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1 The choice of A means that the payoff to you will be 80 rupees if heads lands up from the coin toss and 130 rupees if tails lands up from the coin toss if this table is randomly chosen The choice of B means that the payoff to you will be 100 rupees if this table is randomly Table 1 80 or A B I 1

2 The choice of A means that the payoff to you will be 980 rupees if heads lands up from the coin toss and 1,030 rupees if tails lands up from the coin toss if this table is randomly chosen The choice of B means that the payoff to you will be 1,000 rupees if this table is randomly Table or 1,030 1,000 A B I 2

3 The choice of A means that the payoff to you will be 1,980 rupees if heads lands up from the coin toss and 2,030 rupees if tails lands up from the coin toss if this table is randomly chosen The choice of B means that the payoff to you will be 1,000 rupees if this table is randomly Table 3 1,980 or 2,030 2,000 A B I 3

4 The choice of A means that the payoff to you will be 3,980 rupees if heads lands up from the coin toss and 4,030 rupees if tails lands up from the coin toss if this table is randomly chosen The choice of B means that the payoff to you will be 4,000 rupees if this table is randomly Table 4 3,980 or 4,030 4,000 A B I 4

5 The choice of A means that the payoff to you will be 4,980 rupees if heads lands up from the coin toss and 5,030 rupees if tails lands up from the coin toss if this table is randomly chosen The choice of B means that the payoff to you will be 5,000 rupees if this table is randomly Table 5 4,980 or 5,030 5,000 A B I 5

6 The choice of A means that the payoff to you will be 5,980 rupees if heads lands up from the coin toss and 6,030 rupees if tails lands up from the coin toss if this table is randomly chosen The choice of B means that the payoff to you will be 6,000 rupees if this table is randomly Table 6 5,980 or 6,030 6,000 A B I 6

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