2013 Truth-In- Taxation

Save this PDF as:
 WORD  PNG  TXT  JPG

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "2013 Truth-In- Taxation"

Transcription

1 2013 Truth-In- Taxation A Guide for Setting School District Tax Rates Susan Combs Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts

2

3 Texas Property Tax Table of Contents Introduction Chapter 1: Truth-in-Taxation Overview Important Dates... 3 School District Calculations Calculating required rates Failure to comply... 4 Consolidation of two or more school districts... 4 Drafting a budget and deciding how much tax to levy Adopting a school district s tax rate... 4 Budget and proposed tax rate notice Rate limitation Rate Adoption Open meetings notices... 5 Agenda item Official action Failure to comply... 6 Administering a rollback election... 6 Preparing and mailing tax bills Chapter 2: The Effective Tax Rate... 7 Calculating the Effective Tax Rate Last Year s Taxes Less Taxes on Property Lost This Year Current Value of Property Taxed in the Prior Year Properties under protest Properties not included at certification New property value... 9 The Calculation... 9 Chapter 3: The Rollback Tax Rate Calculating the Rollback Tax Rate M&O Rate Additional rollback protection for pollution control Truth-in-Taxation for School Districts (2013) i

4 Table of Contents Debt Component Debt payments Anticipated and excess debt collections Estimated debt collection rate for Excess debt tax collections for Total Rollback Tax Rate Chapter 4: Required Public Notice and Meeting One Public Notice Content of the notice Newspaper requirements School District with July 1 Fiscal Year Municipal School District Certain School Districts Chapter 5: Rollback Elections Appendix 1: 2013 Planning Calendar for School Districts Appendix 2: 2013 Effective Tax Rate Worksheet Appendix 3: 2013 Rollback Tax Rate Worksheet Appendix 4: Additional Rollback Protection for Pollution Control Appendix 5: Notice of Public Meeting to Discuss Budget and Proposed Tax Rate Appendix 6: Notice of Public Meeting to Discuss Proposed Tax Rate Appendix 7: Notice of Public Hearing to Discuss Budget Appendix 8: Sample Rollback Ballot Appendix 9: Tax Rate ii Truth-in-Taxation for School Districts (2013)

5 Texas Property Tax Introduction The Texas Constitution (Exhibit 1), Tax Code and Education Code embody the concepts of truth-in-taxation to require school districts to comply with certain steps in adopting their tax rates. The truth-in-taxation laws have two purposes: to make taxpayers aware of tax rate proposals; and to allow taxpayers, in certain cases, to roll back or limit a tax increase. The Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts is authorized to issue publications concerning the administration of the local property tax. 1 The Comptroller s office prepared this guide to tax rate setting, also known as truth-in-taxation, as a public service to school districts in the state that will hold public hearings, consider budgets and set rates to impose property taxes. This guide is specifically intended to help school districts set 2013 tax rates. By publishing this guide to instruct tax assessor collectors, budget officers and elected officials, the Comptroller s office is providing technical assistance. It is not offering legal advice. Interpretations of law must be made by legal counsel representing governmental entities. Questions about the meaning of the statutes, notice requirements and other matters that are unclear in the law and in this guide should be posed to legal councel and not to the Comptroller s Property Tax Assistance Division staff. EXHIBIT 1 Texas Constitution Truth-in-Taxation Provisions The Texas Constitution sets out the general requirements for truth-in-taxation. Tax Code Chapter 26 provides the specifics. Article VIII, Section 21. INCREASE IN TOTAL PROPERTY TAXES; NOTICE AND HEARING; CALCULATION. (A) Subject to any exceptions prescribed by general law, the total amount of property taxes imposed by a political subdivision in any year may not exceed the total amount of property taxes imposed by that subdivision in the preceding year unless the governing body of the subdivision gives notice of its intent to consider an increase in taxes and holds a public hearing on the proposed increase before it increases those total taxes. The legislature shall prescribe by law the form, content, timing, and methods of giving the notice and the rules for the conduct of the hearing. (B) In calculating the total amount of taxes imposed in the current year for the purposes of Subsection (a) of this section, the taxes on property in territory added to the political subdivision since the preceding year and on new improvements that were not taxable in the preceding year are excluded. In calculating the total amount of taxes imposed in the preceding year for the purposes of Subsection (a) of this section, the taxes imposed on real property that is not taxable by the subdivision in the current year are excluded. (C) The legislature by general law shall require that, subject to reasonable exceptions, a property owner be given notice of a revaluation of his property and a reasonable estimate of the amount of taxes that would be imposed on his property if the total amount of property taxes for the subdivision were not increased according to any law enacted pursuant to Subsection (a) of this section. The notice must be given before the procedures required in Subsection (a) are instituted. Source: Texas Constitution, Article VIII, 21 1 Tax Code Truth-in-Taxation for School Districts (2013) 1

6 Introduction There are four principles to truth-in-taxation as it relates to school districts: Property owners have the right to know of increases in their properties appraised value and to be notified of the estimated taxes that could result from the new value. A school district must publish its proposed tax rate, rollback tax rate and other specific information about its proposed taxes. A school district must publish a budget and proposed tax rate hearing notice and hold a public hearing to provide an opportunity for citizen input concerning these issues. A school district must hold an election to ratify a tax rate adopted above its rollback rate. After the appraisal district certifies appraised values, school districts take the first step toward adopting a tax rate by calculating the effective, effective maintenance and operations (M&O) and rollback tax rates. The effective tax rate is a calculated rate that would provide the school district with about the same amount of revenue it received in the year before, on properties taxed in both years. If property values rise, the effective tax rate will go down and vice versa. The effective M&O rate is $1.50, or the 2005 adopted M&O rate if voters approved a rate higher than $1.50, times the compression rate of The rollback rate is a calculated maximum rate allowed by law without voter approval. More specifically, it is the lesser of: the effective M&O rate, plus 4 cents, plus the rate that is equal to the sum of any differences between the adopted tax rate and the rollback tax rate approved by the voters for 2006 and subsequent years, plus the current debt rate; or the effective M&O rate as calculated according to Tax Code 26.08(n)(2)(B), plus the current debt rate. In future years, the Texas commissioner of education may determine a different compression percentage. If a school district adopts a tax rate that is higher than the rollback rate, school board trustees must hold an election to ask voters to approve the rate. School districts must publish rollback rates in local newspapers, along with other information about budget and tax revenues in a notice titled Notice of Public Meeting to Discuss Budget and Proposed Tax Rate. If taxpayers believe that the school district has not calculated these rates, published the required notice or otherwise complied with other tax rate adoption laws in good faith, they may ask a district court to stop the school from adopting a tax rate until it complies with the laws. 2 Truth-in-Taxation for School Districts (2013)

7 Texas Property Tax CHAPTER 1: Truth-in-Taxation Overview Creating a budget and adopting a property tax rate to support that budget are major functions of the school board. This is accomplished by following legislative guidelines to ensure the public is informed of any increases. Important Dates The Tax Code establishes target dates for many truth-in-taxation activities. Although circumstances may require an appraisal district or a taxing unit to alter the timetable, Exhibit 2 sets out the framework for the required activities. EXHIBIT Truth-in-Taxation Calendar Date April 1 May 1 April 30 July 20* (Aug. 31) July 25 August September Sept. 29 October Activity The chief appraiser sends notices of appraised value. The chief appraiser prepares and certifies to the school assessor an estimate of the taxable value of property in that school district. The appraisal review board (ARB) approves the appraisal records. The chief appraiser certifies the approved appraisal roll to the school district. A school district adopts its budget according to its fiscal year but first must publish a Notice of Public Meeting to Discuss Budget and Proposed Tax Rate 10 to 30 days before the public meeting date. (School districts with a July 1 fiscal year adopt budgets in June and comply with notice and hearing provisions during June). After adopting the budget, the school adopts a tax rate. A school district must adopt its tax rate by this date or 60 days after it receives the appraisal roll, whichever date is later. The tax assessor prepares and mails tax bills. *Note: Tax Code 1.06 states that If the last day of the performance of an act is a Saturday, Sunday, or legal state or national holiday, the act is timely if performed on the next regular business day. Source: Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts, A school district that receives an equalized wealth notice from the commissioner of education may not adopt its tax rate until the commissioner certifies that the school district has reached its equalized wealth level. 2 At the same time it publishes the tax rate meeting notice, a school district must post a summary of its proposed budget. Appendix 1 provides a more detailed schedule school districts can consult when planning their truth-in-taxation activities. Chapter 313, added in 2001, allows schools to negotiate limitations on a property s appraised value for maintenance and operations taxes with qualifying companies. To qualify, companies must agree to make certain levels of investment and create a certain number of new jobs within the district, according to a schedule in the law based on the amount of taxable property value within the district. This provision in the Tax Code allows school districts to attract new taxable property by offering a tax credit and an eight-year limitation on the appraised value of a property for the maintenance and operations portion of the school district property tax. Tax Code (6) excludes from current total value any new property value that is subject to a limitation agreement under Tax Code Chapter 313. The information provided on Lines 2B (for the previous year) and 17B (for the current year) account for this adjustment in the effective tax rate worksheet. A school district should always check with professional counsel before making this adjustment for the first time as there could be time delay modifications in the agreement. You may download and print Chapter 313 at School District Calculations Truth-in-taxation requires school districts to calculate two rates after receiving a certified appraisal roll from the chief appraiser the effective tax rate and the rollback tax rate. 2 Education Code (c). Truth-in-Taxation for School Districts (2013) 3

