TRAINING SEMINAR ON MARITIME AND PORT FACILITY SECURITY

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1 TRAINING SEMINAR ON MARITIME AND PORT FACILITY SECURITY Valetta, Jan How to implement security regulations - on board Costas Cavdas Maritime Security Consultant 1

2 1 The Company Security Officer (CSO) 2

3 The Company shall designate a Company Security Officer (CSO) For one or more ships depending on number or types operated Clearly identified for which ships the CSO is responsible More than one CSOs may be designated by the Company, provided it is clearly identified for which ships each one is responsible CSO is the liaison of the Company and the Ship(s) CSO duties and responsibilities shall include, but are not limited to: 3

4 Advising the level of the threats likely to be encountered by the ship Ensuring that ship security assessments are carried out Ensuring the development, approval, implementation and maintenance of the ship security plan Ensuring modification of SSP to correct deficiencies and satisfy the security requirements of each individual ship Arranging for internal audits and reviews of security activities Arranging for the initial and subsequent verifications of the ship by the administration or the Recognized Security Organization (RSO) 4

5 Ensuring that deficiencies and non-conformities identified during internal audits, periodic reviews, security inspections and verifications of compliance are promptly addressed and dealt with Enhancing security awareness and vigilance Ensuring adequate training for personnel with ship security duties Ensuring effective communication and co-operation between the Ship Security Officer (SSO) and the Port Facility Security Officer (PFSO) Ensuring consistency between security and safety requirements Ensuring that if sister-ship or fleet security plans are used, the plan for each ship accurately reflects the ship-specific information 5

6 Ensuring that any alternative or equivalent arrangements approved for a particular ship or group of ships are implemented & maintained The CSO shall also Support the SSO and the Master of the ship on security matters Evaluate on quarterly basis the SSO security reports, the outcome of onboard security drills and the security incidents or breach of security Keep the SSO and the Master of the ship informed on latest security information on ship s pattern and any Flag State security guidance Coordinate security issues with the PFSO of regularly called ports 6

7 2 The Ship Security Officer (SSO) 7

8 A Ship Security Officer (SSO) shall be designated on each ship Any qualified Officer may be designated as SSO The Master of the Ship may be also designated as SSO, but its is not recommended The SSO is the liaison between the Ship and the Company SSO duties and responsibilities shall include, but are not limited to: 8

9 Undertaking regular security inspections of the ship to ensure appropriate security measures are maintained Maintaining and supervising the implementation of the ship security plan, including any amendments to the plan Coordinating the security aspects of cargo and ship s stores handling with shipboard personnel and the relevant PFSO Proposing modifications to the ship security plan Reporting to CSO any deficiencies and non-conformities identified during internal audits, periodic reviews, security inspections and verifications of compliance and implementing any corrective action 9

10 Enhancing security awareness and vigilance on board Ensuring the provision of adequate training to shipboard personnel Reporting all security incidents and breach of security Coordinating implementation of the ship security plan with the CSO and the relevant PFSO, and Ensuring the security equipments, if any, are properly operated, tested, calibrated and maintained The SSO shall also Ensure the proper security documentation and records keeping 10

11 3 Ship Security Assessment (SSA) 11

12 The CSO shall ensure that a Ship Security Assessment (SSA) is carried out for each ship in the Company s fleet, required to comply with the provisions of SOLAS Chapter XI-2 and the ISPS Code, for which the CSO is responsible. While the CSO may not undertake all the duties associated with the post, the ultimate responsibility remains with the individual CSO Prior to commencing the SSA, the CSO should take advantage of available information on the assessment of threats and the protective measures at the frequently called ports The CSO should follow any specific guidance offered by the Contracting Governments 12

13 The SSA should address the following elements on board or within the ship physical security structural integrity personnel protection systems procedural policies radio and telecommunication systems, including computer systems and networks other areas that may, if damaged or used for illicit observation, pose a risk to people, property, or operations on board the ship or within a port facility Those involved in a SSA should be able to draw expert assistance on security aspects if they are not properly qualified 13

14 Let s see a SSA in a more practical way; How it should look like? An adequate SSA should have at least 10 Sections, as follows: Section 1: Introduction Section 2: Definitions Section 3: Information required to conduct a SSA Section 4: Identification of possible motives for unlawful actions Section 5: Initial assessment of key shipboard operations, existing security measures and procedures Section 6: Identification of possible threat scenarios Section 7: Onboard ship security survey (SSS) Section 8: Identification of weaknesses during SSS Section 9: Threat and vulnerability (risk) assessment & mitigation Section 10: SSA summary report 14

15 Section 1: Introduction Ship s Data Revision Records Index Introductory Text 15

16 Section 2: Definitions Unlawful Act Company Security Officer Ship Security Officer Declaration of Security Security Levels 1,2,3 Operator 16

17 Section 3: Information Required to Conduct a SSA Shipping company security organization structure Ship s current employment The general arrangements plan of the ship The location and function of each or potential access points to ship Changes in the tide which may have an impact on security The cargo spaces and stowage arrangements The locations where ship s stores and essential maintenance equipment is stored 17

18 Section 3: Information Required to Conduct SSA (continue) The locations where unaccompanied baggage is stored The emergency and stand-by equipment available to maintain essential services The number of ship s personnel, any existing security duties and existing training requirement practices of the Company Escape and evacuation routes and assembly stations, which have to be maintained to ensure safe evacuation of the ship Existing agreements with private security companies Existing security measures and procedures in effect 18

