Review of Basic Concepts, Molarity, Solutions, Dilutions and Beer s Law

Save this PDF as:
 WORD  PNG  TXT  JPG

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "Review of Basic Concepts, Molarity, Solutions, Dilutions and Beer s Law"

Transcription

1 Review of Basic Concepts, Molarity, Solutions, Dilutions and Beer s Law

2 Aqueous Solutions In Chemistry, many reactions take place in water. This is also true for Biological processes. Reactions that take place in water are said to occur in an aqueous solution. Three common types of reactions take place in aqueous solutions: Precipitation, Acid-Base and Redox.

3 Properties of Aqueous Solutions Solution- a homogeneous mixture of two or more substances. Solute- a substance in a solution that is present in the smallest amount. Solvent- a substance in a solution that is present in the largest amount. In an aqueous solution, the solute is a liquid or solid and the solvent is always water.

4 Properties of Aqueous Solutions All solutes that dissolve in water fit into one of two categories: electrolyte or non-electrolyte. Electrolyte - a substance that when dissolved in water conducts electricity, i.e. partially or completely dissociate in solution Non-electrolyte- a substance that when dissolved in water does not conduct electricity. To have an electrolyte, ions must be present in water.

5 Electrolytic Properties of Aqueous Solutions NaCl in water. What happens? NaCl(s) Na + (aq) + Cl (aq) Completely dissociates Strong electrolyte

6 Strong vs. Weak Electrolytes How do you know when an electrolyte is strong or weak? Take a look at how HCl dissociates in water. HCl(s) H + (aq) + Cl (aq)

7 Electrolytic Properties of Aqueous Solutions

8 Electrolytic Properties of Aqueous Solutions

9 Hydrated Ions

10 Electrolytic Properties of Aqueous Solutions What about weak electrolytes? What makes them weak? Ionization of acetic acid CH 3 COOH(aq) CH 3 COO (aq) + H + (aq)

11 Electrolytic Solutions

12 Precipitation Reactions Precipitation Reaction- a reaction that results in the formation of an insoluble product. These reactions usually involve ionic compounds. Formation of PbI 2 : Pb(NO 3 ) 2 (aq) + 2KI(aq) PbI 2 (s) + 2KNO 3 (aq)

13 Precipitate

14 Precipitate

15 Precipitation Reactions How do you know whether or not a precipitate will form when a compound is added to a solution? By knowing the solubility of the solute! Solubility - The maximum amount of solute that will dissolve in a given quantity of solvent at a specific temperature. Three levels of solubility: Soluble, slightly soluble or insoluble.

16 Precipitation Reactions

17 Determining Solubility Determine the level of solubility for the following: (1) Ag 2 SO 4 (2) CaCO 3 (3) Na 3 PO 4

18 Acid-Base Reactions Acids- generally have a sour taste, change litmus from blue to red, can react with certain metals to produce gas, conduct electricity. Bases- generally have a bitter taste, change litmus from red to blue, feel slippery, conduct electricity. BrØnstead Acid- proton donor BrØnstead Base- proton acceptor

19 Acid-Base Reactions Acid or Base? HCl(aq) + H 2 O(l) H 3 O + (aq) + Cl (aq) NH 3 (aq) + H 2 O(l) NH 4 + (aq) + OH (aq)

20 Acid-Base Reactions Look at the following compounds and decide whether they are a BrØnstead Acid or a BrØnstead Base. HBr NO 2 HCO 3

21 Acid-Base Reactions

22 Oxidation-Reduction Reactions Can also be called Redox reactions. Considered electron-transfer reactions. Occur in steps called half-reactions. Half-Reactions- Two parts to a redox reaction that explicitly show the electrons involved and where they are transferred.

23 Oxidation Reduction Reactions Oxidation Reaction- refers to the half-reaction that involves the loss of electrons. Reduction Reaction- refers to the half-reaction that involves the gain of electrons. OILRIG Oxidation is loss electrons and Reduction is gain electrons Oxidizing agent- the compound or ion in a redox reaction that donates electrons. Reducing agent- the compound or ion in a redox reaction that accepts electrons.

