLICATIONS FIFTH EDITION Bart Goddard Kenneth H. Rosen AT&T Labs Reproduced by Pearson Addison-Wesley from electronic files supplied

More information

Automata and Rational Numbers

Automata and Rational Numbers Automata and Rational Numbers Jeffrey Shallit School of Computer Science University of Waterloo Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 Canada shallit@cs.uwaterloo.ca http://www.cs.uwaterloo.ca/~shallit 1/40 Representations

More information

PUTNAM TRAINING POLYNOMIALS. Exercises 1. Find a polynomial with integral coefficients whose zeros include 2 + 5.

PUTNAM TRAINING POLYNOMIALS. Exercises 1. Find a polynomial with integral coefficients whose zeros include 2 + 5. PUTNAM TRAINING POLYNOMIALS (Last updated: November 17, 2015) Remark. This is a list of exercises on polynomials. Miguel A. Lerma Exercises 1. Find a polynomial with integral coefficients whose zeros include

More information

Full and Complete Binary Trees

Full and Complete Binary Trees Full and Complete Binary Trees Binary Tree Theorems 1 Here are two important types of binary trees. Note that the definitions, while similar, are logically independent. Definition: a binary tree T is full

More information

Finite Fields and Error-Correcting Codes

Finite Fields and Error-Correcting Codes Lecture Notes in Mathematics Finite Fields and Error-Correcting Codes Karl-Gustav Andersson (Lund University) (version 1.013-16 September 2015) Translated from Swedish by Sigmundur Gudmundsson Contents

More information

March 29, 2011. 171S4.4 Theorems about Zeros of Polynomial Functions

March 29, 2011. 171S4.4 Theorems about Zeros of Polynomial Functions MAT 171 Precalculus Algebra Dr. Claude Moore Cape Fear Community College CHAPTER 4: Polynomial and Rational Functions 4.1 Polynomial Functions and Models 4.2 Graphing Polynomial Functions 4.3 Polynomial

More information

CS 3719 (Theory of Computation and Algorithms) Lecture 4

CS 3719 (Theory of Computation and Algorithms) Lecture 4 CS 3719 (Theory of Computation and Algorithms) Lecture 4 Antonina Kolokolova January 18, 2012 1 Undecidable languages 1.1 Church-Turing thesis Let s recap how it all started. In 1990, Hilbert stated a

More information

Worksheet on induction Calculus I Fall 2006 First, let us explain the use of for summation. The notation

Worksheet on induction Calculus I Fall 2006 First, let us explain the use of for summation. The notation Worksheet on induction MA113 Calculus I Fall 2006 First, let us explain the use of for summation. The notation f(k) means to evaluate the function f(k) at k = 1, 2,..., n and add up the results. In other

More information

The sample space for a pair of die rolls is the set. The sample space for a random number between 0 and 1 is the interval [0, 1].

The sample space for a pair of die rolls is the set. The sample space for a random number between 0 and 1 is the interval [0, 1]. Probability Theory Probability Spaces and Events Consider a random experiment with several possible outcomes. For example, we might roll a pair of dice, flip a coin three times, or choose a random real

More information

I. GROUPS: BASIC DEFINITIONS AND EXAMPLES

I. GROUPS: BASIC DEFINITIONS AND EXAMPLES I GROUPS: BASIC DEFINITIONS AND EXAMPLES Definition 1: An operation on a set G is a function : G G G Definition 2: A group is a set G which is equipped with an operation and a special element e G, called

More information

Math 55: Discrete Mathematics

Math 55: Discrete Mathematics Math 55: Discrete Mathematics UC Berkeley, Fall 2011 Homework # 5, due Wednesday, February 22 5.1.4 Let P (n) be the statement that 1 3 + 2 3 + + n 3 = (n(n + 1)/2) 2 for the positive integer n. a) What

More information

MATH 4330/5330, Fourier Analysis Section 11, The Discrete Fourier Transform

MATH 4330/5330, Fourier Analysis Section 11, The Discrete Fourier Transform MATH 433/533, Fourier Analysis Section 11, The Discrete Fourier Transform Now, instead of considering functions defined on a continuous domain, like the interval [, 1) or the whole real line R, we wish

More information

Solutions for Practice problems on proofs

Solutions for Practice problems on proofs Solutions for Practice problems on proofs Definition: (even) An integer n Z is even if and only if n = 2m for some number m Z. Definition: (odd) An integer n Z is odd if and only if n = 2m + 1 for some

More information