19 Shipping Company s Security Organizational Structure Security Organizational Structure Ashore (at the Offices) Ship/Shore Interface Security Organizational Structure Onboard 19

20 Ship s Current Employment Owner / Company Ship s Operator Ship s Characteristics (Name, IMO No, Registration, etc.) Charter Details Ship s Trade Pattern Cargo 20

21 The general arrangements of the ship Detailed layouts of all decks Deck s cross-sections Marking of access points, restricted areas etc. 21

22 The location of areas which should have restricted access Navigation Bridge Engine Room Steering Gear Room Radio Room Spaces containing security and surveillance equipment, systems and their controls Emergency Generator Room Battery Room 22

23 The location of areas which should have restricted access (continue) Emergency Fire Pump Room Ballast Control Room Lift Power Unit and Machinery Room Crane Power Unit and Machinery Room Fixed fire fighting stores room (e.g.co2 bottle room) and activation points Quick closing valve station Fire Fighting Stations / Emergency Headquarters 23

24 The location of areas which should have restricted access (continue) Galley Provision handling spaces Hospital Electrical distribution boxes Garage areas on Car Ferries Cargo Pump Room on Tankers Nitrogen Bottle Room LPG / LNG Compressor Room 24

25 The location and function of each actual or potential access points (Possible Access Points to the Ship) Gangway / Accommodation Ladder Pilot Ladder Access by crane or other hoisting gear Vehicle Ramps Side Ports and Portholes Anchor Cable Mooring Ropes Open Weather Decks 25

26 The location and function of each actual or potential access points (Access to Ship s Interiors & Restricted Areas) Accommodation doors on all decks providing emergency escape All other accommodation doors Portholes on various decks Doors on funnel on various decks Lift emergency exit Engine room emergency exits Engine room access hatch for lowering stores in engine room Access hatch for lowering stores into provisions store 26

27 The location and function of each actual or potential access points (Access to Ship s Interiors & Restricted Areas) Entrance to steering room Entrance to emergency generator room Entrance to emergency fire pump room Entrance to hydraulic and crane machinery rooms Forecastle door to the under deck passage and bow thruster room Escape hatches from engine room on various decks Stores and lockers on deck Elevators connecting various decks 27

28 Changes in the tide, which may have an impact on the vulnerability or security of the ship Information on Company s Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) regarding changes in the tide, relating to ship s security Availability of equal provisions in the Company s SOP for the impact of tide changes on security issues Change in the tide in the frequently called ports Difference in height between the docking line and the lowest open deck of the ship if change in the tide is experienced 28

29 The cargo spaces and stowage arrangements Information on cargo spaces Number of cargo holds Number of cargo pumps and manifolds Number of cargo containers Existing SOP on stowage arrangements 29

30 The location where ship s stores and essential maintenance equipment is stored The location where ship s stores and essential maintenance equipment is stored to be briefly but accurately described on a detailed table 30

31 The location where unaccompanied baggage is stored Information on the location(s) where unaccompanied baggage is stored 31

32 The emergency and stand-by equipment available to maintain essential services Information on types, position etc. on emergency and stand-by Equipment available to maintain essential services 32

33 The number of ship s personnel, any existing security duties and any existing training practices of the Company Crew list, with security functions, if any Existing personnel with security duties Existing security related training practices Existing security related drills Existing security related exercises 33

34 Existing security and safety equipment for the protection of passengers and ship s personnel List of all security and safety equipment for the protection of passengers and ship s personnel 34

35 Escape and evacuation routes and assembly stations, which have to be maintained to ensure safe evacuation of the ship List of all doors and emergency escapes from accommodation and other manned spaces. These doors and escapes have to be kept clear of obstructions and if they are locked for security reasons, they should be capable of being opened without keys for the direction for which escape is required. List of emergency and secondary muster points. The routes to these areas should be kept at all times clear of obstructions. 35

36 Existing agreements with private security companies providing ship/ waterside security services Information of existing agreements, if any, with private security companies providing ship/waterside security services at ports of call 36

37 Existing security measures and procedures in effect Deck and Shipside lighting Access Control and Identification Restricted Areas Security Alert and Communications Systems Contingency Plans Any other relevant security information 37

38 Section 4: Identification of Possible Motives for Unlawful Actions Description of possible threats on the following motives categories: Political Symbolic Economical Damage to Society/Industry Damage to the Company Fear, and Other 38

39 Section 5: Assessment of Key Shipboard Operations Existing Security Measures & Procedures The critical shipboard operations, systems, physical areas and personnel that may be subject to security incidents should be duly highlighted for evaluation in relation to ship s trading areas, the ship s characteristics and other operational conditions. Existing security measures and procedures for the same operations, systems, areas etc. should be also included for further evaluation The key shipboard operations should be divided in the following categories: 39

40 Section 5: Assessment of Key Shipboard Operations Existing Security Measures & Procedures (continue) Access Control (personnel, passengers, visitors, vendors, contractors, etc.) Restricted Areas on the Ship Cargo Handling Ship s Stores Handling Ship s Security Surveillance & Monitoring Ship s Safety Systems and Procedures 40

41 Section 6: Identification of Possible Threat Scenarios Identification of possible threat scenarios on the basis of intelligent information of the Company for the ship s routes, the cargo transported, and ports used by the ship. Risk-based decision-making is one of the best tool to complete a security assessment and to determine appropriate security measures for a ship A security assessment is a process that identifies weaknesses in physical structures, personnel protection systems, processes or other areas that may lead to a security breach, and may suggest options to eliminate or mitigate those weaknesses 41