24 Oxidation-Reduction Reactions

25 Concentration of Solutions Concentration of a Solution- amount of solute present in a given quantity of solvent or solution. We will use Molarity, M, for measurement. Molarity can also be called Molar Concentration. Molarity the number of moles of solute per liter of solution. Molarity- moles of solutes/ liters of solution Or n/v (L) Moles- grams of sample/ molecular weight of sample Or g/ Mw

26 Concentration of Solutions How many moles are there in 24.0g of C? moles = g/mw moles = 24.0g/ 12.0 g/mol moles = 2.0 There are 2.0 moles of C in 24.0g of C.

27 Concentration of Solutions How many grams are in 2.0 moles of Boron? moles= g/mw 2.0 moles = grams/ 10.81g /mol 2.0 moles x 10.81g Boron = grams Grams = There are g of Boron in 2.0 moles of Boron.

28 Concentration of Solutions What is the Molarity of a 1L solution containing 9.0g HCl? 9.00g / g/mol = 0.25 mol HCl M = n/v M = 0.25 mol HCl/ 1L M = 0.25 The concentration of the solution is 0.25M.

29 Preparation of Solutions Now that you know how to calculate M, n and v, what does that mean? You can make your own solutions! What are the steps in making a proper solution?

30 Preparation of Solutions

31 Concentration of Solutions How many grams of Potassium Dichromate, K 2 Cr 2 O 7, are required to prepare a 250 ml solution with a concentration of 2.16 M? 250 ml x 1 L/ 1000 ml = L M= n/v n= M x v n= 2.16 M x.250 L n= 0.54 mol moles = g/mw Grams = moles x MW Grams = 0.54 mol K 2 Cr 2 O 7 x g K 2 Cr 2 O 7 Grams = grams of K 2 Cr 2 O 7 are needed to prepare the requested solution.

32 Concentration of Solutions In a biochemical assay, a chemist needs to add 0.381g of glucose to a reaction mixture. Calculate the volume in millimeters of a 2.53M glucose solution that she should use for this addition. moles = g/mw moles = 0.381g C 6 H 12 O 6 / 180.2g C 6 H 12 O 6 moles = x 10 2 mol C 6 H 12 O 6 M = n/v v = n/m v = x 10 2 mol C 6 H 12 O 6 / 2.53M C 6 H 12 O 6 v = 8.36mL She should use 8.36mL of the 2.53M glucose solution.

33 Preparation of Solutions Explain the process of creating 1L of 3.0M KCl. M = n/v n = M x v n = 3.0M x 1L n = 4.0 mol of KCl needed moles= g/mw Grams = moles x MW Grams = 4.0 mol KCl x 36.0g KCl Grams = 144g KCl Weigh out 144g of KCl. Put in a 1L flask. Add enough dh 2 0 to dissolve KCl. Fill flask to 1L meniscus.

34 Dilution of Solutions Dilution- the procedure for preparing a less concentrated solution from a more concentrated one. Dilutions can be made in increments of 10, 20, 50 or any other value. Serial Dilution- the process of diluting a solution by removing part of it, placing this in a new flask and adding water to a known volume in the new flask.

35 Dilution of Solutions When you want to dilute a solution, what happens to the number of moles present in the solution? Do they increase? Decrease? Stay the same?

36 Dilution of Solutions

37 Dilution of Solutions

38 Dilution of solutions Since moles are constant before and after dilution, we can use the following formula for calculations. M i V i = M f V f

39 Dilution of Solutions Describe how you would prepare 800mL of a 2.0M H 2 SO 4 solution, starting with a 6.0M stock solution of. 800mL x 1L/ 1000mL = 0.800L M i V i = M f V f 6.0M x Vi = 2.0M x 0.800L 6.0M x Vi = 1.6M x L Vi = 1.6M x L/ 6.0M Vi = 0.26L 0.26L of the 6.0M H 2 SO 4 solution should be diluted to give a final volume of 800mL.

