Technician. Chapter 5: A Dose of Professionalism for the Pharmacy. 3 Contact Hours. Learning objectives. Introduction

Save this PDF as:
 WORD  PNG  TXT  JPG

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "Technician. Chapter 5: A Dose of Professionalism for the Pharmacy. 3 Contact Hours. Learning objectives. Introduction"

Transcription

1 Chapter 5: A Dose of Professionalism for the Pharmacy Technician 3 Contact Hours By Katie Ingersoll, RPh, PharmD, and Staff Pharmacist for a national chain. Author Disclosure: Katie Ingersoll and Elite Professional Education, LLC do not have any actual or potential conflicts of interest in relation to this lesson. Universal Activity Number (UAN): H04-T Activity Type: Knowledge-based Initial Release Date: June 1, 2015 Expiration Date: May 31, 2017 Target Audience: Pharmacy Technicians in a community-based setting. To Obtain Credit: A minimum test score of 70 percent is needed to obtain a credit. Please submit your answers either by mail, fax, or online at PharmacyTech.EliteCME.com. Questions regarding statements of credit and other customer service issues should be directed to This lesson is $ Educational Review Systems is accredited by the Accreditation Council of Pharmacy Education (ACPE) as a provider of continuing pharmaceutical education. This program is approved for 3 hours (0.3 CEUs) of continuing pharmacy education credit. Proof of participation will be posted to your NABP CPE profile within 4 to 6 weeks to participants who have successfully completed the post-test. Participants must participate in the entire presentation and complete the course evaluation to receive continuing pharmacy education credit. Learning objectives After completing this continuing education program, the pharmacy technician should be able to: List the demographic and insurance information necessary for a patient s profile as well as information necessary to complete a prescriber s profile. Discuss the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), including protected health information, disclosures that may be made, and patient rights under HIPAA. Discuss medication error prevention, including common points of error and strategies used to prevent errors. Describe how to report medication errors and prevention strategies to reduce the occurrence of errors. Describe the technician s role in customer satisfaction surveys and internal audits of processes. Introduction The responsibilities of pharmacy technicians are continuously changing, but the professional status of the technician remains the same. Technicians are perfectly poised to encourage the safe and efficient delivery of medications to patients, and many professional standards and regulations exist to guide the technician in this regard. Applying the knowledge of these guidelines to daily practice will help Creating and maintaining patient profiles Each patient must have his or her own medication profile that contains demographic information, insurance information, and medication records. A complete patient profile ensures the pharmacist has all of Demographics Basic patient identifiers need to be collected for all new patients to allow the pharmacy to contact the patient if needed and ensure the correct patient is selected when filling future prescriptions. If a patient has never had a prescription filled at a particular pharmacy, the following information should be collected to complete the patient s profile: Full name. Date of birth. Gender. Address. Page 41 the technician remain in compliance with the law and serve patients in the safest and most effective manner possible. In addition, actively participating in quality assurance activities will help the technician assume a more integral role in the pharmacy team. Assuming a central role on the pharmacy team will allow the technician to grow both personally and professionally. the information necessary to accurately assess the appropriateness of medications used for treatment and minimize adverse events. Phone number. Allergies, to medications, foods, and any other pertinent stimuli. Chronic medical conditions. Other medications the person is taking. It is important for the pharmacy technician to obtain basic medical information about patients, including medical conditions, other medications they are taking, and allergies. Because certain medications can have adverse reactions or are contraindicated in specific disease states, it is important for pharmacy technicians to enter chronic medical conditions in patient profiles to ensure pharmacists have the PharmacyTech.EliteCME.com

2 information they need to properly assess medication therapy. Some state boards of pharmacy have regulations requiring pharmacies to enter chronic disease states in patient profiles, so this information should be collected on each patient to ensure compliance with state laws, if applicable. Medications that patients obtain elsewhere and over-the-counter products the patient is taking should be entered into the patient s profile to ensure the pharmacist can appropriately check for drug interactions and contraindications. Allergy information is critical to ensuring a patient does not receive a drug that could potentially cause a life-threatening allergic reaction. Insurance information Collecting insurance information from patients will allow the pharmacy to bill their insurance for the services rendered. The patient should be asked for a prescription insurance card to obtain the information necessary to bill a claim to an insurance company. Pharmacies generally need the following information to bill prescription insurance for pharmacy services: BIN number identifies the company with whom the patient has insurance. Identification number identifies the patient within the insurance company. Group number identifies the patient s employer or group the insurance is purchased through. PCN number processor control number, identifies the processing necessary within the insurance company. Provider information Prescriber profiles need to be created and maintained for each prescriber who has written prescriptions filled at each pharmacy. Each prescriber s profile should include: The prescriber s first and last name. Office address of the prescriber, with a separate listing for each office if the person practices at multiple locations. Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) number if the person ever prescribes controlled substances. Tech alert! Serious allergies to stimuli other than medications should be recorded as well. A few medications are processed in ways that can cause allergic reactions in patients with allergies to eggs, peanuts, shellfish, and other severe allergies, so this information should be recorded for the pharmacist to accurately assess medication therapy. All patient information must be collected in a manner that ensures the confidentiality of the information. Any information written down before entering it into the computer system should be destroyed in a way that maintains confidentiality of written information, such as shredding or incineration. All information collected orally should be spoken in soft tones to prevent others from hearing. Person code number indicating where the patient falls in order of people covered on the plan, such as cardholder, spouse, or child. If a patient does not bring an insurance card but has active coverage, either the patient or technician can collect the pharmacy billing information from the insurance company. Medicare Part D information can often be looked up through a government-run search engine. This requires the patient s Social Security number, which should be communicated and disposed of in a confidential manner. Pharmacy technicians should ensure the patient s prescription insurance information is collected appropriately before the patient leaves the pharmacy to ensure billing can be completed in a timely fashion. National provider identifier (NPI). State license number, if required by state law. Updates to prescriber profiles should occur as requested by the prescriber. Prescriber files may be closed without notification from the prescriber if it is discovered that the person has retired, had his or her license revoked, or otherwise stopped practicing medication. Laws governing patient information Federal laws have been created to respect the basic rights of all patients and to ensure health care professionals explain those rights to patients. These help ensure a patient s welfare is protected. HIPAA The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) was enacted in 1996, and has far-reaching effects for all health care professionals. There are many implications of this act, which is divided into two major sections: Title I: Health Care Access, Portability, and Renewability Increasing the portability and continuity of health insurance, such as when a patient changes or loses a job. Reducing health insurance fraud, waste, and abuse. Encouraging the use of health savings accounts. Title II: Administrative Simplification Ensuring the confidentiality of protected health information (PHI). Disclosing and using only the minimum amount of PHI necessary. Giving patients the right to see who has accessed their PHI. HIPAA established that health care workers are responsible for the protection of a patient s PHI, which is any patient information that identifies a patient, relates to a past, present or future health condition, and is created or used by a covered entity under HIPAA. Examples of PHI include: Name, address, and other demographic information. Date of birth. Social Security number. Payment history. Account, license, and record numbers. Prescription and medical history. address. Device identifiers, such as IP addresses. Genetic information. Covered entities under HIPAA include any person or group that provides health care to a patient, bills for health care services, or is paid for health care services. This includes pharmacists and pharmacy technicians as well as doctors, nurses, and other health care providers. PharmacyTech.EliteCME.com Page 42

3 Protecting PHI in various communication formats HIPAA protects health information in any communication format. Written PHI must be handled and stored appropriately and guarded against potential unauthorized releases of information. Pharmacies should have a plan for dealing with written PHI to ensure that all PHI they receive or produce is guarded against potential unauthorized disclosures. All trash that has patient information on it should be disposed of in a confidential manner, by shredding or storing in an opaque bag until an outside HIPAA-compliant company can pick it up for shredding. Prescription vials containing patient information should have labels removed before disposal. Electronically transmitted health information must be communicated through HIPAA-compliant channels, and computerized patient information must be protected. This includes billing claims for prescriptions and prescriptions received through electronic transmission as well as computerized patient records and medication information. This information must be securely stored and protected from unauthorized access. Users of electronic medical record systems should be given individual usernames and passwords to access the computer system. Training requirements All pharmacy staff and any other facility employees who have access to PHI must receive formal training on HIPAA. Employees should Notice of privacy practices HIPAA requires patients to be provided with a written notice of a covered entity s privacy practices. The notice should include information about the privacy practices of the pharmacy or health care provider, including how they intend to use or disclose a patient s PHI and how they will protect this information. The patient should be given the privacy notice in person or by mail, and a copy of the privacy Minimum necessary PHI After verifying the identity of the person seeking to obtain PHI, disclosures must include only the minimum necessary amount of information on the patient. Minimizing the amount of PHI disclosed will decrease the amount of PHI available for potential unauthorized disclosures. Pharmacy technicians should apply this concept when discussing patient information with others and also when requesting PHI themselves from other health care providers. There are exceptions to the minimum necessary disclosure rule. When having a discussion with a patient, providers should not limit themselves to obtaining only the information necessary to treat PHI disclosures Protected health information may be disclosed to other health professionals who are involved in a patient s treatment as long as the health care professional has his or her own privacy policy that the patient has acknowledged. The minimum necessary rule does not apply to two providers exchanging PHI on the same patient, except if dealing with sensitive issues such as HIV status, psychotherapy, or substance abuse treatment. Disclosures may be made to relatives and caregivers within reason and at the discretion of the health care professional. There are limitations disclosures should remain applicable to the health condition being discussed, and should not be made if the patient explicitly requests PHI not be disclosed to relatives or caregivers. Disclosures made to parents of Page 43 Tech alert! Usernames and passwords for systems containing protected health information should never be given out to unauthorized users! People who do not have access to the computer system but require access to complete their job should set up their own access through the appropriate channels. Orally communicated PHI must be protected from potential disclosures as well, and therefore should be discussed at low volumes to prevent other people from hearing this information. Patients may request a more private area for discussion of PHI if they are uncomfortable having a discussion where others could potentially hear, and should be directed to a private area, such as a consultation room, away from earshot of other people. Pharmacy technicians should use discretion when discussing PHI with a patient s family member, friend, or other representative. Confidential patient information should not be discussed with anyone other than the patient, the patient s caregiver who has medical power of attorney over the patient, or the parent of a child less than 18 years of age. If a patient s spouse or other family member is representing the patient at the pharmacy, technicians should use caution when disclosing patient information, and only disclose the minimum necessary information if the patient s representative introduces it into the conversation. be made aware of the general principles of HIPAA as well as their employer s privacy practices. notice should be posted in an easy-to-view area of the pharmacy. Each patient should sign an acknowledgment on the first day of their treatment stating they have received the health care provider s notice of privacy practices, and signatures should be maintained for at least six years from the date of last service to the patient, depending on state law. one specific thing. Obtaining as much information as possible for the purpose of treatment is necessary to provide proper care. Other exceptions can be made to follow other laws or if PHI is used by the patient or an authorized representative. The minimum necessary rule also applies to the health care employees who have access to PHI. If it is not necessary for employees to use PHI to perform their jobs, they should not be given access, such as the cleaning staff in a hospital. Minimizing the number of people who have access to PHI will decrease the amount of PHI available for potential unauthorized disclosures. a minor should be made at the discretion of the pharmacist and according to state law. Tech alert! Disclosing health care information on minors to parents can be a sensitive subject, such as when a minor is taking birth control pills or emergency contraception. If you are unsure whether a disclosure should be made, consult the pharmacist. PHI can also be released to companies that work on behalf of the patient, such as insurance companies. This information may only be disclosed for treatment, payment, or normal health care operations, and the minimum necessary rule applies to these disclosures. Other disclosures can be made under certain circumstances, such as: Law enforcement reasons. PharmacyTech.EliteCME.com

