Models in earth science provide opportunities to investigate and obtain evidence on which to base scientific explanations.

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1 Landforms Lesson 2 Fifth-Sixth Grade Models in earth science provide opportunities to investigate and obtain evidence on which to base scientific explanations. Continue establishing working word wall throughout the lesson. I N T E N D E D C U R R I C U L U M BIG IDEA: (display in class during the lesson) Landforms kit Investigations 4.1, 4.2, 5.1, and 5.2 Idaho Science Standard(s) LESSON CONTENT GOALS GUIDING QUESTIONS (Display after prediction) 1) A topographic map is a two ay after prediction) dimensional representation of a three dimensional surface as seen directly from above and can be carried easily. 2) Contour lines, contour intervals and index intervals, on a topographic map represent specific elevations and show the shape of the land at one specific elevation. 3) Aerial photographs of the earth s surface show actual scale sizes of trees, valleys, bodies of water, buildings, roads, etc. are used by cartographers and topographers to make maps. 1) How are topographical maps different from models? 2) How do we know how high or low a surface is when looking at a topographic map? 3) How are aerial photographs different from topographic maps? TESLA Scaffolding Guided Inquiry Landforms Lesson 2, DRAFT08/01/08 1

2 I M P L E M E N T E D C U R R I C U L U M Estimated instructional time: This lesson will take at about 6-7 days to complete. (45-50 minutes of instructional time.) Advanced Preparation 1) Check templates found at the end of this lesson and decide which to make transparencies and which to copy. 2) Make copies for all students of worksheets No LE2-1, and LE2-2 from the back of this lesson. 3) Make 1 copy per group of worksheets LE2-3,LE2-4, LE2-5 4) Make a transparency of worksheet LE2-6 from Landform s Teacher s guide MATERIALS FOR A GROUP OF 4 STUDENTS Optional copies for the group 1 Foam model of Mt. Shasta 1 Topographic checklist 1 Topographic Poster 1 Steps for making profile view 1 Aerial Photograph of Mt. Shasta 1 guiding question template 4 Science Stories book 4 copies of Mountain map worksheet LE2-1 4 copies of Profile sheet LE2-2 1 copy of Topographic symbols worksheet LE2-3 1 copies of Worksheet LE2-4 1 copy of Worksheet LE2-5 4 overlay grid transparencies and 4 map grids Overview of Lesson/Check list: Read engaging scenario and discuss clues provided. Discuss and record the problem to solve according to the engaging scenario. Observe foam model of Mt. Shasta, then describe and record its features. Answer teacher guided questions as a class of the model of Mt. Shasta. Discuss and record a prediction of how to use the model to make a topographic map. Closure for the day: Students do a think-pair-share on what they learned about Mt. Shasta. Introduce the word contour line. Provide materials to make the topographic maps, including the mountain map paper for those tracing each section of the mountain. Students make their topographic maps. Display and share topographic maps made by groups. Compare model with topographic map by making a chart. Closure for the day: students write what they learned about making topographic maps. Introduce profile map instructions Make a profile map of the model. Closure for the day, students discuss and write why contour lines are important in making topographic maps and profile views. Read Topographic Maps page in science stories using anticipatory guide reading strategy. For closure students write their own definitions for index interval, contour lines, contour interval Compare an aerial photograph of Mt. Shasta with the topographic map. Practice reading maps using aerial photo and topographic map of Mt. Shasta. Closure for the day: getting ready for making meaning conference. Using proficiency guide students work in pairs to check data collected up to now Making meaning conference: students are guided in discussing the way the process of making a model, topographic map and a profile view by listening to claims and providing evidence. Claims and Evidence: using guiding questions, students make 3 claims and evidence and record in notebook. Conclusion: revisit prediction statements and write whether the prediction worked or did not work based on the evidence and why. Reflection: With dilemma from worksheet LE2-5 students respond by writing a paragraph. TESLA Scaffolding Guided Inquiry Landforms Lesson 2, DRAFT08/01/08 2

