14A Atomic Structure. What is inside an atom? Modeling an atom. Thinking about the atom. Atomic Structure Investigation 14A.

Save this PDF as:
 WORD  PNG  TXT  JPG

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "14A Atomic Structure. What is inside an atom? Modeling an atom. Thinking about the atom. Atomic Structure Investigation 14A."

Transcription

1 Atomic Structure Investigation 14A 14A Atomic Structure What is inside an atom? We once believed that atoms were the smallest units of matter. Then it was discovered that there are even smaller particles inside atoms! The structure of the atom explains why nearly all the properties of matter we experience are what they are. This investigation will lead you through some challenging and fun games that illustrate how atoms are built from protons, neutrons, and electrons. Materials Atom Building Game A Modeling an atom In the atom game, colored marbles represent the three kinds of particles. Red marbles are protons, blue marbles are neutrons, and yellow marbles are electrons. B 1. Build the atom above using three red, three blue, and three yellow marbles. 2. Fill in the blanks in the empty periodic table box for the atom you constructed. Thinking about the atom a. What is the number below the element symbol? What does this number tell you about the the atom? 1

2 Investigation 14A Atomic Structure b. What is the number(s) above the element symbol called? What does this number tell you about the atom? c. Why do some elements have more than one number above the symbol? What are the variations in this number called? C Making atoms Build the 6 atoms shown on the chart and fill in the missing information Protons and neutrons go in the middle of the board. Electrons go in the outside and fill up the holes from the lowest row to the highest. 2

3 D Atomic Structure Investigation 14A Stop and think a. Two of the atoms you made were the same element. What was different about them? b. One of the atoms had just enough electrons to completely fill the first two rows. Which atom was this? Where on the periodic table is it found? c. Which atom had an atomic number of 8? d. Which atom had a mass number of 14? e. One atom is found in a lightweight, silvery metal used in airplanes. Which atom was it? f. One atom is found in an element that makes up about 21% of the air you breathe. You could not live without this element. 3

4 Investigation 14A Atomic Structure 7 4

5 Atomic Challenge! Investigation 14B 14B Atomic Challenge! How were the elements created? During the middle ages, people believed you could turn lead into gold if you did followed the right procedures. Later, we learned that lead and gold are different elements with different kinds of atoms. You have to change the atoms inside to make lead into gold. Lead atoms have 82 protons in the nucleus. Gold atoms have 79 protons. Materials Atom Building Game A Building the elements About 13 billion years ago, when the universe was much younger, the only atoms in existence were hydrogen, helium, and a small amount of lithium. These are the three lightest elements. Today, we find carbon, oxygen, iron, and even uranium atoms. Where did these heavy atoms come from? All the elements were created in the super-hot cores of stars. Stars get their energy by combining hydrogen atoms together to make other elements, such as helium. Along the way, a few protons get converted into neutrons and electrons. In this investigation, you will learn how these subatomic particles are arranged to make up the structure of an atom by playing the game of Atomic Challenge. B Quick review of the atom In the atom game, colored marbles represent the three kinds of particles. Red marbles are protons, blue marbles are neutrons, and yellow marbles are electrons. 1

6 Investigation 14B Atomic Challenge! C The game of atomic challenge This game simulates how the heavy elements were created inside stars. Each player takes a turn adding protons, neutrons, and electrons to the atom to build heavier and heavier elements. D 1. The winner of the game is the first player to run completely out of marbles. 2. Each player should start with 6 blue marbles (neutrons), 5 red marbles (protons), and 5 yellow marbles (electrons). 3. Each player takes turns adding 1-5 marbles, but not more than 5. The marbles may include any mixture of electrons, protons, and neutrons. FOR EXAMPLE: you can add one blue, one red, and one yellow marble in a turn. That makes three total marbles, which is less than Marbles played in a turn are added to the marbles already in the atom. 5. Only atoms where the electrons, protons, and neutrons match one of the naturally occurring elements on the table are allowed. If you add marbles that make an atom NOT on the red periodic table you have to take your marbles back and lose your turn. 6. A player can trade marbles with the bank INSTEAD of taking a turn. The player can take as many marbles, and of as many colors as they need but must take at least as many total marbles as they put in. For example, a player can trade 2 yellows for 1 yellow, 1 blue, and 1 red. Stop and think Atoms which are not on the periodic table shown may exist in nature but they are radioactive and unstable. For example, carbon-14 is unstable and is not listed although carbon-12 and carbon-13 are stable. a. What four elements make up almost all of the mass in your body? 2

7 Atomic Challenge! Investigation 14B b. How many stable isotopes does oxygen have? c. Find one element on the chart that has no stable isotopes. d. What element has atoms with 26 protons in the nucleus? e. On most periodic tables, a single atomic mass is listed instead of the mass numbers for all the stable isotopes. How is this mass related to the different isotopes? 3

8 The Periodic Table Investigation 15A 15A The Periodic Table How is the periodic table organized? Virtually all the matter you see is made up of combinations of elements. Scientists know of 118 different elements, of which about 90 occur naturally. Each element has its own unique kind of atom. The periodic table is a chart that shows all of the elements in order of increasing atomic number. Materials Periodic table tiles A Building the periodic table Every element is given a symbol of one or two letters. For example, the symbol for hydrogen is a capital letter H. The symbol for lithium is two letters, Li. Each element also has a unique number called the atomic number. The periodic table is a chart that shows the elements in an arrangement that helps us recognize groups of elements with similar properties. The picture below shows the shape of the periodic table and the first few elements in sequence from left to right. The elements are arranged from lowest to highest atomic number. Using the chart as a guide, build the periodic table out of the periodic table tiles. The only tile you should use yellow-side up is the hydrogen tile. The colors will show a pattern when you are finished. There is a tricky part near the bottom of the table. The table breaks off between element 56 (Ba) and element 71 (Lu), and fills in the first of two long rows underneath the main part of the chart. 1

9 Investigation 15A The Periodic Table B Organization of the periodic table Look at the periodic table you put together out of the tiles. Use the diagram below, and your model of the periodic table, to answer the questions below. a. Which elements are in group 1? b. Which elements are in group 8? 2

10 The Periodic Table Investigation 15A c. Name three transition metals. d. To which group does chlorine belong? What other elements are in that group? e. Which elements are in the 2 nd period? C Applying what you have learned a. Each row (period) of the periodic table contains only a certain number of elements. What does this have to do with the structure of the atom? Research this question in your textbook. 3

