2013/2014 CSAE BEnEfitS & CompEnSAtion SuRvEy REpoRt

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1 2013/2014 CSAE Benefits & Compensation Survey Report

2 Association Executive Benefits and Compensation Report 2013/2014

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4 2013 Association Executive Benefits and Compensation Report 32 nd Edition Copyright 2013 Canadian Society of Association Executives All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage or retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. Printed in Canada This publication is published for information and educational purposes only and should not be considered legal advice. ISBN Print ISBN Digital

5 About This Report Published by: Research and Analysis Conducted by: 10 King Street East, Suite 1100 Suite 405, th Avenue SW Toronto, ON M5C 1C3 Calgary, AB T2R 1K7 T: x x 235 T: F: F: E: E: W: csae.com W: framework-partners.com Market Research and Strategic Management Consulting Engaged for DIRECTION Noted for RESULTS Copyright 2013 Canadian Society of Association Executives v

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7 Table of Contents Executive Summary A. Introduction A.1. Background A.2. Study Purpose and Objectives A.3. Methodology A.4. Executive Framework A.5. Organization Framework A.6. Study Limitations and Interpretation B. Monetary Compensation B.1. Summary Findings B.2. Monetary Compensation by Level B.3. Growth B.4. Association Management Payrolls B.5. Monetary Compensation by Association Characteristics Association Type Region of Headquarters Geographic Scope Size and Type of Membership Compensation by Member Type Organizational Revenue B.6. Compensation by Demographics Age Education Tenure Gender Experience Impact of CAE Designation and CSAE Membership Executive Role in the Organization C. Incentive Compensation C.1. Summary Findings C.2. Executive Incentive Plans Factors for Incentive Compensation Determination of Incentive Compensation D. Benefits D.1. Summary Findings D.2. Retirement Benefits Value of Retirement Benefits Copyright 2013 Canadian Society of Association Executives v

8 D.3. Health Benefits D.4. Fringe Benefits D.5. Automobile Benefits D.6. Benefits Summary E. Determining Compensation E.1. Summary Findings E.2. Factors for Determining Compensation E.3. Use of Contracts E.4. Negotiation Inputs Appendix 1: Detailed Results for Industry Associations Appendix 2: Detailed Results for Professional Associations Appendix 3: Detailed Results for Registered Charity Associations Appendix 4: Detailed Results for Special/Common Interest Associations Appendix 5: Detailed Compensation by Region Appendix 6: Characteristics of Executives Appendix 7: Peer Comparisons Notice to Readers vi Copyright 2013 Canadian Society of Association Executives

9 Tables Table 1 Type of Executive Table 2 Type of Organization Table 3 Change in Base Monetary Compensation ( ) Table 4 Change in Additional Monetary Compensation ( ) Table 5 Additional Monetary Compensation Ratio Table 6 Compensation Levels by Table 7 Total Monetary Compensation Change Table 8 Estimated Changes in Compensation by Level Table 9 Average Expected Increase Table 10 Association Type Table 11 Monetary Compensation by Association Type Table 12 Monetary Compensation by Association Type Table 13 Headquarters Location Table 14 Monetary Compensation by Association Region Table 15 Changes in Monetary Compensation by Association Region Table 16 Geographic Scope Table 17 Monetary Compensation by Geographic Scope Table 18 Membership Size Table 19 Monetary Compensation by Size of Membership Table 20 General Statistics for Associations with Indirect Members (i.e. Federations) Table 21 Compensation for Associations with Indirect Members Table 22 Compensation for Associations with Direct Members Table 23 Monetary Compensation by type of Membership Table 24 Organizational Revenue Table 25 Monetary Compensation by Size of Organizational Revenue Table 26 Distribution of A and B level Executives by Age Table 27 Compensation by Executive Age Table 28 Distribution of Executives by level and Education Table 29 Monetary Compensation by Level of Education Table 30 Years of Working at Current Level Table 31 Compensation by Years Working at Current :Level Copyright 2013 Canadian Society of Association Executives vii

10 Table 32 Gender of Executives Table 33 Monetary Compensation by Gender Table 34 Years in the Workforce Table 35 Compensation by Years in the Workforce Table 36 Previous Workplace Organization Type Table 37 Monetary Compensation by Previous Workplace Organization Type Table 38 Prior Membership Status Table 39 Monetary Compensation by Prior Membership Status Table 40 CAE Designation Table 41 Monetary Compensation by CAE Designation Table 42 CSAE Membership Table 43 Monetary Compensation by CSAE Membership Table 44 Role in Organization Table 45 Monetary Compensation by Role in Organization Table 46 Executives with Incentive Plans Table 47 Incentive Plan Offered by Association Type Table 48 Factors on Which Performance Measures are Based Table 49 Ranking Factors on Which Performance Measures are Based Table 50 Basis for How Variable Pay is Determined Table 51 Who Determines the Target for Incentive Pay Table 52 Retirement Benefits Table 53 Types of Retirement Benefits by Executive Level Table 54 Annual Value of Retirement Benefits Among Those Who Receive Them Table 55 Annual Value of Retirement Benefits Among All Executives Table 56 Summary of RRSP Benefits by Level as Percentage of Salary Table 57 Health Benefits by Executive Level: A level Table 58 Health Benefits by Executive Level: B level Table 59 Health Benefits by Executive Level: C level Table 60 Health Benefits by Executive Level: D level Table 61 Average Value of Health Benefits Table 62 Types of Fringe Benefits by Executive Level Table 63 Value of Fringe Benefits by Executive viii Copyright 2013 Canadian Society of Association Executives