3 DAY ONE ENGAGING SCENARIO TEACHER S NOTE: Read the following paragraph to students. Use APPENDIX 2A to either make copies or a transparency for students to follow along. Analyze the clues in the reading to help students write the problem or focus question in this situation. The scout master from my son s hiking club came to visit and was impressed with your maps. He said his house had flooded and all his maps were lost. Next week he is taking a group of students to a landform called Mount Shasta in the northern region of the state of California. He has a model of the mountain but has no topographic map to give to his students. These types of maps indicate the shape and land elevation of the area. He would like to know if we could help him with his problem. Word Wall: Elevation: any height above sea Word Wall: Topographic map: indicates elevation and shape of the land FOCUS QUESTION (display, discuss by groups, record in notebooks) Teacher s notes: Provide clues to help students derive to a focus question that relates to the problem described: Teacher says: What do we have to make? A map of Mt. Shasta. What type of map do we have to make? A topographic map. What does a topographic map include? Elevation and shape What do we have available to make the map? A model of the mountain. When does the project need to be ready? One week What is the problem we have here? Think about this and talk it over with your group and be ready to share. Allow students time to discuss the problem/focus question. Walk around the groups and listen to their ideas. Solicit groups that have a clear understanding of the problem to share their ideas, and display if possible. If there are groups that are having difficulty writing their focus question have them use one of the examples as they are being shared. Make them record it as CLASS FOCUS QUESTION in their notebooks. Suggested class focus question DO NOT COPY ON THE BOARD How are we going to use the model Mt. Shasta to make a topographic map? Check and provide feedback After students have shared and recorded their focus question in their notebooks, distribute the model of the six foam pieces already connected and marked with the corresponding elevations. Students will make observations and describe the model. Teacher says: Here is the model we have to use to make the map. Describe what you notice about the model by making a list and record it in your notebooks. Be ready to share. TESLA Scaffolding Guided Inquiry Landforms Lesson 2, DRAFT08/01/08 3

4 Teacher s Note: Walk around and listen to students as they describe the model. Guide students to infer what the numbers painted on the side represent (mountain s height by sections called elevation). Have them notice the model s irregular shape. Allow time to record observations. Use the following questions to help students focus on the model. At the end of this lesson you will find APPENDIX B with the questions below. Make a transparency for students to follow. Teacher says: Add the following observations to the list in your notebook if you do not have them. How many sections does the model have? 6 What is the amount or number recorded on the base or bottom section of the model? 11,000 feet What shape does Mt. Shasta have? Regular or irregular Take a finger walk up the model of Mount Shasta how many sections do you need to climb up to get to 12,000 feet? Three How many feet are indicated on the peak or highest section of the model of Mt. Shasta? 13,500. If you were to be going down from the mountain s peak how many feet total would you travel all the way to the base of the mountain? 2,500 feet Do a finger walk all around the second section of the model, compare the height of the mountain on the North side, the South and West sides? The are all the same Do a finger walk up the mountain from where the notch is and compare it to a finger walk hike on the opposite side. Which side is steeper, or hardest to climb? It is steeper where the notch is. What is the difference in feet between each mountain section? 500 feet Teacher s Note: Students will discuss a prediction of how a topographical map can be made with this model. Have each group agree on one prediction statement they will investigate. Teacher says: Now that you have observed and studied the model carefully, predict how you can make a topographic map with this model. Remember these maps have to show elevation and shape as viewed from the top (bird s eye view). I want you to come up with a prediction statement of how you can use this model to make a topographic map. Discuss and decide the prediction statement with your group. Record it in your notebooks and be ready to share. Allow time for students to discuss and record their prediction. Review how they can start the prediction statement by providing them with a sentence starter. Remind them to include a because after the statement. Walk around and listen to their ideas. Guide their thinking into using either the overlay grid transparency or tracing the sections one by one on a sheet of paper. When all groups are ready have them share their ideas with the class. Suggested prediction statement starter I think that if we then because Check and provide feedback TESLA Scaffolding Guided Inquiry Landforms Lesson 2, DRAFT08/01/08 4