42 Section 6: Identification of Possible Threat Scenarios (continue) A simplified risk-based security assessment is recommended. The processes and results that will be documented when performing the assessment are highlighted below Select a Scenario Evaluate/Score the scenario in terms of potential consequences Evaluate/Score the scenario in terms of the ship s vulnerability Determine if the scenario requires a mitigation strategy Implement mitigation strategy (protective measures) 42

43 Section 6: Identification of Possible Threat Scenarios (continue) To begin the process, a threat scenario is selected 1. Select a scenario 43

44 Section 6: Identification of Possible Threat Scenarios (continue) To begin the assessment, the attack scenarios consisting of a potential threat to the ship under specific circumstances are considered The selected scenarios must be within the realm of possibility The number of scenarios is left to the judgment of each ship owner or operator. An initial evaluation should at least consider those scenarios provided in Paragraph 8.9 of part B of ISPS Code The emphasis should be placed on the worst-case scenario as well as the most probable scenarios. 44

45 Section 6: Identification of Possible Threat Scenarios (continue) The following selected threat scenarios are recommended for further sub-scenarios analysis Damage to, destruction of, the ship (bombing, arson, sabotage) Hijacking or seizure of the ship or of persons on board Tampering with cargo, essential ship equipment or systems or ship s stores Unauthorized access or use including presence of stowaways Smuggling weapons or equipment, including weapons of mass destruction 45

46 Section 6: Identification of Possible Threat Scenarios (continue) The following selected threat scenarios are recommended for further sub-scenarios analysis Use of the ship to carry perpetrators and their personal equipment Use the ship itself as a weapon or as a mean to cause damage or destruction Attacks from seaward Attacks whilst at sea Other possible scenarios 46

47 Section 7: Onboard Ship Security Survey At this stage, the onboard Ship Security Survey should be conducted, towards the: Verification of the information provided by the Shipping Company Evaluation of effectiveness on existing security measures and procedures Evaluation of the existing security systems onboard, if any Identification and proper documentation of weaknesses 47

48 Section 7: Onboard Ship Security Survey (continue) During the onboard ship security survey existing shipboard protective measures, if any, procedures and operations, under both routine and emergency conditions should be examined and evaluated for: Ensuring the performance of the ship security duties Monitoring restricted areas to ensure that only authorized persons have access Controlling access to the ship, including any identification systems applied Monitoring of deck areas and areas surrounding the ship 48

49 Section 7: Onboard Ship Security Survey (continue) During the onboard ship security survey existing shipboard protective measures, if any, procedures and operations, under both routine and emergency conditions should be examined and evaluated for: Controlling the embarkation of persons and their personal effects, accompanied and unaccompanied baggage, and ship s personnel effects Supervising the handling of cargo and the delivery of ship s stores Ensuring that ship s security communication, information and equipment are readily available 49

50 Section 7: Onboard Ship Security Survey (continue) During the onboard ship security survey, due attention should be given to the identification and proper documentation, of eventual weaknesses relating to: Conflicts between safety and security measures Conflicts between shipboard duties and security assignments Watch-keeping duties, number of personnel, particularly with implications on crew fatigue, alertness and performance Any identified security training deficiencies, including drills and exercises Any insufficient, poor maintained, sub-standard security equipment or systems, including communication systems 50

51 Section 8: Identification of Weaknesses During Ship Security Survey Upon completion of the onboard ship security survey, identified weaknesses in the following areas should be thoroughly evaluated Company Security Management and Policy Company Security Organization Company Security Officer (CSO) Ship Security officer (SSO) Ship s Master Ship s Personnel Training and Qualification Ship Security Plan (SSP) (not applicable at initial SSA) Ship Security Surveys and Audits (not applicable at initial SSA) Security Records (not applicable at initial SSA) 51

52 Section 9: Threat and Vulnerability (Risk) Assessment and Mitigation Strategy At this stage all information are available to proceed with: Threat s scenarios analysis Threat s potential consequences Analysis of ship s vulnerability Threat s mitigation strategy 52

53 Section 9: Threat and Vulnerability (Risk) Assessment and Mitigation Strategy (continue) In Section 6, the possible threat scenarios, relevant to the ship, were Identified. Based on the possible threat scenarios, a threat and vulnerability (risk) assessment is processes as per step 2 of the process sequence below 1. Select a scenario 2. Evaluate/Score the scenario in terms of the potential consequences 53

54 Section 9: Threat and Vulnerability (Risk) Assessment and Mitigation Strategy (continue) Each scenario is being evaluated in terms of the potential consequences of the attack. Three elements are included in the consequences assessment; death and injury, economic impact, and environmental impact. A description of the consequences components follows: Death and injury The potential number of lives that could be lost and injuries occurring as a result of an attack scenario. Economic impact The potential economic impact of an attack scenario. Environmental impact The potential environmental impact of an attack scenario. 54

55 Section 9: Threat and Vulnerability (Risk) Assessment and Mitigation Strategy (continue) The appropriate consequences score or rating should be evaluated for each scenario. Consequences rating and criteria with benchmarks are provided in the following table. The appropriate rating is determined by using the consequence component that results in the highest rating. Table 2: Consequences Score Assign a rating of: If the impact could be CATASTROPHIC = numerous loss of life or injuries, major national or long term economic impact, complete destruction of multiple aspects of the eco-system over a large area SIGNIFICANT = multiple loss of life or injuries, major regional economic impact, long-term damage to a portion of the eco-system MODERATE = little or no loss of life or injuries, minimal economic impact, or some environmental damage 55