11 Table 64 Automobile by Executive Level Table 65 Average Value of Automobile Benefits Table 66 Automobile Allowance Other than Lease Table 67 Parking For Executives Table 68 Automobile Benefits by Executive Level Table 69 Summary of Benefits by Level Table 70 Average total compensation change (2012 vs. 2013) Table 71 Detailed Total Compensation Table 72 Final Decision Maker for Base Compensation by Level Table 73 Final Decision Maker for Additional Compensation by Level Table 74 Compensation Target Determination Table 75 Information Used to Determine Compensation by Type of Association Table 76 Monetary Compensation by Source Used Table 77 Use of Contracts Table 78 Monetary Compensation use of Contract Table 79 Negotiator Used Table 80 Salary by use of Third Party Negotiator Table 81 Information Most Commonly Used in Negotiations Table 82 Survey Use as a Reference to Negotiate Table 83 Surveys Used Table 84 Monetary Compensation by Survey Used Table 85 Health Benefits by Level for Industry Associations Table 86 Fringe Benefits by Level for Industry Associations Table 87 Retirement Benefits by Level for Industry Associates Table 88 Automobile Benefits for Industry Associates Table 89 Value of Benefits by Level for Industry Associations Table 90 Compensation by Level for Industry Associations Table 91 Compensation by Level for Industry Associations Table 92 Health Benefits by Level for Professional Associations Table 93 Fringe Benefits by Level for Professional Associations Table 94 Retirement Benefits by Level for Professional Associates Table 95 Automobile Benefits for Professional Associates Copyright 2013 Canadian Society of Association Executives ix

12 Table 96 Value of Benefits by Level for Professional Associations Table 97 Compensation by Level for Professional Associations Table 98 Compensation by Level for Professional Associations Table 99 Health Benefits by Level for Registered Charity Associations Table 100 Fringe Benefits by Level for Registered Charity Associations Table 101 Retirement Benefits by Level for Registered Charity Associates Table 102 Automobile Benefits for Registered Charity Associates Table 103 Value of Benefits by Level for Registered Charity Associations Table 104 Compensation by Level for Registered Charity Associations Table 105 Compensation by Level for Registered Charity Associations Table 106 Health Benefits by Level for Special/Common Interest Associations Table 107 Fringe Benefits by Level for Special/Common Interest Associations Table 108 Retirement Benefits by Level for Special/Common Interest Associates Table 109 Automobile Benefits for Special/Common Interest Associates Table 110 Value of Benefits by Level for Special/Common Interest Associations Table 111 Compensation by Level for Special/Common Interest Associations Table 112 Compensation by Level for Special/Common Interest Associations Table 113 A Level Compensation by Region Table 114 B Level Compensation by Region Table 115 C Level Compensation by Region Table 116 D Level Compensation by Region Table 117 Compensation by Level by Compensation Table 118 Organizational Characteristics by Level by Compensation : Type of Organization Table 119 Organizational Characteristics by Level by Compensation : Region of Headquarters96 Table 120 Organizational Characteristics by Level by Compensation : Geographic Scope Table 121 Organizational Characteristics by Level by Compensation : Organizations with Indirect Members Table 122 Organizational Characteristics by Level by Compensation : Organizations with No Indirect Members Table 123 Organizational Characteristics by Level by Compensation : Number of Staff (Full- Time Employees) Table 124 Organizational Characteristics by Level by Compensation : Organization's Total Revenue From All Sources x Copyright 2013 Canadian Society of Association Executives

13 Table 125 Organizational Characteristics by Level by Compensation : Compensation Decision Maker 98 Table 126 Length of Contract by Compensation Table 127 Role of A Level Executive and Negotiation Tools Used: Role as Senior Executive Table 128 Role of A Level Executive and Negotiation Tools Used: Are Surveys Used as a Reference Point for Negotiation of "A" Level Compensation? Table 129 Role of A Level Executive and Negotiation Tools Used: What Information Is Used When Determining "A" Level Salary? Table 130 Role of A Level Executive and Negotiation Tools Used: Use of a Third Party Negotiator for "A" Level Salary Table 131 Demographics by Compensation : Age Table 132 Demographics by Compensation : Years in the Workforce Table 133 Demographics by Compensation : Years in Current Position Table 134 Demographics by Compensation : Sector of Previous Employment Table 135 Demographics by Compensation : Member of Organization Before Employment. 101 Table 136 Demographics by Compensation : Education Table 137 Demographics by Compensation : CAE Designation Table 138 Demographics by Compensation : CSAE Member Table 139 Executive Compensation by CAE Designation Table 140 Executive Compensation by Receipt of Variable Pay Table 141 Executive Compensation by Number of Staff Table 142 Employment History of Executives : A and B Level Prior Position by Years in Organization Table 143 A and B Level Was Member Prior to Taking Current Position by Years in Organization106 Copyright 2013 Canadian Society of Association Executives xi