5 Prediction Example: DO NOT COPY THIS ON THE BOARD I think that if we place the overlay grid transparency over the top of the model then we can trace the mountain sections with their elevations and then passed them over to the map grid, because this is the way we did our school yard map, as we draw the sections this will show the shape of the mountain. Check and provide feedback CLOSURE FOR THE DAY: Have students do a 2 minutes think-pair-share of what they learn today about the model of Mount Shasta. TESLA Scaffolding Guided Inquiry Landforms Lesson 2, DRAFT08/01/08 5

6 DAY TWO: DATA CHART (record in notebooks) Teacher s Note: Review the characteristics of a topographic map: shape and elevation. Provide groups with the necessary materials: overlay grid transparency, grid map, and mountain map paper to make their maps. Clarify what a contour line represents on a topographical map. Teacher says: Each one is going to make a map the way you predicted. I have the materials you need to do this and the materials manager (GETTER) will have to collect them. The scout master wants a title on the map, what do you think we should title it? TOPOGRAPHIC MAP OF MT. SHASTA. The scout master said that a topographic map has to indicate the elevation for each section on both sides of the mountain. Each line you trace on paper is called a contour line and it represents the same elevation anywhere along that line. Label one of the lines so you can remember this word. He would like to have the elevation marked from where the notches are located all the way to the other side. He wants you to place the difference between each contour line at the bottom of the map and label it contour interval. (500ft.). Explain the meaning of the word interval using math connections. I made a check list of what you should have on your map. Use Appendix 2C at the end of the lesson to either post or make a copy for each group. TOPOGRAPHIC MAP CHECK LIST 1) has a title at the top of the page, Topographic Map of Mt. Shasta 2) has one of the lines labeled contour line 3) write the difference between the contour lines (500 ft) at the bottom of the map and label it contour interval 4) has the elevations for each section marked from the notches side all the way to the other side. 5) shows the shape of each section 6) group names at the bottom left corner Word Wall: Interval: distance between two sections Show the shape of each section as you draw them. If your prediction statement said you were going to trace the sections one by one I have here a paper you can do it on. (show mountain map worksheet). When your group has all the materials needed to make the topographic map and there are no more questions you may begin. Word Wall: Contour line: line on a topographic map that connects points of equal elevation. Word Wall: Contour interval: the total elevation distance in feet or meters between two contour lines. Teacher s Note: Allow enough time for students to finish. Walk around and make sure they label their maps. Have the groups present their topographic maps. Select groups to explain the features they TESLA Scaffolding Guided Inquiry Landforms Lesson 2, DRAFT08/01/08 6

7 have included. Have them make a chart comparing the similarities and differences between the model and the topographic map. Teacher says: Look at your topographic map and your model. Choose a person from your group to explain the way you made the map. Allow each group to explain briefly what they did. Teacher says: Discuss and compare the characteristics of the model and the map. Make two columns on your notebook page and record the characteristics. Title your notebook page COMPARISON CHART. On one side put the characteristics for the model and on the other for the map you made. Be ready to share with the class. Use appendix 2D to record what ever students share with the class. You have two ways to use charts to make the comparison, either one works the same. EXAMPLE COMPARISON CHART Model Topographic Map shows the height, length and width (3 shows the area ( length and width) 2 dimensions dimensions) elevation is represented with each section. contour lines to indicate elevations see and touch the shape of the mountain see the shape of the mountain has the contour interval at the bottom has a title name has a name of who made it has a date when it was made CLOSURE FOR THE DAY: have students write in their notebook a sentence stating what they learned today about making topographic maps. TESLA Scaffolding Guided Inquiry Landforms Lesson 2, DRAFT08/01/08 7