40 Concentration of Solutions There are several ways to determine the concentration of a solution. In this week s lab, we will be using spectroscopy to help us identify the molar concentration of an unknown substance. Spectroscopy is helpful because it gives us: Amount of light transmitted through a solution Amount of light absorbed by a solution Beer s Law- a relationship between proportionality constant, path length of radiation going through solution and concentration of the solution. A = abc A = -log(t)

41 Beer s Law If we know the value of T, we can solve the previous equation and figure out what A is. Absorbance vs. wavelength Absorbance vs. concentration Use excel and be sure to add in your equation for the line. Calculation of A or C: A = mc

42 Beer s Law

43 Class Problems 1 1. Calculate the molarity of a solution prepared by dissolving 11.5 g of solid NaOH in enough water to make 1.50 L of solution. Ans: M 2. Calculate the molarity of a solution prepared by dissolving 1.56 g of gaseous HCl in water to make 26.8 ml of solution. Ans: 1.60 M HCl 3. Give the concentration of each type of ion in the following solutions: (a) 0.50 M Co(NO 3 ) 2 (b) 1 M Fe(ClO 4 ) 3 4. Calculate the number of moles of Cl - ions in 1.75 L of 1.0 x 10-3 M ZnCl 2. Ans: 3.5 x 10-3 mol Cl - 5. Typical blood serum is about 0.14 M NaCl. What volume of lood contains 1.0 mg NaCl? Ans: 0.12 ml 6. To analyse the alcohol content of a certain wine, a chemist needs 1.00 L of an aqueous M K 2 Cr 2 O 7 (potassium dichromate) solution. How much solid K 2 Cr 2 O 7 must be weighed out to make this solution? Ans: 58.8 g 7. What volume of 16 M sulphuric acid must be used to prepare 1.5 L of a 0.10 M H 2 SO 4 solution? Ans: 9.4 ml 8. Concentrated sulphuric acid is 97% w/w and 1.84 g/ml density and hydrochloric acid is 37% w/w and 1.18 g/ml. Calculate their concentration in molarity. Ans: 18.2M, 12.0M 9. Describe how you prepare 2.00 L of each of the following solutions: (a) M NaOH from solid NaOH (b) M NaOH from 1.00 M NaOH stock solution. (c) 0.50 M H 2 SO 4 from concentrated (18 M ) sulphuric acid (d) 0.5 M NiCl 2 from the salt NiCl 2 6H 2 O (e) 0.5 M HNO 3 from concentrated (16 M ) reagent

44 Class Problems 2 1. How many atoms are in 75.0 g of nitrogen gas? 2. How many grams of Mg contain the same number of atoms as 20.0 of Ca? 3. How many ml of water should be added to 25.0 ml of a stock 12.0 M HCl solution to make 1.50 M HCl? Assume that the volumes are additive. 4. How many ml of M NaOH solution contain 2.00 g NaOH (Mw = 40.0 g/mol)? 5. What weight of KClO 3 (s) (Mw = ) contains 5.0 g of oxygen atoms? 6. If ml of 0.10 M H 2 SO 4 is neutralised by ml of NaOH solution, determine the molarity of NaOH. 7. A bottle contains x carbon atoms that weigh 3.00 g. Determine the mass containing an equal number of nickel atoms in another bottle. 8. How many grams of Cd 3 P 2 can be made from 375 g of Cd and 61.7 g of P? 9. To what volume of water should 25.0 g BaCl 2 to give a solution that is 0.3 M in chloride ion? 10. What is the total number of atoms present in 25.0 mg C 10 H 16 O? 11. What is the number of oxygen atoms in a 20 g Al 2 (SO 4 ) 3 sample?

stoichiometry = the numerical relationships between chemical amounts in a reaction.

stoichiometry = the numerical relationships between chemical amounts in a reaction. 1 REACTIONS AND YIELD ANSWERS stoichiometry = the numerical relationships between chemical amounts in a reaction. 2C 8 H 18 (l) + 25O 2 16CO 2 (g) + 18H 2 O(g) From the equation, 16 moles of CO 2 (a greenhouse

More information

Solution a homogeneous mixture = A solvent + solute(s) Aqueous solution water is the solvent

Solution a homogeneous mixture = A solvent + solute(s) Aqueous solution water is the solvent Solution a homogeneous mixture = A solvent + solute(s) Aqueous solution water is the solvent Water a polar solvent: dissolves most ionic compounds as well as many molecular compounds Aqueous solution:

More information

Chapter 4 Notes - Types of Chemical Reactions and Solution Chemistry

Chapter 4 Notes - Types of Chemical Reactions and Solution Chemistry AP Chemistry A. Allan Chapter 4 Notes - Types of Chemical Reactions and Solution Chemistry 4.1 Water, the Common Solvent A. Structure of water 1. Oxygen's electronegativity is high (3.5) and hydrogen's