8 Chapter 1: Truth-in-Taxation Overview EXHIBIT 3 The rollback tax rate is a calculated rate that limits the school district tax rate to the lesser of: the sum times $1.50 (or times the 2005 M&O rate for the sum of the effective M&O rate school districts with 2005 M&O rates of more than $1.50) cents times 0.06 (this amounts to 4 cents in 2013) + + the rate that is equal to the sum of any differences between the adopted tax rate and the rollback tax rate approved by the voters the current debt rate. for 2006 and subsequent years, plus the current debt rate. School districts are not required to publish the effective tax rate, but must publish the rollback rate in a public meeting notice. The school board must perform the following: calculate the effective tax rate and the rollback tax rate; decide how much revenue it needs and calculate the rate required to raise that amount; hold a hearing on the budget and proposed tax rate; adopt a budget and then adopt the tax rate; and administer a rollback election if the adopted rate exceeds the rollback rate. A planning calendar for these steps appears on Appendix 1. Chapter 5 of the guide discusses rollback elections. Calculating required rates All school districts must calculate an effective tax rate and a rollback tax rate. School districts must publish the rollback tax rate. A school district s effective tax rate is a calculated rate that is generally equal to the prior year s taxes divided by the current taxable value of properties that were also on the tax roll in the prior year. The resulting tax rate, used for comparison only, shows the relation between the prior year s revenue and the current year s values. To calculate the effective M&O rate, school districts should consult with the Texas Education Agency or their Regional Education Service Center. The debt service portion of the rollback tax rate is the current year s debt payments divided by the current year s property values. The debt service tax rate may rise as high as necessary to cover qualified debt expenses. The overall rollback rate calculation is explained in greater detail in Chapter 3. Failure to comply If a school district fails to calculate or publish the required rates and notices properly, a property owner in the school district may seek an injunction to prohibit the school district from adopting a tax rate. The district court may issue the injunction if it finds that the school district s failure was not in good faith. Consolidation of two or more school districts A school district that was two or more school districts in the prior year handles the effective and rollback rate calculations differently. The consolidated school district combines last year s taxes for each school district and divides by the total values for the current year for the new consolidated school district. First, calculate last year s taxes for each school district in Lines 1-14 of the Effective Tax Rate Worksheet (Appendix 2). Then, combine last year s taxes on Line 14 for each school district to obtain last year s total taxes. The calculation for a tax-base consolidated school district differs slightly from a whole consolidation. If the consolidation is for M&O purposes only, each school district will calculate its own debt service rate for debt purposes. Drafting a budget and deciding how much tax to levy The school district must identify its needs and draft a budget to meet those needs. The school district must decide how much property taxes, along with state funds, are necessary to fund that budget and, based on current year s values, what M&O rate is necessary. The school district must determine its payments for debt service. The school district s governing body must determine the amount of surplus funds, if any, it plans to expend from its 4 Truth-in-Taxation for School Districts (2013)

9 Chapter 1: Truth-in-Taxation Overview M&O and debt service funds. It must determine the final amount of property taxes needed for the budget. Truth-in-taxation laws explicitly address the debt service rate component of a school district s overall tax rate. The adopted debt service rate must equal the debt rate published in the school s notice of public meeting. 3 Adopting a school district s tax rate School districts have a special notice for the public meeting on their budget and proposed tax rate. While other taxing units are required to follow the notice and hearing requirements of the Tax Code, school districts must follow the notice and hearing requirements of the Education Code, which sets out the items to include in the budget hearing and proposed tax rate notice (Appendix 5). 4 Budget and proposed tax rate notice The notice entitled Notice of Public Meeting to Discuss Budget and Proposed Tax Rate (Appendix 5) is published in a local newspaper 10 to 30 days before the public meeting date. The quarter-page meeting notice includes a comparison of property tax rates, comparison of the proposed budget and last year s budget, comparison between last year and the current year of property taxes on an average residence and unencumbered fund balances. The notice includes information about the total appraised and taxable value for all property and all new property for last year and this year and a section listing the school s total outstanding and unpaid bonded indebtedness. The rollback rate is stated in the notice. If a school board adopts a tax rate above its 2013 rollback tax rate, the school board must hold an election to ratify the adopted tax rate. Rate limitation The law limits a school district s M&O rate. 5 The rate may not exceed the rate equal to the sum of $0.17 and the product of the state compression percentage multiplied by $1.50. A school district that adopted a 2005 M&O rate above $1.50, as permitted by special law, may not exceed the rate equal to the sum of $0.17 and the product of the state compression percentage multiplied by the school district s M&O tax rate for The state compression percentage is currently percent, so the M&O rate limit for most school districts is $ Tax Code 26.05(a)(1) 4 Education Code and Education Code Rate Adoption The school board may adopt the budget and tax rate after the public meeting or the board may adopt the budget and wait to adopt the tax rate. School districts subject to an equalized wealth notice must wait to adopt a tax rate until the commissioner of education certifies that the wealth is equalized. 6 A school district must adopt the tax rate by Sept. 29 or 60 days after receiving the certified appraisal roll, whichever date is later. Open meetings notices The school district must post notice of the meeting in compliance with the open meetings law. 7 The meeting must be open to the public. Agenda item Usually a school district adopts its tax rate after it adopts its budget. If the school district elects to adopt a tax rate before receiving the certified appraisal roll, it may adopt its budget after it adopts a tax rate for the tax year in which the fiscal year covered by the budget begins. If a school district elects to adopt a tax rate before adopting a budget, it must publish notice and hold a meeting for the purpose of discussing the proposed tax rate (Appendix 6). Following adoption of the tax rate, the school district must publish notice and hold another public meeting before it may adopt a budget (Appendix 7). The Comptroller s Office prescribes the language and format the school district must use in the notices. The school district may use the certified estimate of taxable value in preparing a notice. 8 Official action The school district s governing body must adopt a tax rate by official action and set it out in an ordinance, resolution, or order. School districts should consult with legal counsel regarding the instrument to use for rate adoption. School districts that adopt a rate above the effective tax rate must use special language in the motion to adopt. The motion to adopt an ordinance, resolution or order setting a tax rate that exceeds the effective tax rate must be made in the following form: I move that the property tax rate be increased by the adoption of a tax rate of (specify tax rate), which is effectively a (insert percentage by which 6 Education Code (c). 7 Government Code Chapter Education. Code (j). Truth-in-Taxation for School Districts (2013) 5

10 Chapter 1: Truth-in-Taxation Overview the proposed tax rate exceeds the effective tax rate) percent increase in the tax rate. 9 In the order, ordinance or resolution, the school districts must use larger type, include an example of the maintenance tax increase on a $100,000 home and state that the adopted tax rate will raise more taxes for M&O than the prior year s tax rate. If the school district operates a website, it must include similar language about increasing M&O taxes on its home page (Appendix 9). 10 What happens when property taxation will be decreased, rather than increased? What kind of motion is acceptable? May school districts provide more information in the order, ordinance or resolution to explain the tax rate s effects? The law does not prohibit explanatory information. The law, in fact, provides mandatory motion language only when the new tax rate will exceed the effective tax rate. School boards with questions regarding the correct methods and phrasing of an order, ordinance or resolution to adopt a tax rate should discuss these questions with their legal counsel. Failure to comply If a school board fails to comply with the hearing, notice or rate adopting process in good faith, a property owner in the school district may seek an injunction. The injunction stops the school district from sending tax bills until the school district convinces the district court that it has complied with the law. A property owner must act to enjoin collections before the school district delivers substantially all of its tax bills. Administering a rollback election A school district is required to hold an automatic rollback election no petition process is necessary to ratify a current year s tax rate, if the school board adopts a tax rate above the rollback rate. Chapter 5 provides more about administering a rollback election. Preparing and mailing tax bills School districts must prepare and mail a tax bill to each property owner by Oct. 1 or as soon thereafter as practicable. 11 The bill must include the information required by the Tax Code. 12 School districts must include the following additional information on the tax bills or on a separate statement in separate lines: the school district M&O rate; the school s debt rate; the M&O rate for the preceding tax year; if for the current tax year the school district imposed taxes for debt, the debt rate for the current tax year; if for the preceding tax year the school district imposed taxes for debt, the debt rate for that year; and the total tax rate of the school district for the preceding tax year Tax Code 31.01(c). 9 Tax Code 26.05(b). 10 Tax Code 26.05(b)(1) and (2). 12 Tax Code 31.01(c). 13 Tax Code (d-1). 6 Truth-in-Taxation for School Districts (2013)

11 Texas Property Tax CHAPTER 2: The Effective Tax Rate The effective tax rate enables the public to evaluate the relationship between taxes for the preceding year and for the current year, based on a tax rate that would produce the same amount of taxes if applied to the same properties taxed in both years. The calculation process starts after the chief appraiser delivers to the school district the certified appraisal roll and the estimated values of properties under protest. The school district s tax assessor determines the following: 1. the total appraised and taxable value of property in the school district; 2. the total appraised and taxable value of new improvements; and 3. the total taxable property annexed since the preceding year. The assessor submits all of this information to the school board. The school board designates an officer or employee (often the tax assessor but not necessarily) to calculate the effective tax rate and the rollback tax rate. School districts are not required to publish the effective tax rate. Calculating the Effective Tax Rate Calculating the effective tax rate requires the prior year s taxes and the current year s taxable value for property taxed in both years. Dividing the taxes by the value (and multiplying by 100 to convert to a rate per $100 of value) produces the effective tax rate, as illustrated in Exhibit 4. Last Year s Taxes Less Taxes on Property Lost This Year To calculate a 2013 effective tax rate, a school district must first determine its total 2012 taxes. The effective and rollback rate calculations begin with the total taxes and values for the prior year at the time of the rate calculations. These totals include all supplements and corrections that have occurred to the tax roll since the prior year s certification and tax rate adoption. However, certain corrections are not included in these adjusted total taxes and values. 14 The appraisal district should be able to assist the school district in identifying supplements and corrections for the prior year. School districts may be required to refund taxes for tax years prior to the last year. School districts include all types of refunds for years preceding the prior year court decisions, corrections and payment errors for tax years preceding tax year For example, in 2013 a district court approved reducing a property owner s 2010, 2011 and 2012 taxable values, resulting in three years of tax refunds from the 2012 property taxes. The school district includes refunds paid in 2012 for tax years 2010 and A second example is a school district that refunded part of a 2008 payment for a clerical error. The school district includes the refunded tax amount in the total 2012 taxes. A separate provision provides for any 2012 court-ordered refunds to be included as a separate step in the rate calculation. EXHIBIT 4 Calculating the Effective Tax Rate Prior Year s Taxes less Taxes on Property Lost this Year Current Value of Property Taxed in the Prior Year x $100 = Effective Tax Rate Source: Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts, Tax Code 25.25(d). 15 Tax Code 25.25(b) and (c) and Truth-in-Taxation for School Districts (2013) 7