14 Figures Figure 1 Organization Chart Figure 2 Monetary Compensation by Level Figure 3 Additional Monetary Compensation Ratio Figure 4 "A" Level Monetary Compensation Distribution (N=393) Figure 5 "B" Level Monetary Compensation Distribution (N=139) Figure 6 "C" Level Monetary Compensation Distribution (N=392) Figure 7 "D" Level Monetary Compensation Distribution (N=189) Figure 8 Compensation from for A level executives Figure 9 Compensation from for B, C, and D level executives Figure 10 A Level Executive Expected Change in Compensation Figure 11 B Level Executive Expected Change in Compensation Figure 12 C Level Executive Expected Change in Compensation Figure 13 D Level Executive Expected Change in Compensation Figure 14 Association Type Figure 15 Headquarters Location Figure 16 Geographic Scope Figure 17 Membership Size Figure 18 Organizational Revenue (N=446) Figure 19 Distribution of A and B Level Executives by Age Figure 20 Distribution of C and D Level Executives by Age xii Copyright 2013 Canadian Society of Association Executives

15 Association Executive Benefits and Compensation Report 2013/2014 Framework Partners Inc.

16 Executive Summary The 2013/14 edition of the CSAE Association Executive Benefits and Compensation Survey consists of reported information from 1219 executives representing 448 associations and notfor-profit organizations. This years response rate is an improvement of roughly 19% over the 2012 report with respect to the number of respondent organizations. This robust response rate, along with improved methodology first adopted in 2012, makes this year s report the most accurate to date. The key findings are listed below. Please Note: Readers are cautioned that the general findings above apply only on an overall basis, and that specific segmented findings frequently vary from overall average findings. The data in this report is segmented in greater detail, particularly by organization type, which will allow the reader to make a more comparable determination, however the reader is cautioned that some segments are smaller and accordingly data reported on those segments is less reliable. Monetary Compensation On average, compensation has increased since 2012 for all types of organizations and associations, with a few exceptions Base monetary compensation has risen by an average of 2.7% over 2012 levels. All executive levels saw an increase, with D level executives experiencing the most growth since Executives expectations of future increases to compensation are lower than what the trend of actual historical increases would predict. However, on average, executives are expecting positive growth in the coming year. A level executives in the Greater Toronto Area are the highest earning executives in the survey, consistent with past surveys. BC executives experienced significant monetary gains since 2012, and are up 8% since Organizations of national scope pay higher than provincial, local, and other regional organizations. Membership size is not related to executive compensation. A high level of compensation is just as likely in an organization with fewer than 500 members as it is in an organization with more than 10,000 members. Organizational revenue is strongly related to executive compensation. Organizations with higher revenue provide higher compensation than organizations with lower revenue. Over half of A level executives are over the age of fifty. Further, A level executives over the age of 50 earn the highest levels of compensation in the survey. In general, executives with higher educational attainment receive greater compensation. The exception to this rule is for A level executives with no formal post-secondary education, who receive similar compensation to A level executives holding a bachelor s degree. The majority of executives are women in this survey. However, women tend to earn less than men in comparable executive roles. However, CSAE member organizations are ahead of the overall economy in terms of female compensation levels. 14 Copyright 2013 Canadian Society of Association Executives

17 Incentive Compensation Fewer than half of executives receive an incentive plan. Those that do, are more likely to be an executive at an Industry/Trade organization or a Professional organization. Incentives for A level executives are most commonly related to the performance of an organization as a whole. By contrast, a lower level executive s incentive is most commonly tied to performance of the executive s department within the organization. Further, the most common method of measuring performance is by use of financial targets. Incentives are most commonly given as a percentage of executive salary. Incentive compensation is most often determined by the board of directors for A level executives. For lower level executives, it is more common that a management supervisor is responsible for determining incentive compensation. Benefits Retirement benefits are offered to most executives, and the most common form of retirement benefit is an RRSP contribution. The likelihood of receiving retirement benefits is not related to executive level, executives at all levels are equally likely to have retirement benefits. Health benefits are the most common form of benefit for all executives. Medical, Drug, Life and dental insurance are most likely to be employer provided. A large majority (86%) of A level executives receive fringe benefits, and 70% of B level executives receive fringe benefits. The most common forms of fringe benefits are conference registration, travel, cell phone, and laptop. Provision of a vehicle is very rare for association executives. A level executives are the most likely group to receive a vehicle, though fewer than 4% of A level executives actually receive a vehicle. As in previous years, the majority of organizations have parking freely available, or provide parking for executives. Auto allowances have increased by 4% over 2012, from 48 /km in 2012 to 50 km in Copyright 2013 Canadian Society of Association Executives 15

18 Determining Compensation Executives who use information from surveys to benchmark their compensation make a considerable margin over their counterparts who use no survey at all. For example, A level executives who use the CSAE survey earn an average of over $20,000 more than A level executives who use no survey at all. Compensation for A level executives is determined by the board, while for lower executive levels a chief staff officer most commonly decides base compensation. The most common information referenced in salary determination is organizational budget, but those who use trend or other information sources tend to make more on average, with some exceptions. Most executives have a contract. Those who do not have a contract, on average, earn lower levels of compensation. Third party negotiators are not commonly used, but when they are used, the resulting compensation is considerably higher; however, there may be confounding factors in this result. 16 Copyright 2013 Canadian Society of Association Executives