11 Investigation 15A The Periodic Table b. Which group of the periodic table above contains the element argon? What characteristic do the elements in this group share? c. Which group contains the element carbon? What characteristic do the elements in this group share? 4

12 15B Periodic Table Challenge What information can you get from the periodic table? Periodic Table Challenge Investigation 15B Each box on the periodic table tells you the element symbol, atomic number, and atomic mass for all the known elements. This is very useful information, but did you know that the arrangement of the elements on the periodic table gives you even more information? Each major column of elements represents a group of elements with similar chemical behavior. Can you see why the arrangement of elements on the periodic table is important? Materials Blank periodic table bingo card sheets; 1 per player Caller s clues and checklist; 1 per team Copy of the periodic table of elements; 1 per player Highlighter or other marker; 1 per player A The challenge Periodic Table Challenge is a bingo-like game that helps you understand how the elements on the periodic table are arranged. Each player will fill out their own five-by-five grid with element symbols, and then the caller will read element clues. The players must interpret the clues and highlight any boxes on the grid that fit the clue. The first player that correctly highlights five boxes across, up-and-down, or diagonally in a row is the winner. B Rules of play 1. Designate one member of your group to be the caller. The caller will call out clues and keep track of them on the checklist. 2. Each player will have a sheet of 4 blank grids. Fill out one of the grids with random element symbols (other grids can be used for additional games). You may choose elements in the atomic number range of 1 54 (hydrogen through xenon). Do not repeat symbols on the card. You will only be able to fit 25 of the possible 54 symbols on the card. You choose which ones to use, and where to place them on the grid. 3. The caller will randomly pick clues from the list, and as a clue is called out, the caller will check off the clue. The answers are only for the caller to check the winner s card! 4. When a clue is called, players check the grid to see if any of the elements fit the clue. Any elements that fit the clue must be highlighted. If no elements fit the clue, then no boxes are highlighted on that turn. 5. When a player has five boxes highlighted in a row up and down, across, or diagonally, play stops. The caller will double check the clue list and answers to see if the clues indeed match the elements. Play continues until a true winner is determined. 1

13 Investigation 15B Periodic Table Challenge C Caller s clues Clues can be called in any order. Check off each clue as you use it. Clue A member of the carbon family Chemical properties similar to calcium, but not calcium A transition metal that has a C in the symbol A member of the oxygen family Chemical properties similar to cesium, but not cesium A member of the noble gas family A nonmetal in the nitrogen family A metal in the boron family A gas in the oxygen family A solid in the halogen family An element that is liquid at room temperature A transition metal with less than 25 protons A transition metal commonly found in jewelry A metalloid in the carbon family Chemical properties similar to aluminum, but not aluminum A transition metal with protons An element symbol with a first letter that is different from the first letter of the name A member of the nitrogen family with a one-letter symbol A transition metal from period 5 Possible Answers C, Si, Ge, Sn Be, Mg, Sr Sc, Cr, Co, Cu, Tc, Cd, O, S, Se, Te H, Li, Na, K, Rb He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe N, P Al, Ga, In O I Hg, Br Cr, V, Ti, Sc Ni, Cu, Ag Si, Ge B, Ga, In Y, Zr, Nb, Mo, Tc Na, K, Fe, Ag, Sn, Sb N, P Y, Zr, Nb, Mo, Tc, Ru, Rh, Pd, Ag, Cd 2

14 D Periodic table challenge card Periodic Table Challenge Investigation 15B Fill in each of the squares with the symbol of an element with atomic number between 1 and 54 (hydrogen - xenon) You may not use the same element symbol twice. 3

15 Chemical Bonds Investigation 16A 16A Chemical Bonds Why do atoms form chemical bonds? Most of the matter on Earth is in the form of compounds. Even when a substance exists as a pure element, it tends eventually to combine with other elements. For example, if you leave an iron nail outside in the rain, it will quickly combine with the oxygen in the air to form iron oxide, better known as rust. In this Investigation, you will build models of atoms and discover one of the fundamental ideas in chemistry: how electrons are involved in the formation of chemical bonds. Materials Atom Building Game A Reviewing atomic structure Let s review what you already know about atoms: A neutral atom has the same number of electrons and protons. The electrons occupy energy levels surrounding the nucleus. Since electrons are attracted to the nucleus, they fill the lower energy levels first. Once a given level is full, electrons start filling the next level. 1

16 Investigation 16A Chemical Bonds B How many electrons in the outermost level? Using the atom building game, build each element in the table. For each element, record the number of electrons in the outermost energy level and the number of unoccupied spaces in the outermost energy level. element atomic number electrons in outermost level unoccupied spaces in outermost level C hydrogen helium lithium fluorine neon sodium chlorine argon potassium What are valence electrons? Examine the table you just completed and record the answers to the following questions: a. Use your textbook to find out about valence electrons. b. What do lithium, sodium, and potassium have in common? 2

17 c. What do fluorine and chlorine have in common? Chemical Bonds Investigation 16A d. What do neon and argon have in common? D Modeling a chemical bond Atoms that have a complete outermost energy level are stable. If there are empty holes, an atom will either gain, lose, or share electrons with another atom in order to complete its outermost level and become stable. When atoms gain, lose, or share electrons with another atom, they form chemical bonds. Using two atom building games, build a sodium atom and a chlorine atom. Put them next to each other and answer the questions below. a. In order to complete its outermost energy level, do you think sodium will tend to lose its only valence electron, or gain seven? Explain your answer. 3

18 Investigation 16A Chemical Bonds b. In order to complete its outermost energy level, do you think chlorine will tend to lose all of its valence electrons or gain one electron? Explain your answer. c. Why might these two atoms bond together to form a molecule? In your answer, describe what you think might happen when sodium and chlorine form a chemical bond. E Determining oxidation numbers An element s oxidation number is equal to the charge an atom has when it ionizes, that is, gains or loses electrons. Use your models of sodium and chlorine to answer the questions below. a. Remove the valence electron from sodium. What has happened to the balance of positive and negative charges? What is sodium s oxidation number? b. Move the electron you took from sodium into the chlorine. What happens to chlorine s charge when it gains the electron from the sodium atom? What is chlorine s oxidation number? 4

19 Chemical Bonds Investigation 16A c. When sodium and chlorine form a chemical bond, what is the overall charge of the molecule? Why do you think sodium and chlorine combine in a 1:1 ratio? F Modeling chemical bonds Use multiple atom boards for this part of the investigation. First, build each atom. Next, move the boards together to model the formation of a chemical bond. a. One carbon atom and four hydrogen atoms b. Two lithium atoms and one oxygen atom c. One beryllium atom and two fluorine atoms 5