More information

Chapter 3 Molecules, Moles, and Chemical Equations. Chapter Objectives. Warning!! Chapter Objectives. Chapter Objectives

Chapter 3 Molecules, Moles, and Chemical Equations. Chapter Objectives. Warning!! Chapter Objectives. Chapter Objectives Larry Brown Tom Holme www.cengage.com/chemistry/brown Chapter 3 Molecules, Moles, and Chemical Equations Jacqueline Bennett SUNY Oneonta 2 Warning!! These slides contains visual aids for learning BUT they

More information

Chemistry 51 Chapter 8 TYPES OF SOLUTIONS. A solution is a homogeneous mixture of two substances: a solute and a solvent.

Chemistry 51 Chapter 8 TYPES OF SOLUTIONS. A solution is a homogeneous mixture of two substances: a solute and a solvent. TYPES OF SOLUTIONS A solution is a homogeneous mixture of two substances: a solute and a solvent. Solute: substance being dissolved; present in lesser amount. Solvent: substance doing the dissolving; present

More information

Chemical Equations. Chemical Equations. Chemical reactions describe processes involving chemical change

Chemical Equations. Chemical Equations. Chemical reactions describe processes involving chemical change Chemical Reactions Chemical Equations Chemical reactions describe processes involving chemical change The chemical change involves rearranging matter Converting one or more pure substances into new pure

More information

CHAPTER 9. ANS: a. ANS: d. ANS: c. ANS: a. ANS: c

CHAPTER 9. ANS: a. ANS: d. ANS: c. ANS: a. ANS: c CHAPTER 9 1. Which one of the following is the acid in vinegar? a. acetic acid b. citric acid c. muriatic acid d. ascorbic acid 2. Which is a basic or alkaline substance? a. gastric fluid b. black coffee

More information

Chemistry. Zumdahl, 7th edition

Chemistry. Zumdahl, 7th edition Chemistry Zumdahl, 7th edition CH4 Types of Chemical Reactions and Solution Stoichiometry Yellow lead(ii) iodide is produced when lead(ii) nitrate is mixed with potassium iodide. P.126 Contents 4.1 Water,

More information

Aqueous Solutions. Water is the dissolving medium, or solvent. Some Properties of Water. A Solute. Types of Chemical Reactions.

Aqueous Solutions. Water is the dissolving medium, or solvent. Some Properties of Water. A Solute. Types of Chemical Reactions. Aqueous Solutions and Solution Stoichiometry Water is the dissolving medium, or solvent. Some Properties of Water Water is bent or V-shaped. The O-H bonds are covalent. Water is a polar molecule. Hydration

More information

SAMPLE PROBLEM 8.1. Solutions of Electrolytes and Nonelectrolytes SOLUTION STUDY CHECK

SAMPLE PROBLEM 8.1. Solutions of Electrolytes and Nonelectrolytes SOLUTION STUDY CHECK Solutions of Electrolytes and Nonelectrolytes SAMPLE PROBLEM 8.1 Indicate whether solutions of each of the following contain only ions, only molecules, or mostly molecules and a few ions: a. Na 2 SO 4,

More information

CHAPTER 4. AQUEOUS REACTION CHEMISTRY

CHAPTER 4. AQUEOUS REACTION CHEMISTRY CAPTER. AQUEOUS REACTION CEMISTRY solution - homogeneous mixture of or more substances; uniform distribution of particles and same properties throughout. A solution is composed of a solute dissolved in

More information

Chapter 17. How are acids different from bases? Acid Physical properties. Base. Explaining the difference in properties of acids and bases

Chapter 17. How are acids different from bases? Acid Physical properties. Base. Explaining the difference in properties of acids and bases Chapter 17 Acids and Bases How are acids different from bases? Acid Physical properties Base Physical properties Tastes sour Tastes bitter Feels slippery or slimy Chemical properties Chemical properties

More information

Chemical Reactions in Water Ron Robertson

Chemical Reactions in Water Ron Robertson Chemical Reactions in Water Ron Robertson r2 f:\files\courses\1110-20\2010 possible slides for web\waterchemtrans.doc Properties of Compounds in Water Electrolytes and nonelectrolytes Water soluble compounds