12 Chapter 2: The Effective Tax Rate A school district may increase the prior tax year s taxes to reflect lost taxes in the prior tax year because a court overruled an ARB decision with a lower taxable value. The result of including these refunds in last year s levy is higher effective and rollback rates for school districts. These higher rates give school districts the ability to recapture revenue removed from last year s taxes because of returned money to taxpayers. The tax collector has information about refunds. Truth-in-taxation laws require the school district to reduce last year s total taxes for the amount of lost property levy. Lost property levy is the amount of taxes on property value that was taxable in the preceding year but is not taxable in the current year. Property value not taxed in the current year may have been deannexed by the school district, received a new exemption or qualified for special appraisal in the current year. The appraisal district has value information on these properties. Property first qualified for a new exemption does not include freeport property or goods-in-transit property. 16 For homeowners age 65 or older or disabled, the school district adjusts last year s value by subtracting the value of homesteads with tax ceilings. Subtracting the revenue lost because of these changes gives the school district s adjusted 2012 taxes. Current Value of Property Taxed in the Prior Year Before calculating its effective rate, a school district must adjust the 2013 values. The school district begins with the total taxable value on the 2013 certified appraisal roll and adds the value of properties still under protest or known but not appraised for The school district then subtracts the value of new property property annexed since Jan. 1, 2012, and improvements new to the 2013 tax roll. The result is the 2013 taxable values adjusted to include only the property that was taxed in both 2012 and The school district adjusts its 2013 values by subtracting the 2013 values of homesteads with tax ceilings and any new value subject to a limitation under an economic development agreement. The homesteads with tax ceilings are for both the homeowners age 65 or older or disabled. A school district excludes the taxable value of property exempted for the current tax year for the first time as pollution control property. Since the taxable value of exempt property is zero, such an interpretation would not affect the current total value. Legislative intent would appear to require some adjustment. School districts that wish to exclude the market value of this exempt property should consult with legal counsel. Properties under protest If a property s value is under protest when the school district receives the certified appraisal roll, the chief appraiser submits both the appraisal district s and the taxpayer s estimated values. In calculating the effective and rollback tax rates, the school district uses the lower taxable value. If the property owner did not estimate a value, the chief appraiser must estimate the outcome of the ARB appeal. Two rules govern this estimate: If this year s appraised value is the same or less than last year s, the chief appraiser estimates the value that would be assigned if the property owner wins. If this year s value is greater than last year s, the chief appraiser uses last year s value. However, if it is likely the ARB will reduce the value the chief appraiser should estimate the ARB value. Properties not included at certification The chief appraiser must give school districts a list of taxable properties the chief appraiser knows about but are not included at the time the chief appraiser certifies the appraisal roll. 17 These properties are not on the list of properties that are still under protest. On this list of properties, the chief appraiser includes the market value, appraised value and exemptions for the preceding year and a reasonable estimate of the market value, appraised value and exemptions for the current year. A school district s assessor must use the lower of the market, appraised or taxable value (as appropriate) for computing the school district s effective and rollback tax rates. New property value New property value will generate new revenue for a school district. It helps to offset property value losses for new exemptions and special appraisals granted for the first time in 16 Tax Code and Tax Code 26.01(d). 8 Truth-in-Taxation for School Districts (2013)

13 Chapter 2: The Effective Tax Rate the current year. The school district will deduct new property value from the 2013 appraised values in the effective tax rate calculation. The chief appraiser will supply the value of real and personal property new to the 2013 appraisal roll. For real property, new value includes additions to existing improvements (such as a garage) or new separate structures added to a property containing existing improvements (such as a company expansion) made after Jan. 1, Only the value of the individual new improvement is new value. The increased value on any existing structures is not new value. For personal property, new value includes only the personal property that is located in a new improvement and that entered the school district after Jan. 1, The Calculation Dividing the adjusted 2012 taxes by the adjusted 2013 taxable values and multiplying by $100 produces the 2013 effective tax rate, as illustrated in Exhibit 5. EXHIBIT 5 Detailed Steps in Calculating the Effective Tax Rate 2012 Taxes (on date of calculation)* Total value on the 2013 certified appraisal roll + + Estimated value that will be placed on property Taxes on 2012 values lowered in court decisions under protest or not included in certification + Taxes refunded for tax years preceding tax year 2012 Value of property annexed after Jan. 1, 2012 Taxes on deannexed territory Value of new improvements built after Jan. 1, 2012** Taxes on property value not taxable in 2013 because it received an exemption or special appraisal for the first time Value of pollution control property exempted from the first time = = Adjusted 2012 Taxes Adjusted 2013 Taxable Values Adjusted 2012 Taxes Adjusted 2013 Taxable Value x $100 = 2013 Effective Tax Rate * Do not include Tax Code 25.25(d) corrections for one-third over-appraised errors. ** Do not include Tax Increment Financing (TIF) taxes if there is no TIF captured appraised value. Source: Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts, Truth-in-Taxation for School Districts (2013) 9

14 Part 2: The Effective Tax Rate 10 Truth-in-Taxation for School Districts (2013)

15 Texas Property Tax CHAPTER 3: The Rollback Tax Rate Tax revenue falls into two general categories: M&O and debt service. M&O includes such things as salaries, utilities and day-to-day operations. Debt service covers the interest and principal on bonds and other debt secured by property tax revenues, also called interest and sinking (I&S). 18 Line 28 of the Rollback Tax Rate Worksheet outlines the four-part test based on that legal definition. Calculating an effective tax rate does not require the school district to distinguish between M&O and debt service. The rollback tax rate, however, is the sum of the maximum M&O rate and debt service rate. Calculating the Rollback Tax Rate The M&O portion of the rollback tax rate allows school districts to add four cents ($0.04) to the lesser of the 2013 compressed operating tax rate or the effective M&O rate to generate operating funds. School districts will get to add to the compressed operating rate any additional cents approved by voters at a 2006 or subsequent rollback election. The debt service rate portion is the tax rate necessary to pay the school s debt payments in the coming year. This part of the calculation does not depend on the prior year s debt taxes at all; it simply considers what the school district will actually need for the current year. The portion of the overall rate used to retire debt may rise as high as necessary without triggering the threat of a rollback. M&O Rate School districts add four cents ($0.04) to the lesser of the compressed operating tax rate or the effective M&O rate for their highest M&O rate; school districts then add their 2013 debt service rate for the final 2013 rollback tax rate (Exhibit 6). Additional rollback protection for pollution control Any school district may increase its rollback rate by the rate that generates the amount of funds the school district will spend for pollution control property, divided by the school district s current total value. Lines of the Rollback EXHIBIT 6 Calculating the M&O Portion of the Rollback Tax Rate $1.50 (or adopted 2005 rate if voters approved a rate higher than $1.50) x $ Rate equal to the sum of any differences between the adopted tax rate and the rollback tax rate approved by voters for 2006 and each subsequent year or Effective M&O rate + $0.04 Source: Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts, = School District M&O Rollback Rate (the lesser of the two rates) 18 Tax Code (7) and (8) provides a full legal definition of debt. Truth-in-Taxation for School Districts (2013) 11

16 Chapter 3: The Rollback Tax Rate Tax Rate Worksheet in Appendix 4 provide for calculating the additional rate to add to the rollback rate. The school district may raise its rate for M&O funds used to pay for a facility, device or method for the control of air, water or land pollution. 19 This means any land, structure, building, installation, excavation, machinery, equipment or device that is used, constructed, acquired or installed wholly or partly to meet or exceed pollution control requirements. The school district s expenses are necessary to meet the requirements of a permit issued by the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ). The TCEQ will determine if the facility, device or method is used wholly or partly for pollution control. Then the TCEQ executive director issues a determination letter stating the portion of the cost of the installation for pollution control. The TCEQ may charge a fee for processing the information, making a determination and issuing the letter. School districts should check with the TCEQ for rules regarding this process by calling its Air Quality Division at (512) The school district shall provide its tax assessor with a copy of the TCEQ s letter. The assessor must accept the copy as conclusive evidence and must adjust the rollback tax rate. The additional lines on the calculation provide for entering the amount of pollution control expenditures and the 2013 total taxable value. The additional rate is added to the school district s rollback rate. Debt Component The debt service portion of the rollback rate differs entirely from the M&O portion. The debt service rate portion is the tax rate necessary to pay the school district s debt payments in the coming year. This part of the calculation does not depend on the prior year s debt taxes; it considers what the school district will need to meet its bond obligations, including early payment of bonds. The portion of the overall rate used to retire debt may rise as high as necessary without triggering the threat of a rollback. The debt service component does not use the adjusted 2013 taxable value (the current value of properties taxed in the prior year). Instead, it uses the total 2013 taxable value (the current value of all properties) in the lower part of the formula less the 2013 taxable values of homesteads with tax ceilings, 19 Tax Code less any TIF captured appraised value where the school district agreed to deposit taxes into the TIF fund. Debt payments The top half of the formula is the actual debt payments required for the fiscal year, not the prior fiscal year s debt. These are debt payments that 2013 property taxes will pay. School districts are required to consider the amount of facilities state aid (Existing Debt Allotment and/or Instructional Facilities Allotment) they will receive in setting their local debt service rates. Doing so reduces the amount of debt that school districts pay from local funds and produces a lower debt service tax rate. School districts that do not take the state funding into account will both violate state law and levy rates that are too high. An adjustment to the 2013 debt service can be made for anticipated collection losses. The school district subtracts the amount of 2012 excess debt tax collections from the current year s debt payments, and then divides the resulting figure by the anticipated 2013 collection rate. The school district s tax collector will certify these excess debt tax collections and the anticipated collection rate. The following section on anticipated and excess collections tells the tax collector how to calculate these figures. Anticipated and excess debt collections A school district that levies a debt service tax must consider anticipated collections in calculating the debt service component of its rollback tax rate. The collector for such a school district must certify the estimated debt collection rate for 2013 and the excess debt tax collections for 2012, to the school board. Estimated debt collection rate for 2013 To find the estimated collection rate, the collector must first estimate the school district s total debt collections from July 1, 2013, through June 30, This estimate equals the total tax dollars that the school district collects for current debt taxes, delinquent taxes, special appraisal rollback taxes, penalties and interest. The collector will not know the precise amount until this collection period is completed. Truth-in-taxation laws, however, require the collector s estimate. The collector will compare this amount to what the school district plans to levy for paying debt service in the fiscal year. Dividing the estimated collections by the required debt payments gives the estimated collection rate. Suppose, for 12 Truth-in-Taxation for School Districts (2013)