4 Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) investigations. Board of Pharmacy investigations. Adverse event reporting. Workers Compensation. Certain public health reasons. Use of a patient s health information outside of these permitted disclosures requires approval from the patient through a written and signed authorization letter stating the proposed use of disclosed information. Accidental disclosures HIPAA does have allowances for accidental disclosures of PHI, such as when another patient hears a pharmacist counseling someone else or a patient finds another patient s medication leaflet in the parking lot. If these disclosures could not be reasonably prevented, are a result of a permitted disclosure, and only include a limited amount of information, they are acceptable. De-identified PHI PHI that has been de-identified may be disclosed if it cannot be used to identify a patient. This requires the removal of all potentially identifying information, including a patient s name, demographics, ID and account numbers, and date of birth or death. Patient rights under HIPAA Patients have the following rights under HIPAA: The right to receive a list of all non-routine disclosures of their PHI within the past six years. The right to receive a copy of their medical records. Violations of HIPAA Periodic audits are conducted by the Department of Health and Human Services. Violations can result in fines and imprisonment, depending Other implications of HIPAA NPI numbers The enactment of HIPAA also initiated the use of national provider identifier (NPI) numbers for all health care professionals who use electronic communications and prescribe medication or vaccines to patients. After registration with the National Plan and Provider State Board of Pharmacy regulations Pharmacy technicians should make sure they are familiar with regulations enacted by their state s Board of Pharmacy that govern their practice of pharmacy. They may need to register for a pharmacy technician license if required by their state. If required, this license must be obtained after receiving adequate technician training, and the applicant may need to pass the Pharmacy Technician Certification Board (PTCB) exam to obtain licensure. If required, licensure must be obtained before beginning work as a pharmacy technician. A state s board of pharmacy regulations may be more stringent than federal laws, including HIPAA. For example, states have varying Pharmacy technicians should always use caution to prevent these accidental disclosures by keeping their voice low when discussing patient information and storing and disposing of written patient information appropriately. De-identified patient information can be used for research purposes, public health purposes, case studies, or quality improvement. Those that use de-identified health information for research may need to sign a data use agreement that fulfills the requirements of HIPAA. The right to request changes to their medical records, such as an error on a prescription on their record. Pharmacy technicians should ensure requests pertaining to these rights are handled in a timely fashion to accommodate the patient s needs. on the severity of the disclosures and whether they were accidental or due to willful neglect. Enumeration System, providers are issued a unique 11-digit NPI number that will remain with them as long as they continue to practice medicine. Health care professionals are required by HIPAA to use their NPI number for all transactions involving PHI. standpoints on the confidentiality of a minor on the subject of contraception. If state laws are more restrictive than federal law, the state law should be followed, and technicians should make sure to familiarize themselves with pertinent state laws. Board of pharmacy regulations govern the length of time records need to be maintained. Each state has a different time frame for record storage, including patient profiles. Pharmacy technicians should consult their state board of pharmacy to determine how long patient profiles should be maintained. Participate in quality assurance activities Medication error prevention Michelle is a pharmacy technician at the local branch of a large chain retail pharmacy. Her store is undergoing a remodel, and there is construction going on throughout the store during her workday. In the early afternoon, she is trying to get a few more prescriptions typed for patients waiting in the store before she can finally go on her lunch break, when a customer looking for toilet paper interrupts her. Michelle directs her to the paper products aisle, and when she goes back to typing her prescriptions, she accidentally types a prescription for Mr. Smith for the incorrect strength of morphine. The product she selected is four times as strong as the one the doctor ordered. The pharmacist does not catch this mistake on the quality assurance check, and Mr. Smith receives the medication that he needs for pain associated with a recent back surgery. He takes the medication, and luckily, his wife was home when he took it because it resulted in severe respiratory depression that sent him back to the hospital. PharmacyTech.EliteCME.com Page 44

5 What is considered an error? Errors are preventable occurrences that can lead to inappropriate use of a medication while the health care professional or patient is in control of the medication. They can be caused by systems and procedures related to prescribing and dispensing the medication within the health care system, and can also be associated with use by the patient. When do errors occur? Medication errors can occur in the pharmacy at any part of the prescription dispensing process. Common points of error include data entry, production/counting, pharmacist quality assurance check, and point of sale. Pharmacy technicians should be aware of potential Data entry Many types of medication errors can occur when entering prescriptions into the pharmacy s computer system. Data entry is the point where the pharmacy technician pulls up the patient s file or creates a new file for new patients, and types the prescription into the file. The patient s demographics should be entered to create the patient s file, including name, address, date of birth, and phone number. Any allergies, medical conditions, and insurance information should be added at this point as well, and confirmed with the patient at each visit. Missing or inaccurate information in the patient s file can increase the chance of an error occurring; missing demographics can result in confusion between multiple customers with similar names, and Difficult to read handwriting Pharmacy technicians should use caution when deciphering medication orders handwritten by prescribers. Since prescribers are often in a rush when writing out prescriptions, their handwriting can be difficult to decipher and occasionally illegible. Knowing the reason why a patient is taking a particular medication can help clarify questionable handwriting, and looking at a patient s medication history can also provide insight into what is being prescribed. Pharmacy technicians should never guess what they cannot decipher if the medication order is questionable because of poor handwriting, Verbal orders All orders received over the phone, whether a refill or new prescription, should be read back after it is recorded. This allows the pharmacy to verify that the prescription that was recorded matches the order the doctor prescribed. Reading back prescription information after the entire order is recorded to ensure it is transcribed correctly The five rights of data entry There are several ways that medication errors can occur during data entry. Errors are commonly related to five common points in the data entry process. The pharmacy technician should ensure that the right Right patient Ensuring the right patient is chosen when entering a prescription into the patient profile is the first step in correctly filling a prescription. Using two patient identifiers, such as name and date of birth, to verify a patient s identity will help ensure the right patient is chosen. If two patients have the same name and date of birth, their address or another identifier should be used to distinguish between the two. Medication errors are a common occurrence that can affect as many as 1.5 million American patients per year, according to the Institute of Medicine s error report, Preventing Medication Errors. This report brought to light the sheer number of medication errors that occur in the U.S. annually, and inspired many health care facilities to refocus on patient safety. 13 causes of error at all points in the dispensing process to prevent errors from occurring and maximize patient safety. Procedures for dispensing medications should be evaluated regularly to address potential causes of error. missing allergies and medical conditions can result in inappropriate medications being dispensed. Developing a checklist of information that should be obtained from the patient at each visit will help prevent errors from occurring because of missing information. Once the file has been created or found, the technician should read the entire prescription and assess it for completeness and accuracy before typing it into the patient s file. The prescription should then be typed into the computer system by following the pharmacy s designated data entry process for every prescription. Any automatic safety alerts that arise when entering data into the computer system should be addressed immediately and not bypassed. it should be clarified with the prescriber to prevent medication errors. Suggesting typewritten orders to prescribers who have handwriting issues is also appropriate. Tech alert! If technicians are unsure what a prescriber wrote on a prescription, they should never guess! Clarification of illegible handwriting should always be made with the pharmacist or prescriber to minimize the risk of error. is good practice and will help prevent medication errors with verbal orders. Because state laws on pharmacy technicians taking verbal orders vary, technicians should consult their state board of pharmacy to find out what prescription information they may take over the phone and what must be received by a pharmacist. patient, drug, dosage, route, and timing are entered into the computer system and printed on the patient s medication label to prevent medication errors from occurring. Common reasons for errors when selecting patient names include similar sounding names, similar spelling of names, and patients in the same family with the same names and different titles, such as Sr., Jr., or III. Pharmacy technicians should ensure they are familiar with these common reasons for errors and take the steps necessary to prevent them from occurring. Page 45 PharmacyTech.EliteCME.com

6 Right drug There are many factors that contribute to errors from the selection of incorrect medication. Pharmacy technicians should be aware of medications that look and sound alike, as well as high-alert medications and those that have multiple release formulations, such as extended and regular release tablets, to prevent medication errors from selecting the wrong drug. Look-alike and sound-alike medications The Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) maintains a list of easily confused medications, including look-alike and sound-alike medications. The medications on this list are commonly confused for one another, either because they look similar to one another or sound similar to each other when spoken. The ISMP also includes other pairs of medications on their list that do not necessarily look or sound alike but are easily confused for one another and have been associated with errors in the past. The medications on this list have been associated with errors that were reported to the ISMP through its National Medication Errors Reporting Program (ISMP MERP). Pharmacy technicians should familiarize themselves with the medications on this list that are commonly used in their pharmacy to understand when potential errors may occur and attempt to prevent errors. When medications are going through the approval process for sale in the U.S., the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) reviews the names of medications to assess for similarities among other available products. Drug names that are similar to another medication already on the market are rejected, but some do make it to the market and are changed after errors are reported. Reporting errors involving similar drug names to the FDA through its MedWatch system will help the FDA assess the risk of error and require the names to be changed or other safeguards put in place, if necessary. The FDA also collaborates with the ISMP to share error reports to obtain the most information possible on errors occurring in the U.S. Therefore, errors involving drug name similarities can be reported to the ISMP or FDA so the information can be used to develop programs to prevent future errors from occurring. Examples of look-alike and sound-alike medications include: Hydroxyzine and hydralazine. Leukeran and leucovorin. Mucinex and Mucomyst. Prilosec and Prozac. Retrovir and ritonavir. Zantac and Xanax. Tech alert! The ISMP s complete list of look-alike and soundalike medications can be found at confuseddrugnames.pdf. 9 As you can see, in a busy pharmacy setting, these medications can be easily confused for one another, especially when written in poor handwriting or spoken with an accent. The FDA has approved the use of tall man lettering on the labeling of some of these commonly confused medications to help distinguish between similar names. This type of labeling uses capital letters in the word to highlight the portion of the word that is different. For example, hydroxyzine and hydralazine are listed on stock bottles of these medications to help prevent confusion between the two products. Using tall man lettering to highlight differences between drug names has been shown to decrease the risk of confusion between similar drug names, decreasing error potential.10 A complete list of medications that have been FDA-approved to use tall man lettering as well as additional medications suggested by the ISMP can be found at High-alert medications Certain medications are associated with a greater risk of harm to patients if they are used incorrectly. These high-alert medications are associated with a higher risk of harmful side effects that can increase as the dosage of medication increases. This means that dosing errors with these medications are particularly dangerous errors involving dosing that is one decimal place off can be potentially fatal. Examples of high alert medications and the risks associated with them include: Opiates, such as oxycodone, fentanyl, and morphine, because of the risk of respiratory depression. Anticoagulants, such as warfarin and heparin, because of the risk of excessive bleeding. Insulin, because of the risk of hyper- or hypoglycemia. Chemotherapy medications, such as methotrexate and cisplatin, because of the risk of toxicity. These high alert medications may have special precautions in place to prevent errors associated with them, depending on the institution. These precautions may include separation of these medications from others in the pharmacy s stock or alerts that arise in the computer system when the pharmacist is checking the prescription of a high-alert medication for accuracy. Pharmacy technicians should familiarize themselves with the risks associated with high-alert medications and the precautions in place at their institution to prevent errors associated with these potentially dangerous drugs. Different formulations of the same medications Technicians should also be aware of varying forms of the same medications. Medications that are available in instant and extended release formulations are often confused for one another. Technicians should look for abbreviations after medication names for drugs with several formulations and ensure they are entered into the computer system properly. They should also look for any abbreviations that do not correlate with products on the marketplace. For example, a patient brings in a prescription for bupropion LA. There is no LA formulation of bupropion, but there is a regular release as well as sustained release (SR) and extended release (XL) versions. Checking the formulation the patient was on previously can help to decipher any discrepancies, and if the pharmacist cannot discern the correct formulation, the doctor should be called for verification. Other formulation errors that commonly occur involve differing concentrations of the same medications. An example of a medication with various concentrations is heparin. Heparin is commonly available in 1,000 units/ml, 5,000 units/ml, and 10,000 units/ml. Heparin is also a high-alert medication because it is an anticoagulant and can increase the risk of bleeding if given in doses higher than necessary and increase the risk of blood clots if given in doses lower than necessary. Using the incorrect concentration of heparin has the potential to result in fatal consequences, especially when used in children and infants. Pharmacists and pharmacy technicians should check the concentration of heparin several times before filling a medication order or refilling an automated dispensing machine. There are many other medications with several concentrations available, including: Morphine. Lorazepam. Amoxicillin suspension. Epinephrine. Insulin. PharmacyTech.EliteCME.com Page 46