20 Investigation 16A Chemical Bonds G Applying your knowledge Read in your textbook about Lewis dot diagrams. Draw a dot diagram for each compound in Part 6. 6

21 Chemical Formulas Investigation 16B 16B Chemical Formulas Why do atoms combine in certain ratios? Chemists have long noticed that groups of elements behave similarly. The periodic table is an arrangement of the elements grouped according to similar behavior. In this investigation, you will discover how the arrangement of electrons in atoms is related to groups on the periodic table. You will also learn why atoms form chemical bonds with other atoms in certain ratios. Materials Periodic Table Tiles Periodic table with oxidation numbers Special Bonds cards A Oxidation numbers and ions An element s oxidation number indicates how many electrons are lost or gained when chemical bonding occurs. The oxidation number is equal to the charge an atom has when it ionizes, that is, gains or loses electrons to become an ion. The partial periodic table below shows the most common oxidation numbers of the elements. The oxidation numbers are written above the group number above each column on the table. The most common oxidation numbers for the main group elements are shown. 1

22 Investigation 16B Chemical Formulas B Stop and think a. How are elements grouped according to the number of valence electrons in their outermost levels? b. Why do elements in group 2 have an oxidation number of 2+? c. Why do elements in group 17 have an oxidation number of 1? d. Why do the oxidation numbers in the first two groups tend to be positive? C Predicting chemical formulas A binary compound is composed of two different elements. Predict the chemical formulas for the binary compounds that are made up of the pairs of elements in the table below. Use the following steps: 1. Using the periodic table on the previous page, determine the ion formed by each element. 2. Figure out how many periodic table tiles of each element will be needed to make the compound electrically neutral. 2

23 Chemical Formulas Investigation 16B 3. Form the compound with your tiles and write the chemical formula for each compound based on the number of tiles of each element Table 1: Writing chemical formulas for binary compounds element 1 element 2 oxidation no. 1 oxidation no. 2 number of tiles of element 1 number of tiles of element 2 chemical formula hydrogen magnesium calcium aluminum potassium lithium rubidium fluorine sulfur bromine oxygen chlorine argon sulfur D Naming compounds Naming binary ionic compounds is very simple if you follow these rules: 1. Write the name of the element with a positive oxidation number first. 2. Write the root name of the element with a negative oxidation number second. For example, chlor- is the root name of chlorine. Subtract the -ine ending. 3. Add the ending -ide to the root name. Chlor- becomes chloride. Using these rules, write the name of each of the compounds in Table 1. E Playing Compound Crossword Now that you understand how elements combine to form compounds, you are ready to play Compound Crossword. In this game, you will score points by forming stable compounds, crossword style. Players use the oxidation numbers of the elements to form correct compounds. Points are determined by adding up the atomic numbers of each atom in the compound. 3

24 Investigation Play 16B Chemical Formulas Sample game after four turns: CH 3 OH scores 18 points Fe 2 O 3 scores 76 points SiO 2 scores 30 points H 2 SO 4 scores 50 points Starting the game Each player starts with ten randomly selected tiles. The remaining tiles should be placed in a box or paper bag so that additional tiles may be drawn without being seen. The playing surface can be any flat table (or floor) with minimum dimensions of 75-by-75 centimeters. Each player draws a tile from the bag; the highest atomic number goes first. Once the starting player has been determined, those tiles are returned to the bag. The play continues to the starting player s right. 1. Players take turns adding a compound to the crossword by using tiles from their set of ten. Either side of a tile may be used. 2. The elements in a compound may be arranged in any order, as long as they are in a single horizontal or vertical row. 3. Each new compound must be shown by the player to have oxidation numbers that add up to zero. Otherwise the player must take back the compound and wait until the next turn. 4. If the compound is correct, the player adds up the atomic numbers of all the atoms in the compound to determine the points and then draws new tiles to restore a set of ten. 5. Play continues until all the tiles in the bag are used and one player is out of tiles, or until all players are unable to make a compound with their remaining tiles. 6. The winner is the player with the highest score at the end of the game. Determining correct compounds The oxidation numbers found directly above each element on the periodic table provided are used to determine whether a molecule is correct. The oxidation numbers of all the elements in the compound must add up to zero. In some cases there is more than one oxidation number for an element. Iron (Fe), for example, has oxidation numbers of +2 and +3. The player may choose either oxidation number to add to the total. The Special Bonds card included with the Periodic Table Tiles gives some additional possibilities for forming compounds. 4

25 Chemical Formulas Investigation 16B Examples of correct and incorrect compounds: The oxidation number for each element in a compound is counted once for every atom present. The two iron atoms contribute a total of +6, which is balanced by the -6 from the three oxygen atoms. Note: The Special Bonds card has some extra ways compounds can form when two atoms of the same element bond together, and when hydrogen is involved in unusual ways. The example of CH 3 OH (methanol) above uses one of the special bonds that hydrogen can make with carbon. Miscellaneous rules and strategies: The noble gases do not form bonds; therefore they can t be played. Players may decide at the start of the game to remove these tiles. As another option, players can choose to turn the noble gas tiles over, revealing the + symbol. This symbol could be used as a wildcard in which the player chooses which element the + should represent. The symbol scores no points but allows the player to complete a molecule. Players must agree on the use of the noble gas tiles before the game begins. 5

12B The Periodic Table

12B The Periodic Table The Periodic Table Investigation 12B 12B The Periodic Table How is the periodic table organized? Virtually all the matter you see is made up of combinations of elements. Scientists know of 118 different

More information

47374_04_p25-32.qxd 2/9/07 7:50 AM Page 25. 4 Atoms and Elements

47374_04_p25-32.qxd 2/9/07 7:50 AM Page 25. 4 Atoms and Elements 47374_04_p25-32.qxd 2/9/07 7:50 AM Page 25 4 Atoms and Elements 4.1 a. Cu b. Si c. K d. N e. Fe f. Ba g. Pb h. Sr 4.2 a. O b. Li c. S d. Al e. H f. Ne g. Sn h. Au 4.3 a. carbon b. chlorine c. iodine d.