More information

Chemical Reactions in Water

Chemical Reactions in Water Chemical Reactions in Water Ron Robertson r2 f:\files\courses\1110-20\2010 possible slides for web\waterchemtrans.doc Acids, Bases and Salts Acids dissolve in water to give H + ions. These ions attach

More information

How Many Cookies Can I Make? You can make cookies until you run out of one of the ingredients Once you run out of sugar, you will stop making cookies

How Many Cookies Can I Make? You can make cookies until you run out of one of the ingredients Once you run out of sugar, you will stop making cookies Limi$ng reactants How Many Cookies Can I Make? You can make cookies until you run out of one of the ingredients Once you run out of sugar, you will stop making cookies How Many Cookies Can I Make? In this

More information

Solutions Review Questions

Solutions Review Questions Name: Thursday, March 06, 2008 Solutions Review Questions 1. Compared to pure water, an aqueous solution of calcium chloride has a 1. higher boiling point and higher freezing point 3. lower boiling point

More information

Lecture 6. Classes of Chemical Reactions

Lecture 6. Classes of Chemical Reactions Lecture 6 Classes of Chemical Reactions Lecture 6 Outline 6.1 The Role of Water as a Solvent 6.2 Precipitation Reactions 6.3 Acid-Base Reactions 1 Electron distribution in molecules of H 2 and H 2 O The

More information

Stoichiometry and Aqueous Reactions (Chapter 4)

Stoichiometry and Aqueous Reactions (Chapter 4) Stoichiometry and Aqueous Reactions (Chapter 4) Chemical Equations 1. Balancing Chemical Equations (from Chapter 3) Adjust coefficients to get equal numbers of each kind of element on both sides of arrow.

More information

midterm1, 2009 Name: Class: Date:

midterm1, 2009 Name: Class: Date: Class: Date: midterm1, 2009 Record your name on the top of this exam and on the scantron form. Record the test ID letter in the top right box of the scantron form. Record all of your answers on the scantron

More information

Chapter 4 Chemical Reactions

Chapter 4 Chemical Reactions Chapter 4 Chemical Reactions I) Ions in Aqueous Solution many reactions take place in water form ions in solution aq solution = solute + solvent solute: substance being dissolved and present in lesser

More information

16. What is the H 3 O + concentration of a solution that has an OH concentration of 1 10 3 M? 1) 1 10 4 M 3) 1 10 11 M

16. What is the H 3 O + concentration of a solution that has an OH concentration of 1 10 3 M? 1) 1 10 4 M 3) 1 10 11 M 1. If the [OH ] = 1 10 4 at 298 K for a given solution, the [H + ] of the solution is equal to 1) 1 10 14 3) 1 10 6 2) 1 10 10 4) 1 10 4 2. Based on Reference Table V, which is the strongest base? 1) NO

More information

The component present in larger proportion is known as solvent.

The component present in larger proportion is known as solvent. 40 Engineering Chemistry and Environmental Studies 2 SOLUTIONS 2. DEFINITION OF SOLUTION, SOLVENT AND SOLUTE When a small amount of sugar (solute) is mixed with water, sugar uniformally dissolves in water

More information

Chapter 4: Reactions in Aqueous Solution (Sections )

Chapter 4: Reactions in Aqueous Solution (Sections ) Chapter 4: Reactions in Aqueous Solution (Sections 4.1-4.12) Chapter Goals Be able to: Classify substances as electrolytes or nonelectrolytes. Write molecular, ionic, and net ionic equations for precipitation,

More information

4.1 Aqueous Solutions. Chapter 4. Reactions in Aqueous Solution. Electrolytes. Strong Electrolytes. Weak Electrolytes

4.1 Aqueous Solutions. Chapter 4. Reactions in Aqueous Solution. Electrolytes. Strong Electrolytes. Weak Electrolytes Chapter 4 Reactions in Aqueous Solution 4.1 Aqueous Solutions Solution homogeneous mixture of 2 or more substances Solute the substance present in a smaller amount (usually solid in Chap. 4) Solvent the

More information

ph: Measurement and Uses

ph: Measurement and Uses ph: Measurement and Uses One of the most important properties of aqueous solutions is the concentration of hydrogen ion. The concentration of H + (or H 3 O + ) affects the solubility of inorganic and organic