56 Section 9: Threat and Vulnerability (Risk) Assessment and Mitigation Strategy (continue) Each scenario should be evaluated in terms of the ship s vulnerability to an attack, as per step 3 in the process sequence. 1. Select a scenario 2. Evaluate/Score the scenario in terms of the potential consequences 3. Evaluate/Score the scenario in terms of the ship s vulnerability 56

57 Section 9: Threat and Vulnerability (Risk) Assessment and Mitigation Strategy (continue) The four elements of the vulnerability score are: availability, accessibility, organic security, and vessel hardness. With the understanding that the vessel owner and/or operator have the greatest control over the accessibility and organic security elements, these elements may be addressed for each scenario. Description of these two vulnerability elements follow: Accessibility Accessibility of the vessel to the attack scenario. This relates to physical and geographic barriers that deter the threat without organic security. Organic security The ability of security personnel to deter the attack. It includes security plans, communication capabilities, guard force, intrusion detection systems, and timeliness of outside law enforcement to prevent the attack. 57

58 Section 9: Threat and Vulnerability (Risk) Assessment and Mitigation Strategy (continue) The ship owner and/or operator should discuss each vulnerability element for a given scenario. The initial evaluation of vulnerability is normally viewed with only existing strategies and protective measures, meant to lessen vulnerabilities, which are already in place. After the initial evaluation, a comparison evaluation can be made with new strategies and protective measures considered. Assessing the vulnerability with only the existing strategies and protective measures provides a better understanding of the overall risk associated with the scenario and how new strategies and protective measures will mitigate the risk. 58

59 Section 9: Threat and Vulnerability (Risk) Assessment and Mitigation Strategy (continue) The vulnerability score and criteria with benchmark examples are provided in the following table. Each scenario should be evaluated to get the individual score for each element and then the sum of these elements will give the total vulnerability score (step 3 in Table 5). This score should be used as the vulnerability score when evaluating each scenario in the next step. 59

60 Section 9: Threat and Vulnerability (Risk) Assessment and Mitigation Strategy (continue) Table 3: Vulnerability Score Category Accessibility Organic Security 3 No deterrence (e.g. unrestricted access to vessel and unrestricted internal movement) No deterrence capability (e.g. no plan, no guard force, no emergency communication, outside law enforcement not available for timely prevention, no detection capability) 2 1 Good deterrence (e.g. single substantial barrier; unrestricted access to within 100 yards of vessel) Excellent deterrence (expected to deter attack; access restricted to within 500 yards of vessel; multiple physical/ geographical barriers) Good deterrence capability (e.g. minimal security plan, some communications, armed guard force of limited size relative to the vessel; outside law enforcement not available for timely prevention, limited detection systems) Excellent deterrence capability expected to deter attack; (covert security elements that represent additional elements not visible or apparent) 60

61 Section 9: Threat and Vulnerability (Risk) Assessment and Mitigation Strategy (continue) The vessel owner and/or operator should next determine which scenarios might have mitigation strategies (protective measures) implemented, as per step 4 in the process sequence. 1. Select a scenario 2. Evaluate/Score the scenario in terms of the potential consequences 3. Evaluate/Score the scenario in terms of the ship s vulnerability 4. Determine if the scenario requires a mitigation strategy 61

62 Section 9: Threat and Vulnerability (Risk) Assessment and Mitigation Strategy (continue) This is accomplished by determining where the scenario falls in Table 4 based on the consequence and vulnerability assessment scores.the following terms are used in Table 4 as mitigation categories: Mitigate means that mitigation strategies, such as security protective measures and/or procedures should be developed to reduce risk for that scenario. Consider means that the scenario should be considered and mitigation strategies should be developed on a case-by-case basis. Document means that the scenario may not need mitigation measure at this time and therefore needs only to be documented. However, mitigation measures having little cost may still merit consideration. 62

63 Section 9: Threat and Vulnerability (Risk) Assessment and Mitigation Strategy (continue) Table 4 is intended as broad, relative tool to assist in the development of the ship security plan. Results are not intended to be the sole basis to trigger or waive the need for specific measures, but are one tool in identifying potential vulnerabilities and evaluating prospective methods to address them. Table 4: Vulnerability & Consequences Matrix Vulnerability Score Consequenc e score 3 Consider Mitigate Mitigate 2 Document Consider Mitigate 1 Document Document Consider 63

64 Section 9: Threat and Vulnerability (Risk) Assessment and Mitigation Strategy (continue) An assistance tool in determining which scenarios may require mitigation methods is Table 5 below. The scenarios considered have been rerecorded, the consequence score (Table 2), outcome of each element of vulnerability (Table 3), the total vulnerability score, and mitigation category Table 5 MITIGATION DETERMINATION WORKSHEET Step 1 Step 2 Step 3 Step 4 Scenario/Description Consequences Score (Table 2) accessibility + Vulnerability Score (Table 3) organic security = total score Mitigation Results (Table 4) 64

65 Section 9: Threat and Vulnerability (Risk) Assessment and Mitigation Strategy (continue) The true value of these assessments is realized, once the assessment determines which scenarios require mitigation, and when mitigation strategies (protective measures) are implemented to reduce vulnerabilities, 1. Select a scenario as per Step 5 in the process sequence. 2. Evaluate/Score the scenario in terms of the potential consequences 3. Evaluate/Score the scenario in terms of the ship s vulnerability The process is repeated until all unique scenarios have been evaluated 4. Determine if the scenario requires a mitigation strategy 5. Implement mitigation strategy (protective measures) 65