More information

Chapter 5 TEST: The Periodic Table name

Chapter 5 TEST: The Periodic Table name Chapter 5 TEST: The Periodic Table name HPS # date: Multiple Choice Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question. 1. The order of elements in the periodic table is based

More information

Chapter 3 Applying Your Knowledge- Even Numbered

Chapter 3 Applying Your Knowledge- Even Numbered Chapter 3 Applying Your Knowledge- Even Numbered 2. Elements in a specific compound are always present in a definite proportion by mass; for example, in methane, CH 4, 12 g of carbon are combined with

More information

Periodic Table Questions

Periodic Table Questions Periodic Table Questions 1. The elements characterized as nonmetals are located in the periodic table at the (1) far left; (2) bottom; (3) center; (4) top right. 2. An element that is a liquid at STP is

More information

EXPERIMENT 4 The Periodic Table - Atoms and Elements

EXPERIMENT 4 The Periodic Table - Atoms and Elements EXPERIMENT 4 The Periodic Table - Atoms and Elements INTRODUCTION Primary substances, called elements, build all the materials around you. There are more than 109 different elements known today. The elements

More information

Untitled Document. 1. Which of the following best describes an atom? 4. Which statement best describes the density of an atom s nucleus?

Untitled Document. 1. Which of the following best describes an atom? 4. Which statement best describes the density of an atom s nucleus? Name: Date: 1. Which of the following best describes an atom? A. protons and electrons grouped together in a random pattern B. protons and electrons grouped together in an alternating pattern C. a core

More information

B) atomic number C) both the solid and the liquid phase D) Au C) Sn, Si, C A) metal C) O, S, Se C) In D) tin D) methane D) bismuth B) Group 2 metal

B) atomic number C) both the solid and the liquid phase D) Au C) Sn, Si, C A) metal C) O, S, Se C) In D) tin D) methane D) bismuth B) Group 2 metal 1. The elements on the Periodic Table are arranged in order of increasing A) atomic mass B) atomic number C) molar mass D) oxidation number 2. Which list of elements consists of a metal, a metalloid, and

More information

1 Arranging the Elements

1 Arranging the Elements CHAPTER 12 1 Arranging the Elements SECTION The Periodic Table BEFORE YOU READ After you read this section, you should be able to answer these questions: How are elements arranged on the periodic table?

More information

ATOMIC THEORY. Name Symbol Mass (approx.; kg) Charge

ATOMIC THEORY. Name Symbol Mass (approx.; kg) Charge ATOMIC THEORY The smallest component of an element that uniquely defines the identity of that element is called an atom. Individual atoms are extremely small. It would take about fifty million atoms in

More information

What is an Atom? smallest particle of an element that still has the properties of that element

What is an Atom? smallest particle of an element that still has the properties of that element Date: Science 10 4.1 Atomic Theory & Bonding What is an Atom? smallest particle of an element that still has the properties of that element An atom = proton(s) + electron(s) + neutron(s) (PEN) Fun Fact:

More information

Periodic Table of the Elements

Periodic Table of the Elements Periodic Table of the Elements Where did it come from? 1869 Demitri Mendeleev Russian chemist who discovered a pattern to the elements Wrote properties on cards Arranged cards according to properties

More information

Atomic Theory and Bonding

Atomic Theory and Bonding Atomic Theory and Bonding Textbook pages 168 183 Section 4.1 Summary Before You Read What do you already know about Bohr diagrams? Record your answer in the lines below. What are atoms? An atom is the

More information

UNIT (2) ATOMS AND ELEMENTS

UNIT (2) ATOMS AND ELEMENTS UNIT (2) ATOMS AND ELEMENTS 2.1 Elements An element is a fundamental substance that cannot be broken down by chemical means into simpler substances. Each element is represented by an abbreviation called

More information

Atomic Theory: The Nuclear Model of the Atom

Atomic Theory: The Nuclear Model of the Atom Chapter 5 Atomic Theory: The Nuclear Model of the Atom Section 5.1 Dalton s Atomic Theory Goal 1 Precursors to John Dalton s atomic theory Law of Definite Composition The percentage by mass of the elements

More information

Test 7: Periodic Table Review Questions

Test 7: Periodic Table Review Questions Name: Wednesday, January 16, 2008 Test 7: Periodic Table Review Questions 1. Which halogen is a solid at STP? 1. fluorine 3. bromine 2. chlorine 4. iodine 2. Element M is a metal and its chloride has the

More information

Science and technology 404

Science and technology 404 Name Date STUDY GUIDE CHAPTER 1 ATOMS AND ELEMENTS 1) DESCRIBE THE RUTHERFORD-BOHR ATOMIC MODEL All matter is made of small particles called atoms. An atom is the smallest unit of matter that retains the

More information

1. Structure and Properties of the Atom

1. Structure and Properties of the Atom SACE Stage 1 Chemistry - The Essentials 1. Structure and Properties of the Atom 1.1 Atoms: A simple definition of the atom is that it is the smallest particle that contains the properties of that element.

More information

The Periodic Table. Name: Class: Date: ID: A. Multiple Choice Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question:

The Periodic Table. Name: Class: Date: ID: A. Multiple Choice Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question: Name: Class: Date:, ID: A The Periodic Table Multiple Choice Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question: 1. What are the elements with atomic numbers from 58 to 71 called?

More information

The Periodic Table: Periodic trends

The Periodic Table: Periodic trends Unit 1 The Periodic Table: Periodic trends There are over one hundred different chemical elements. Some of these elements are familiar to you such as hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen and carbon. Each one has

More information

The Periodic Table and Periodic Law

The Periodic Table and Periodic Law The Periodic Table and Periodic Law Section 6.1 Development of the Modern Periodic Table In your textbook, reads about the history of the periodic table s development. Use each of the terms below just

More information

Scientists create models to understand how things work, including atoms.

Scientists create models to understand how things work, including atoms. CHEM100 Week 4 Notes Page 1 of 6 Scientists create models to understand how things work, including atoms. Dalton created a theory for the atom with these 5 postulates 1. Elements consist of one or more

More information

3. What would you predict for the intensity and binding energy for the 3p orbital for that of sulfur?

3. What would you predict for the intensity and binding energy for the 3p orbital for that of sulfur? PSI AP Chemistry Periodic Trends MC Review Name Periodic Law and the Quantum Model Use the PES spectrum of Phosphorus below to answer questions 1-3. 1. Which peak corresponds to the 1s orbital? (A) 1.06

More information

Chapter 6 The Periodic Table

Chapter 6 The Periodic Table Chapter 6 The Periodic Table Organizing the Periodic Table In a grocery store, the products are grouped according to similar characteristics. With a logical classification system, finding and comparing

More information

Name. Worksheet: Periodic Trends. 11. Which sequence of elements is arranged in order of decreasing atomic radii?