7 Pharmacy technicians can help pharmacists and the pharmacy team prevent medication errors by being aware of the different Right dose Being diligent about calculating and selecting the correct dosage of medication in the data entry process is critical to ensuring the correct dosage is dispensed to the patient. Dosages are often incorrectly interpreted when excessive zeros are used, and pharmacy technicians should be aware of this common error to make sure they do not interpret zeros incorrectly, potentially resulting in a significantly higher or lower dose. Trailing zeros should not be used after a decimal point. For example, a common dosage of warfarin is 1 mg.; it should never be written as 1.0 mg. because it is easy to miss the decimal and confuse it for 10 mg. This could result in a potentially fatal error with this high-alert medication. Being aware of common dosages of medications can help the pharmacy technician prevent these errors, because, for example, it is less common to see a prescription written for 10 mg. tablets of warfarin than it is to see a prescription for 1 mg. tablets. Leading zeros should always be used before a decimal point. For example, haloperidol that is dosed at 0.5 mg. should never be written as.5 mg, as it can easily be confused for 5 mg., another dosage that is available for haloperidol. This would result in a 10-fold increase in dose that could be harmful to a patient. Pharmacy technicians should become familiar with common dosages of medications and think about what is available when they are entering medications into the computer system. Any questions should be clarified with the pharmacist or prescriber before entering Right time and route Ensuring the correct directions are entered into the computer system from a prescription will help the patient take the medication at the right time and through the correct route of administration. Pharmacy technicians should take the time to read the directions on the prescription before typing them into the computer system to make Abbreviations 6 Incorrect use of abbreviations is a major contributing factor to errors in the timing and route of administration. The Joint Commission (JCAHO) issues an official Do Not Use list of abbreviations that are commonly associated with medication errors, and hospitals are required to have their own Do Not Use list with these abbreviations included on their list. Abbreviations on the Do Not Use list should never be used, and prescribers who use these abbreviations should be contacted to prevent the further use of these error-prone shortcuts. This list includes the following abbreviations that should not be used: U for unit The word unit should be written out to avoid mistaking it for a zero or part of another word. IU for international unit The words international unit should be written out to avoid confusing this abbreviation for IV or the number 10. QD for daily and QOD for every other day These abbreviations should always be written out as daily or every other day to avoid confusion between the two terms as well as to prevent misinterpreting either of these for QID, which stands for four times daily. MSO4 for morphine sulfate and MgSO4 for magnesium sulfate, as well as MS, which could be interpreted as either these concentrations available for each medication and using caution when handling these medications. the information into the computer system to avoid significant and potentially fatal errors. Calculation of dosages also occurs during data entry, and is another contributing factor to incorrect dosage errors. For example, if a prescriber writes a prescription to have a patient take 0.5 mg. of liquid lorazepam every eight hours, the pharmacy technician must calculate how many milliliters of liquid to give in each dose, based on the concentration of liquid lorazepam stocked at the pharmacy. Because the amount of liquid given in each dose is incredibly important in ensuring the patient receives the correct amount of medication in each dose, the technician should ensure this is done carefully and accurately. Pharmacy technicians should take the time to calculate dosages appropriately and consult the pharmacist if any questions or concerns arise. Calculating the number of days a given supply of medication should last is another important part of the data entry process. If an incorrect days supply is calculated, this can lead to the patient receiving too much or too little medication for a set period of time, which can lead to the patient taking the incorrect amount of medication. Calculating the correct days supply is also important from an insurance standpoint, because an incorrect days supply can result in rejected insurance claims and even prompt insurance audits. Technicians should take their time when calculating days supply and discuss any questions or concerns with the pharmacist. sure they make sense and do not need further clarification from the doctor or pharmacist. Any questionable instructions or handwriting issues should be discussed with the pharmacist before entering the information into the patient s file. words should all be written out to prevent misinterpreting one for the other, resulting in a potentially fatal error. Trailing zeros and lack of leading zeros the Joint Commission also encourages the use of leading zeros and recommends against using trailing zeros to prevent dosage errors. The Institute of Safe Medication Practices has compiled a more thorough list of abbreviations and symbols that are associated with errors reported to it. Pharmacy technicians should familiarize themselves with this list to prevent common errors associated with these abbreviations and shortcuts. This list can be accessed at Avoiding abbreviations altogether can prevent many errors associated with difficult-to-interpret abbreviations. Writing out the medication name and directions can eliminate those easily confused abbreviations, reducing the risk of errors. But because many prescribers will continue to use these abbreviations despite the risk associated with them, pharmacy technicians should be on the lookout for potential errors and clarify any questionable information with the pharmacist or prescriber. The use of technology can also prevent abbreviation-related errors. Prescriptions that are typed out instead of handwritten can prevent errors caused by poor handwriting. Prescriptions can also be ed or electronically transmitted directly to the pharmacy s computer Page 47 PharmacyTech.EliteCME.com

8 system to start the data entry process, eliminating some of the data entry a technician has to do and the errors associated with it. Prescribers with poor handwriting should be encouraged to use electronic systems for writing and sending in prescriptions to reduce Production/counting The production part of the dispensing process occurs after medication orders are entered into the computer system. Production consists of printing a label for the prescription vial, counting out the number of tablets or pouring liquid medication for the prescription, and preparing the order for the pharmacist s final check. Even if there are no errors in the data entry phase, errors can still occur in the production phase, and pharmacy technicians should be aware of the potential for errors at this point of the dispensing process. Pulling medication off the pharmacy s shelves for use in dispensing can be associated with medication errors. Stock bottles often have similar packaging to other medications, and different strengths of the same medication are often located next to one another. Error Barcode technology Barcode technology is available to ensure the correct medication is used to fill prescriptions. After a prescription is typed into the computer system, the barcode of the stock bottle is scanned to create a label for the patient s prescription vial. This allows the computer to check that the bottle picked off the shelf matches the product that was selected in typing the prescription, and thus ensure the correct medication is used to fill a Counting errors Errors can also occur when counting out the amount of medication needed to fill a prescription order. Orders in the outpatient pharmacy setting are often filled in increments of 30 because many insurance companies pay for a 30- or 90-day supply of medication at a time. Pharmacy technicians should make sure to pay attention to the number of tablets or units a prescription requires, especially when they are written for odd quantities or more than the standard number of units. Quantities should be double-counted for controlled substances and any time a technician for any reason is unsure how many tablets were counted out to ensure the proper quantity is dispensed to the patient. Pharmacist quality assurance check During the quality assurance check, the pharmacist reviews all prescriptions to ensure they are filled according to the prescriber s directions and are appropriate for each patient. Errors can occur when this check is performed inaccurately, which can occur when the pharmacist is very busy or distracted. Drug interaction errors Drug interaction errors commonly occur when information is overlooked during the pharmacist s quality assurance check, and are more common in patients who take many medications, such as elderly and critically ill patients. These patients are also prone to changes in metabolism that can alter the effects of their medications and their interaction with other medications, increasing the risk of adverse effects. Point of sale Errors can also occur when selling medications to patients. In a busy pharmacy environment, errors can occur when a medication is sold to someone it was not intended for. This can result in a patient taking error potential. Ensuring all error-reducing technology is used appropriately and not bypassed will help prevent potentially harmful errors from occurring. prevention strategies, such as physically separating similar looking bottles and different dosages of the same medication with dividers, will help prevent technicians and pharmacists from pulling the wrong medication off the shelf to fill an order. Stickers or signs can also be used for high alert medications, or those that are prone to more dangerous errors. When filling prescriptions, the National Drug Code number should be checked three times for accuracy when the medication is pulled off of the shelf, when the medication is counted out, and when the stock bottle is put back on the shelf or disposed of. Pharmacy technicians should be aware of the similarities in packaging of products in their pharmacy and use all available technology to prevent errors when pulling medications off of the shelves for use in dispensing. patient s prescription. Technicians should make sure barcodes are scanned for each medication filled to prevent errors. Tech alert! Barcode technology is an error-prevention strategy that should not be bypassed unless absolutely necessary. Regularly overriding barcode scans is associated with an increased risk of errors! If the medication s barcode was not scanned to print the medication label or if medications and labels were shuffled around after the labels were printed, there is potential for the wrong medication to be counted and put into a prescription vial. Pharmacy technicians should count out the required amount of units for a prescription right after printing the label to minimize the risk of medications being mixed up and incorrectly dispensed. Always using barcode technology and not bypassing this error-prevention tool will also help the pharmacy to dispense the correct product. Errors are also common if the same pharmacist completes the data entry and filling process and also checks the prescription for accuracy. Ideally, different people should complete the dispensing process and quality assurance checks to decrease the risk of overlooking erroneous information. While it is generally the responsibility of the pharmacist to determine whether medications will interact with one another, knowing common drug interactions will allow the technician to help the pharmacy team prevent common medication errors. Pharmacy technicians should discuss common interactions with their pharmacist and learn from drug interaction errors that occur to prevent their recurrence. a completely different medication than what their doctor ordered, and is also a violation of HIPAA when a patient receives another patient s protected health information. PharmacyTech.EliteCME.com Page 48