17 Chapter 3: The Rollback Tax Rate example, the collector projects the school district will take in $950,000 in debt revenues during the period. The school district s budget calls for it to levy $1 million in debt service taxes for The anticipated collection rate is 95 percent ($950,000 divided by $1 million). If the collector s anticipated collection rate exceeds 100 percent, the collector would use 100 percent in the calculation. Delinquent taxes from prior years may generate more than a 100 percent rate. Excess debt tax collections for 2012 The law requires the collector to compare the amount of taxes actually collected in current taxes, delinquent taxes, special appraisal rollback taxes, penalties and interest for debt in 2012 from July 1, 2012 through June 30, The collector compares this collected amount with the amount that the collector estimated to collect according to the 2012 anticipated collection rate. If the school district took in more debt tax dollars than should have been collected, the collector certifies the amount of excess debt tax collections to the school board. For example, last year the collector projected a 2012 collection rate of 95 percent and the school board levied $500,000 in 2012 debt service taxes. The anticipated debt tax collections for 2012 were $475,000 (0.95 x $500,000). The collector determines whether the total amount of debt service taxes collected from July 1, 2012, through June 30, 2013, exceeds $475,000 and determines the amount of any excess. If the school district collected $485,000 in 2012 debt service taxes, the collector certifies excess debt tax collections of $10,000. The school district will subtract this $10,000 from the 2013 debt payments to lower the 2013 debt service rate. If the collector projected a 2012 collection rate of 100 percent and collected more than 100 percent, the collector certifies excess debt collections of 0. Dividing the adjusted debt payments by the total 2013 taxable values, times $100, gives the debt service portion of the rollback rate. Exhibit 7 illustrates the debt service calculation. Total Rollback Tax Rate Totaling the M&O rollback rate and the debt service rate and multiplying by 100 (to convert to a rate per $100 of value) gives the rollback tax rate. EXHIBIT 7 Calculating the Debt Service Portion of the Rollback Rate (2013 debt payments 2012 excess debt tax collections) divided by 2013 anticipated collection rate = Adjusted 2013 debt Adjusted 2013 debt divided by 2013 total taxable values* 2013 captured appraised value in a TIF fund x $100 = 2013 debt service rate * School districts exclude the total taxable value of the 2013 homesteads with tax ceilings for homeowners age 65 or older or disabled. Source: Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts, Truth-in-Taxation for School Districts (2013) 13

18 Chapter 3: The Rollback Tax Rate 14 Truth-in-Taxation for School Districts (2013)

19 CHAPTER 4: Required Public Notice and Meeting Texas Property Tax School districts must post meeting notices for adoption of their proposed budget and tax rates. 20 In addition, they must at the same time post a summary of their proposed budgets. 21 One Public Notice A school district publishes one notice the Notice of Public Meeting to Discuss Budget and Proposed Tax Rate in a local newspaper (Appendix 5). The notice appears in the newspaper no later than 10 days or earlier than 30 days before the date of the public meeting. School districts are not required to publish the effective tax rate and other schedules required by law for other types of taxing units. The rollback tax rate and unencumbered fund balances will appear on this one notice. Content of the notice The notice must appear in a newspaper, may not be smaller than a quarter-page ad and must include the following: comparison of property tax rates; comparison of the proposed budget and last year s budget; comparison between last year and current year property taxes on an average residence; and unencumbered fund balances. The notice includes information about the total appraised and taxable value for all property and all new property for last year and this year and a section listing the school s total outstanding and unpaid bonded indebtedness. The school district may enlarge the notice if it chooses and may use a larger type size if printing space allows. The first paragraph of the notice states the name of the school district, the time, date and place of the public meeting to discuss the school district s budget and the proposed tax rate. The notice states that the budget determines the adopted tax rate. The purpose of the meeting is to discuss the budget and proposed tax rate and public participation in the discussion is invited. The notice states that the school board may not adopt a rate that exceeds the proposed rate shown on this notice, unless the school district publishes a revised notice and holds another public meeting to discuss the revised notice. Below this information, the school district lists the proposed M&O rate and rate to pay for any bonded indebtedness under the captions Maintenance Tax and School Debt Service Tax Approved by Local Voters. The second section of the notice is titled Comparison of Proposed Budget with Last Year s Budget and shows the percent increase or decrease in the amount budgeted in the preceding fiscal year and the amount budgeted for the fiscal year that begins this tax year for M&O, debt service and total expenditures. The third section is titled Total Appraised Value and Total Taxable Value. This section lists the total appraised and taxable values for all property and all new property in the school district for last year and the current tax year. 22 School districts are next required to state the amount of their outstanding and unpaid bonded indebtedness. This includes the school district s outstanding principal. The next part of the notice is a chart with three columns that state the school district s tax rates for M&O, I&S and total. The rows in the chart include: Last Year s Rate. This row is the adopted 2012 M&O rate, 2012 I&S rate and the total adopted 2012 rate. Rate to Maintain Same Level of Maintenance & Operations Revenue & Pay Debt Service. These 2013 rates maintain the same level of M&O revenue and pay debt service in the fiscal year. To determine the M&O rate, the amount of local and state funds is divided by the current 2013 taxable values as certified by the chief appraiser (including any changes) at the time this notice is prepared. The amount needed for debt service is determined by the values certified by the chief appraiser (including any changes) at the time this notice is prepared, plus the school district s anticipated collection rate and any excess taxes 20 Education Code Tax Code Education Code Truth-in-Taxation for School Districts (2013) 15

20 Chapter 4: Required Public Notice and Meeting collected for debt during the preceding year but not used for debt during that year. The 2013 debt payments, adjusted for excess debt collections and taking into account an anticipated collection rate, is on line 32 on the 2013 Rollback Tax Rate Worksheet. The 2013 debt tax rate is Line 35 of the worksheet. Proposed Rate. This row is the proposed 2013 rates for M&O, I&S and total. This table includes two additional columns Local Revenue Per Student and State Revenue Per Student. The amounts to enter are determined as follows: To compute the Local Revenue per Student, the school district multiplies the total taxable value, as determined by the chief appraiser for the applicable year and as adjusted to reflect any changes as of the time this notice is prepared, by the total tax rate and then divides by the number of students in average daily attendance for the applicable school year. To compute the State Revenue per Student, the school district divides the amount of state aid received or to be received of the applicable school year by the number of students in average daily attendance for the applicable school year. The sixth part of the notice is another chart that compares the proposed levy (taxes) with last year s levy on an average residence in the school district. The chart includes the following rows: Average Market Value of Residences. The first row states the average market value last year and this year of a residence in the school district, disregarding the limited home value that some homeowners may have for the 110 percent appraisal limitation. 23 The school district uses the same group of residences for each year to determine the average market value and the following items below. Average Taxable Value of Residences. The second row is the average taxable value, after subtracting all homestead exemptions applicable in each year and taking into account the 110 percent appraisal limitation. The school district disregards the age 65 or older and disabled homeowner s exemptions. Last Year s Rate versus Proposed Rate (per $100 Value). The third row is the school district s adopted rate last year and the proposed rate for this year. Taxes Due on Average Residence. The fourth row is the amount of taxes on the average residence for both years. Increase (Decrease) in Taxes. The fifth and final row is the amount of increase or decrease from last year s taxes to this year s proposed taxes on the average residence. The appraisal district can assist with the average market and taxable values of residences. The school district should use the same group of residences for the different rows. The seventh part of the notice is a statement that the dollar amount of school taxes on the homesteads of persons age 65 or older (or the surviving spouse) may not increase above the amount paid in the first year after the homeowner turned 65. The law sets out the exact wording of this statement that must be in bold print. The eighth part of the notice is a Notice of Rollback Rate in bold print. Again, the law sets out the exact wording of this statement. The rollback rate is Line 36, or Line 40, on the 2013 Rollback Tax Rate Worksheet. The ninth and final part of the notice is titled Fund Balances. The school district states the estimated unencumbered fund balance(s) remaining in the I&S fund and the M&O or general fund balance(s) at the end of the current fiscal year. The school district may subtract estimated funds necessary to operate the school district before receiving its first state aid payment for the succeeding school year. Newspaper requirements The notice must be at least a quarter-page in a standardsize or tabloid-size newspaper. Its headline must appear in 18-point type or larger. The school district may not publish the notice in the legal or classified section of the newspaper. The notice is published at least 10 days but no longer than 30 days before the date of the public meeting. The school district may publish the notice in a daily, weekly or biweekly newspaper that is published in the school district. If there is not a daily, weekly or biweekly newspaper in the school district, the school board president must provide for publication in at least one newspaper of general circulation in the county in which the school district s central administrative office is located. A legal newspaper must devote at least 20 percent of its space to general interest items. It must be published at least once a week and must have been regularly published for at least 23 Tax Code Truth-in-Taxation for School Districts (2013)

2012 Truth-In- Taxation

2012 Truth-In- Taxation 2012 Truth-In- Taxation Susan Combs Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts A Guide for Setting Tax Rates for Taxing Units Other than Schools Texas Property Tax Table of Contents Introduction.... 1 Chapter

More information

ORDINANCE TO SET TAX RATE FOR 2014 (2014-2015 SCHOOL YEAR)

ORDINANCE TO SET TAX RATE FOR 2014 (2014-2015 SCHOOL YEAR) Attachment #1 ORDINANCE TO SET TAX RATE FOR 2014 (2014-2015 SCHOOL YEAR) An ordinance levying an annual ad valorem tax for the year 2014, setting specific tax rates applicable to all real, personal, and

More information

AGENDA SPECIAL MEETING OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES. October 7, 2014 3:30 p.m.