Name. Worksheet: Periodic Trends. 11. Which sequence of elements is arranged in order of decreasing atomic radii? 1. Which statement best describes Group 2 elements as they are considered in order from top to bottom of the Periodic Table? (A) The number of principal energy levels increases, and the number of valence

More information

SCPS Chemistry Worksheet Periodicity A. Periodic table 1. Which are metals? Circle your answers: C, Na, F, Cs, Ba, Ni

SCPS Chemistry Worksheet Periodicity A. Periodic table 1. Which are metals? Circle your answers: C, Na, F, Cs, Ba, Ni SCPS Chemistry Worksheet Periodicity A. Periodic table 1. Which are metals? Circle your answers: C, Na, F, Cs, Ba, Ni Which metal in the list above has the most metallic character? Explain. Cesium as the

More information

Electron Configurations

Electron Configurations SECTION 4.3 Electron Configurations Bohr s model of the atom described the possible energy states of the electron in a hydrogen atom. The energy states were deduced from observations of hydrogen s emissionline

More information

The Periodic Table, Electron Configuration & Chemical Bonding. Lecture 7

The Periodic Table, Electron Configuration & Chemical Bonding. Lecture 7 The Periodic Table, Electron Configuration & Chemical Bonding Lecture 7 Electrons We will start to look at the periodic table by focusing on the information it gives about each element s electrons. How

More information

Find a pair of elements in the periodic table with atomic numbers less than 20 that are an exception to the original periodic law.

Find a pair of elements in the periodic table with atomic numbers less than 20 that are an exception to the original periodic law. Example Exercise 6.1 Periodic Law Find the two elements in the fifth row of the periodic table that violate the original periodic law proposed by Mendeleev. Mendeleev proposed that elements be arranged

More information

7.4. Using the Bohr Theory KNOW? Using the Bohr Theory to Describe Atoms and Ions

7.4. Using the Bohr Theory KNOW? Using the Bohr Theory to Describe Atoms and Ions 7.4 Using the Bohr Theory LEARNING TIP Models such as Figures 1 to 4, on pages 218 and 219, help you visualize scientific explanations. As you examine Figures 1 to 4, look back and forth between the diagrams

More information

Name PRE-TEST. Directions: Circle the letter indicating whether the following statements are either true ("T") or false ("F").

Name PRE-TEST. Directions: Circle the letter indicating whether the following statements are either true (T) or false (F). 1 PRETEST Directions: Circle the letter indicating whether the following statements are either true ("T") or false ("F"). T F 1. Chemical elements with similar chemical properties are referred to as a

More information

Chemistry CP Unit 2 Atomic Structure and Electron Configuration. Learning Targets (Your exam at the end of Unit 2 will assess the following:)

Chemistry CP Unit 2 Atomic Structure and Electron Configuration. Learning Targets (Your exam at the end of Unit 2 will assess the following:) Chemistry CP Unit 2 Atomic Structure and Electron Learning Targets (Your exam at the end of Unit 2 will assess the following:) 2. Atomic Structure and Electron 2-1. Give the one main contribution to the

More information

EXPERIMENT 4: Electron Configuration of elements

EXPERIMENT 4: Electron Configuration of elements Material: laboratory display of the elements and a wall periodic table is required. Objective: To learn the use of periodic table for writing electron configuration of elements. INTRODUCTION Basic building

More information

Unit 2: Atomic Theory Practice Packet

Unit 2: Atomic Theory Practice Packet Unit 2: Atomic Theory Practice Packet 1 Name History of Atomic Theory Period Fill in the missing information in the chart below: Name of Researcher Equipment Sketch of Model Major Idea/Discovery N/A All

More information

MODERN ATOMIC THEORY AND THE PERIODIC TABLE

MODERN ATOMIC THEORY AND THE PERIODIC TABLE CHAPTER 10 MODERN ATOMIC THEORY AND THE PERIODIC TABLE SOLUTIONS TO REVIEW QUESTIONS 1. Wavelength is defined as the distance between consecutive peaks in a wave. It is generally symbolized by the Greek

More information

Question Bank Periodic Table and Periodic Properties

Question Bank Periodic Table and Periodic Properties Question Bank Periodic Table and Periodic Properties 1. Name the following with reference to the elements of Modern Periodic Table. (1 26) (a) An alkali metal in period 2. Ans. Lithium (b) A halogen in

More information

Chapter 6. Periodic Relationships Among the Elements

Chapter 6. Periodic Relationships Among the Elements Chapter 6. Periodic Relationships Among the Elements Student: 1. The nineteenth century chemists arranged elements in the periodic table according to increasing A. atomic number. B. number of electrons.

More information

MULTIPLE CHOICE. Choose the one alternative that best completes the statement or answers the question.

MULTIPLE CHOICE. Choose the one alternative that best completes the statement or answers the question. Chem2A_Ch3_PT MULTIPLE CHOICE. Choose the one alternative that best completes the statement or answers the question. 1) The smallest amount of an element that retains that elementʹs characteristics is

More information

Section 1: Arranging the Elements Pages 106-112

Section 1: Arranging the Elements Pages 106-112 Study Guide Chapter 5 Periodic Table Section 1: Arranging the Elements Pages 106-112 DISCOVERING A PATTERN 1. How did Mendeleev arrange the elements? a. by increasing density b. by increasing melting point

More information

TRENDS IN THE PERIODIC TABLE

TRENDS IN THE PERIODIC TABLE Noble gases Period alogens Alkaline earth metals Alkali metals TRENDS IN TE PERIDI TABLE Usual charge +1 + +3-3 - -1 Number of Valence e - s 1 3 4 5 6 7 Electron dot diagram X X X X X X X X X 8 Group 1

More information

Directions: Multiple Choice For each of the following questions, choose the answer that best answers the question and place it on your answer sheet.