66 Section 9: Threat and Vulnerability (Risk) Assessment and Mitigation Strategy (continue) The overall desire is to reduce the risk associated with the identified scenario. Note that generally, as mentioned previously, it is easier to reduce vulnerabilities than to reduce consequences or threats when considering mitigation strategies. An assistance tool in evaluating the effectiveness of specific mitigation strategies (protective measures), that is beneficial to use, is Table 6 provided below. 66

67 Section 9: Threat and Vulnerability (Risk) Assessment and Mitigation Strategy (continue) Table 6 MITIGATION IMPLEMENTATION WORKSHEET Mitigation Strategy (Protective Measure) Scenario(s) that are affected by Mitigation Strategy (from Step 1 in Table 5) Consequences Score (remains the same) New Vulnerability Score (Table 3) Accessibili ty + Organic Security = Total Score New Mitigation Results (Table 4)

68 Section 9: Threat and Vulnerability (Risk) Assessment and Mitigation Strategy (continue) Guidance to complete Table 6 Column 1: Brainstorm for mitigation strategies (protective measures) and Record them Column 2: List scenarios from Table 5 that would be affected by the selected mitigation strategy Column 3: The consequences score remains the same as it was recorded in Table 5 for each scenario Column 4: Re-evaluate the vulnerability score (Table 3) for each element, taking into consideration the mitigation strategy, for each scenario Column 5: Determine the new mitigation results with the consequences score and new total vulnerability score, using Table 4 68

69 Section 9: Threat and Vulnerability (Risk) Assessment and Mitigation Strategy (continue) There are two factors, effectiveness and feasibility, to consider in determining if a mitigation strategy should be implemented. A strategy may be thought of as highly effective if its implementation lowers the mitigation category (e.g. from mitigate to consider in Table 4) A strategy may be thought of as partially effective if the particularly strategy will lower the overall vulnerability score when implemented or along with one or more other strategies. For example, if a mitigation strategy lowers the vulnerability score from 5-6 to 3-4 while the consequences score remains at 3 and the mitigation category stays at mitigate, a combination of another strategy would be required. 69

70 Section 9: Threat and Vulnerability (Risk) Assessment and Mitigation Strategy (continue) It should be noted that if a mitigation strategy, when considered individually, does not reduce the vulnerability, that multiple strategies may be considered in combination. Considering mitigation strategies as a whole may allow the vulnerability to be reduced. A strategy may be thought of as feasible if it can be implemented with little operational impact or funding relative to the prospective reduction in vulnerability. A strategy may be thought of as partially feasible if its implementation requires significant changes or funding relative to the prospective reduction in vulnerability. A strategy may be thought of as not feasible if its implementation is extremely problematic or is cost prohibitive. 70

71 Section 9: Threat and Vulnerability (Risk) Assessment and Mitigation Strategy (continue) Some strategies that may be deployed commensurate with various security levels established. Feasibility of a mitigation strategy may vary based on the applicable security Level, therefore some strategies may not be warranted at Level 1, but may be at Levels 2 or 3. For example, using divers to inspect the underwater pier structures and vessel may not be necessary at Level 1, but may be necessary if there is a specific threat and/or an increase in Security Level. Mitigation strategies should ultimately ensure that a level of security is maintained to achieve the desired security objectives. 71

72 Section 9: Threat and Vulnerability (Risk) Assessment and Mitigation Strategy (continue) SHIP S THREAT AND VULNERABILITY (RISK ASSESSMENT) Selected Threat Scenarios Consequence Vulnerability Death & Injury Economical Impact Environ mental impact Result Accessi bility + Organic security Result Prevention Conceal explosives onboard, initiate with timer or remote device Bring explosives onboard, suicidal/high risk action Mitigate Mitigate 1.7 Set ship on fire Consider 1.11 Activate pumps to change trim Document 72

73 Section 9: Threat and Vulnerability (Risk) Assessment and Mitigation Strategy (continue) SHIP S MITIGATION STRATEGY MITIGATION IMPLEMENTATION WORKSHEET Mitigation Strategy (Protective Measure) Scenario(s) that are affected by Mitigation Strategy (from Step 1 in Table 5) Conseque nce Score (remains the same) New Vulnerability Score (Table 3) Accessibility + Orga nic Secu rity = Total Score New Mitigation Results (Table 4)

74 Section 9: Threat and Vulnerability (Risk) Assessment and Mitigation Strategy (continue) SUMMARY OF ADDITIONAL MEASURES REQUIRED AS A RESULT OF MITIGATION STRATEGY S/N Mitigation Strategy Equipment/Security System Required New/Amended Security Procedure Required Implementation Timeframe 74

75 Section 10: SSA Summary Report A Summary report of how the SSA was conducted A description of vulnerabilities found during the SSA A description of counter measures that are deemed necessary to be implemented to address the vulnerabilities found during the SSA 75

76 Section 10: SSA Summary Report (continue) Confidential Name of Ship Gross tonnage Reg. No. Name of class society IMO No. Flag Call sign Port of registry Type Date of SSA Date of On-Scene Security Survey Place of On-Scene Security Survey Name and signature of Assessor 76

77 Section 10: SSA Summary Report (continue) Summary of how the SSA was conducted: Description of each vulnerability found during the assessment: Description of the counter measures that should be used to address the above mentioned vulnerabilities: Date SSA reviewed: Name and Signature: Date SSA accepted: Name and Signature: 77