19 A. Introduction A.1. Background On June 8, 1951, a committee of six trade association executives founded the Institute of Canadian Trade Association Executives (ICTAE) a group of chief executives from national trade associations based in Montreal, Ottawa and Toronto. Operating from a small Ottawabased office, the new association developed a constitution, bylaws, hired part-time staff, and began a remarkable tradition of service. In 1953, the fledgling Institute held its first annual business meeting, approved 25 membership applications, and elected the first woman Florence Montgomery of the Canadian Restaurant Association to its board. Member services included a newsletter, employee referral and group insurance discounts. The Institute changed its name to the Institute of Association Executives (IAE) in1956 and opened its doors to all individuals employed by non profit associations. On October 18, 1962, the Institution was incorporated under federal charter and moved from Ottawa to Toronto two years later. In 1987, the association changed its name again this time to its current title, the Canadian Society of Association Executives (CSAE). Currently the CSAE has over 2800 Executive and Business members from all over Canada. This geographic diversity is shown through the local CSAE Chapters in Vancouver, Edmonton, Winnipeg, Toronto, Ottawa, Montreal and Halifax. A.2. Study Purpose and Objectives The 2013/2014 edition of the Association Executive Benefits and Compensation Report is the 32 nd in a series of annual compensation reports produced for those involved or interested in associations and other not-for-profit organizations. This year s report, jointly produced by CSAE and Framework Partners Inc., provides comprehensive documentation of compensation and benefits currently provided to executives employed in associations and other not-forprofit organizations across Canada. This report investigates a multitude of factors relevant in determining the appropriate level of compensation and benefits offered to executives in associations and other not-for-profit organizations. A.3. Methodology Organizations were invited to participate in an online survey from March through to April The resulting survey population from all those contacted was The survey closed in April The online survey used a convenience sampling methodology, and while a large sample such as this indicates strong and reliable data, the non-probabilistic sampling methodology means that a definitive margin of error cannot be expressed. Copyright 2013 Canadian Society of Association Executives 17

20 A.4. Executive Framework The 2013 survey results reflect the compensation of over 1,200 association executives at four levels of senior management, representing 448 organizations, which is a 60% increase over three years ago. Further, it is the opinion of the author that the analytics in the 2013/2014 report are superior to those of previous years. The four levels of senior management used in this report are labelled as levels A through D to avoid inadvertently limiting inclusion of senior managers at the appropriate level due to inconsistent organizational titles. The definitions in Table 1 describe each level of executive for greater clarity. Figure 1 Organization Chart Board A Level Executive (Most Senior Staff Officer) B Level Executive (2 nd in Command) C Level Executive C Level Executive C Level Executive D Level Executive D Level Executive D Level Executive A typical organization chart for a larger organization has an A level executive that reports to the Board of Directors. The ``A`` level executive may have a direct report or B level executive (e.g., Chief Operating Officer) that acts to lead the organization in his or her absence. Depending on the size of the organization, there will be different strata of senior managers whom we have defined as C and D level executives for the purpose of this study. 18 Copyright 2013 Canadian Society of Association Executives

21 Table 1 Type of Executive Type of Executive Number of Executives Represented Number of Organizations Represented A Level Executive: The single, most senior fulltime salaried executive of the organization who reports directly to the board. (Common Titles: President, Executive Director, Executive Vice President, General Manager, Registrar) B Level Executive: The single, full-time salaried executive who reports to "A" and deputizes in the absence of "A." Many associations do not have a "B" level executive. (Common Titles: Chief Operating Officer, Assistant Executive Director, Assistant General Manager, Deputy CEO). C Level Executive: Full-time salaried directors or managers who report to either "A" or "B" and are the senior people responsible for a particular area of activity. "C" level managers/directors typically advise "A" and "B" with respect to their particular area of expertise and have responsibility for staff and budgets for their area. "C" level managers/directors usually have at least one staff member reporting directly to them. (Common Titles: Director of Public Affairs, VP - Marketing, Director of Finance, Manager of Member Services). D Level Executive: Full-time, salaried managers who report to either "A," "B" or "C." Managers at the "D" level usually follow policies and budgets set by "A," "B" or "C." "D" level staff do not have direct employee management responsibility. The definition does not include non-management or support staff. (Common Titles: Manager of Finance and/or Administration, Human Resources Manager, Manager of Meetings). Total number of executives/organizations represented Copyright 2013 Canadian Society of Association Executives 19

22 A.5. Organization Framework This report offers further usability through the identification of five types of organizations which divide the data for greater clarity and comparability to similar types of organizations. Table 2 Type of Organization Type of Organization Industry: members are typically business entities which share common business interests (e.g., manufacturers of products, providers of services, chambers of commerce and other businesses/services) Professional: members are typically individuals who share a specific vocation and common interests (e.g., engineers, accountants, health-related colleges or regulatory bodies) Registered Charities: charitable organizations registered with CRA Number of Responses Received Special/Common Interest: members are individuals or organizations who share a special or common interest (e.g., environmental, recreational, community, social issues) 40 Other: 30 A.6. Study Limitations and Interpretation When interpreting the results from this study, it is important to keep in mind the following limitations: Data Integrity. Compensation and benefit averages and ranges (e.g., annual base salary, additional monetary compensation, vacation entitlement, employee benefit premiums, etc.) as well as other data are based on survey responses and are only as accurate as the data provided by those survey respondents. Comparability. Since compensation levels vary significantly with the demographic characteristics of the executive and the organizational profiles of the associations for which they work, these factors should be taken into consideration when using this study as a resource for compensation planning. Externalities. There are several characteristics that likely influence compensation for executive factors that are not measured in this report because they are not easily measurable (e.g., interpersonal skills, professional networks, etc.). 20 Copyright 2013 Canadian Society of Association Executives