Directions: Multiple Choice For each of the following questions, choose the answer that best answers the question and place it on your answer sheet. CHEMISTRY TEST: THE PERIODIC TABLE Directions: Multiple Choice For each of the following questions, choose the answer that best answers the question and place it on your answer sheet. 1. Which of the following

More information

Bonding Practice Problems

Bonding Practice Problems NAME 1. When compared to H 2 S, H 2 O has a higher 8. Given the Lewis electron-dot diagram: boiling point because H 2 O contains stronger metallic bonds covalent bonds ionic bonds hydrogen bonds 2. Which

More information

2. John Dalton did his research work in which of the following countries? a. France b. Greece c. Russia d. England

2. John Dalton did his research work in which of the following countries? a. France b. Greece c. Russia d. England CHAPTER 3 1. Which combination of individual and contribution is not correct? a. Antoine Lavoisier - clarified confusion over cause of burning b. John Dalton - proposed atomic theory c. Marie Curie - discovered

More information

Chapter 2 Atoms, Ions, and the Periodic Table

Chapter 2 Atoms, Ions, and the Periodic Table Chapter 2 Atoms, Ions, and the Periodic Table 2.1 (a) neutron; (b) law of conservation of mass; (c) proton; (d) main-group element; (e) relative atomic mass; (f) mass number; (g) isotope; (h) cation; (i)

More information

Periodic Table Packet #1

Periodic Table Packet #1 Directions: Answer the questions with the proper information using your notes, book, and the periodic table. 1. Define a family. 2. What is a period? 3. What is the symbol for the following elements. a.

More information

19.1 Bonding and Molecules

19.1 Bonding and Molecules Most of the matter around you and inside of you is in the form of compounds. For example, your body is about 80 percent water. You learned in the last unit that water, H 2 O, is made up of hydrogen and

More information

Chapter 6: The Periodic Table Study Guide

Chapter 6: The Periodic Table Study Guide Chapter 6: The Periodic Table Study Guide I. General organization of table A. Modern periodic table 1. Increasing atomic number B. 3 major blocks 1. Metals a. Mostly solids at room temperature b. Conduct

More information

CHAPTER 6: THE PERIODIC TABLE

CHAPTER 6: THE PERIODIC TABLE CHAPTER 6: THE PERIODIC TABLE Problems to try in the textbook. Answers in Appendix I: 5,9,13,15,17,19,21,25,27,29,31,33,35,41,43,45,47,49,55abcde,57,59,61,63,65,67,69,71,73,75,89,91 6.1 CLASSIFICATION

More information

Unit 3 Study Guide: Electron Configuration & The Periodic Table

Unit 3 Study Guide: Electron Configuration & The Periodic Table Name: Teacher s Name: Class: Block: Date: Unit 3 Study Guide: Electron Configuration & The Periodic Table 1. For each of the following elements, state whether the element is radioactive, synthetic or both.

More information

2. All of the atoms of argon have the same. 1. The atomic number of an atom is always equal to the total number of. A. mass number B.

2. All of the atoms of argon have the same. 1. The atomic number of an atom is always equal to the total number of. A. mass number B. 1. The atomic number of an atom is always equal to the total number of A. neutrons in the nucleus B. protons in the nucleus 2. All of the atoms of argon have the same A. mass number B. atomic number C.

More information

Chemistry A: Periodic Table Packet Name: Hour: Page 1. Chemistry A Periodic Table

Chemistry A: Periodic Table Packet Name: Hour: Page 1. Chemistry A Periodic Table Chemistry A: Periodic Table Packet Name: Hour: Page 1 Chemistry A Periodic Table Chemistry A: Periodic Table Packet Name: Hour: Page 2 Worksheet #1: Periodic Table Inquiry Activity Directions: I know that

More information

Part I: Principal Energy Levels and Sublevels

Part I: Principal Energy Levels and Sublevels Part I: Principal Energy Levels and Sublevels As you already know, all atoms are made of subatomic particles, including protons, neutrons, and electrons. Positive protons and neutral neutrons are found

More information

PERIODIC TABLE OF GROUPS OF ELEMENTS Elements can be classified using two different schemes.

PERIODIC TABLE OF GROUPS OF ELEMENTS Elements can be classified using two different schemes. 1 PERIODIC TABLE OF GROUPS OF ELEMENTS Elements can be classified using two different schemes. Metal Nonmetal Scheme (based on physical properties) Metals - most elements are metals - elements on left

More information

Electron Configurations, Isoelectronic Elements, & Ionization Reactions. Chemistry 11

Electron Configurations, Isoelectronic Elements, & Ionization Reactions. Chemistry 11 Electron Configurations, Isoelectronic Elements, & Ionization Reactions Chemistry 11 Note: Of the 3 subatomic particles, the electron plays the greatest role in determining the physical and chemical properties

More information

Atoms. Chemistry 100. Bettelheim, Brown, Campbell & Farrell. Introduction to General, Organic and Biochemistry Chapter 2

Atoms. Chemistry 100. Bettelheim, Brown, Campbell & Farrell. Introduction to General, Organic and Biochemistry Chapter 2 Chemistry 100 Bettelheim, Brown, Campbell & Farrell Ninth Edition Introduction to General, Organic and Biochemistry Chapter 2 Atoms Classifications of Matter: Elements An Element is a substance (for example,

More information

ANSWER KEY : BUILD AN ATOM PART I: ATOM SCREEN Build an Atom simulation ( http://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/build an atom )

ANSWER KEY : BUILD AN ATOM PART I: ATOM SCREEN Build an Atom simulation ( http://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/build an atom ) ANSWER KEY : PART I: ATOM SCREEN Build an Atom simulation ( http://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/build an atom ) 1. Explore the Build an Atom simulation with your group. As you explore, talk about what

More information

3.01 Elements, Symbols and Periodic Table

3.01 Elements, Symbols and Periodic Table .0 Elements, Symbols and Periodic Table Dr. Fred O. Garces Chemistry 00 Miramar College.0 Elements, symbols and the Periodic Table January 0 The Elements: Building block of Matter The periodic table of

More information

Chapter Outline. 3 Elements and Compounds. Elements and Atoms. Elements. Elements. Elements 9/4/2013

Chapter Outline. 3 Elements and Compounds. Elements and Atoms. Elements. Elements. Elements 9/4/2013 3 Elements and Compounds Chapter Outline 3.1 Elements A. Distribution of Elements Foundations of College Chemistry, 14 th Ed. Morris Hein and Susan Arena Copyright This reclining Buddha in Thailand is

More information

Chapter 2 The Structure of Matter and the Chemical Elements

Chapter 2 The Structure of Matter and the Chemical Elements 9 Chapter 2 The Structure of Matter and the Chemical Elements Review Skills 2.1 Solids, Liquids, and Gases Solids Liquids Gases Internet: The Structure of Matter 2.2 The Chemical Elements Internet: Element

More information

Electrons in Atoms & Periodic Table Chapter 13 & 14 Assignment & Problem Set

Electrons in Atoms & Periodic Table Chapter 13 & 14 Assignment & Problem Set Electrons in Atoms & Periodic Table Name Warm-Ups (Show your work for credit) Date 1. Date 2. Date 3. Date 4. Date 5. Date 6. Date 7. Date 8. Electrons in Atoms & Periodic Table 2 Study Guide: Things You