9 It is important for technicians to verify that the medication is going to the correct patient by asking the person picking up a prescription for two patient identifiers, such as the name and date of birth of the patient. The technician should ask for this information in the form of an open-ended question, such as What is your birthdate? instead of Is your birthdate May 4, 1972? Counseling All patients should receive counseling on all new prescriptions and be offered counseling on refills, depending on state law. Counseling is an opportunity for the pharmacist to discuss the medication with the patient and includes a review of the medication name, dose, and directions. Reviewing this information with the patient gives the pharmacist a chance to ensure the information on the prescription bottle is what the patient expected to receive, and allows the pharmacist to discuss the potential for side effects and adverse reactions as well as any questions the patient has. And counseling is often a time when errors are prevented because the pharmacist is given a chance to look at the order again with the patient Patient responsibility Even if prescriptions are filled with 100 percent accuracy, there is still a level of responsibility that lies with patients and their caregivers to ensure their own safety when taking prescription medications. Patients should understand that they are responsible for several things with their medication treatment, including: Using their medications as their doctor prescribed them. Looking for side effects and reporting them to medical professionals as necessary. Identifying when their medications look or smell differently than normal, and discussing the differences with a pharmacist before using the different medication. Keeping an accurate record of the medications they are taking, including over-the-counter products and supplements, and After an error occurs If an error occurs, the pharmacist should be notified immediately. The first step in dealing with an error is ensuring the patient is safe. The pharmacist should then assess what happened and how it happened. Performing a root-cause analysis will help the pharmacy staff assess what happened and what needs to be done to prevent it from happening again. Root-cause analysis 12 Conducting a root-cause analysis after an error occurs is essential to help staffers learn from their mistakes and assess what steps need to be taken to prevent similar errors from occurring in the future. The analysis is a written plan set up to analyze an error and is an opportunity to discover what must to be done to prevent recurrence. There are several methods for conducting a root-cause analysis. The Joint Commission publishes a checklist with questions to guide the process of analysis, available at Framework_for_Conducting_a_Root_Cause_Analysis_and_Action_ Plan/. This plan requires the user to complete a thorough description of the event, including the date and time it occurred, what happened, the patient s diagnosis, medication list, and medical history. A series of 24 questions assesses the process that should normally occur and the process that did occur, including human factors, equipment factors, environmental factors, communication factors, staffing issues, and external factors that contributed to the error. They also assess the systems in place to decrease risks of errors, the barriers to appropriate Page 49 Some pharmacies have automatic safeguards at the point of sale that require the patient s date of birth to be entered into the computer system to prevent errors at this point. Automatic safeguards should not be bypassed without approval from the pharmacist. present to ensure the prescription information is consistent with the information the patient received from his or her doctor. It also allows the pharmacist to ensure the patient knows how to properly take the medication and what to do if side effects occur; many medication errors are associated with patients taking their medication incorrectly, causing side effects and adverse reactions. Pharmacy technicians should make sure all patients are given an opportunity to receive counseling, not only to minimize the risk of errors and maximize patient comprehension of medications dispensed, but to remain compliant with state board of pharmacy laws as well. ensuring their entire health care team is kept up-to-date on their current medications. Involving themselves in designing their own medical treatment regimen. Ensuring their entire health care team is kept up-to-date on their medical status, especially with new allergies and medical conditions. When a pharmacy technician notices patients are not following these guidelines, they should be referred to the pharmacist for further consultation. Patients should always be taught that they can raise concerns about their treatment with their pharmacist, and should be encouraged to call or come by the pharmacy to resolve even the smallest medication questions. Tech alert! It is important to avoid blaming one person for the occurrence of an error. Analyzing the error and how it occurred to prevent future errors is more important than focusing on who caused the error. use of these systems, and what additional training or systems are necessary to prevent future errors. After answering the error assessment questions, the next step is to develop a written action plan for dealing with the error. The action plan should include measurable risk reduction strategies, such as, Verify two patient identifiers at the pick-up window before selling a medication to a patient. The plan should list who will be responsible for implementing the plan for each action item, as well as when it will be implemented and when it will be assessed for effectiveness. Once the action plan is developed and implementation has begun, it is important to have a discuss ion about the incident with the people involved in its occurrence. Those involved in the error can feel guilt and even suffer physical and mental effects, especially if the error caused harm to a patient. The involved parties should focus on preventing future occurrences of the error and improving patient safety, and refrain from blaming each other. PharmacyTech.EliteCME.com

10 Reporting errors Errors should be reported to both internal and external agencies that monitor medication errors. The error reporting process will help both the pharmacy and the health care system develop procedures to prevent similar errors from occurring in the future. Errors should be reported without fear of punishment; this process is designed to improve the system for the future, not to blame one person for the error. Pharmacies should have a written plan in place for internal error reporting. Reporting medication errors to external agencies will also help improve patient safety on a broader scale. External agencies that track medication errors include: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) MedWatch Receives reports of not only medication errors, but also adverse events related to medications, product use errors, quality issues, and therapeutic differences between manufacturers. Vaccine adverse event reporting system (VAERS) Surveillance program for collecting adverse event information related to administration of vaccines. Institute for Safe Medication Practices National Medication Errors Reporting Program (ISMP MERP) For practitioners and pharmacies to report errors. Errors can be reported by going to or by calling FAIL-SAF(E). ISMP also has an error reporting system for consumers at Preventing errors Pharmacy technicians play a key role in the prevention of medication errors. Technicians should follow safe practices for filling each and every prescription, encourage a safe workplace, and recognize gaps in Safe practices Pharmacy technicians can decrease the risk of creating errors by ensuring safe practices and procedures are followed when entering prescriptions into the computer system. Following the pharmacy s designated process for data entry for each and every prescription will help the technician develop a routine to follow when entering prescriptions, making it easier to ensure all steps are followed for each prescription. Communication is also incredibly important throughout the dispensing process. Any questions the technician has about a prescription should Safe workplace As in the example with Michelle, pharmacy staff members often have an incredibly high workload, and can be pushed to complete several tasks at once. Trying to focus on many tasks at one time and interrupting one task to complete another are common root causes for errors. Working in a stressful or noisy environment can also contribute to errors. Patient education Because consultation is a point where many medication errors are prevented, pharmacy technicians should do everything they can to ensure patients receive proper consultation on their medications. State pharmacy laws often require consultations at the point of sale, but consultations can also be appropriate when a patient is dropping off a prescription or calling about a refill. Any time a pharmacy technician Training pharmacy staff The staff should receive adequate training on the pharmacy s systems before beginning work in the pharmacy. Orientation to the pharmacy s policies and procedures is essential to preparing technicians to conduct their work accurately and efficiently. They should be tested on the information to assess their proficiency before starting work and encouraged to ask questions and seek assistance with problems that arise when they begin to work in the pharmacy. Continuing education 11 Another strategy for preventing medication errors is continuing education for both pharmacists and pharmacy technicians. Continually both their own education as well as their patients to help decrease the risk of errors occurring. be communicated to the pharmacist or patient as appropriate; answers to these questions should never be assumed. All tools available to the technician for error prevention should be used and not bypassed. Alerts that the computer system detects should be assessed thoroughly, and not ignored. If errors occur, technicians should ensure they understand how the error occurred and what they should do to prevent it from happening again in the future. Technicians should ensure they follow the steps needed to improve their dispensing skills to prevent future errors. Pharmacies should minimize distractions in the workplace and encourage technicians to complete one task before starting another to decrease the risk of medication errors. Employees should also be encouraged to take breaks when appropriate to allow them to step away from a busy situation and regain focus on the tasks at hand. talks to a patient and determines there is a need for additional information, the patient should be directed to the pharmacist for education. Ensuring patients receive all the information they need to properly take their medications decreases the risk of incorrect medication administration, decreasing medication errors. Training also should occur for all employees when new policies and procedures are introduced or when there is an immediate need for further training, such as after an error occurs. This should be done to update both pharmacists and technicians so the entire pharmacy staff can continue to perform their jobs appropriately and continue to maintain patient safety. learning more about medications and their side effects, interactions and contraindications will help pharmacy technicians to spot potential PharmacyTech.EliteCME.com Page 50