23 B. Monetary Compensation Monetary compensation is a primary factor in workplace satisfaction and is often considered an indicator of workplace success. Awareness of the average monetary compensation of comparable executives provides a framework for understanding relative positioning and offers a basis for negotiation when compensation is inconsistent between executives in comparable positions. This section provides analysis on the monetary compensation of executives in associations and other not-for-profit organizations. Compensation is identified by varying organizational and individual executive factors. B.1. Summary Findings On average, compensation has increased since 2012 for all types of organizations and associations, with a few exceptions Base monetary compensation has risen by an average of 2.7% over 2012 levels. All executive levels saw an increase, with D level executives experiencing the most growth since Executives expectations of future increases to compensation are lower than what the trend of actual historical increases would predict. However, on average, executives are expecting positive growth in the coming year. A level executives in the Greater Toronto Area are the highest earning executives in the survey, consistent with past surveys. BC executives experienced significant monetary gains since 2012, and are up 8% since Organizations of national scope pay higher than provincial, local, and other regional organizations. Membership size is not related to executive compensation. A high level of compensation is just as likely in an organization with fewer than 500 members as it is in an organization with more than 10,000 members. Organizational revenue is strongly related to executive compensation. Organizations with higher revenue provide higher compensation than organizations with lower revenue. Over half of A level executives are over the age of fifty. Further, A level executives over the age of 50 earn the highest levels of compensation in the survey. In general, executives with higher educational attainment receive greater compensation. The exception to this rule is for A level executives with no formal post-secondary education, who receive similar compensation to A level executives holding a bachelor s degree. The majority of executives are women in this survey. However, women tend to earn less than men in comparable executive roles. However, CSAE member organizations are ahead of the overall economy in terms of female compensation levels. Copyright 2013 Canadian Society of Association Executives 21

24 B.2. Monetary Compensation by Level Compensation by level is demonstrated in Figure 2. In 2013 A level executives are earning an average monetary compensation of $141,339 with a base compensation of $134,278, and additional compensation (e.g. bonus) of $6,834. The compensation level of A level executives is approximately $35,000 higher than that of B level executives, and is the largest disparity in pay scale between any two adjacent executive levels. A difference of approximately $10,000 is observed between executives at levels B and C, and approximately $20,000 separates executives at level C from executives at level D. Figure 2 Monetary Compensation by Level Base Compensation Additional Compensation $160,000 $140,000 $6,834 $120,000 $100,000 $2,908 $1,802 $80,000 $60,000 $40,000 $134,278 $103,213 $90,211 $1,092 $70,354 $20,000 $- "A" Level (N=393) B Level (N=139) C Level (N=392) D Level (N=189) Table 3 Change in Base Monetary Compensation ( ) Base Compensation 2012 N 2013 N Increase "A" Level $130, $134, % "B" Level $98, $103, % "C" Level $89, $90, % "D" Level $68, $70, % On average, base monetary compensation has risen by 2.7% since Between 2011 and 2012, by comparison, the increase in base monetary compensation was 3.7%. All executive levels observed an increase in 2013 over 2012 level base monetary compensation. The largest increase in base monetary compensation is 2.9% for D level executives. 22 Copyright 2013 Canadian Society of Association Executives

25 Table 4 Change in Additional Monetary Compensation ( ) Additional Compensation* 2012 N 2013 N Increase "A" Level $7, $6, % "B" Level $4, $2, % "C" Level $2, $1, % "D" Level $ $1, % *For all executives Additional Compensation** 2012 N 2013 N Increase "A" Level $21, $20, % "B" Level $10, $9, % "C" Level $7, $7, % "D" Level $4, $4, % **For only those executives that receive addition compensation In 2013 additional monetary compensation saw an average of 7.9% decline from 2012 levels. This decline follows an increase of 15.7% between 2011 and 2012, thus 2013 sees a return to 2011 additional compensation levels. Further, when only those who actually receive additional monetary compensation are reported, the size of additional monetary compensation is considerable. Level A executives, for example, receive $20,342 in additional monetary compensation. Table 5 Additional Monetary Compensation Ratio 1 A Level B Level C Level D Level (N=393) (N=139) (N=392) (N=189) Base Compensation 95% 97% 98% 98% Additional Compensation 5% 3% 2% 2% 1 Additional monetary compensation ratio is calculated on a case-by-case basis. Results in the table represent the average of the individual ratios. Calculating based on the aggregate compensation (presented in the table) will yield a different answer that does not represent the average variable pay level. Copyright 2013 Canadian Society of Association Executives 23

26 Figure 3 Additional Monetary Compensation Ratio Base Compensation Additional Compensation 100% 5% 3% 2% 2% 95% 90% 95% 97% 98% 98% 85% 80% A Level (N=393) B Level (N=139) C Level (N=392) D Level (N=189) Table 5 shows the relative ratio of additional and base monetary compensation between the four executive levels. A level executives earn a slightly larger portion of additional monetary compensation than the other executive levels, but there is little overall variation across the four executive levels. These findings are similar to what is observed in data from Table 6 Compensation Levels by 1st 2nd 3rd 4th A Level (N=393) $29,500 - $90,000 $90,000 - $125,000 $125,000 - $172,450 $172,450 - $658,725 B Level (N=139) $25,000 - $77,450 $77,450 - $95,000 $95,000 - $121,500 $121,500 - $275,000 C Level (N=392) $26,000 - $68,937 $68,937 - $87,312 $87,312 - $108,018 $108,018 - $296,330 D Level (N=189) $22,500 - $56,650 $56,650 - $68,000 $68,000 - $82,797 $82,797 - $240,000 Table 6 reports the range of salaries observed in 2013 at each of the four executive levels. The quartile ranges divide respondents into four equal groups by numbering respondents according to salary (i.e., 25% in each group). This provides an effective framework for salary determination, comparisons, and negotiations by executives or boards by representing the range of salaries within each quartile, at each executive level, thus providing greater detail than simply reporting the average. 24 Copyright 2013 Canadian Society of Association Executives