78 and now a very important notice IT IS COFFEE BREAK TIME!!! 78

79 4 Ship Security Plan (SSP) 79

80 Ship Security Plan (SSP) (ISPS Code Parts A & B Chapter 9) About The Ship Security Plan Every Ship should have its own Security Plan, which: is developed by the CSO who may seek third party assistance (RSO, Security Consultants) is compiled based on the SSA carried out contains security measures that should be adopted at each security level is approved by the Administration or a Recognized Security Organization (RSO) is implemented on board the ship for at least two months period to enable the issuance of the ISSC 80

81 Ship Security Plan (SSP) (ISPS Code Parts A & B Chapter 9) About The Ship Security Plan Every Ship should have its own Security Plan, which: is checked for its compatibility with the security systems and equipment during the ship verification is compulsory for the issuance of the International Ship Security Certificate (ISSC) is confidential it is not subject to State Port Controls only under special circumstances and with the consent of the Contracting Government of, or the master of, the ship concerned, limited access may be allowed to the SSP of the Ship. 81

82 Ship Security Plan (SSP) (ISPS Code Parts A & B Chapter 9) About The Ship Security Plan Every Ship should have its own Security Plan, which: should be checked in regular intervals for its effectiveness should be amended whenever there are security incidents or breach of security eventual amendments should be approved prior to their implementation and according to the instructions of the Flag Administration should forecast explicit processes for effective communication between CSO, SSO and PFSO 82

83 Ship Security Plan (SSP) (ISPS Code Parts A & B Chapter 9) The Ship Security Plan for each ship should, preferably, have the following Parts Part A Security Measures Part B Procedures for the implementation of security measures Part C Appendices and Tables 83

84 Ship Security Plan (SSP) (ISPS Code Parts A & B Chapter 9) SPECIMEN OF A SSP PAGE SHIP SECURITY PLAN (SSP) Document Version 1.0 dated (date) SHIP NAME & IMO No: COMPANY: PART A SECURITY MEASURES Page: Page 1 of 8 SECTION: 01 - INTRODUCTION 84

85 Ship Security Plan (SSP) (ISPS Code Parts A & B Chapter 9) PART A Security Measures 1. Introduction and Definitions 2. SSA Summary Report 3. Ship s General Arrangements 4. Ship s Security Organisational Structure 5. Access to the Ship 6. Restricted Areas on the Ship 7. Handling of Cargo 85

86 Ship Security Plan (SSP) (ISPS Code Parts A & B Chapter 9) PART A Security Measures 8. Handling of Ship s Stores 9. Handling of Unaccompanied Baggage 10. Monitoring Ship Security 11. Differing Security Levels 12. Activities not covered by the Code 13. Security Systems Onboard 14. Contingency Plans & Evacuation 86

87 Ship Security Plan (SSP) (ISPS Code Parts A & B Chapter 9) PART A - 1. Introduction & Definitions 1.1. Ship s Data 1.2. Security Measures & Procedures Revision Records 1.3. Index of Part A 1.4. Introduction 1.5. Definitions 87

88 Ship Security Plan (SSP) (ISPS Code Parts A & B Chapter 9) PART A - 1. Introduction & Definitions 1.1. Ship s Data SHIP SECURITY PLAN (SSP) SHIPPING COMPANY: SHIP S NAME: SHIP S IMO NO: FLAG STATE: PORT OF REGISTRY: ISSUE DATE: AUTHORISATION: 88

89 Ship Security Plan (SSP) (ISPS Code Parts A & B Chapter 9) PART A - 1. Introduction & Definitions 1.1. Ship s Data 1.2. Security Measures & Procedures Revision Records [SHIP NAME] SECURITY MEASURES & SECURITY PROCEDURES REVISION RECORDS Part Section Revision Description Approval Y/N Approval (date) Date Implemented All All 0 Initial Issue Yes 89

90 Ship Security Plan (SSP) (ISPS Code Parts A & B Chapter 9) PART A - 1. Introduction & Definitions 1.1. Ship s Data 1.2. Security Measures & Procedures Revision Records 1.3. Index of Part A INDEX of PART A Security Measures Section Revision Subject 01 0 Introduction and Definitions 02 0 SSA Summary Report 03 0 Ship s General Arrangements 04 0 Ship s Security Organisational Structure 90

91 Ship Security Plan (SSP) (ISPS Code Parts A & B Chapter 9) PART A - 1. Introduction & Definitions 1.1. Ship s Data 1.2. Security Measures & Procedures Revision Records 1.3. Index of Part A 1.4. Introduction Purpose Regulatory basis Plan documentation and control Periodic review Plan security and control 91

92 Ship Security Plan (SSP) (ISPS Code Parts A & B Chapter 9) PART A - 1. Introduction & Definitions 1.1. Ship s Data 1.2. Security Measures & Procedures Revision Records 1.3. Index of Part A 1.4. Introduction 1.5. Definitions 92

93 Ship Security Plan (SSP) (ISPS Code Parts A & B Chapter 9) PART A - 2. SSA Summary Report (B/8.12) 2.1. Summary of how the assessment was conducted 2.2. Description of each vulnerability found during the assessment 2.3. Description of counter measures that could be used to address each vulnerability 93

94 Ship Security Plan (SSP) (ISPS Code Parts A & B Chapter 9) PART A - 3. Ship s General Arrangements 3.1. Detailed layouts for each deck 3.2. Marking of access points, restricted areas, emergency evacuation routes etc. 94

95 Ship Security Plan (SSP) (ISPS Code Parts A & B Chapter 9) PART A - 3. Ship s General Arrangements 3.1. Detailed layouts for each deck The following information should be marked on to the ship s General Arrangement (GA) plan Access points Restricted Areas Escape and evacuation routes Existing security equipment/systems 95