11 errors before they occur. Pharmacy technicians should also stay up to date on current safety issues and recalls on pharmaceutical products to minimize the risk of errors related to these issues. Pharmacy technician certification is also associated with a decrease in medication errors. Certified pharmacy technicians have learned the knowledge necessary to pass the Pharmacy Technician Board Exam, and have a broader pharmacy knowledge base than their uncertified Customer satisfaction surveys Many retail pharmacies have surveys available to patients to assess customer satisfaction with the pharmacy s services. These surveys assess the patient s experience at the pharmacy and allow the pharmacy to improve on the areas that patients feel need improvement. They are often Web-based or available over the phone, and must be completed within a set timeframe after services are rendered, often within 14 days of the pharmacy visit, depending on the pharmacy. Some pharmacies offer incentives for patients to complete the surveys, such as drawings for cash prizes or coupons for future purchases. The customer satisfaction surveys often ask a range of questions to assess the patient s feelings on their pharmacy experience. The questions cover both pharmacy and general customer service topics, such as: Was the pharmacist available for consultation? On a scale of 1 to 5, how satisfied are you with the service you received today? Based on your last experience at our store, how likely are you to recommend this store to others? Internal audits of processes Pharmacists and technicians must continuously assess the daily processes for dispensing medications and maintaining the pharmacy to ensure patient safety and compliance with the law. Managers often review the pharmacy s operations on a monthly basis, but the technician is perfectly poised to monitor operations more frequently. Each pharmacy generally has a checklist that is assessed monthly to ensure the pharmacy is operating smoothly and efficiently. Assessing the items on this checklist before the manager completes it will help the pharmacy technician understand what steps need to take place to optimize efficiency and patient safety. Technicians should discuss the References The American Pharmacist s Association. The Pharmacy Technician, 4th Edition. Englewood, CO: Morton Publishing Company U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office for Civil Rights. A health care provider s guide to the HIPAA Privacy rule: Communicating with a patient s family, friends, or others involved in the patient s care. Accessed October 27, 2013 at www. hhs.gov/ocr/privacy/hipaa/understanding/coveredentities/provider_ffg.pdf Department of Health and Human Services. HIPAA Administrative Simplification: Standards for Privacy of Individually Identifiable Health Information. 45 CFR Parts 160 & : October. Accessed October 27, 2013 at hipaa/understanding/special/genetic/ginanprm.pdf. Mizner J. Mosby s Review for the Pharmacy Technician Certification Examination, 2nd Edition. St. Louis: Elsevier Hopper T. Mosby s Pharmacy Technician Principles and Practice, 3rd Edition. St. Louis: Elsevier The Joint Commission. Facts about the Official Do Not Use list. 6/2013. Accessed November 4, 2013 at pdf. The Institute for Safe Medication Practices. ISMP s List of Error-Prone Abbreviations, Symbols and Dose Designations Accessed November 4, 2013 at ismp.org/tools/errorproneabbreviations.pdf. The Institute for Safe Medication Practices. FDA and ISMP Lists of Look-Alike Drug Names with Recommended Tall Man Letters Accessed November 6, 2013 at counterparts. The use of certified technicians allows the pharmacist to spend more time counseling patients and focusing on patient care, ensuring patients understand how to take their medications and preventing errors in the process. Tech alert! Pharmacy technicians should contact their state s board of pharmacy to determine the continuing education requirements in their state. There is often an area for customers to leave comments and concerns in an anonymous format to protect patient confidentiality while allowing the customer s voice to be heard. Pharmacy staff should remind patients to leave out any identifying health information to protect their anonymity. The results of these surveys are then compiled into reports to help the pharmacy team assess the satisfaction level of their service. Reports can often be compiled for various timeframes, such as weekly, monthly, or annual reports, to assess service at a particular point of the year. The results of these survey reports should be discussed with the pharmacy team to examine strengths and weaknesses of the pharmacy s service. Pharmacy technicians should take the time to point out these survey opportunities to customers and ask them to complete them within the allotted time frame. The more customers complete these surveys, the more the overall scores are reflective of the services provided by the pharmacy. And because customer satisfaction is important to conducting business, the pharmacy technician should take a leading role in helping the pharmacy achieve its customer service goals. monthly review process with their managers and take an active role in improving the dispensing process. The state board of pharmacy also conducts regular reviews of pharmacies to ensure they remain in compliance with the law. Many states have a guideline of the information board that inspectors look for during an inspection. Reviewing this information on a regular basis before inspections occur will help the pharmacy maintain compliance and allow the staff to actively participate in the maintenance of the pharmacy. Guidelines for board of pharmacy inspections can be found on the state s board of pharmacy website. The Institute for Safe Medication Practices. ISMP s List of Confused Drug Names. 6/2011. Accessed November 6, 2013 at confuseddrugnames.pdf. Filik R, Purdy K, Gale A, Gerrett D. Drug name confusion: evaluating the effectiveness of capital ( Tall Man ) letters using eye movement data. Soc Sci Med Dec;59(12): Accessed November 6, 2013 at com/science/article/pii/s x. Medscape. Certified Pharmacy Technicians: Innovation and Medication Error Prevention. Accessed November 6, 2013 at viewarticle/ The Joint Commission. Framework for Conducting a Root Cause Analysis and Action Plan. March Accessed November 6, 2013 at Framework_for_Conducting_a_Root_Cause_Analysis_and_Action_Plan/. Institute of Medicine (IOM). Preventing Medication Errors. Report Brief Accessed November 7, 2013 at preventing-medication-errors-quality-chasm-series/medicationerrorsnew.pdf Page 51 PharmacyTech.EliteCME.com

12 A Dose of Professionalism for the Pharmacy Technician 1. Which of the following is NOT an example of protected health information? a. Genetic information. b. Date of birth. c. De-identified patient cases for research purposes. d. Payment history. Final Examination Questions Choose the best answer for questions 1 through 5 and mark your answers online at PharmacyTech.EliteCME.com. 4. Which of the following high-alert medications is correctly matched with the risk associated with them? a. Opiates risk of respiratory depression. b. Anticoagulants risk of hyper- or hypoglycemia. c. Insulin risk of excessive bleeding. d. Chemotherapy medications risk of excessive bleeding. 2. Protected health information can be disclosed under certain circumstances for all of the following EXCEPT: a. DEA investigations. b. Board of Pharmacy investigations. c. Law enforcement reasons. d. A patient s divorce hearing. 3. Under HIPAA, patients have the right to receive a list of all nonroutine disclosures of their PHI within the past years. a. 3. b. 5. c. 6. d The is a written plan set up to analyze an error and is an opportunity to discover what must to be done to prevent recurrence. a. Root-cause analysis. b. Joint Commission. c. Institute for Safe Medication Practices. d. Error reporting. RPTFL03DPE14 PharmacyTech.EliteCME.com Page 52

ExCPT Certified Pharmacy Technician (CPhT) Detailed Test Plan* 100 scored items, 20 pretest items Exam time: 2 hours 10 minutes

ExCPT Certified Pharmacy Technician (CPhT) Detailed Test Plan* 100 scored items, 20 pretest items Exam time: 2 hours 10 minutes ExCPT Certified Pharmacy Technician (CPhT) Detailed Test Plan* 100 scored items, 20 pretest items Exam time: 2 hours 10 minutes # scored items 1. Regulations and Pharmacy Duties 35 A. Overview of technician

More information

Medication Safety and Error Prevention

Medication Safety and Error Prevention Medication Safety and Error Prevention 16 LEARNING OBJECTIVES By the end of this chapter, students will be able to competently: 1. Explain the process for reporting errors. 2. Explain the difference between

More information

Administrative Policies and Procedures for MOH hospitals /PHC Centers. TITLE: Organization & Management Of Medication Use APPLIES TO: Hospital-wide

Administrative Policies and Procedures for MOH hospitals /PHC Centers. TITLE: Organization & Management Of Medication Use APPLIES TO: Hospital-wide Administrative Policies and Procedures for MOH hospitals /PHC Centers TITLE: Organization & Management Of Medication Use APPLIES TO: Hospital-wide NO. OF PAGES: ORIGINAL DATE: REVISION DATE : السیاسات

More information

WellDyneRx Mail Service General Questions and Answers

WellDyneRx Mail Service General Questions and Answers WellDyneRx Mail Service General Questions and Answers I. Location/ Hours of Operation 1. Where is WellDyneRx Mail Pharmacy located? WellDyneRx mail pharmacy has two locations: 1) Centennial, CO, a suburb

More information

The Academy of Managed Care Pharmacy s Concepts in Managed Care Pharmacy. Medication Errors

The Academy of Managed Care Pharmacy s Concepts in Managed Care Pharmacy. Medication Errors The Academy of Managed Care Pharmacy s Concepts in Managed Care Pharmacy Medication Errors Medication errors are among the most common medical errors, harming at least 1.5 million people every year. The

More information

Technician. Chapter 6: Inventory Management for the Pharmacy. 4 Contact Hours. Learning objectives. Introduction

Technician. Chapter 6: Inventory Management for the Pharmacy. 4 Contact Hours. Learning objectives. Introduction Chapter 6: Inventory Management for the Pharmacy Technician 4 Contact Hours By Katie Ingersoll, RPh, PharmD, and Staff Pharmacist for a national chain Author Disclosure: Katie Ingersoll and Elite Professional

More information

Medication Errors. Prevention and Reduction Guidelines. Approved by PEIPB November 2004

Medication Errors. Prevention and Reduction Guidelines. Approved by PEIPB November 2004 Medication Errors Prevention and Reduction Guidelines Approved by PEIPB November 2004 Medication Error Reduction Given the complexity of the processes required to safely and accurately process a prescription

More information

Pharmacy Program Pre-Test

Pharmacy Program Pre-Test Last Name: Pharmacy Program Pre-Test * For each question, put a check mark for the one option that you think is correct. 1. A pharmacist receives a security prescription from a known local medical group

More information

Notice of Privacy Practices

Notice of Privacy Practices Notice of Privacy Practices THIS NOTICE DESCRIBES HOW MEDICAL INFORMATION ABOUT YOU MAY BE USED AND DISCLOSED AND HOW YOU CAN GET ACCESS TO THIS INFORMATION. PLEASE REVIEW IT CAREFULLY. This Notice Of

More information

Reducing Medication Errors

Reducing Medication Errors Chapter 6: The Pharmacy Technician s Role in Reducing Medication Errors 2 Contact Hours By Katie Ingersoll, RPh, Pharm D and staff pharmacist for a national chain. Author Disclosure: Katie Ingersoll and

More information

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF RECEIPT OF WESTERN DENTAL S NOTICE OF PRIVACY PRACTICE

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF RECEIPT OF WESTERN DENTAL S NOTICE OF PRIVACY PRACTICE ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF RECEIPT OF WESTERN DENTAL S NOTICE OF PRIVACY PRACTICE By signing this document, I acknowledge that I have received a copy of Western Dental s Joint Notice of Privacy Practices. Name

More information

PRIVACY HIPAA NOTICE OF PRACTICE

PRIVACY HIPAA NOTICE OF PRACTICE PRIVACY HIPAA NOTICE OF PRACTICE Bux-Mont Allergy & Asthma, L.L.C. NOTICE OF PRIVACY PRACTICES Effective date: September 23, 2013 THIS NOTICE DESCRIBES HOW MEDICAL INFORMATION ABOUT YOU MAY BE USED AND

More information

GUIDELINES ON PREVENTING MEDICATION ERRORS IN PHARMACIES AND LONG-TERM CARE FACILITIES THROUGH REPORTING AND EVALUATION

GUIDELINES ON PREVENTING MEDICATION ERRORS IN PHARMACIES AND LONG-TERM CARE FACILITIES THROUGH REPORTING AND EVALUATION GUIDELINES GUIDELINES ON PREVENTING MEDICATION ERRORS IN PHARMACIES AND LONG-TERM CARE FACILITIES THROUGH REPORTING AND EVALUATION Preamble The purpose of this document is to provide guidance for the pharmacist

More information

Birkam Health Center Ferris State University NOTICE OF PRIVACY PRACTICES

Birkam Health Center Ferris State University NOTICE OF PRIVACY PRACTICES Birkam Health Center Ferris State University NOTICE OF PRIVACY PRACTICES Effective Date of Notice: October 1, 2013 THIS NOTICE DESCRIBES HOW MEDICAL INFORMATION ABOUT YOU MAY BE USED AND DISCLOSED AND

More information

Sarasota Personal Medicine 1250 S. Tamiami Trail, Suite 202 Sarasota, FL 34239 Phone 941.954.9990 Fax 941.954.9995

Sarasota Personal Medicine 1250 S. Tamiami Trail, Suite 202 Sarasota, FL 34239 Phone 941.954.9990 Fax 941.954.9995 Sarasota Personal Medicine 1250 S. Tamiami Trail, Suite 202 Sarasota, FL 34239 Phone 941.954.9990 Fax 941.954.9995 NOTICE OF PRIVACY PRACTICES THIS NOTICE DESCRIBES HOW MEDICAL INFORMATION ABOUT YOU MAY

More information

SafetyFirst Alert. Errors in Transcribing and Administering Medications

SafetyFirst Alert. Errors in Transcribing and Administering Medications SafetyFirst Alert Massachusetts Coalition for the Prevention of Medical Errors January 2001 This issue of Safety First Alert is a publication of the Massachusetts Coalition for the Prevention of Medical

More information

REVIEW OF FEDERAL LAW FOR PHARMACY TECHNICIANS DR. SULLIVAN S MONOGRAPH

REVIEW OF FEDERAL LAW FOR PHARMACY TECHNICIANS DR. SULLIVAN S MONOGRAPH REVIEW OF FEDERAL LAW FOR PHARMACY TECHNICIANS DR. SULLIVAN S MONOGRAPH REVIEW OF FEDERAL LAW FOR PHARMACY TECHNICIANS ACTIVITY DESCRIPTION This program will assist pharmacy technicians to understand the