27 It is important to note that the quartiles include the upper and lower extremes reported by respondents and do not imply an even distribution of salaries within that quartile. For example, almost all A level executives earn over $50,000 in monetary compensation and almost all earn less than $575,000. Across A level executives, most earn between $75,000 and $200,000 in monetary compensation. Below, figures 4 to 7 depict the distribution of compensation level by each executive level. Figure 4 "A" Level Monetary Compensation Distribution (N=393) "A" Level Figure 5 "B" Level Monetary Compensation Distribution (N=139) "B" Level Copyright 2013 Canadian Society of Association Executives 25

28 Figure 6 "C" Level Monetary Compensation Distribution (N=392) "C" Level Figure 7 "D" Level Monetary Compensation Distribution (N=189) "D" Level B.3. Growth Despite year-to-year variation, the overall trend in compensation is one of growth for all levels of executives. A level executives experience the largest growth cumulative rate since 2000 with a 62.21% increase, and an average yearly growth rate of 5.18%. B level executives show a return to growth in 2013 after a slight decrease in 2012 compensation, since 2000 B level executive compensation has grown 53.37%. C and D level compensation closely resemble one another, and exhibit a much more consistent, albeit slower, growth rate since Copyright 2013 Canadian Society of Association Executives

29 Figure 8 Compensation from for A level executives $150,000 $140,000 $130,000 $120,000 $110,000 $100,000 $90,000 $80,000 $141,339 $128,605 $127,628 $138,900 $126,246 $112,380 $121,397 $105,286 $109,506 $97,340 $90,660 $87,132 $92,188 $89, Figure 9 Compensation from for B, C, and D level executives $110,000 $100,000 $90,000 $80,000 $70,000 $60,000 $50,000 $40,000 $69,235 $64,561 $64,116 B Level C Level D Level $74,231 $73,458 $79,053 $76,589 $72,221 $72,452 $73,396 $51,461 $52,392 $53,524 $54,773 $48,145 $95,845 $82,375 $90,207 $80,709 $78,091 $80,330 $61,139 $61,804 $64,074 $106,139 $94,447 $94,253 $90,398 $85,111 $103,616 $87,368 $86,720 $106,184 $102,980 $91,403 $92,835 $76,496 $71,453 $66,307 $67,267 $69,365 $67, Copyright 2013 Canadian Society of Association Executives 27

30 Table 7 Total Monetary Compensation Change % Change 13 year average % change Cumulative % change "A" Level 1.76% 5.18% 62.21% "B" Level 3.11% 4.45% 53.37% "C" Level 0.47% 3.52% 42.25% "D" Level 3.01% 4.03% 48.41% Changes in the 2013 data show a slower pace of change than in the average trend. A level executives show less than half of the annual average growth in since As mentioned above, B level executives return to positive growth in 2013, and come much closer to the 13 year average of 4.45% than the -0.09% observed in In terms of cumulative change, A level executives have the highest overall change with 62.21%, with B level executives exhibiting an overall growth of 53.37%, and cumulative growth rates of 42.25% and 48.41% for C and D level executives respectively. B.4. Association Management Payrolls For all four levels of executives, the majority of respondents expect to see some increase in monetary compensation. However, as compared to last year, executives are less optimistic. Respondents at the A, B, and C level of executives are not reporting expectations of 4% or higher as frequently as in Further, the proportion of A, B, and C level executives reporting No Increase in monetary compensation has increased in 2013 over 2012 levels. D level executives show a slightly higher frequency of respondents expecting a 4-6% increase in compensation, but also show a shift from a 2-4% expected increase to a 0-2% expected increase. The average expected annual increases summarized in Table 8 exemplify the more modest expectations seen by executives at the A and C levels, while B and D level executives remain fairly static in their expectations over the 2012 to 2013 period. Table 8 Estimated Changes in Compensation by Level "A" Level 2012 "A" Level 2013 "B" Level 2012 "B" Level 2013 "C" Level 2012 "C" Level 2013 "D" Level 2012 "D" Level 2013 (N=373) (N=415) (N=126) (N=146) (N=319) (N=390) (N=141) (N=189) Decrease 1% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% No Increase 23% 25% 8% 12% 10% 16% 13% 13% Increase 0% - 2% 22% 21% 29% 32% 25% 31% 30% 33% Increase 2% - 4% 33% 34% 40% 39% 50% 43% 46% 39% Increase 4% - 6% 12% 11% 15% 11% 10% 8% 7% 11% Increase >6% 10% 9% 7% 5% 5% 2% 3% 4% 28 Copyright 2013 Canadian Society of Association Executives

31 Table 9 Average Expected Increase "A" Level "B" Level "C" Level "D" Level % 3.2% 3.1% 2.5% % 3.1% 2.5% 2.6% Compared to average % change (see Table 7), the expected changes in compensation in 2013 are lower for all executive levels. While all levels of executives, on average, expect an increase, the historical trend is nearly 1 percentage point higher at each executive level. Figure 10 A Level Executive Expected Change in Compensation "A" Level 2012 (N=373) "A" Level 2013 (N=415) 40% 35% 30% 25% 20% 15% 10% 5% 0% Decrease No Increase Increase 0% - 2% Increase 2% - 4% Increase 4% - 6% Increase >6% Copyright 2013 Canadian Society of Association Executives 29