8 DAY THREE Word Wall: Profile: side view of objects Teacher s Note: Students are guided into making a profile of Mt. Shasta. Use a transparency of LE2-6 to explain how they will match the elevations from one paper to the elevations on the other. Guide students as they place their points on the chart. Walk around as you read the instructions making sure students have followed the directions. Teacher says: Yesterday the scout master before he left looked at the maps and appreciated your hard work. He now thinks you are ready to make a profile or side view of the mountain. A profile of a mountain is similar to the pictures we take when we pass by a mountain. He said we could make the profile view using our topographic maps and has provided instructions to do this. He wants me to send him the maps as soon as we get them done. Perform the instructions as I read each one step by step. (Use Appendix 2E at the end of this lesson to copy or make a transparency and see the picture 2E-1 for clarification.) STEP ONE: Fold your topographic map in half from where the notches are located. STEP TWO: Use the profile sheet to line up the folded side of the topographical map with the last horizontal line in the profile sheet. STEP THREE: Label the elevation on the vertical line of the profile sheet, starting with 11,000 feet the next with 11,500 and so on, all the way up to 13,500 feet. STEP FOUR: Intersect (meet, join) the elevations of the contour lines on the topographical map to the amounts on the vertical line of the profile sheet. Mark them with a dot. STEP FIVE: Connect the intersecting points in the profile sheet. STEP SIX: write a title on the top of the page Teacher s Note: Compare the topographic maps with the profile maps and the model. Students will need to add another column or circle to their comparison chart. Use appendix 2F. Teacher says: Look at your profile view of Mt. Shasta and compare it to the topographic map and the model. Use the previous chart by adding another column for Profile view. Discuss with your group the characteristics for this one and record them. Be ready to share with the class. TESLA Scaffolding Guided Inquiry Landforms Lesson 2, DRAFT08/01/08 8

9 EXAMPLE COMPARISON CHART Model Topographic Map Profile View shows the height, length and width (3 dimensions) elevation is represented with each section. see and touch the shape of the mountain shows the area ( length and width) 2 dimensions contour lines elevations shows contour interval at the bottom see the shape of the mountain has a title name has a names of who made it has the date of when it was made shows area( two dimensions) shows elevations see the slopes or hills of the mountain. has a title has names of who made it has the date of when it was made CLOSURE FOR THE DAY: Students explain in their notebooks why contour lines are important when making topographic maps and profiles. TESLA Scaffolding Guided Inquiry Landforms Lesson 2, DRAFT08/01/08 9

10 DAY FOUR Teacher s Note: Students read and discuss Topographic Maps page 33 from Science Stories, using the anticipatory guide strategy. Have students make before and after columns in their notebook to respond to the anticipatory guide before you begin reading. Follow instructions provided for the anticipatory guide strategy. Teacher says: I will read questions about the reading and I want you to respond in your notebook if you think the answer is true or false. Title the notebook page with TOPOGRAPHIC MAP READING. Make two columns below this title and subtitle them Before reading notebook and After reading. ANTICIPATORY GUIDE Respond true or false 1. A topographic map shows changes in elevation. 2. All contour lines on a topographic map represent the same elevation. 3. The US Geological Survey measures elevations in meters. 4. A surveyor is a person that measures elevations to make a map. 5. A hill on a topographic map is represented by rings of contour lines. 6. Walking across contour lines on a map means you are going either uphill or downhill. 7. Contour lines when they are close together indicate a gradual slope. 8. Index contours are thinner than other contour lines. 9. The contour interval is the change in elevations between any two contour lines. 10. Natural landforms and structures made by people are represented with symbols and colors in a topographic map. Teacher s Note: ANTICIPATORY GUIDE STRATEGY INSTRUCTIONS Use Appendix G and make a transparency to record student responses. Once all questions have been answered tally the results by having students report their T or F answers to each question. Record and display the total amounts for each question. Display the tallied responses on a column chart sub-titled Before Reading. After recording their responses read the passage as a class and discuss with the class as your read. After reading the passage, direct students to the questions again to respond a second time. Have them make a second column on their chart and label it After Reading. Read the questions once again and allow time for students to discuss their response. If the class total result is not either of 100% true or 100% false, then students have to provide evidence for their response. CLOSURE FOR THE DAY: Students write in their notebook their own definitions for: index intervals, contour lines, contour interval TESLA Scaffolding Guided Inquiry Landforms Lesson 2, DRAFT08/01/08 10