96 An example of a detailed partial deck layout 96

97 Ship Security Plan (SSP) (ISPS Code Parts A & B Chapter 9) PART A - 3. Ship s General Arrangements 3.2. Marking of access points, restricted areas, emergency evacuation routes etc. The following information should be marked, preferable, on a deck by deck basis. Mooring lines, Anchor chains Pilot ladders, Gangways, Ramps Cranes, Hoists, Bunker Stations, Discharge hoses Doors, Ramps, Ports, Scuttles Emergency Doors and Escape Hatches Cargo Hatches, Doors, Ports 97

98 An example of marking of access points (Anchor Chains & Mooring Lines) 98

99 Ship Security Plan (SSP) (ISPS Code Parts A & B Chapter 9) PART A - 4. Ship s Security Organisational Structure 4.1. Company policy and Master s authority 4.2. Company security organisation diagram and responsibilities 4.3. Ship s current employment 4.4. Contact lists 4.5. Communications 4.6. Security Training, Drills and Exercises 4.7. Records 99

100 Ship Security Plan (SSP) (ISPS Code Parts A & B Chapter 9) PART A - 4. Ship s Security Organisational Structure 4.1. Company policy and Master s authority (A/6) Security policy statement with company objectives and means to achieve them Master authority statement (SOLAS XI-2/Reg 8) 100

101 Ship Security Plan (SSP) (ISPS Code Parts A & B Chapter 9) PART A - 4. Ship s Security Organisational Structure 4.2. Company security organisation diagram and responsibilities Ashore Ship/Shore Interface Onboard Responsibility for crew hire Ship s employment (responsibility) CSO responsibility (for specific ship) SSO responsibility (for specific ship) Authority to enter in to a Declaration of Security (DoS) Duties and responsibilities of all shipboard personnel with a security role 101

102 Ship Security Plan (SSP) (ISPS Code Parts A & B Chapter 9) PART A - 4. Ship s Security Organisational Structure 4.2. Company security organisation diagram and responsibilities Ashore Managing Director (Name) Financial Division (Name) Technical Director (Name) CSO (Name) Shipcrew Hiring (Name) Operations Manager (Name) 102

103 Ship Security Plan (SSP) (ISPS Code Parts A & B Chapter 9) PART A - 4. Ship s Security Organisational Structure 4.2. Company security organisation diagram and responsibilities Ship/Shore Interface CSO (Name) SSO SSO SSO 103

104 Ship Security Plan (SSP) (ISPS Code Parts A & B Chapter 9) PART A - 4. Ship s Security Organisational Structure 4.2. Company security organisation diagram and responsibilities Onboard Master (Name) Chief Engineer (Name) SSO (Name) Machinery Spaces Officers/Crew Navigation Bridge Officers Crew with Security Duties 104

105 Ship Security Plan (SSP) (ISPS Code Parts A & B Chapter 9) PART A - 4. Ship s Security Organisational Structure 4.2. Company security organisation diagram and responsibilities Responsibility for crew hire (SOLAS XI-2/Reg 5.1) Who is responsible for crew hire Hiring of shipboard personnel (operations under franchise agreement such as restaurants, bars, entertainment etc) Hiring of entire or supplementary crew by charterer Hiring of temporary crew by Master at ports of call 105

106 Ship Security Plan (SSP) (ISPS Code Parts A & B Chapter 9) PART A - 4. Ship s Security Organisational Structure 4.2. Company security organisation diagram and responsibilities Ship s employment (responsibility) (SOLAS XI-2/Reg 5.2 & 5.3) Who is responsible for the employment of the ship (Name and contact information) If the ship is employed under the terms of charter, the parties to the charter (Names and contact information) 106

107 Ship Security Plan (SSP) (ISPS Code Parts A & B Chapter 9) PART A - 4. Ship s Security Organisational Structure 4.2. Company security organisation diagram and responsibilities CSO responsibility (for specific ship) SSO responsibility (for specific ship) 107

108 Ship Security Plan (SSP) (ISPS Code Parts A & B Chapter 9) PART A - 4. Ship s Security Organisational Structure 4.2. Company security organisation diagram and responsibilities Authority to enter in to a Declaration of Security (DoS) Contracting Governments shall determine when DoS is required by assessing the risk associated with ship/port interface The ship may also request DoS under certain circumstances DoS is completed by the Master, SSO an/or other authorised Officer DoS is shared between ship/port or between ships and the responsibility of each party is clearly stated. 108

109 Specimen of DoS DECLARATION OF SECURITY Declaration of Security is valid From To Reason Name of Ship Name of Port Other Ship (s) IMO No Port of Registry Responsible Company Owners Address Tel No Mobile No IMO No Port of Registry Responsible Company 24 hr Contact No Fax No 24 hr Contact No Security Level Security Level Security Level The activities listed in the Declaration of Security between the ship and port facility or other ships, must be checked and agreed upon, by the designated security personnel, prior to commencing any operations. 109

110 Specimen of DoS Activity The Ship Port Facility Other Ships Confirm Security & Responsibilities CSO SSO PFSO CSO SSO Restricted Areas Established & Controlled. Access Points Controlled & Monitored Seaward perimeter monitored Landside perimeter monitored Adequate lighting during the night, for the Ship, Land & Seaward perimeters. Procedures for handling Cargo agreed Procedures for handling ships stores agreed. Response Plans for Fire, access by Unauthorised Personnel. Suspicious article discovered. Communications Check. Covert Signal agreed. Alarms. Personnel identification & screening Visitors list approved Procedures in place for Unexpected visitors. 110