More information

Guidelines on Counseling. Approved by PEIPB

Guidelines on Counseling. Approved by PEIPB Guidelines on Counseling Approved by PEIPB November 2005 1 Patient Counseling Patient counseling is a key competency element of the Pharmaceutical Care process. Given the advertising for medication in

More information

HIPAA Privacy & Security Training for Clinicians

HIPAA Privacy & Security Training for Clinicians HIPAA Privacy & Security Training for Clinicians Agenda This training will cover the following information: Overview of Privacy Rule and Security Rules Using and disclosing Protected Health Information

More information

HOW TO PREVENT MEDICATION ERRORS

HOW TO PREVENT MEDICATION ERRORS These books provide more information: Safe use of Medications by Older People. National Institutes of Health, National Institute on Aging. Bethesda, MD: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2000

More information

MAT Disclosures & Consents 1 of 6. Authorization & Disclosure

MAT Disclosures & Consents 1 of 6. Authorization & Disclosure MAT Disclosures & Consents 1 of 6 Authorization & Disclosure ***YOUR INSURANCE MAY NOT PAY FOR ROUTINE SCREENING*** *** APPROPRIATE SCREENING DIAGNOSES MUST BE PROVIDED WHEN INDICATED*** Urine Drug Test

More information

TRANSMUCOSAL IMMEDIATE RELEASE FENTANYL (TIRF) RISK EVALUATION AND MITIGATION STRATEGY (REMS)

TRANSMUCOSAL IMMEDIATE RELEASE FENTANYL (TIRF) RISK EVALUATION AND MITIGATION STRATEGY (REMS) Initial REMS approval: 12/2011 Most recent modification: /2014 TRANSMUCOSAL IMMEDIATE RELEASE FENTANYL (TIRF) RISK EVALUATION AND MITIGATION STRATEGY (REMS) Page 1 of 16 I. GOALS The goals of the TIRF

More information

HIPAA Notice of Privacy Practices - Sample Notice. Disclaimer: Template Notice of Privacy Practices (45 C.F.R. 164.520)

HIPAA Notice of Privacy Practices - Sample Notice. Disclaimer: Template Notice of Privacy Practices (45 C.F.R. 164.520) HIPAA Notice of Privacy Practices - Sample Notice Disclaimer: Template Notice of Privacy Practices (45 C.F.R. 164.520) The information provided in this document does not constitute, and is no substitute

More information

Agency # 070.00 REGULATION 9 PHARMACEUTICAL CARE/PATIENT COUNSELING

Agency # 070.00 REGULATION 9 PHARMACEUTICAL CARE/PATIENT COUNSELING Agency # 070.00 REGULATION 9 PHARMACEUTICAL CARE/PATIENT COUNSELING 09-00: PATIENT COUNSELING 09-00-0001--PATIENT INFORMATION, DRUG USE EVALUATION, AND PATIENT COUNSELING The intent of this regulation

More information

Notice of Privacy Practices

Notice of Privacy Practices Notice of Privacy Practices THIS NOTICE OF PRIVACY PRACTICES DESCRIBES HOW MEDICAL INFORMATION ABOUT YOU MAY BE USED AND DISCLOSED AND HOW YOU CAN GET ACCESS TO THIS INFORMATION. PLEASE REVIEW IT CAREFULLY.

More information

SECTION.1800 - PRESCRIPTIONS

SECTION.1800 - PRESCRIPTIONS SECTION.1800 - PRESCRIPTIONS 21 NCAC 46.1801 EXERCISE OF PROFESSIONAL JUDGMENT IN FILLING PRESCRIPTIONS (a) A pharmacist or device and medical equipment dispenser shall have a right to refuse to fill or

More information

Key Element IX: Patient Education

Key Element IX: Patient Education Key Element IX: Patient Education Patients are included as active partners in their care through education about their medications and ways to avert errors. Pharmacists establish and participate in community-based

More information

TABLE OF CONTENTS CHAPTER 9 PATIENT COUNSELING AND PROSPECTIVE DRUG USE REVIEW REGULATIONS

TABLE OF CONTENTS CHAPTER 9 PATIENT COUNSELING AND PROSPECTIVE DRUG USE REVIEW REGULATIONS TABLE OF CONTENTS CHAPTER 9 PATIENT COUNSELING AND PROSPECTIVE DRUG USE REVIEW REGULATIONS Section 1. Authority 9-1 Section 2. Definitions 9-1 Section 3. Patient Profile Records 9-1 Section 4. Prospective

More information

Allergic Disease Associates, PC / The Asthma Center and Allergy & Asthma Research of New Jersey

Allergic Disease Associates, PC / The Asthma Center and Allergy & Asthma Research of New Jersey Allergic Disease Associates, PC / The Asthma Center and Allergy & Asthma Research of New Jersey NOTICE OF PRIVACY PRACTICES Effective date: September 23, 2013 THIS NOTICE DESCRIBES HOW MEDICAL INFORMATION

More information

Minimum Performance and Service Criteria for Medicare Part D

Minimum Performance and Service Criteria for Medicare Part D Minimum Performance and Service Criteria for Medicare Part D 1. Terms and Conditions. In addition to the other terms and conditions of the Pharmacy Participation Agreement ( Agreement ), the following

More information

Privacy Space. Public Place. How to Protect PHI and be HIPAA Compliant

Privacy Space. Public Place. How to Protect PHI and be HIPAA Compliant Privacy Space. Public Place. How to Protect PHI and be HIPAA Compliant Event Type Live Online ACPE Expiration Date 12/11/2016 Credits 1 Contact Hour Target Audience Pharmacy Technicians Program Overview

More information

Reproductive Medicine Associates of New Jersey, LLC

Reproductive Medicine Associates of New Jersey, LLC NOTICE OF PRIVACY PRACTICES Effective Date: September 20, 2013 Last Modified: May 12, 2013 THIS NOTICE DESCRIBES HOW MEDICAL INFORMATION ABOUT YOU MAY BE USED AND DISCLOSED AND HOW YOU CAN GET ACCESS TO

More information

UAB MY HEALTH REWARDS BIOMETRIC SCREENING PROGRAM NOTICE OF HEALTH INFORMATION PRACTICES

UAB MY HEALTH REWARDS BIOMETRIC SCREENING PROGRAM NOTICE OF HEALTH INFORMATION PRACTICES UAB MY HEALTH REWARDS BIOMETRIC SCREENING PROGRAM NOTICE OF HEALTH INFORMATION PRACTICES 1 Effective Date: January 26, 2015 THIS NOTICE APPLIES TO THE UAB MY HEALTH REWARDS BIOMETRIC SCREENING PROGRAM

More information

Clinical Solutions. 2 Hour CEU

Clinical Solutions. 2 Hour CEU 1 2 Hour CEU 2 Course Objectives The purpose of this program is to provide nurses with information about the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), especially as it relates to protected

More information

NOTICE OF HEALTH INFORMATION PRIVACY PRACTICES (HIPAA)

NOTICE OF HEALTH INFORMATION PRIVACY PRACTICES (HIPAA) NOTICE OF HEALTH INFORMATION PRIVACY PRACTICES (HIPAA) THIS NOTICE OF PRIVACY PRACTICES DESCRIBES HOW HEALTH INFORMATION ABOUT YOU MAY BE USED AND DISCLOSED AND HOW YOU CAN GET ACCESS TO THIS INFORMATION.

More information

HIPAA NOTICE OF PRIVACY PRACTICES

HIPAA NOTICE OF PRIVACY PRACTICES HIPAA NOTICE OF PRIVACY PRACTICES Human Resources Department 16000 N. Civic Center Plaza Surprise, AZ 85374 Ph: 623-222-3532 // Fax: 623-222-3501 TTY: 623-222-1002 Purpose of This Notice This Notice describes

More information

Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) Overview

Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) Overview Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) Overview Agency, Contract and Temporary Staff Orientation Initiated: 5/04, Reviewed: 7/10, Revised: 10/10 Prepared by SHS Administration & Samaritan

More information

HIPAA Notice of Privacy Practices

HIPAA Notice of Privacy Practices HIPAA Notice of Privacy Practices THIS NOTICE DESCRIBES HOW MEDICAL INFORMATION ABOUT YOU MAY BE USED AND DISCLOSED AND HOW YOU CAN GET ACCESS TO THIS INFORMATION. PLEASE REVIEW IT CAREFULLY. This Notice

More information

Patient Advocate Checklist For:

Patient Advocate Checklist For: Today s Date Patient Advocate Checklist For: Name of Patient An advocate is not a Health Care Proxy and can not make decisions for the patient. The advocate should know who the Health Care Proxy is and

More information

The Health and Benefit Trust Fund of the International Union of Operating Engineers Local Union No. 94-94A-94B, AFL-CIO. Notice of Privacy Practices

The Health and Benefit Trust Fund of the International Union of Operating Engineers Local Union No. 94-94A-94B, AFL-CIO. Notice of Privacy Practices The Health and Benefit Trust Fund of the International Union of Operating Section 1: Purpose of This Notice Notice of Privacy Practices Effective as of September 23, 2013 THIS NOTICE DESCRIBES HOW MEDICAL

More information

HIPAA Compliance. 2013 Annual Mandatory Education

HIPAA Compliance. 2013 Annual Mandatory Education HIPAA Compliance 2013 Annual Mandatory Education What is HIPAA? Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act Federal Law enacted in 1996 that mandates adoption of Privacy protections for health

More information

FACT SHEET FOR HEALTH CARE PRACTITIONERS

FACT SHEET FOR HEALTH CARE PRACTITIONERS Florida s Prescription Drug Monitoring Program http://www.e-forcse.com FACT SHEET FOR HEALTH CARE PRACTITIONERS The Florida Prescription Drug Monitoring Program (PDMP), known as E-FORCSE (Electronic- Florida

More information

Population Health Management Program Notice of Privacy Practices

Population Health Management Program Notice of Privacy Practices Population Health Management Program Notice of Privacy Practices Premier Health provides population health management services to its health plan members. Services include wellness program tools and technology,

More information

HIPAA NOTICE OF PRIVACY PRACTICES

HIPAA NOTICE OF PRIVACY PRACTICES HIPAA NOTICE OF PRIVACY PRACTICES THIS NOTICE DESCRIBES HOW YOUR MEDICAL INFORMATION MAY BE USED AND DISCLOSED AND HOW YOU CAN GET ACCESS TO THIS INFORMATION. PLEASE REVIEW IT CAREFULLY. This HIPAA Notice

More information

NOTICE OF PRIVACY PRACTICES

NOTICE OF PRIVACY PRACTICES THE PHYSICIAN PRACTICE, P.A. NOTICE OF PRIVACY PRACTICES THIS NOTICE DESCRIBES HOW MEDICAL INFORMATION ABOUT YOU MAY BE USED AND DISCLOSED AND HOW YOU CAN GET ACCESS TO THIS INFORMATION. PLEASE REVIEW