AGENDA SPECIAL MEETING OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES. October 7, 2014 3:30 p.m. AGENDA SPECIAL MEETING OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES October 7, 2014 3:30 p.m. HCC Administration Building 3100 Main, 2nd Floor, Seminar Room B Houston, Texas 77002 Strategic Plan 2012-2015 Creating Opportunities

More information

Adopting a City Budget and Property Tax Rate Training Austin Texas February 2013

Adopting a City Budget and Property Tax Rate Training Austin Texas February 2013 Adopting a City Budget and Property Tax Rate Training Austin Texas February 2013 Leela R. Fireside, Assistant City Attorney, Austin Texas. (contact info: leela.fireside@ci.austin.tx.us or (512) 974-2163)

More information

Adopting a City Budget and Property Tax Rate Training Austin Texas February 2015

Adopting a City Budget and Property Tax Rate Training Austin Texas February 2015 Adopting a City Budget and Property Tax Rate Training Austin Texas February 2015 Leela R. Fireside, Assistant City Attorney, Austin Texas. (contact info: leela.fireside@austintexas.gov or (512) 974-2163)

More information

150-303-405 (Rev. 6-09)

150-303-405 (Rev. 6-09) A Brief History of Oregon Property Taxation 150-303-405-1 (Rev. 6-09) 150-303-405 (Rev. 6-09) To understand the current structure of Oregon s property tax system, it is helpful to view the system in a

More information

Senate Select Committee for Property Tax Reform & Relief

Senate Select Committee for Property Tax Reform & Relief Senate Select Committee for Property Tax Reform & Relief LOCAL TAXES VS. HOUSEHOLD INCOMES Statewide Since 2005, city and county property tax levies have increased much faster than median household incomes

More information

LEGISLATURE OF THE STATE OF IDAHO Sixty-third Legislature Second Regular Session - 2016 IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES HOUSE BILL NO.

LEGISLATURE OF THE STATE OF IDAHO Sixty-third Legislature Second Regular Session - 2016 IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES HOUSE BILL NO. LEGISLATURE OF THE STATE OF IDAHO Sixty-third Legislature Second Regular Session - 0 IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES HOUSE BILL NO. BY REVENUE AND TAXATION COMMITTEE 0 0 0 AN ACT RELATING TO TAXING DISTRICT

More information

Susan Combs Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts. Property Tax Basics. Texas Property Tax

Susan Combs Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts. Property Tax Basics. Texas Property Tax Susan Combs Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts Property Tax Basics Texas Property Tax January 2014 This publication is intended to provide customer assistance to taxpayers. It does not address all aspects

More information

Texas Property Tax System

Texas Property Tax System FAQ Texas Property Tax System What is Property Tax? Property taxes are local taxes that are assessed locally, collected locally and used locally. You pay your property taxes to the local tax collector.

More information

A JOINT RESOLUTION BE IT RESOLVED BY THE LEGISLATURE OF THE STATE OF TEXAS. Section 5, Article VII, Texas Constitution, is amended to read as follows:

A JOINT RESOLUTION BE IT RESOLVED BY THE LEGISLATURE OF THE STATE OF TEXAS. Section 5, Article VII, Texas Constitution, is amended to read as follows: By: H.J.R. No. A JOINT RESOLUTION proposing a constitutional amendment relating to establishing the Texas Great Classroom Fund as a sequestered fund, funded by an Education Flat Tax, a Reformed Franchise

More information

and residents sixty years of age or older who are surviving spouses

and residents sixty years of age or older who are surviving spouses Chapter 2 Tax Levies 2013 Chapter 2: Tax Levies GENERALLY The authority for levying taxes on real property, and for limiting or exempting certain types of real property from taxation, is set forth in Section

More information

OVERVIEW OF ARIZONA STATE PROPERTY TAX SYSTEM IN MARICOPA COUNTY

OVERVIEW OF ARIZONA STATE PROPERTY TAX SYSTEM IN MARICOPA COUNTY Maricopa County Department of Finance Prepared: 10/22/13 OVERVIEW OF ARIZONA STATE PROPERTY TAX SYSTEM IN MARICOPA COUNTY The following Overview of the Arizona State Property Tax System was prepared by

More information

The Property Tax Extension Limitation Law, A Technical Manual. Page 2

The Property Tax Extension Limitation Law, A Technical Manual. Page 2 Page 2 The Property Tax Extension Limitation Law, A Technical Manual Table of Contents Introduction Purpose... 6 Summary The PTELL does not cap individual property assessments... 7 The PTELL limits the

More information

TEXAS SCHOOL LAW BULLETIN

TEXAS SCHOOL LAW BULLETIN TEXAS SCHOOL LAW BULLETIN EDUCATION CODE TITLE 2. PUBLIC EDUCATION Chapter 44. Fiscal Management Section Subchapter A. School District Fiscal Management. 44.001. Fiscal Guidelines. 44.0011. Fiscal Year.

More information

2014 Clerk-Treasurer s Conference. Dan Jones Asst. Director of Budget Division June 2014

2014 Clerk-Treasurer s Conference. Dan Jones Asst. Director of Budget Division June 2014 2014 Clerk-Treasurer s Conference Dan Jones Asst. Director of Budget Division June 2014 1 Topics Preparing for 2015 Budget Gateway Problem Areas Most Common Reasons for Budget Problems 1782 Requirement:

More information

Local Budgeting in Oregon

Local Budgeting in Oregon Local Budgeting in Oregon 150-504-400 (Rev. 02-14) Local Budgeting in Oregon Table of contents First, the basics...1 What is the law? What is a budget? Who is on the budget committee? The budget cycle...2

More information

How to do a City Referendum

How to do a City Referendum How to do a City Referendum A Guide to Placing a City Referendum on the Ballot PREPARED BY: THE CITY OF SANTA CRUZ CITY CLERK S DIVISION Bren Lehr, City Clerk Administrator / Elections Official 809 Center

More information

COUNTY AND DISTRICT INITIATIVE & REFERENDUM PETITIONS

COUNTY AND DISTRICT INITIATIVE & REFERENDUM PETITIONS COUNTY AND DISTRICT INITIATIVE & REFERENDUM PETITIONS Santa Barbara County Registrar of Voters P. O. Box 61510 Santa Barbara, CA 93160-1510 (800) SBC-VOTE, (800) 722-8683 www.sbcvote.com Revised: March

More information

CHAPTER 241 TAXATION OF BANKS AND OTHER FINANCIAL CORPORATIONS

CHAPTER 241 TAXATION OF BANKS AND OTHER FINANCIAL CORPORATIONS TAXATION OF BANKS AND OTHER FINANCIAL CORPORATIONS 241-1 CHAPTER 241 TAXATION OF BANKS AND OTHER FINANCIAL CORPORATIONS Section 241-1 Definitions 241-1.5 Time of application of tax and other provisions

More information

Tax Rate Certification Standards of Practice

Tax Rate Certification Standards of Practice Tax Rate Certification Standards of Practice 10 Utah State Tax Commission Property Tax Division Rev. August 2011 Table of Contents Standard 10 Tax Rate Certification Section X.I 5 General Information 5

More information

2012Susan Combs Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts. Property Tax Basics. Texas Property Tax

2012Susan Combs Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts. Property Tax Basics. Texas Property Tax 2012Susan Combs Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts Property Tax Basics Texas Property Tax This publication is intended to provide customer assistance to taxpayers. It does not address all aspects of

More information

(7) For taxable years beginning after December 31, 2012, every. nonresident estate having for the taxable year any gross income

(7) For taxable years beginning after December 31, 2012, every. nonresident estate having for the taxable year any gross income IC 6-3-4 Chapter 4. Returns and Remittances IC 6-3-4-1 Who must make returns Sec. 1. Returns with respect to taxes imposed by this act shall be made by the following: (1) Every resident individual having

More information

Chapter 32 Utah Interlocal Financing Authority Act

Chapter 32 Utah Interlocal Financing Authority Act Chapter 32 Utah Interlocal Financing Authority Act 11-32-1 Short title. (1) This chapter shall be known as the "Utah Interlocal Financing Authority Act." (2) All bonds issued pursuant to authority of this

More information

RELEVANT GOVT CODE AND ED CODE SECTIONS FOR SCHOOL DIST GO BONDS

RELEVANT GOVT CODE AND ED CODE SECTIONS FOR SCHOOL DIST GO BONDS RELEVANT GOVT CODE AND ED CODE SECTIONS FOR SCHOOL DIST GO BONDS Issues of particular interest to Treasurer-Tax Collectors are highlighted in blue Added comments are highlighted in Yellow GOVERNMENT CODE

More information

FY16 City Council Public Hearing and Financial Summary Notice... 373

FY16 City Council Public Hearing and Financial Summary Notice... 373 Legal Forms Table of Contents FY16 Adopted Budget Resolution... 357 Exhibit A Expenditure Appropriations by Fund... 359 Exhibit B Fund Names... 365 FY16 State Shared Revenues Resolution... 367 FY16 State

More information

CHAPTER 2014-254. Committee Substitute for Committee Substitute for House Bill No. 1445

CHAPTER 2014-254. Committee Substitute for Committee Substitute for House Bill No. 1445 CHAPTER 2014-254 Committee Substitute for Committee Substitute for House Bill No. 1445 An act relating to the Citrus County Hospital Board, Citrus County; amending chapter 2011-256, Laws of Florida; authorizing

More information

May 23, 1996 AGO 96-039. Mr. James D. Palermo Tampa City Attorney 315 East Kennedy Boulevard Fifth Floor Tampa, Florida 33602. Dear Mr.