More information

The Atom Atomic Number Mass Number Isotopes

The Atom Atomic Number Mass Number Isotopes The Atom Atomic Number Mass Number Isotopes 1 Atomic Theory Atoms are building blocks of elements Similar atoms in each element Different from atoms of other elements Two or more different atoms bond in

More information

How Atoms Interact with Each Other

How Atoms Interact with Each Other Active Chemistry The Periodic Table Active Chemistry The Periodic Table Activity 8 ow Atoms Interact with Each Other GOALS In this activity you will: Relate patterns in ionization energies of elements

More information

Chemistry: The Periodic Table and Periodicity

Chemistry: The Periodic Table and Periodicity Chemistry: The Periodic Table and Periodicity Name: Hour: Date: Directions: Answer each of the following questions. You need not use complete sentences. 1. Who first published the classification of the

More information

Matter, Elements, Compounds, Chemical Bonds and Energy

Matter, Elements, Compounds, Chemical Bonds and Energy Science of Kriyayoga IST 111-01, Spring 2005 Matter, Elements, Compounds, Chemical Bonds and Energy In our discussion so far, we have discussed human nervous system and cell biology, in addition to the

More information

Paper 3 and Paper 4. CC4 The Periodic Table. The learning journey

Paper 3 and Paper 4. CC4 The Periodic Table. The learning journey Paper 3 and Paper 4 CC4 The Periodic Table There are over 100 known elements. The modern periodic table is a chart that arranges these elements in a way that is useful to chemists. Thanks to the periodic

More information

******* KEY ******* Atomic Structure & Periodic Table Test Study Guide

******* KEY ******* Atomic Structure & Periodic Table Test Study Guide Atomic Structure & Periodic Table Test Study Guide VOCABULARY: Write a brief definition of each term in the space provided. 1. Atoms: smallest unit of an element that has all of the properties of that

More information

Chemistry: The Periodic Table and Periodicity

Chemistry: The Periodic Table and Periodicity Chemistry: The Periodic Table and Periodicity Name: per: Date:. 1. By what property did Mendeleev arrange the elements? 2. By what property did Moseley suggest that the periodic table be arranged? 3. What

More information

CHAPTER 13 THE PERIODIC TABLE

CHAPTER 13 THE PERIODIC TABLE CHAPTER 13 THE PERIODIC TABLE OVERVIEW The periodic table is usually the first thing that comes to mind when thinking about the subject of chemistry. We have all heard about the periodic table from as

More information

Periodic Table. 1. In the modern Periodic Table, the elements are arranged in order of increasing. A. atomic number B. mass number

Periodic Table. 1. In the modern Periodic Table, the elements are arranged in order of increasing. A. atomic number B. mass number Name: ate: 1. In the modern, the elements are arranged in order of increasing. atomic number. mass number. oxidation number. valence number 5. s the elements in Group I are considered in order of increasing

More information

Chapter 7 Periodic Properties of the Elements

Chapter 7 Periodic Properties of the Elements Chapter 7 Periodic Properties of the Elements 1. Elements in the modern version of the periodic table are arranged in order of increasing. (a). oxidation number (b). atomic mass (c). average atomic mass

More information

Review- The Periodic Table

Review- The Periodic Table Review- The Periodic Table Name Date Block Matching: Match the description in with the correct term in. Write the letter in the blank provided. Each term matches with only one description, so be sure to

More information

Chemistry 104 Chapter Three PowerPoint Notes

Chemistry 104 Chapter Three PowerPoint Notes Atomic Structure and the Periodic Table Chapter 3 Chemistry 104 Professor Michael Russell Atomic Theory Chemistry founded on four fundamental assumptions about atoms and matter which make up the modern

More information

Periodic Table, Valency and Formula

Periodic Table, Valency and Formula Periodic Table, Valency and Formula Origins of the Periodic Table Mendelѐѐv in 1869 proposed that a relationship existed between the chemical properties of elements and their atomic masses. He noticed

More information

Trends of the Periodic Table Diary

Trends of the Periodic Table Diary Trends of the Periodic Table Diary Trends are patterns of behaviors that atoms on the periodic table of elements follow. Trends hold true most of the time, but there are exceptions, or blips, where the

More information

1) is credited with developing the concept of atomic numbers.

1) is credited with developing the concept of atomic numbers. Chemistry Chapter 14 Review Name answer key General Concept Questions 1) is credited with developing the concept of atomic numbers. A) Dmitri Mendeleev B) Lothar Meyer C) Henry Moseley D) Ernest Rutherford

More information

Name: Period: Date: Unit 3 Practice Review (the questions on the test are NOT the same as the review questions)

Name: Period: Date: Unit 3 Practice Review (the questions on the test are NOT the same as the review questions) Name: Period: Date: Unit 3 Review: things you will need to know 1. Atomic Theories: Know all the scientists in order. What did they discover? What experiment did they use? 2. Development of the periodic

More information

1. According to the modern model of the atom, the nucleus of an atom is surrounded by one or more

1. According to the modern model of the atom, the nucleus of an atom is surrounded by one or more 1. According to the modern model of the atom, the nucleus of an atom is surrounded by one or more 8. The diagram below represents the nucleus of an atom. A) electrons B) neutrons C) positrons D) protons

More information

Name period AP chemistry Unit 2 worksheet Practice problems

Name period AP chemistry Unit 2 worksheet Practice problems Name period AP chemistry Unit 2 worksheet Practice problems 1. What are the SI units for a. Wavelength of light b. frequency of light c. speed of light Meter hertz (s -1 ) m s -1 (m/s) 2. T/F (correct

More information

PERIODIC TABLE. reflect

PERIODIC TABLE. reflect reflect Suppose you wanted to organize your locker at school. How could you separate and arrange everything in an organized way? You could place the books, notebooks, and folders on a shelf that is separate

More information

Atoms and Molecules. Preparation. Objectives. Standards. Materials. Grade Level: 5-8 Group Size: 20-30 Time: 60 90 Minutes Presenters: 2-4

Atoms and Molecules. Preparation. Objectives. Standards. Materials. Grade Level: 5-8 Group Size: 20-30 Time: 60 90 Minutes Presenters: 2-4 Atoms and Molecules Preparation Grade Level: 5-8 Group Size: 20-30 Time: 60 90 Minutes Presenters: 2-4 Objectives This lesson will enable students to: Describe how atoms are the building blocks of matter

More information

All answers must use the correct number of significant figures, and must show units!