111 Specimen of DoS SIGNATURES AND CONTACT DETAILS The Ship Port Facility Other Ships Name Name Name Title Title Title Signature Signature Signature Date Date Date Tel No Tel No Tel No Radio Channel Radio Channel Radio Channel 111

112 Ship Security Plan (SSP) (ISPS Code Parts A & B Chapter 9) PART A - 4. Ship s Security Organisational Structure 4.2. Company security organisation diagram and responsibilities Duties and responsibilities of all shipboard personnel with a security role Stewardship of ID cards, keys and access control systems Gangway and ramp control Loading cranes, hoists, cargo and bunkering hoses In charge of shore party Shipboard guarding and patrols During security threats and incidents During emergency evacuation 112

113 Ship Security Plan (SSP) (ISPS Code Parts A & B Chapter 9) PART A - 4. Ship s Security Organisational Structure 4.3. Ship s current employment Owner/Company Ship Operator Vessel Characteristics Charter Details Crew Composition, Ranks, Nationalities Trade Pattern Cargo 113

114 Ship Security Plan (SSP) (ISPS Code Parts A & B Chapter 9) PART A - 4. Ship s Security Organisational Structure 4.4. Contact Lists CSO responsible for the ship SSO onboard ship Company Security Manager (if applicable) Port Details (frequently called) 114

115 Ship Security Plan (SSP) (ISPS Code Parts A & B Chapter 9) PART A - 4. Ship s Security Organisational Structure 4.5. Communications Ship Communications Table System Use Transmit Location Remarks GMDSS Primary system ship to shore, ship to ship, distress, world wide Navigation Bridge Ships Main VHF Secondary system ship to shore, ship to ship, Local area Navigation Bridge Ship telephone Internal communications See ships directory attached Part C, Annex 2 Hand held VHF Security and Deck communications All locations throughout the ship Xx VHF radios are reserved for security Ship P A System General announcements, instructions and alarms 115

116 Ship Security Plan (SSP) (ISPS Code Parts A & B Chapter 9) PART A - 4. Ship s Security Organisational Structure 4.6. Security Training, Drills and Exercises The CSO and appropriate shore based Company personnel The SSO onboard ship Shipboard personnel having specific security duties All other shipboard personnel 116

117 Ship Security Plan (SSP) (ISPS Code Parts A & B Chapter 9) Security Training Schedule Item Involving Frequency Comments PART A - 4. Ship s Security Organisational Structure 4.6. Security Training, Drills and Exercises Specimen of a Security Training Schedule Initial Security Familiarisation course The meaning of security levels Role and Responsibility of SSO Ship & Port Facility Security measures Recognition and detection of weapons and devices Techniques used to circumvent security measures Entire ship crew Entire ship crew Master, SSO On assignment of duties onboard the ship On assignment of duties onboard the ship Annually Annual refresher Entire ship crew Annually All newly recruited crew to attend training Entire ship crew Annually All newly recruited crew to attend training Entire ship crew Annually All newly recruited crew to attend training Recognition of characteristics and behavioural patterns of persons who may threaten security Entire ship crew Annually All newly recruited crew to attend training Security Staff Training All personnel whose full time job is a security function When assigned Can be modified based on the law enforcement and/or security experience of the candidate. 117

118 Ship Security Plan (SSP) (ISPS Code Parts A & B Chapter 9) Security Drills Schedule PART A - 4. Ship s Security Organisational Structure 4.6. Security Training, Drills and Exercises Specimen of Security Drills Schedule Item Involving Frequency Comments Bomb Threat/Bomb Search Drill Watchstanding in security Level 3 Environment Stowaway Search Drill Bomb search crew Annually Should be covered in training when individuals are assigned All security watch Annually crew All crew involved on security duties Every four months Contraband Baggage Introduction (e.g. mock weapon) Baggage screeners Periodically based on equipment and procedures Exercise should be conducted without prior knowledge of screeners Illegal attempt of persons for entry through gangways All crew involved on security duties Every four months Positive Passenger identification at entry Attempt of intruders to enter restricted areas All crew involved on security duties Annually Effectiveness of access control to restricted areas 118

119 Ship Security Plan (SSP) (ISPS Code Parts A & B Chapter 9) Security Exercises Schedule PART A - 4. Ship s Security Organisational Structure 4.6. Security Training, Drills and Exercises Specimen of Security Exercises Schedule Item Involving Frequency Comments Intruders attempting to take control of ship, while docked at port, from shore side in order to take hostage and/or kill people Intruders approaching from the sea to take control of ship, while in the sea, in order to take hostage and/or kill people. Bomb placed on board ready to be detonated within 25 minutes Bomb detection equipment All Crew All Crew All Crew Personnel assigned to use the equipment Annually (alternatively) Annually (alternatively) Annually (alternatively) Prior to assignment Monitoring of crew readiness, alarm response time, precise actions by crew with security duties. Monitoring of crew readiness, alarm response time, precise actions by crew with security duties. Monitoring of crew readiness, alarm response time, precise actions by crew with security duties. May be adequate procedures and training to be provided by the manufacturer 119

120 Ship Security Plan (SSP) (ISPS Code Parts A & B Chapter 9) PART A - 4. Ship s Security Organisational Structure 4.7. Records Security records for previous ship/port facility and ship/ship interface Training, Drills and exercises Security threats and security incidents (unlawful acts) Breaches of security Changes in security level Communications relating to the direct security of the ship Internal audits and reviews of security activities 120

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