May 23, 1996 AGO 96-039. Mr. James D. Palermo Tampa City Attorney 315 East Kennedy Boulevard Fifth Floor Tampa, Florida 33602. Dear Mr. May 23, 1996 AGO 96-039 Mr. James D. Palermo Tampa City Attorney 315 East Kennedy Boulevard Fifth Floor Tampa, Florida 33602 Dear Mr. Palermo: You ask substantially the following question: Which value

More information

Utah Property Tax Calendar

Utah Property Tax Calendar =Utah State Tax Commission Revised 11/01/2014 Before Jan. Jan. Taxing Entities Utah Property Tax Calendar January County, city and town legislative bodies and all taxing entities are to inform of boundary

More information

SHARED REVENUE AND TAX RELIEF

SHARED REVENUE AND TAX RELIEF SHARED REVENUE AND TAX RELIEF Budget Summary by Funding Source Joint Finance Change to: 2014-15 Base 2015-17 2015-17 Governor Base Year Doubled Governor Jt. Finance Amount Percent Amount Percent Direct

More information

Minnetonka Independent School District 276 Levy Adoption Taxes Payable in 2012

Minnetonka Independent School District 276 Levy Adoption Taxes Payable in 2012 Minnetonka Independent School District 276 Levy Adoption Taxes Payable in 2012 Public Schools Established by Minnesota Constitution ARTICLE XIII MISCELLANEOUS SUBJECTS Section 1. UNIFORM SYSTEM OF PUBLIC

More information

Florida Senate - 2011 SB 980

Florida Senate - 2011 SB 980 By Senator Bennett 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 A bill to be entitled An act relating to convention development taxes; amending s. 212.0305, F.S.; making

More information

SCHOOL LOCAL PROPERTY TAX OPTION 1999 Legislation

SCHOOL LOCAL PROPERTY TAX OPTION 1999 Legislation STATE OF OREGON LEGISLATIVE REVENUE OFFICE H-197 State Capitol Building Salem, Oregon 97310-1347 Research Report (503) 986-1266 Research Report # 5-99 SCHOOL LOCAL PROPERTY TAX OPTION 1999 Legislation

More information

THE PROPERTY TAX PROTEST PROCESS

THE PROPERTY TAX PROTEST PROCESS THE PROPERTY TAX PROTEST PROCESS A summary of the appeal procedures under the Texas Property Tax Code Presented by: Jason C. Marshall THE MARSHALL FIRM PC 302 N. Market Suite 510 Dallas TX 75202 214.742.4800

More information

Bulletin No. 12 of 2014 Annual Calendar October 13, 2014

Bulletin No. 12 of 2014 Annual Calendar October 13, 2014 89 (Rev. 01-11) RICK SNYDER GOVERNOR STATE OF MICHIGAN DEPARTMENT OF TREASURY LANSING R. KEVIN CLINTON STATE TREASURER TO: FROM: Equalization Directors and Assessors The State Tax Commission Bulletin No.

More information

SHARED REVENUE AND TAX RELIEF

SHARED REVENUE AND TAX RELIEF SHARED REVENUE AND TAX RELIEF Budget Summary by Funding Source Act 55 Change Over 2014-15 Base 2015-17 2015-17 2015-17 2015-17 Base Year Doubled Year Doubled Governor Jt. Finance Legislature Act 55 Amount

More information

State of North Dakota Office Of State Tax Commissioner

State of North Dakota Office Of State Tax Commissioner State of North Dakota Office Of State Tax Commissioner RYAN RAUSCHENBERGER, COMMISSIONER Bismarck, North Dakota July 2015 Schedule of Levy Limitations Applicable To The Authority Of The Political Subdivisions

More information

GUIDE TO OHIO S SCHOOL DISTRICT INCOME TAX Prepared by THE OHIO DEPARTMENT OF TAXATION JUNE 2013 TABLE OF CONTENTS

GUIDE TO OHIO S SCHOOL DISTRICT INCOME TAX Prepared by THE OHIO DEPARTMENT OF TAXATION JUNE 2013 TABLE OF CONTENTS Gui det oohi o s SchoolDi st r i ct I ncometax Updat edjune2013 GUIDE TO OHIO S SCHOOL DISTRICT INCOME TAX Prepared by THE OHIO DEPARTMENT OF TAXATION JUNE 2013 TABLE OF CONTENTS General Filing On the

More information

Local Government Expenditure and Revenue Limits

Local Government Expenditure and Revenue Limits Local Government Expenditure and Revenue Limits Prepared by Russ Kava and Rick Olin Wisconsin Legislative Fiscal Bureau One East Main, Suite 301 Madison, WI 53703 Local Government Expenditure and Revenue

More information

P.A. 86-1. House Bill No. 9001

P.A. 86-1. House Bill No. 9001 JUNE 23, 1986 P.A. 86-1 House Bill No. 9001 June 23, 1986, Special Session II PUBLIC ACT NO. 86-1 AN ACT AUTHORIZING THE USE OF A PORTION OF THE GENERAL FUND SURPLUS FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30,

More information

HOW TO DO A CITY REFERENDUM

HOW TO DO A CITY REFERENDUM HOW TO DO A CITY REFERENDUM A Guide to Placing a City Referendum on the Ballot MARK A. LUNN Clerk Recorder/Registrar of Voters Ventura County Elections Division 800 South Victoria Avenue Ventura, CA 93009-1200

More information

CITY ATTORNEYS OFFICE CITY HALL, 435 RYMAN MISSOULA, MT 59802 Phone: (406) 523-4614 Fax: (406) 327-2105 LEGAL OPINION 2002-014

CITY ATTORNEYS OFFICE CITY HALL, 435 RYMAN MISSOULA, MT 59802 Phone: (406) 523-4614 Fax: (406) 327-2105 LEGAL OPINION 2002-014 CITY ATTORNEYS OFFICE CITY HALL, 435 RYMAN MISSOULA, MT 59802 Phone: (406) 523-4614 Fax: (406) 327-2105 LEGAL OPINION 2002-014 TO: FROM: Mike Kadas, Mayor City Council Janet Stevens, Chief Administrative

More information

2012Susan Combs Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts. Property Tax Basics. Texas Property Tax

2012Susan Combs Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts. Property Tax Basics. Texas Property Tax 2012Susan Combs Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts Property Tax Basics Texas Property Tax This publication is intended to provide customer assistance to taxpayers. It does not address all aspects of

More information

TABLE OF CONTENTS. Page 2 of 28

TABLE OF CONTENTS. Page 2 of 28 TABLE OF CONTENTS PETITION AND REMONSTRANCE PROCESS... 3 Petition and Remonstrance: Application Process... 4 Petition and Remonstrance: Race for Signatures... 8 REFERENDUM / LOCAL PUBLIC QUESTION PROCESS...

More information

Property Tax Relief: The $7 Billion Reality

Property Tax Relief: The $7 Billion Reality August 2008 Property Tax Relief: The $7 Billion Reality In the spring of 2006, Texas lawmakers passed a massive package of school finance reforms. School tax rates for maintenance and operations were to

More information

Bulletin No. 12 of 2015 Annual Calendar October 12, 2015

Bulletin No. 12 of 2015 Annual Calendar October 12, 2015 5102 (Rev. 04-15) RICK SNYDER GOVERNOR STATE OF MICHIGAN DEPARTMENT OF TREASURY LANSING NICK A. KHOURI STATE TREASURER TO: FROM: Equalization Directors and Assessors The State Tax Commission Bulletin No.

More information

April 30, 2010. Mr. Wesley Bryant Georgetown County Attorney PO Drawer 421270 Georgetown, SC 29442. Dear Mr. Bryant,

April 30, 2010. Mr. Wesley Bryant Georgetown County Attorney PO Drawer 421270 Georgetown, SC 29442. Dear Mr. Bryant, April 30, 2010 Mr. Wesley Bryant Georgetown County Attorney PO Drawer 421270 Georgetown, SC 29442 Dear Mr. Bryant, SCAC has been asked to address the questions of whether the rollback millage rate applied

More information

ASSEMBLY, No. 903 STATE OF NEW JERSEY. Introduced Pending Technical Review by Legislative Counsel PRE-FILED FOR INTRODUCTION IN THE 1996 SESSION

ASSEMBLY, No. 903 STATE OF NEW JERSEY. Introduced Pending Technical Review by Legislative Counsel PRE-FILED FOR INTRODUCTION IN THE 1996 SESSION ASSEMBLY, No. 0 STATE OF NEW JERSEY Introduced Pending Technical Review by Legislative Counsel PRE-FILED FOR INTRODUCTION IN THE SESSION By Assemblymen ROCCO and WOLFE 0 0 AN ACT concerning State support

More information

LEGISLATIVE SERVICES AGENCY OFFICE OF FISCAL AND MANAGEMENT ANALYSIS 301 State House (317) 232-9855

LEGISLATIVE SERVICES AGENCY OFFICE OF FISCAL AND MANAGEMENT ANALYSIS 301 State House (317) 232-9855 LEGISLATIVE SERVICES AGENCY OFFICE OF FISCAL AND MANAGEMENT ANALYSIS 301 State House (317) 232-9855 FISCAL IMPACT STATEMENT LS 7482 DATE PREPARED: Mar 30, 2001 BILL NUMBER: SB 199 BILL AMENDED: Mar 29,