11 DAY FIVE Teacher s Note: Compare actual topographic maps with student made maps to review characteristics of topographic maps. Practice reading a topographic map. Looking at an aerial photograph Teacher says: The scoutmaster now has copies of both your topographic map and profile view of Mt. Shasta. He wants us to look at an actual topographic map of Mt. Shasta and see if we could use it to locate the hiking path he will be taking. He thinks we should study the map first to become familiar with the area in detail. I have one topographic map for each group as well as a worksheet with symbols used in topographic maps. Study and discuss with your group what you observe in the map. Keep a record in your notebook of the list of the things you observe or find. Title your list Characteristics of Topographic Maps. When you are done, place a check mark on those things that you already have in your topographic map. Sample List Characteristics of Topographic Maps contour lines index intervals contour interval ( at the bottom) colors- blue for lakes and creeks, brown for contour lines, green for forests, orange red for lava a scale at the bottom who made the map when the map was made names of glaciers, lakes, creeks, ridges, gulches, falls, canyons, hills, springs, latitude and longitude lines natural boundary landmark different kinds of roads and symbols for the roads north direction mark ( or cardinal point) Teacher s Note: Allow time for students to study the map. Walk around and listen to what they are finding and make sure they are recording this information in their notebook. When students finish recording, provide students with the scoutmaster s hiking path to practice reading topographic maps. TESLA Scaffolding Guided Inquiry Landforms Lesson 2, DRAFT08/01/08 11

12 Teacher says: What is the value of the contour interval on this map? 40 feet How many contour lines are in between each of the thicker lines? 5 How many feet would we have climbed between each of the thicker lines? 200 ft. The scoutmaster said they would start their hike to the south of Brewer Creek and continue their journey up between two glaciers. Find the names of these two glaciers. Winturn Glacier and Hotlum Glacier. Name the lakes locate to the west of Mt. Shasta. Sisson Lake and Clarence King Lake. Go to the southeast section of the map and tell me which creek has more springs. Mud springs The scout master said we could place the model of Mt. Shasta on the map to get a better idea of where they were going. Match the center of the model with the center of Mt. Shasta. Locate the 11,000 ft. contour index line to match them with the edges of the base of the model. Orient or position the notches on the foam to the east side. What boundary does the model fit into? The natural landmark boundary. Teacher s Note: Distribute photograph of Mt. Shasta for students to compare. Students practice observing and locating objects with the photo and the topographic map of Mt. Shasta. Teacher says: Look at the photograph of Mount Shasta. How do you think this photo was taken? An airplane, a helicopter, a satellite. What things can be seen more clearly in the aerial photograph than in the topographic map? Ridges, creeks, valleys. How could aerial pictures be of use by cartographers (people that make maps)? To make precise measurements of landforms found in an area. Distribute one copy of worksheet LE2-4 Mt. Shasta questions, to the group. Teacher says: Discuss the answers to the questions about Mt. Shasta with your group using the aerial picture and the topographic map. Record the answers in your notebook. Title the notebook page Mt. Shasta Questions and be ready to share your answers with the rest of the class. Allow students time to discuss and record their answers. Have students share their responses in class. CLOSURE FOR THE DAY: students do a self check of all the data they have collected up to now and get ready for the making meaning conference. Provide the Proficiency Feedback guide at the end of the unit for students to check what they have. It is recommendable that they check another student notebook and not their own. TESLA Scaffolding Guided Inquiry Landforms Lesson 2, DRAFT08/01/08 12