32 Figure 11 B Level Executive Expected Change in Compensation "B" Level 2012 (N=126) "B" Level 2013 (N=146) 45% 40% 35% 30% 25% 20% 15% 10% 5% 0% Decrease No Increase Increase 0% - 2% Increase 2% - 4% Increase 4% - 6% Increase >6% Figure 12 C Level Executive Expected Change in Compensation "C" Level 2012 (N=319) "C" Level 2013 (N=390) 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% Decrease No Increase Increase 0% - 2% Increase 2% - 4% Increase 4% - 6% Increase >6% 30 Copyright 2013 Canadian Society of Association Executives

33 Figure 13 D Level Executive Expected Change in Compensation "D" Level 2012 (N=141) "D" Level 2013 (N=189) 50% 45% 40% 35% 30% 25% 20% 15% 10% 5% 0% Decrease No Increase Increase 0% - 2% Increase 2% - 4% Increase 4% - 6% Increase >6% B.5. Monetary Compensation by Association Characteristics This section details the differences in compensation between the various types of associations. Association Type The proportion of association types reporting in 2013 is consistent with what is observed over the previous three years. The frequency of a given association type varies by, at most, 6% over the four year period detailed in Table 10. Notably, participation from Industry associations is down from a high of 36% in 2010, but is more comparable to more recent levels at 30% in Professional associations are the largest single group of participants, which is true in all reporting periods; however 2013 shows a slight decrease from 2012: falling from 41% in 2010 to 37% in Participation of registered charities has reverted to near 2011 levels, at 22% in 2013, up from 18% in Table 10 Association Type 2013 Type of Association (N=589) Industry 36% 31% 28% 30% Professional Association 37% 33% 41% 37% Registered Charity 18% 23% 18% 22% Special/Common Interest 9% 8% 9% 7% Other - 5% 4% 5% Copyright 2013 Canadian Society of Association Executives 31

34 Figure 14 Association Type 2013 Special/Common Interest, 7% Other, 5% Registered Charity, 22% Industry, 30% Professional Association, 37% Table 11 Monetary Compensation by Association Type Industry/Trade Professional Registered Charity Special/Common Interest Average N Average N Average N Average N "A" Level $153, $149, $114, $115, "B" Level $112, $108, $94, $86,051 9 "C" Level $95, $101, $78, $80, "D" Level $74, $72, $64, $53,845 9 Industry/Trade organizations typically earn the highest levels of compensation, a finding that is consistent over the past two years of surveys. In 2013, only C level executives from professional organizations realize higher monetary compensation than Industry/Trade executives at equivalent positions. Professional associations average higher compensation levels than registered charities and special/common interest associations. For 2013, registered charities provide greater compensation than special/common interest associations, except for A level executives, where the opposite is observed. By contrast, in the 2012 special/common interest associations reported compensation levels closer to levels observed in professional associations, thus 2013 sees a reduction in special/common interest association compensation from 2012 levels. All association types exhibit a graduated pay grade moving from executive levels D to A. That is, the higher the executive level, the higher the monetary compensation. The greatest increase in pay grade is seen in the industry/trade associations, while the smallest increases are seen in registered charities. Table 12 illustrates the growth in compensation at each executive level for each association type. Special/common interest groups drop significantly in compensation from 2012 levels at each executive level. This finding is indicative that the levels reported in 2012 were unusually 32 Copyright 2013 Canadian Society of Association Executives

35 high, since 2011 levels provide a similar profile to what is observed in D level executives of professional associations and registered charities see the highest levels of compensation growth, while. D level executives at special/common interest associations see the largest decrease in compensation however this is most likely due to an unusually large value reported in 2012, as was previously mentioned. Table 12 Monetary Compensation by Association Type Industry/Trade Professional Registered Charity Special/Common Interest "A" Level 3% 8% 2% -19% "B" Level 5% 6% 4% -14% "C" Level -1% 8% 3% -16% "D" Level 5% 10% -8% -31% Please note that as the segmentation of the data become more granular, data reliability decreases. Region of Headquarters Organizations based in Greater Toronto make up the largest group of respondents with 24% of the overall responses, which is consistent to past surveys. In general, the responses show a similar dispersion to what has been observed in the past. Slightly fewer organizations are reporting from Greater Toronto (down 1%), Ottawa (the next largest group, down 2%), Quebec, Saskatchewan, and New Brunswick (all down by 1%), while a slightly greater number of organizations are reporting from Alberta and Other Ontario (both up by 2%). Other regions remain static in their share of overall responses. Figure 15 Headquarters Location Newfoundland, 1% NWT & Nunavut, 1% Yukon, 0% Nova Scotia, 2% PEI, 0% Quebec, 2% Outside of Canada, 1% British Columbia, 11% Other Ontario, 14% Alberta, 16% Ottawa, 17% Saskatchewan, 5% Manitoba, 3% Greater Toronto Area, 24% New Brunswick, 2% Copyright 2013 Canadian Society of Association Executives 33