More information

Eligible Personal Property Exemptions for Assessors

Eligible Personal Property Exemptions for Assessors Eligible Personal Property Exemptions for Assessors In December of 2012 Governor Snyder signed into law Public Acts 397 through 403 and 406 through 408 of 2012. These Public Acts significantly changed

More information

California Election Codes Relating to the County Initiative and Referendum Petition Process

California Election Codes Relating to the County Initiative and Referendum Petition Process California Election Codes Relating to the County Initiative and Referendum Petition Process Terry Hansen Yuba County Clerk-Recorder Registrar of Voters The Yuba County Elections Division has prepared this

More information

VOLUME NO. 49 OPINION NO. 22

VOLUME NO. 49 OPINION NO. 22 VOLUME NO. 49 OPINION NO. 22 BONDS - County water and sewer district general obligation bond payable by levy on real and personal property in district; COUNTIES - County water and sewer district general

More information

GEORGIA CODE PROVISIONS PUBLIC RETIREMENT SYSTEMS INDEX

GEORGIA CODE PROVISIONS PUBLIC RETIREMENT SYSTEMS INDEX GEORGIA CODE PROVISIONS PUBLIC RETIREMENT SYSTEMS INDEX TITLE 47. RETIREMENT AND PENSIONS TITLE 47 NOTE CHAPTER 1. GENERAL PROVISIONS CHAPTER 2. EMPLOYEES' RETIREMENT SYSTEM OF GEORGIA CHAPTER 3. TEACHERS

More information

Property Tax Levies. Agenda. Property Tax Overview. There are two types of property subject to taxation:

Property Tax Levies. Agenda. Property Tax Overview. There are two types of property subject to taxation: Property Tax Levies Prepared for the 2013 Annual Local Government Officials Conference April 4, 2013 Tax Equalization Division Ohio Department of Taxation Agenda I: Types of Property Tax II: Inside Millage

More information

APPENDIX A - CHARTER ORDINANCES

APPENDIX A - CHARTER ORDINANCES APPENDIX A - CHARTER ORDINANCES NOTE: The charter ordinances included herein are for information only. Each of them contains the substance as adopted by the governing body but enacting clauses, publication

More information

Property Tax Cap Fiscal Years Beginning 2014

Property Tax Cap Fiscal Years Beginning 2014 New York State Office of the State Comptroller Thomas P. DiNapoli State Comptroller Property Tax Cap Fiscal Years Beginning Property Tax Cap Instructions The State Legislature and the Governor enacted

More information

COUNTY TAX REFUND SETOFF PILOT PROGRAM TIMELINE OF ACTIVITIES

COUNTY TAX REFUND SETOFF PILOT PROGRAM TIMELINE OF ACTIVITIES COUNTY TAX REFUND SETOFF PILOT PROGRAM TIMELINE OF ACTIVITIES Activities through Year End Aug. 15 Aug. 20 Sept. 2 Sept. 8 Sept. 24 Deadline for counties to sign up to participate in pilot program Concurrent

More information

TRUTH IN TAXATION - ALL TAXING DISTRICTS

TRUTH IN TAXATION - ALL TAXING DISTRICTS TRUTH IN TAXATION - ALL TAXING DISTRICTS The Truth in Taxation law establishes procedures taxing districts must follow in the adoption of their property tax levies. See 35 ILCS 200/18-55 through 35 ILCS

More information

NEW CONSTRUCTION BP 7214. General Obligation Bonds. I-Facilities

NEW CONSTRUCTION BP 7214. General Obligation Bonds. I-Facilities NEW CONSTRUCTION General Obligation Bonds I-Facilities The Governing Board recognizes that school facilities are an essential component of the educational program and that the Board has a responsibility

More information

Oregon Property Tax Statistics Fiscal Year 2012-13

Oregon Property Tax Statistics Fiscal Year 2012-13 Oregon Property Tax Statistics Fiscal Year 2012-13 150-303-405 (Rev. 3-13) To order additional copies, please contact: Publications Oregon Department of Revenue 955 Center Street NE Salem OR 97301-2555

More information

CHAPTER 20 COUNTY PERMISSIVE MOTOR VEHICLE LICENSE TAX

CHAPTER 20 COUNTY PERMISSIVE MOTOR VEHICLE LICENSE TAX CHAPTER 20 COUNTY PERMISSIVE MOTOR VEHICLE LICENSE TAX Latest Revision March, 2013 20.01 INTRODUCTION In 1967 the General Assembly granted counties the authority to enact a permissive motor vehicle license

More information

Delta County Appraisal District

Delta County Appraisal District Delta County Appraisal District VALUING PROPERTY Each county s appraisal district determines the value of all taxable property within the county. Before the appraisals begin, the district compiles a list

More information

YOUR PROPERTY TAXES. understanding property tax. assessments. appeal process. property taxes and schools. frequently asked questions.

YOUR PROPERTY TAXES. understanding property tax. assessments. appeal process. property taxes and schools. frequently asked questions. 2006 YOUR PROPERTY TAXES understanding property tax assessments appeal process property taxes and schools frequently asked questions relief programs legislation South Dakota Department of Revenue & Regulation

More information

Panhandle ISD Financial Impact of Chapter 313 Agreement

Panhandle ISD Financial Impact of Chapter 313 Agreement Summary of the District s Financial Impact of Chapter 313 Agreement with Grandview Wind Farm, LLC Prepared by Randy McDowell, RTSBA & Neal Brown School Finance Consultants 1 Summary of Panhandle ISD Financial

More information

Arizona Form 2007 Exempt Organization Business Income Tax Return 99T

Arizona Form 2007 Exempt Organization Business Income Tax Return 99T Arizona Form 2007 Exempt Organization Business Income Tax Return 99T Obtain additional information or assistance, tax forms and instructions, and copies of tax rulings and tax procedures by contacting

More information

Assessor Ken Yazel. Ad Valorem Property Taxes In Tulsa County, OK. Prepared by the Tulsa County Assessor s Office

Assessor Ken Yazel. Ad Valorem Property Taxes In Tulsa County, OK. Prepared by the Tulsa County Assessor s Office Assessor Ken Yazel Ad Valorem Property Taxes In Tulsa County, OK Prepared by the Tulsa County Assessor s Office Tulsa County Assessor s Office Our Commitment Ken Yazel, Assessor The Tulsa County Assessor

More information

Glossary of Assessment Terms:

Glossary of Assessment Terms: Glossary of Assessment Terms: Abatement A reduction or elimination of a tax or charge imposed by a governmental unit, applicable to property tax bills, motor vehicle excise taxes, fees, charges, and special

More information

Property FAQs. Where do I pay my property tax? Generally speaking, property taxes are paid to local Tax Collectors where the property is located.

Property FAQs. Where do I pay my property tax? Generally speaking, property taxes are paid to local Tax Collectors where the property is located. The following is intended to provide general information concerning a frequently asked question about taxes administered by the Mississippi Tax Commission. It is an informal interpretation of the tax law

More information

SCHOOL LOCAL OPTION PROPERTY TAX

SCHOOL LOCAL OPTION PROPERTY TAX STATE OF OREGON LEGISLATIVE REVENUE OFFICE State Capitol Building 900 Court St. NE, Room H-197 Salem, Oregon 97310-1347 Research Report (503) 986-1266 FAX 503-986-1770 www.leg.state.or.us/lro/home.ht m

More information

Fiscal Note. Fiscal Services Division

Fiscal Note. Fiscal Services Division Fiscal Note Fiscal Services Division SF 295 Property Tax Changes (LSB 1464SV.2) Analyst: Jeff Robinson (Phone: (515) 281-4614) (jeff.robinson@legis.iowa.gov) Fiscal Note Version Conference Committee Report

More information

New York State Property Tax Freeze Credit Fact Sheet

New York State Property Tax Freeze Credit Fact Sheet New York State Property Tax Freeze Credit Fact Sheet The Property Tax Freeze Credit is a two-year tax relief program that reimburses qualifying New York State homeowners for increases in local property

More information

Chapter 213. Enforcement of Texas Unemployment Compensation Act... 2 Subchapter A. General Enforcement Provisions... 2 Sec. 213.001.

Chapter 213. Enforcement of Texas Unemployment Compensation Act... 2 Subchapter A. General Enforcement Provisions... 2 Sec. 213.001. Chapter 213. Enforcement of Texas Unemployment Compensation Act... 2 Subchapter A. General Enforcement Provisions... 2 Sec. 213.001. Representation in Court... 2 Sec. 213.002. Prosecution of Criminal Actions...

More information

CHAPTER 13 PAYROLL TAX. 13.03 Definitions. As used in this Chapter, unless the context requires otherwise:

CHAPTER 13 PAYROLL TAX. 13.03 Definitions. As used in this Chapter, unless the context requires otherwise: CHAPTER 13 PAYROLL TAX 13.03 Definitions. As used in this Chapter, unless the context requires otherwise: A. Department means the Department of Revenue, State of Oregon. B. District means the Tri-County

More information

Oklahoma Ad Valorem. 1 of 14. Central Valuation by Oklahoma Tax Commission: All Public Service Corporations (multiple county impact)

Oklahoma Ad Valorem. 1 of 14. Central Valuation by Oklahoma Tax Commission: All Public Service Corporations (multiple county impact) Oklahoma Ad Valorem - Founded Before Statehood And Codified in the 1907 Populist Constitution And Current Laws - Township Assessors in 1894 - County Assessor System Set Up in 1911 - Tax Commission Oversight

More information

Prepared by Jennifer Lockwood, Associate Research Analyst July 21, 2015 15FS020

Prepared by Jennifer Lockwood, Associate Research Analyst July 21, 2015 15FS020 FACT SHEET W Y O M I N G L E G I S L A T I V E S E R V I C E O F F I C E Prepared by Jennifer Lockwood, Associate Research Analyst July 21, 2015 15FS020 BONDING AUTHORITY PROVISIONS Table 1, below, displays

More information

Adoption Of Resolution 1314-1169 Calling Parcel Tax Election

Adoption Of Resolution 1314-1169 Calling Parcel Tax Election Board Office Use: Legislative File Info. File ID Number 14-1495 Introduction Date 6/25/2014 Enactment Number Enactment Date Memo To From Board Meeting Date Subject Action Requested Board of Education Dr.