13 DAY SIX: MAKING MEANING CONFERENCE (teacher directed). 1) Sharing findings and observations. Remember this is the conferencing stage where students share what they learned about topographic maps. Students will have to explain the way they did the map and discuss the importance of contour lines. 2) Looking for patterns from the class data chart. First guide students into thinking about what they did in this investigation with the following questions: Teacher says: What does the topographic map tell us about the height of Mt. Shasta? What claim can we make about the lines on a topographic map? What claim can we make when contour lines are close together in a map? Second, provide students with examples of claims and have them respond to each of them with evidence from their observations. Write the claim on the board for them only to read along. Have them discuss the evidence with their group and then share with the class. EXAMPLES: CLAIMS I claim that I know that.. EVIDENCE I claim this because. I know this because. 1) By looking at a topographic map we can 1) when we made the map, we marked determine the elevation in an area. the sections with a line along with its elevation. 2) one contour line on a topographic map 2) when we finger walked around the has the same elevation anywhere where section the elevation all around was the you follow it in the map. same. 3) Topographic maps use symbols to 3) on the topographic map of Mt. Shasta represent natural landform features and the springs were indicated with man made features. a blue circle with a tail and different kinds of roads with lines. Teacher may invite students to make claims and have other students provide the evidence. Teacher decides to continue the process of making as many claims and evidence needed to confirm understanding of the science content. TESLA Scaffolding Guided Inquiry Landforms Lesson 2, DRAFT08/01/08 13

14 CLAIMS AND EVIDENCE (record in notebook) Teacher says After practicing how to make claims and evidence, you are now ready to make some claims individually. Here are 3 questions I would like you to change into claim statements. Then you will justify the claim with evidence we observed, discussed or designed during this investigation. You will record them in your notebook under the subtitle CLAIMS AND EVIDENCE. Use Appendix 2G to make a transparency to display for students. Guiding questions 1) How are topographical maps different from models? 2) How do we know how high or low a surface is when looking at a topographic map? 3) How is an aerial photograph different from a topographic map? Example sentence structures: I claim that I claim because. I know that. I know this because. Check and provide feedback CONCLUSION (record in notebooks) Have students revisit the prediction. For their conclusion they have to write a sentence stating whether the evidence from their map making supported the prediction or not. They are to provide clear explanations regarding how their evidence supported or did not support their prediction. Have the students write a concluding sentence Today I learned.. Check and provide feedback. REFLECTION (record in notebooks) Provide each group of students with worksheet LE2-5. They will read the dilemma (only) as a group. Using what they learned about topographic maps and aerial photographs, students make a selection and individually write a paragraph explaining the reasons for their selection. Check and provide feedback TESLA Scaffolding Guided Inquiry Landforms Lesson 2, DRAFT08/01/08 14

15 A C H I E V E D C U R R I C U L U M PROFICENCY FEEDBACK: This guide is: To be posted on the board/butcher paper for students to know what is expected in their notebook to be an evaluation tool for teachers as students work in their notebooks. to be converted into questions as a student self assessment piece PROFICIENCY FEEDBACK GUIDE S T Notebook component Focus Question: One question written clearly.. Related to the scenario. Prediction One sentence. Relevant to solving the problem Uses because Data Description list of foam model Topographic map of Mount Shasta Profile map of Mount Shasta Comparison chart Anticipation guide T and F answers Closure for days 2, 3, 4 Characteristics of Topographic maps Mt. Shasta Questions Claims & Evidence 3 complete statements showing understanding of guided questions. Conclusion Accurately shows if prediction was supported or not and explains why. Reflection: A paragraph Has at least 10 sentences Is clear and grammatically correct. Describes what both maps provide. Specifies the reasons why one is better than the other. TESLA Scaffolding Guided Inquiry Landforms Lesson 2, DRAFT08/01/08 15

16 APPENDIX 2A ENGAGING SCENARIO The scout master from my son s hiking club visited me and was impressed with your maps. He said his house had flooded and all his maps were lost. Next week he is taking a group of students to a landform called Mount Shasta in the state of California. He has a model of the mountain but has no topographic map to give to his students. These types of maps indicate the shape and land elevation of the area. He would like to know if we could help him solve his problem. TESLA Scaffolding Guided Inquiry Landforms Lesson 2, DRAFT08/01/08 16