All answers must use the correct number of significant figures, and must show units! CHEM 10113, Quiz 2 September 7, 2011 Name (please print) All answers must use the correct number of significant figures, and must show units! IA Periodic Table of the Elements VIIIA (1) (18) 1 2 1 H IIA

More information

Physical Science Notes Properties of Atoms and the Periodic Table

Physical Science Notes Properties of Atoms and the Periodic Table Physical Science Notes Properties of Atoms and the Periodic Table Structure of the Atom Elements are abbreviated in scientific shorthand. Symbols on the periodic table are short or abbreviated ways to

More information

Ionic and Metallic Bonding

Ionic and Metallic Bonding Ionic and Metallic Bonding BNDING AND INTERACTINS 71 Ions For students using the Foundation edition, assign problems 1, 3 5, 7 12, 14, 15, 18 20 Essential Understanding Ions form when atoms gain or lose

More information

Bonding Web Practice. Trupia

Bonding Web Practice. Trupia 1. If the electronegativity difference between the elements in compound NaX is 2.1, what is element X? bromine fluorine chlorine oxygen 2. Which bond has the greatest degree of ionic character? H Cl Cl

More information

Periodic Table & Periodic Trends I. Importance of Classification II. History & Development law of octaves III. Periodic Law

Periodic Table & Periodic Trends I. Importance of Classification II. History & Development law of octaves III. Periodic Law Periodic Table & Periodic Trends I. Importance of Classification A. Makes large sums of information manageable. B. In chemistry, it reduces the number of reactions that need to be studied. II. History

More information

Organizing the Elements

Organizing the Elements The Periodic Table Organizing the Elements A few elements, such as gold and copper, have been known for thousands of years - since ancient times Yet, only about 13 had been identified by the year 1700.

More information

List the 3 main types of subatomic particles and indicate the mass and electrical charge of each.

List the 3 main types of subatomic particles and indicate the mass and electrical charge of each. Basic Chemistry Why do we study chemistry in a biology course? All living organisms are composed of chemicals. To understand life, we must understand the structure, function, and properties of the chemicals

More information

5.4 Trends in the Periodic Table

5.4 Trends in the Periodic Table 5.4 Trends in the Periodic Table Think about all the things that change over time or in a predictable way. For example, the size of the computer has continually decreased over time. You may become more

More information

Periodic Table Study Guide

Periodic Table Study Guide Chemistry Periodic Table Name: Period: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Periodic Table Study Guide Directions: Please use this packet as practice and review. DO NOT try to answer these questions during presentations, take

More information

Grade 9 Science Unit: Atoms and Elements Topic 4: Periodic Table & Compounds

Grade 9 Science Unit: Atoms and Elements Topic 4: Periodic Table & Compounds Grade 9 Science Unit: Atoms and Elements Topic 4: Periodic Table & Compounds Topic Using the Periodic Table Metals, Non- Metals & Metalloids I can Explain and identify the periods of the Periodic Table.

More information

Name Class Date. What is ionic bonding? What happens to atoms that gain or lose electrons? What kinds of solids are formed from ionic bonds?

Name Class Date. What is ionic bonding? What happens to atoms that gain or lose electrons? What kinds of solids are formed from ionic bonds? CHAPTER 1 2 Ionic Bonds SECTION Chemical Bonding BEFORE YOU READ After you read this section, you should be able to answer these questions: What is ionic bonding? What happens to atoms that gain or lose

More information

2 The Structure of Atoms

2 The Structure of Atoms CHAPTER 4 2 The Structure of Atoms SECTION Atoms KEY IDEAS As you read this section, keep these questions in mind: What do atoms of the same element have in common? What are isotopes? How is an element

More information

Composition and Structure of the Atom. Protons: Positively charged, high mass particle. Neutrons: Neutral (no) charge, high mass

Composition and Structure of the Atom. Protons: Positively charged, high mass particle. Neutrons: Neutral (no) charge, high mass Composition and Structure of the Atom Atom: basic unit of an element; smallest unit that retains chemical properties of an element Subatomic particles: Small particles that are the building blocks from

More information

Short questions: Write the nuclear symbols for three isotopes of oxygen in which there are 8, 9, and 10 neutrons, respectively.

Short questions: Write the nuclear symbols for three isotopes of oxygen in which there are 8, 9, and 10 neutrons, respectively. Atom X A Z A mass number (= number of protons (electrons) + number of neutrons) Z atomic number (= number of protons = number of electrons) Almost all of the mass of an atom is in its nucleus; almost all

More information

Chapter 3 Atoms & the. Chapter 3 Section 2 The Simplest Matter Pages 80-85

Chapter 3 Atoms & the. Chapter 3 Section 2 The Simplest Matter Pages 80-85 Chapter 3 Atoms & the Periodic Table Chapter 3 Section 2 The Simplest Matter Pages 80-85 The Elements There are many different types of atoms. An element is matter made up of only one kind of atom. An

More information

During photosynthesis, plants use light energy (sunlight) from the sun, carbon dioxide (CO 2. ) and water (H 2

During photosynthesis, plants use light energy (sunlight) from the sun, carbon dioxide (CO 2. ) and water (H 2 Scientist Guide The Spice of Life Introduction Plants make the oxygen we breathe and the food we consume. They do this through a process known as photosynthesis. Photosynthesis is the single most important

More information

Chemical Building Blocks: Chapter 3: Elements and Periodic Table

Chemical Building Blocks: Chapter 3: Elements and Periodic Table Name: Class: Date: Chemical Building Blocks: Chapter 3: Elements and Periodic Table Study Guide Multiple Choice Identify the letter of the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question.

More information

Assignments in Science Class X (Term II) IMPORTANT NOTES ANIL TUTORIALS

Assignments in Science Class X (Term II) IMPORTANT NOTES ANIL TUTORIALS Assignments in Science Class X (Term II) Periodic Classification of Elements 1. Early chemists classified elements as metals and non-metals on the basis of a set of physical and chemical properties. 2.

More information

19.2 Chemical Formulas

19.2 Chemical Formulas In the previous section, you learned how and why atoms form chemical bonds with one another. You also know that atoms combine in certain ratios with other atoms. These ratios determine the chemical formula

More information

6.5 Periodic Variations in Element Properties

6.5 Periodic Variations in Element Properties 324 Chapter 6 Electronic Structure and Periodic Properties of Elements 6.5 Periodic Variations in Element Properties By the end of this section, you will be able to: Describe and explain the observed trends

More information