More information

AN ACT RELATING TO SPECIAL DISTRICTS; ENACTING THE INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT ZONE ACT; PROVIDING FOR THE CREATION OF

AN ACT RELATING TO SPECIAL DISTRICTS; ENACTING THE INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT ZONE ACT; PROVIDING FOR THE CREATION OF AN ACT RELATING TO SPECIAL DISTRICTS; ENACTING THE INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT ZONE ACT; PROVIDING FOR THE CREATION OF INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT ZONES AND ELECTED BOARDS; PROVIDING POWERS AND DUTIES; AUTHORIZING

More information

CONTRACT FOR ASSESSMENT AND COLLECTION BETWEEN DALLAS COUNTY, TEXAS AND THE TOWN OF ADDISON

CONTRACT FOR ASSESSMENT AND COLLECTION BETWEEN DALLAS COUNTY, TEXAS AND THE TOWN OF ADDISON CONTRACT FOR ASSESSMENT AND COLLECTION BETWEEN DALLAS COUNTY, TEXAS AND THE TOWN OF ADDISON PURPOSE: This Contract for Assessment and Collection ( Contract ) is between Dallas County, Texas ( County ),

More information

THE STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT Room 475 EBA Office of Educational Management Services Albany, NY 12234 (518) 474-6541

THE STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT Room 475 EBA Office of Educational Management Services Albany, NY 12234 (518) 474-6541 THE STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT Room 475 EBA Office of Educational Management Services Albany, NY 12234 (518) 474-6541 Fund Balance - Reservations and Designations The following Reserve Funds are available

More information

Chapter 18 Municipal Cable Television and Public Telecommunications Services Act. Part 1 General Provisions

Chapter 18 Municipal Cable Television and Public Telecommunications Services Act. Part 1 General Provisions Chapter 18 Municipal Cable Television and Public Telecommunications Services Act Part 1 General Provisions 10-18-101 Title -- Policy statement. (1) This chapter is known as the "Municipal Cable Television

More information

Texas Property Tax Law Changes 2009

Texas Property Tax Law Changes 2009 Susan Combs Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts Texas Property Tax Law Changes 2009 Property Tax Assistance July 2009 Property Tax Bills: 81st Texas Legislature This publication summarizes changes in

More information

Texas Property Tax Law Changes 2013 Property Tax Assistance Aug. 2013

Texas Property Tax Law Changes 2013 Property Tax Assistance Aug. 2013 Susan Combs Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts Texas Property Tax Law Changes 2013 Property Tax Assistance Aug. 2013 Property Tax Bills: 83rd Texas Legislature, Regular This publication includes highlights

More information

11 HB 325/AP A BILL TO BE ENTITLED AN ACT BE IT ENACTED BY THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF GEORGIA:

11 HB 325/AP A BILL TO BE ENTITLED AN ACT BE IT ENACTED BY THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF GEORGIA: House Bill 325 (AS PASSED HOUSE AND SENATE) By: Representatives Ehrhart of the 36 th, Casas of the 103 rd, and Dutton of the 166 th A BILL TO BE ENTITLED AN ACT 1 2 3 4 5 6 To amend Titles 20 and 48 of

More information

TEXAS SALES & PROPERTY TAX

TEXAS SALES & PROPERTY TAX TEXAS SALES & PROPERTY TAX By IRA A. LIPSTET DuBois, Bryant & Campbell, LLP 700 Lavaca, Suite 1300 Austin, Texas 78701 (512) 381-8040 ilipstet@dbcllp.com Ira A. Lipstet, 2007. All rights reserved. State

More information

The Property Tax in Missouri

The Property Tax in Missouri The Property Tax in Missouri This brochure is designed to give taxpayers an understanding of the way property taxes are assessed and levied in Missouri, and how they affect individual taxpayers. A separate

More information

CHAPTER 209 HOUSE BILL 2395 AN ACT

CHAPTER 209 HOUSE BILL 2395 AN ACT Senate Engrossed House Bill State of Arizona House of Representatives Fifty-first Legislature Second Regular Session 0 CHAPTER 0 HOUSE BILL AN ACT AMENDING SECTIONS -, -00, -00, -00 AND -00, ARIZONA REVISED

More information

Basic Accounting. Course Objective. General Budgetary Terms 12/8/2015. Presented by: Local Government Services

Basic Accounting. Course Objective. General Budgetary Terms 12/8/2015. Presented by: Local Government Services Basic Accounting Presented by: Local Government Services Course Objective To give an overview of the different requirements, processes, transactions, and forms relating to your job as clerk General Budgetary

More information

BULLETIN 1992-01 MAY 1992 NEW FUNDING OPTIONS FOR 911 PHONE SYSTEMS

BULLETIN 1992-01 MAY 1992 NEW FUNDING OPTIONS FOR 911 PHONE SYSTEMS BULLETIN 1992-01 MAY 1992 INTRODUCTION NEW FUNDING OPTIONS FOR 911 PHONE SYSTEMS In 1985 the General Assembly enacted H.B. 491 which established a process and procedure for the establishment of 911 phone

More information

LEGISLATIVE REVENUE OFFICE H-197 State Capitol Building Salem, Oregon 97310-1347 http://www.leg.state.or.us/comm/lrohome.htm

LEGISLATIVE REVENUE OFFICE H-197 State Capitol Building Salem, Oregon 97310-1347 http://www.leg.state.or.us/comm/lrohome.htm STATE OF OREGON LEGISLATIVE REVENUE OFFICE H-197 State Capitol Building Salem, Oregon 97310-1347 http://www.leg.state.or.us/comm/lrohome.htm Research Report (503) 986-1266 Research Report #6-99 The New

More information

Proposed Constitutional Amendment to be voted on August 30, Florida Department of State Division of Elections

Proposed Constitutional Amendment to be voted on August 30, Florida Department of State Division of Elections Proposed Constitutional Amendment to be voted on August 30, 2016 Florida Department of State Division of Elections Proposed Constitutional Amendment to be voted on August 30, 2016 Proposed constitutional

More information

LEGISLATIVE RESEARCH COMMISSION PDF VERSION

LEGISLATIVE RESEARCH COMMISSION PDF VERSION CHAPTER 38 PDF p. 1 of 5 CHAPTER 38 (HB 120) AN ACT relating to training of property valuation administrators. Be it enacted by the General Assembly of the Commonwealth of Kentucky: Section 1. KRS 132.590

More information

Manufactured Housing Retailer s Special Inventory

Manufactured Housing Retailer s Special Inventory Glenn Hegar Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts Manufactured Housing Retailer s Special Inventory Instructions for Filing Forms and Paying Property Taxes April 2015 By publishing this manual, the Texas

More information

ATTACHMENT D CHARTER SCHOOLS IN MICHIGAN

ATTACHMENT D CHARTER SCHOOLS IN MICHIGAN ATTACHMENT D CHARTER SCHOOLS IN MICHIGAN Introduction In December of 1993, Michigan became the ninth state to pass charter school legislation. The current charter school statute applicable to this RFP

More information

BE IT ENACTED BY THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF THE STATE OF IOWA:

BE IT ENACTED BY THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF THE STATE OF IOWA: House File 2453 AN ACT RELATING TO THE ADMINISTRATION OF THE HISTORIC PRESERVATION AND CULTURAL AND ENTERTAINMENT DISTRICT TAX CREDIT PROGRAM BY THE DEPARTMENT OF CULTURAL AFFAIRS, PROVIDING FOR FEES,

More information

5 - Member Benefits / Health Insurance Continuation

5 - Member Benefits / Health Insurance Continuation Illinois Municipal Retirement Fund Member Benefits / Health Insurance Continuation / SECTION 5 5 - Member Benefits / Health Insurance Continuation BENEFITS... 143 5.00 INTRODUCTION... 143 5.10 SEPARATION

More information

AD VALOREM TAX ADOPTED BUDGET

AD VALOREM TAX ADOPTED BUDGET AD VALOREM TAX ADOPTED BUDGET AGGREGATE TAX RATE AMENDMENT APPROPRIATION ASSESSED VALUE BALANCE FORWARD BALANCE FORWARD - CAPITAL A tax levied on the assessed value of real property (also known as "property

More information

Real Property Levy Guide

Real Property Levy Guide Real Property Levy Guide How to use this Guide 1. Become familiar with conducting a basic (or fundamental) real property levy as described in Category C of this Guide. Category C serves as the standard

More information

Texas Property Tax Law Changes 2011

Texas Property Tax Law Changes 2011 Susan Combs Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts Texas Property Tax Law Changes 2011 Property Tax Assistance September 2011 Property Tax Bills: 82nd Texas Legislature, Regular and First Called Session

More information

67-3-1. Functions and duties. (1) (a) The state auditor is the auditor of public accounts and is independent of any executive or administrative

67-3-1. Functions and duties. (1) (a) The state auditor is the auditor of public accounts and is independent of any executive or administrative 67-3-1. Functions and duties. (1) (a) The state auditor is the auditor of public accounts and is independent of any executive or administrative officers of the state. (b) The state auditor is not limited

More information

Florida Corporate Short Form Income Tax Return. For tax year beginning on or after January 1, (Continued on Page 2)

Florida Corporate Short Form Income Tax Return. For tax year beginning on or after January 1, (Continued on Page 2) FEIN: Taxable Year End: Florida Corporate Short Form Income Tax Return For tax year beginning on or after January 1 F-1120A Rule 12C-1.051 Florida Administrative Code Effective 01/15 Where to Send Payments

More information