17 APPENDIX 2B QUESTION TEMPLATE 1) How many sections does the model have? 2) What is the amount or number recorded on the base or bottom section of the model? 3) What shape does Mt. Shasta have? 4) Take a finger walk up the model of Mount Shasta how many sections do you need to climb up to get to 12,000 feet? 5) How many feet are indicated on the peak or highest section of the model of Mt. Shasta? 6) If you traveled down from the mountain s peak all the way to the base of the mountain, what would be the total amount of feet you would have traveled? 7) Do a finger walk all around the second section of the model, compare the height of the mountain on the North side, the South and West sides? 8) Do a finger walk up the mountain from where the notch is and compare it to a finger walk hike on the opposite side. Which side is steeper, or hardest to climb? 9) What is the difference in feet between each section of the mountain? TESLA Scaffolding Guided Inquiry Landforms Lesson 2, DRAFT08/01/08 17

18 APPENDIX 2C CHECK LIST TOPOGRAPHIC MAP CHECK LIST 1) has a title at the top of the page Topographic Map of Mt. Shasta. 2) has one of the lines labeled contour line. 3) write the difference between the contour lines (500 ft) at the bottom of the map and label it contour interval. 4) has the elevations for each section marked from the notches side all the way to the other side. 5) shows the shape of each section. 6) group names at the bottom left corner and the date. APPENDIX 2D TESLA Scaffolding Guided Inquiry Landforms Lesson 2, DRAFT08/01/08 18

19 ALTERNATIVE CHART FOR COMPARING TOPOGRAPHIC MAP MODEL TESLA Scaffolding Guided Inquiry Landforms Lesson 2, DRAFT08/01/08 19

20 Model Topographic Map TESLA Scaffolding Guided Inquiry Landforms Lesson 2, DRAFT08/01/08 20

21 APPENDIX 2E Instructions template to build the profile of Mt. Shasta STEP ONE: Fold your topographic map in half from where the notches are located. STEP TWO: Use the profile sheet to line up the folded side of the topographical map with the last horizontal line in the profile sheet. STEP THREE: Label the elevation on the vertical line of the profile sheet, starting with 11,000 feet the next with 11,500 and so on, all the way up to 13,500 feet. STEP FOUR: Intersect (meet, join) the elevations of the contour lines on the topographical map to the amounts on the vertical line of the profile sheet. Mark them with a dot. STEP FIVE: Connect the intersecting points in the profile sheet. STEP SIX: Write a title on the top of the page TESLA Scaffolding Guided Inquiry Landforms Lesson 2, DRAFT08/01/08 21

22 APPENDIX 2E1 TESLA Scaffolding Guided Inquiry Landforms Lesson 2, DRAFT08/01/08 22

23 APPENDIX 2F COMPARISON CHART FOR TEACHER TO FILL WHEN STUDENTS SHARE Transfer information from template appendix 2D. Model Topographic Map Profile View TESLA Scaffolding Guided Inquiry Landforms Lesson 2, DRAFT08/01/08 23

24 APPENDIX 2G ANTICIPATORY GUIDE TEACHER S TEMPLATE TO DISPLAY CLASS RESULTS Topographic Map Reading Before Reading 1 1 After Reading TESLA Scaffolding Guided Inquiry Landforms Lesson 2, DRAFT08/01/08 24

25 APPENDIX 2H Guiding Questions 1. How are topographical maps different from models? 2. How do we know how high or low a surface is when looking at a topographic map? 3. How are aerial photographs different from topographic maps? TESLA Scaffolding Guided Inquiry Landforms Lesson 2, DRAFT08/01/08 25

26 LE2-1 TESLA Scaffolding Guided Inquiry Landforms Lesson 2, DRAFT08/01/08 26

27 TESLA Scaffolding Guided Inquiry Landforms Lesson 2, DRAFT08/01/08 27

28 LE2-2 TESLA Scaffolding Guided Inquiry Landforms Lesson 2, DRAFT08/01/08 28

29 LE2-3 TESLA Scaffolding Guided Inquiry Landforms Lesson 2, DRAFT08/01/08 29

30 LE2-4 TESLA Scaffolding Guided Inquiry Landforms Lesson 2, DRAFT08/01/08 30

31 LE2-5 TESLA Scaffolding Guided Inquiry Landforms Lesson 2, DRAFT08/01/08 31

32 LE2-6 TESLA Scaffolding Guided Inquiry Landforms Lesson 2, DRAFT08/01/08 32

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