More information

SDC-League Health Fund

SDC-League Health Fund SDC-League Health Fund 1501 Broadway, 17 th Floor New York, NY 10036 Tel: 212-869-8129 Fax: 212-302-6195 E-mail: health@sdcweb.org NOTICE OF PRIVACY PRACTICES THIS NOTICE DESCRIBES HOW MEDICAL INFORMATION

More information

Table of Contents. 2 P a g e

Table of Contents. 2 P a g e Table of Contents Introduction... 3 Important Contact Information... 3 Pharmacy Rights... 3 Claims Adjudication... 3 Reversals... 4 Required Data Fields... 4 Identification cards... 4 Required Identification

More information

HIPAA NOTICE OF PRIVACY PRACTICES UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO HEALTH AND WELFARE PLAN NOTICE OF PRIVACY PRACTICES

HIPAA NOTICE OF PRIVACY PRACTICES UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO HEALTH AND WELFARE PLAN NOTICE OF PRIVACY PRACTICES HIPAA NOTICE OF PRIVACY PRACTICES UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO HEALTH AND WELFARE PLAN NOTICE OF PRIVACY PRACTICES THIS NOTICE OF PRIVACY PRACTICES DESCRIBES HOW MEDICAL INFORMATION ABOUT YOU MAY BE USED AND

More information

Notice of Privacy Practices

Notice of Privacy Practices Notice of Privacy Practices This notice describes how medical information about you may be used and disclosed and how you can get access to this information. Please review it carefully. This Notice of

More information

Health Professions Act BYLAWS SCHEDULE F. PART 2 Hospital Pharmacy Standards of Practice. Table of Contents

Health Professions Act BYLAWS SCHEDULE F. PART 2 Hospital Pharmacy Standards of Practice. Table of Contents Health Professions Act BYLAWS SCHEDULE F PART 2 Hospital Pharmacy Standards of Practice Table of Contents 1. Application 2. Definitions 3. Drug Distribution 4. Drug Label 5. Returned Drugs 6. Drug Transfer

More information

Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act HIPAA Privacy Standards

Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act HIPAA Privacy Standards Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act HIPAA Privacy Standards Healthcare Provider Training Module Copyright 2003 University of California Click the arrow to start the YouTube video in a separate

More information

NOTICE OF PRIVACY PRACTICES FOR ORTHOPAEDIC SURGERY & REHAB. ASSOCIATES, P.C.

NOTICE OF PRIVACY PRACTICES FOR ORTHOPAEDIC SURGERY & REHAB. ASSOCIATES, P.C. NOTICE OF PRIVACY PRACTICES FOR ORTHOPAEDIC SURGERY & REHAB. ASSOCIATES, P.C. Effective date: April 14, 2003 THIS NOTICE DESCRIBES HOW MEDICAL INFORMATION ABOUT YOU MAY BE USED AND DISCLOSED AND HOW TO

More information

Reducing the risk of patient harm: A focus on insulin

Reducing the risk of patient harm: A focus on insulin Reducing the risk of patient harm: A focus on insulin New York State Partnership for Patients (NYSPFP) Initiative Regional Educational Session November 2013 1 1 Disclosure Matt Fricker, Matt Grissinger,

More information

HIPAA Notice of Patient Privacy Practices

HIPAA Notice of Patient Privacy Practices HIPAA Notice of Patient Privacy Practices Effective Date: January 1, 2014 THIS NOTICE DESCRIBES HOW PROTECTED HEALTH INFORMATION ABOUT YOU MAY BE USED AND DISCLOSED AND HOW YOU CAN GET ACCESS TO THIS INFORMATION.

More information

UW School of Dentistry Comprehensive Medication Policy

UW School of Dentistry Comprehensive Medication Policy UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY Subject: UW School of Dentistry Comprehensive Medication Policy Policy Number: Effective Date: December 2014 Revision Dates: June 2015 PURPOSE This policy provides

More information

NOTICE OF HEALTH INFORMATION PRACTICES

NOTICE OF HEALTH INFORMATION PRACTICES NOTICE OF HEALTH INFORMATION PRACTICES Effective Date: April 14, 2003 Date Amended: 9/5/13 THIS NOTICE DESCRIBES HOW MEDICAL INFORMATION ABOUT YOU MAY BE USED AND DISCLOSED AND HOW YOU CAN GET ACCESS TO

More information

DETAILED NOTICE OF PRIVACY AND SECURITY PRACTICES OF THE Trustees of the Stevens Institute of Technology Health & Welfare Plan

DETAILED NOTICE OF PRIVACY AND SECURITY PRACTICES OF THE Trustees of the Stevens Institute of Technology Health & Welfare Plan DETAILED NOTICE OF PRIVACY AND SECURITY PRACTICES OF THE Trustees of the Stevens Institute of Technology Health & Welfare Plan THIS NOTICE DESCRIBES HOW MEDICAL INFORMATION ABOUT YOU MAY BE USED AND DISCLOSED

More information

Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals Basic HIPAA Privacy Training: Policies and Procedures

Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals Basic HIPAA Privacy Training: Policies and Procedures Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals Basic HIPAA Privacy Training: Policies and Procedures 1 What Is HIPAA? HIPAA (pronounced hippa) is a federal law. It s a set of rules and regulations that affect

More information

Pharmacy Technician Structured Practical Training Program Logbook

Pharmacy Technician Structured Practical Training Program Logbook Pharmacy Technician Structured Practical Training Program Logbook This logbook outlines the activities that pharmacy technician learners are required to complete in order to demonstrate competencies as

More information

SUBOXONE Film, SUBOXONE Tablets, and SUBUTEX Tablets. Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy (REMS) Program

SUBOXONE Film, SUBOXONE Tablets, and SUBUTEX Tablets. Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy (REMS) Program SUBOXONE Film, SUBOXONE Tablets, and SUBUTEX Tablets Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy (REMS) Program Office-Based Buprenorphine Therapy for Opioid Dependence: Important Information for Pharmacists

More information

HIPAA Security Manual Administrative Security/Omnibus Rule

HIPAA Security Manual Administrative Security/Omnibus Rule Notice of Privacy Policies Form ***This notice describes how medical information about you may be used and disclosed and how you can get access to this information. PLEASE READ IT CAREFULLY!*** The tells

More information

PHARMACY TECHNICIAN STRUCTURED PRACTICAL TRAINING (SPT) - GUIDE

PHARMACY TECHNICIAN STRUCTURED PRACTICAL TRAINING (SPT) - GUIDE PHARMACY TECHNICIAN STRUCTURED PRACTICAL TRAINING (SPT) - GUIDE Goals This structured practical training program is intended to ensure candidates understand and meet the competencies and standards of practice

More information

Keweenaw Holistic Family Medicine Patient Registration Form

Keweenaw Holistic Family Medicine Patient Registration Form Keweenaw Holistic Family Medicine Patient Registration Form How did you first learn of our Clinic? Circle one: Attended Lecture Internet KHFM website Newspaper Sign in window Yellow Pages Physician Friend

More information

The Basics of HIPAA Privacy and Security and HITECH

The Basics of HIPAA Privacy and Security and HITECH The Basics of HIPAA Privacy and Security and HITECH Protecting Patient Privacy Disclaimer The content of this webinar is to introduce the principles associated with HIPAA and HITECH regulations and is

More information

CHAPTER 10 PHARMACY TECHNICIAN REGULATIONS. These regulations are promulgated as authorized by the Act.

CHAPTER 10 PHARMACY TECHNICIAN REGULATIONS. These regulations are promulgated as authorized by the Act. CHAPTER 10 PHARMACY TECHNICIAN REGULATIONS Section 1. Authority. These regulations are promulgated as authorized by the Act. Section 2. Definitions. Direct supervision means that a licensed pharmacist

More information

MCCP Online Orientation

MCCP Online Orientation Objectives At the conclusion of this presentation, students will be able to: Describe the federal requirements of the HIPAA/HITECH regulations that protect the privacy and security of confidential data.

More information

Salt Lake Community College Employee Health Care Benefits Plan Notice of Privacy Practices

Salt Lake Community College Employee Health Care Benefits Plan Notice of Privacy Practices THIS NOTICE DESCRIBES HOW HEALTH INFORMATION ABOUT YOU MAY BE USED AND DISCLOSED AND HOW YOU CAN GET ACCESS TO THIS INFORMATION. PLEASE REVIEW IT CAREFULLY. Date: June 1, 2014 Salt Lake Community College

More information

MEDICAL ASSISTANCE BULLETIN

MEDICAL ASSISTANCE BULLETIN ISSUE DATE April 8, 2011 EFFECTIVE DATE April 8, 2011 MEDICAL ASSISTANCE BULLETIN NUMBER 03-11-01, 09-11-02, 14-11-01, 18-11-01 24-11-03, 27-11-02, 31-11-02, 33-11-02 SUBJECT Electronic Prescribing Internet-based

More information

Privacy and Information Security Awareness Training. Health Insurance Portability & Accountability Act of 1996 -- HIPAA

Privacy and Information Security Awareness Training. Health Insurance Portability & Accountability Act of 1996 -- HIPAA Privacy and Information Security Awareness Training Health Insurance Portability & Accountability Act of 1996 -- HIPAA Objectives Understand basic HIPAA requirements Understand how the MCG Health System

More information

USES AND DISCLOSURES FOR TREATMENT, PAYMENT, AND HEALTH CARE OPERATIONS [45 CFR 164.506]

USES AND DISCLOSURES FOR TREATMENT, PAYMENT, AND HEALTH CARE OPERATIONS [45 CFR 164.506] USES AND DISCLOSURES FOR TREATMENT, PAYMENT, AND HEALTH CARE OPERATIONS [45 CFR 164.506] Background The HIPAA Privacy Rule establishes a foundation of Federal protection for personal health information,

More information

HEALTH INSURANCE PORTABILITY AND ACCOUNTABILITY ACT (HIPAA): FACT SHEET FOR NEUROPSYCHOLOGISTS Division 40, American Psychological Association

HEALTH INSURANCE PORTABILITY AND ACCOUNTABILITY ACT (HIPAA): FACT SHEET FOR NEUROPSYCHOLOGISTS Division 40, American Psychological Association HEALTH INSURANCE PORTABILITY AND ACCOUNTABILITY ACT (HIPAA): FACT SHEET FOR NEUROPSYCHOLOGISTS Division 40, American Psychological Association DISCLAIMER This general information fact sheet is made available

More information

SUPPORT PATH PROGRAM INTAKE FORM PHONE: 1-855-769-7284 FAX: 1-855-298-8700

SUPPORT PATH PROGRAM INTAKE FORM PHONE: 1-855-769-7284 FAX: 1-855-298-8700 SUPPORT PATH PROGRAM INTAKE FORM PHONE: 1-855-769-7284 FAX: 1-855-298-8700 1 REQUESTED SERVICE(S) (REQUIRED) CHECK ALL BOXES THAT APPLY Benefits Investigation Prior Authorization and Appeals Support Patient

More information

Richmond Gastroenterology Associates, Inc.