More information

Chem101: General Chemistry Lecture 9 Acids and Bases

Chem101: General Chemistry Lecture 9 Acids and Bases : General Chemistry Lecture 9 Acids and Bases I. Introduction A. In chemistry, and particularly biochemistry, water is the most common solvent 1. In studying acids and bases we are going to see that water

More information

6 Reactions in Aqueous Solutions

6 Reactions in Aqueous Solutions 6 Reactions in Aqueous Solutions Water is by far the most common medium in which chemical reactions occur naturally. It is not hard to see this: 70% of our body mass is water and about 70% of the surface

More information

1. When the following equation is balanced, the coefficient of Al is. Al (s) + H 2 O (l)? Al(OH) 3 (s) + H 2 (g)

1. When the following equation is balanced, the coefficient of Al is. Al (s) + H 2 O (l)? Al(OH) 3 (s) + H 2 (g) 1. When the following equation is balanced, the coefficient of Al is. Al (s) + H 2 O (l)? Al(OH) (s) + H 2 (g) A) 1 B) 2 C) 4 D) 5 E) Al (s) + H 2 O (l)? Al(OH) (s) + H 2 (g) Al (s) + H 2 O (l)? Al(OH)

More information

REVIEW QUESTIONS Chapter 8

REVIEW QUESTIONS Chapter 8 Chemistry 51 ANSWER KEY REVIEW QUESTIONS Chapter 8 1. Identify each of the diagrams below as strong electrolyte, weak electrolyte or non-electrolyte: (a) Non-electrolyte (no ions present) (b) Weak electrolyte

More information

EXPERIMENT 10 Chemistry 110. Solutions Part 2 ACIDS, BASES, AND ELECTROLYTES

EXPERIMENT 10 Chemistry 110. Solutions Part 2 ACIDS, BASES, AND ELECTROLYTES EXPERIMENT 10 Chemistry 110 Solutions Part 2 ACIDS, BASES, AND ELECTROLYTES PURPOSE: The purpose of this experiment is to determine the properties of solutions of acids, bases and electrolytes. Students

More information

Solute and Solvent 7.1. Solutions. Examples of Solutions. Nature of Solutes in Solutions. Learning Check. Solution. Solutions

Solute and Solvent 7.1. Solutions. Examples of Solutions. Nature of Solutes in Solutions. Learning Check. Solution. Solutions Chapter 7 s 7.1 s Solute and Solvent s are homogeneous mixtures of two or more substances. consist of a solvent and one or more solutes. 1 2 Nature of Solutes in s Examples of s Solutes spread evenly throughout

More information

SCH 3UI Unit 9 Outline: Solutions, Acids and Bases

SCH 3UI Unit 9 Outline: Solutions, Acids and Bases SCH 3UI Unit 9 Outline: Solutions, Acids and Bases Lesson Topics Covered Homework Questions and Assignments 1 Note: Introduction to Solutions review of the organization of matter define: solution, solute,

More information

CHEMISTRY 101 EXAM 3 (FORM B) DR. SIMON NORTH

CHEMISTRY 101 EXAM 3 (FORM B) DR. SIMON NORTH 1. Is H 3 O + polar or non-polar? (1 point) a) Polar b) Non-polar CHEMISTRY 101 EXAM 3 (FORM B) DR. SIMON NORTH 2. The bond strength is considerably greater in HF than in the other three hydrogen halides

More information

Calculation of Molar Masses. Molar Mass. Solutions. Solutions

Calculation of Molar Masses. Molar Mass. Solutions. Solutions Molar Mass Molar mass = Mass in grams of one mole of any element, numerically equal to its atomic weight Molar mass of molecules can be determined from the chemical formula and molar masses of elements

More information

Notes: Acids and Bases

Notes: Acids and Bases Name Chemistry Pre-AP Notes: Acids and Bases Period I. Describing Acids and Bases A. Properties of Acids taste ph 7 Acids change color of an (e.g. blue litmus paper turns in the presence of an acid) React

More information

Solutions CHAPTER Specific answers depend on student choices.