36 Table 13 Headquarters Location Area (N=564) British Columbia 11% Alberta 16% Saskatchewan 5% Manitoba 3% New Brunswick 2% Greater Toronto Area 24% Ottawa 17% Other Ontario 14% Quebec 2% Nova Scotia 2% PEI 0% Newfoundland/Labrador 1% NWT & Nunavut 1% Yukon 0% Outside of Canada 1% Table 14 Monetary Compensation by Association Region 2 British Columbia Alberta Manitoba /Sask./ Terr. Greater Toronto Ottawa Other Ontario Quebec Atlantic "A" Level $138,012 $128,596 $110,889 $188,309 $157,335 $132,250 $120,224 $90,306 N=48 N=68 N=40 N=87 N=20 N=98 N=10 N=20 "B" Level $104,415 $84,960 $92,532 $130,337 $114,841 $103, N=19 N=15 N=20 N=30 N=11 N=36 N=4 N=4 "C" Level $84,401 $82,013 $86,091 $103,440 $109,024 $82,402 $82,578 - N=38 N=60 N=60 N=136 N=11 N=90 N=10 N=5 "D" Level $64,627 $64,520 $51,745 $77,440 $76,187 $71,971 $59,990 - N=13 N=21 N=9 N=76 N=29 N=25 N=11 N=3 2 A - indicates omitted results. Statistics based on 5 or fewer observations are omitted for reasons of confidentiality. 34 Copyright 2013 Canadian Society of Association Executives

37 Greater Toronto and Ottawa executives earn the highest level of compensation across all executive levels, which is consistent with previous survey years. British Columbia executives experienced significant gains over 2012 compensation levels compared to other regions, giving BC executives an average increase of 8% since A and C level executives from Quebec show a similar magnitude of change, but this is likely more to do with higher participation from the region than what is observed in the 2012 survey, and thus a more accurate representation of true compensation levels in the region. Table 15 Changes in Monetary Compensation by Association Region "A" Level "B" Level "C" Level "D" Level British Columbia Alberta Manitoba /Sask./ Terr. Greater Toronto Ottawa Other Ontario Quebec Atlantic 23% 5% -4% 5% 2% -4% -46% -2% 25% -15% 0% 7% -6% -1% 6% 45% 14% 7% 2% -6% 9% -4% 21% -4% 31% 8% 1% 4% 0% -4% -2% 5% Geographic Scope Provincial/Regional organizations form the largest group (39%) of organizations responding to the survey, slightly lower than last year. National organizations constitute nearly as many organizations (35%), again slightly lower than in The most dramatic change from the 2012 survey is the number of local organizations responding: 21% in 2013 vs. 15% in Provincial/regional, national, and local organizations form 94% of total respondents, similar to what has been seen in previous years. Copyright 2013 Canadian Society of Association Executives 35

38 Table 16 Geographic Scope Geographic Scope (N=566) 2013 Provincial/Regional 39% National 35% Local 20% Provincial/Regional Branch 3% Canadian Branch 1% Other: 1% International 1% Figure 16 Geographic Scope Provincial/Regional Branch, 3% Canadian Branch, 1% Other, 1% International, 1% Local, 20% Provincial/Regional, 39% National, 35% Table 17 Monetary Compensation by Geographic Scope International N National N Provincial/ Regional N Local N "A" Level - 3 $159, $138, $114, "B" Level - 1 $120, $103, $84, "C" Level - 2 $95, $96, $77, "D" Level - 2 $71, $72, $62, Copyright 2013 Canadian Society of Association Executives

39 National organizations offer the highest monetary compensation at the A and B executive levels, which is consistent with surveys prior to 2012 (International organizations were the highest paying in 2012). At the C and D level, national and provincial/regional compensation is very comparable, and is the highest compensation at those levels (excluding D level executives from international organizations). Please note, that international organization data is thin, and may not be representative of actual compensation levels. Size and Type of Membership The majority of responses in the 2013 survey come from organizations with 500 or fewer members (76%). 20% of responses come from organizations with 2000 members or more, the proportion was 18% in 2012 and 25% in Thus, representation from larger organizations is within the range of historical levels. Table 18 Membership Size Indirect Membership Size (N=553) Less than % % 501-1,000 4% 1,001-2,000 3% 2,001-5,000 5% 5,001-10,000 3% More than 10,000 9% Copyright 2013 Canadian Society of Association Executives 37

40 Figure 17 Membership Size 5,001-10,000, 3% More than 10,000, 9% 2,001-5,000, 5% 1,001-2,000, 3% 501-1,000, 4% , 10% Less than 100, 66% Table 19 Monetary Compensation by Size of Membership Less than ,000 2,001-5,000 More than 5,000 Average N Average N Average N Average N Average N "A" Level $144, $134, $125, $136, $145, "B" Level $112, $105, $90, $92,967 8 $98, "C" Level $91, $80, $95, $79, $97, "D" Level $72, $61, $67, $80, $77, There is no linear relationship between the size of an organization and compensation of executives, as one might suspect. In other words, it is not true that executive compensation increases as organization size increases, nor is it true that executives are paid more as organization size decreases. In past surveys, executive pay was generally highest in both the smallest organizations and the very largest organizations. Thus, the relationship between compensation and organizational size is such that mid-size organizations pay the least. In 2013 this trend is true for all executives excluding those at the B level in which organizations with members pay B level executives higher than organizations with more than 5000 members, implicating that mid-sized organizations pay more than the very largest organizations for B level executives. Table 20 General Statistics for Associations with Indirect Members (i.e. Federations) Total Industry Professional Registered Charity Special/ Common Interest % with Indirect 47% 50% 36% 55% 57% Average # indirect members 156,432 24,980 76,639 79,421 21, Copyright 2013 Canadian Society of Association Executives

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