Richmond Gastroenterology Associates, Inc. Richmond Gastroenterology Associates, Inc. Notice of Privacy Practices THIS NOTICE DESCRIBES HOW MEDICAL INFORMATION ABOUT YOU MAY BE USED AND DISCLOSED AND HOW YOU CAN GET ACCESS TO THIS INFOMRATION.

More information

GONZABA MEDICAL GROUP PATIENT REGISTRATION FORM

GONZABA MEDICAL GROUP PATIENT REGISTRATION FORM GONZABA MEDICAL GROUP PATIENT REGISTRATION FORM DATE: CHART#: GUARANTOR INFORMATION LAST NAME: FIRST NAME: MI: ADDRESS: HOME PHONE: ADDRESS: CITY/STATE: ZIP CODE: **************************************************************************************

More information

Page 1. NAOP HIPAA and Privacy Risks 3/11/2014. Privacy means being able to have control over how your information is collected, used, or shared;

Page 1. NAOP HIPAA and Privacy Risks 3/11/2014. Privacy means being able to have control over how your information is collected, used, or shared; Page 1 National Organization of Alternative Programs 2014 NOAP Educational Conference HIPAA and Privacy Risks Ira J Rothman, CPHIMS, CIPP/US/IT/E/G Senior Vice President - Privacy Official March 26, 2014

More information

Understanding Alberta s Drug Schedules

Understanding Alberta s Drug Schedules Understanding Alberta s Drug Schedules Preface In May 2002, the provincial drug schedules to the Pharmaceutical Profession Act were amended. In April 2007, the Alberta Regulation 66/2007 to the Pharmacy

More information

Notice of Privacy Practices

Notice of Privacy Practices Kimmel Chaplain Pharmacy NCPDP: 1413018 205 Bailey Lane Benton, IL 62812 Notice of Privacy Practices THIS NOTICE DESCRIBES HOW MEDICAL INFORMATION ABOUT YOU MAY BE USED AND DISCLOSED AND HOW YOU CAN GET

More information

Population Health Management Program Notice of Privacy Practices from Piedmont WellStar HealthPlans, Inc.

Population Health Management Program Notice of Privacy Practices from Piedmont WellStar HealthPlans, Inc. Population Health Management Program Notice of Privacy Practices from Piedmont WellStar HealthPlans, Inc. Piedmont WellStar HealthPlans, Inc. (PWHP) provides population health management services to its

More information

PRIVACY PRACTICES OUR PRIVACY OBLIGATIONS

PRIVACY PRACTICES OUR PRIVACY OBLIGATIONS PRIVACY PRACTICES THIS NOTICE DESCRIBES HOW MEDICAL INFORMATION ABOUT YOU MAY BE USED AND DISCLOSED AND HOW YOU CAN GET ACCESS TO THIS INFORMATION. PLEASE REVIEW IT CAREFULLY. General Information To comply

More information

HIPAA and Privacy Policy Training

HIPAA and Privacy Policy Training HIPAA and Privacy Policy Training July 2015 1 This training addresses the requirements for maintaining the privacy of confidential information received from HFS and DHS (the Agencies). During this training

More information

NOTICE OF PRIVACY PRACTICES

NOTICE OF PRIVACY PRACTICES NOTICE OF PRIVACY PRACTICES Effective Date: Immediately This information is made available to all patients THIS NOTICE DESCRIBES HOW MEDICAL INFORMATION ABOUT YOU MAY BE USED AND DISCLOSED AND HOW YOU

More information

Patient Information Form Trinity Wellness Center. Insurance Information

Patient Information Form Trinity Wellness Center. Insurance Information Patient Information Form Trinity Wellness Center Last Name, First Name, MI* Date of Birth* / / Social Security # -- -- Sex* : Female / Male Student Status (circle one): Full-time / Part-time / not a student

More information

EXAMPLES of HIPAA violations

EXAMPLES of HIPAA violations EXAMPLES of HIPAA violations Minimum Necessary Policies Hospital Implements New Minimum Necessary Polices for Telephone Messages Covered Entity: General Hospital Issue: Minimum Necessary; Confidential

More information

Electronic Signature Guidance

Electronic Signature Guidance National Council for Prescription Drug Programs White Paper Electronic Signature Guidance Version 1.0 February 2014 This document provides clarification and guidance to the industry for the use of electronic

More information

Information for Pharmacists

Information for Pharmacists Page 43 by 42 CFR part 2. A general authorization for the release of medical or other information is NOT sufficient for this purpose. Information for Pharmacists SUBOXONE (buprenorphine HCl/naloxone HCl

More information

HIPAA for Pharmacy Staff. Powered and produced by CECity and the National Community Pharmacists Association

HIPAA for Pharmacy Staff. Powered and produced by CECity and the National Community Pharmacists Association HIPAA for Pharmacy Staff Powered and produced by CECity and the National Community Pharmacists Association 1 Introduction to HIPAA Training Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 Data

More information

Counseling Associates of Southern Illinois 1669 Windham Way, Suite B O Fallon, Illinois 62269 P: 618-622-2579 F: 618-624-8506 www.casicounseling.

Counseling Associates of Southern Illinois 1669 Windham Way, Suite B O Fallon, Illinois 62269 P: 618-622-2579 F: 618-624-8506 www.casicounseling. Counseling Associates of Southern Illinois 1669 Windham Way, Suite B O Fallon, Illinois 62269 P: 618-622-2579 F: 618-624-8506 www.casicounseling.org I. Initial Client Information Date: Social Security

More information

FLORIDA MEDICAL CLINIC, P.A. NOTICE OF PRIVACY PRACTICES

FLORIDA MEDICAL CLINIC, P.A. NOTICE OF PRIVACY PRACTICES FLORIDA MEDICAL CLINIC, P.A. NOTICE OF PRIVACY PRACTICES THIS NOTICE DESCRIBES HOW MEDICAL INFORMATION ABOUT YOU MAY BE USED AND DISCLOSED AND HOW YOU CAN GET ACCESS TO THIS INFORMATION. PLEASE REVIEW

More information

HIPAA NOTICE OF PRIVACY PRACTICES

HIPAA NOTICE OF PRIVACY PRACTICES HIPAA NOTICE OF PRIVACY PRACTICES Marden Rehabilitation Associates, Inc. Marden Rehabilitation Associates of Ohio, Inc. Marden Rehabilitation Associates of West Virginia Health Care Plus Preferred Care

More information

CHAPTER 61-03-02 CONSULTING PHARMACIST REGULATIONS FOR LONG-TERM CARE FACILITIES (SKILLED, INTERMEDIATE, AND BASIC CARE)

CHAPTER 61-03-02 CONSULTING PHARMACIST REGULATIONS FOR LONG-TERM CARE FACILITIES (SKILLED, INTERMEDIATE, AND BASIC CARE) CHAPTER 61-03-02 CONSULTING PHARMACIST REGULATIONS FOR LONG-TERM CARE FACILITIES (SKILLED, INTERMEDIATE, AND BASIC CARE) Section 61-03-02-01 Definitions 61-03-02-02 Absence of Provider or Consulting Pharmacist

More information

EDUCATOR S LESSON PLAN

EDUCATOR S LESSON PLAN EDUCATOR S LESSON PLAN Pharmacy Technician Training Program Student Version Orientation Orientation introduces the student to basic terms and definitions. An introduction to the Pharmacy Technician Certification

More information

CHAPTER 2 THE PHARMACY TECHNICIAN S ROLE IN REDUCING MEDICATION ERRORS (2 CONTACT HOURS - MANDATORY)

CHAPTER 2 THE PHARMACY TECHNICIAN S ROLE IN REDUCING MEDICATION ERRORS (2 CONTACT HOURS - MANDATORY) CHAPTER 2 THE PHARMACY TECHNICIAN S ROLE IN REDUCING MEDICATION ERRORS (2 CONTACT HOURS - MANDATORY) Learning objectives Explain the common points of medication errors as they pertain to pharmacy technicians.

More information

Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA) Contents

Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA) Contents Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA) Contents Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA)... 1 Welcome to HIPAA Awareness Training Content... 3 HIPAA

More information

Purpose: Provide an overview of the Ohio Nurse Practice Act to help nurses in Ohio

Purpose: Provide an overview of the Ohio Nurse Practice Act to help nurses in Ohio Ohio Nurse Practice Act By: Raymond Lengel, CNP, MSN, RN Purpose: Provide an overview of the Ohio Nurse Practice Act to help nurses in Ohio practice in accordance with the law. Objectives 1. Demonstrate

More information

NOTICE OF PRIVACY PRACTICES

NOTICE OF PRIVACY PRACTICES NOTICE OF PRIVACY PRACTICES THIS NOTICE DESCRIBES HOW HEALTH INFORMATION ABOUT YOU MAY BE USED AND DISCLOSED AND HOW YOU CAN GET ACCESS TO THIS INFORMATION. PLEASE REVIEW THIS NOTICE OF PRIVACY PRACTICES

More information

Population Health Management Program Notice of Privacy Practices from Evolent Health

Population Health Management Program Notice of Privacy Practices from Evolent Health Population Health Management Program Notice of Privacy Practices from Evolent Health MedStar Health, Inc., a Maryland not-for-profit corporation, has contracted with Evolent Health, Inc., a Delaware corporation

More information

AVE MARIA UNIVERSITY HIPAA PRIVACY NOTICE

AVE MARIA UNIVERSITY HIPAA PRIVACY NOTICE AVE MARIA UNIVERSITY HIPAA PRIVACY NOTICE This Notice of Privacy Practices describes the legal obligations of Ave Maria University, Inc. (the plan ) and your legal rights regarding your protected health

More information

OUR LADY OF THE LAKE, HOSPITAL INC. AND OUR LADY OF THE LAKE PHYSICIAN GROUP, LLC NOTICE OF PRIVACY PRACTICES

OUR LADY OF THE LAKE, HOSPITAL INC. AND OUR LADY OF THE LAKE PHYSICIAN GROUP, LLC NOTICE OF PRIVACY PRACTICES OUR LADY OF THE LAKE, HOSPITAL INC. AND OUR LADY OF THE LAKE PHYSICIAN GROUP, LLC NOTICE OF PRIVACY PRACTICES THIS NOTICE DESCRIBES HOW HEALTH INFORMATION ABOUT YOU MAY BE USED AND DISCLOSED AND HOW YOU

More information

Medicines reconciliation on admission and discharge from hospital policy April 2013. WHSCT medicines reconciliation policy 1

Medicines reconciliation on admission and discharge from hospital policy April 2013. WHSCT medicines reconciliation policy 1 Medicines reconciliation on admission and discharge from hospital policy April 2013 WHSCT medicines reconciliation policy 1 Policy Title Policy Reference Number Medicines reconciliation on admission and

More information

Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Policy 1.8.4

Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Policy 1.8.4 Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Policy 1.8.4 Appendix C Uses and Disclosures of PHI Procedures This Appendix covers procedures related to Uses and Disclosures of PHI. Disclosures to Law

More information