Solutions CHAPTER Specific answers depend on student choices. CHAPTER 15 1. Specific answers depend on student choices.. A heterogeneous mixture does not have a uniform composition: the composition varies in different places within the mixture. Examples of non homogeneous

More information

Aqueous Ions and Reactions

Aqueous Ions and Reactions Aqueous Ions and Reactions (ions, acids, and bases) Demo NaCl(aq) + AgNO 3 (aq) AgCl (s) Two clear and colorless solutions turn to a cloudy white when mixed Demo Special Light bulb in water can test for

More information

Chemistry 52. Reacts with active metals to produce hydrogen gas. Have a slippery, soapy feeling. React with carbonates to produce CO 2

Chemistry 52. Reacts with active metals to produce hydrogen gas. Have a slippery, soapy feeling. React with carbonates to produce CO 2 ACID AND BASE STRENGTH Experiment #2 PURPOSE: 1. To distinguish between acids, bases and neutral substances, by observing their effect on some common indicators. 2. To distinguish between strong and weak

More information

Name: Class: Date: 2 4 (aq)

Name: Class: Date: 2 4 (aq) Name: Class: Date: Unit 4 Practice Test Multiple Choice Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question. 1) The balanced molecular equation for complete neutralization of

More information

CHEMISTRY 101 EXAM 3 (FORM A) DR. SIMON NORTH

CHEMISTRY 101 EXAM 3 (FORM A) DR. SIMON NORTH CHEMISTRY 101 EXAM 3 (FORM A) DR. SIMON NORTH 1. When considering conjugate acids and bases, (2 points) a) Strong acids have strong conjugate bases. b) Strong bases have strong conjugate acids. c) Weak

More information

Test 12: Review questions

Test 12: Review questions Name: Wednesday, April 16, 2008 Test 12: Review questions 1. Which reaction represents the process of neutralization? 1. Mg(s) + 2HCl(aq) MgCl 2(aq) + H 2(g) 2. HCl(aq) + KOH(aq) KCl(aq) + H2O(l) 3. Pb(NO

More information

Chapter 7: Chemical Reactions

Chapter 7: Chemical Reactions Chapter 7 Page 1 Chapter 7: Chemical Reactions A chemical reaction: a process in which at least one new substance is formed as the result of a chemical change. A + B C + D Reactants Products Evidence that

More information

From the book (10, 12, 16, 18, 22, 24 52, 54, 56, 58, 62, 64, 66, 68, 74, 76, 78, 80, 82, 86, 88, 90, 92, 106 and 116)

From the book (10, 12, 16, 18, 22, 24 52, 54, 56, 58, 62, 64, 66, 68, 74, 76, 78, 80, 82, 86, 88, 90, 92, 106 and 116) Chem 112 Solutions From the book (10, 12, 16, 18, 22, 24 52, 54, 56, 58, 62, 64, 66, 68, 74, 76, 78, 80, 82, 86, 88, 90, 92, 106 and 116) 1. Which of the following compounds are nonelectrolytes? A. NaF

More information

CHM1 Review for Exam 12

CHM1 Review for Exam 12 Topics Solutions 1. Arrhenius Acids and bases a. An acid increases the H + concentration in b. A base increases the OH - concentration in 2. Strong acids and bases completely dissociate 3. Weak acids and

More information

Element of same atomic number, but different atomic mass o Example: Hydrogen

Element of same atomic number, but different atomic mass o Example: Hydrogen Atomic mass: p + = protons; e - = electrons; n 0 = neutrons p + + n 0 = atomic mass o For carbon-12, 6p + + 6n 0 = atomic mass of 12.0 o For chlorine-35, 17p + + 18n 0 = atomic mass of 35.0 atomic mass

More information

Chapter 17. The best buffer choice for ph 7 is NaH 2 PO 4 /Na 2 HPO 4. 19)

Chapter 17. The best buffer choice for ph 7 is NaH 2 PO 4 /Na 2 HPO 4. 19) Chapter 17 2) a) HCl and CH 3 COOH are both acids. A buffer must have an acid/base conjugate pair. b) NaH 2 PO 4 and Na 2 HPO 4 are an acid/base conjugate pair. They will make an excellent buffer. c) H

More information

6) Which compound is manufactured in larger quantities in the U.S. than any other industrial chemical?

6) Which compound is manufactured in larger quantities in the U.S. than any other industrial chemical? MULTIPLE CHOICE. Choose the one alternative that best completes the statement or answers the question. 1) Which statement concerning Arrhenius acid-base theory is not correct? A) Acid-base reactions must

More information

Chapter 13 & 14 Practice Exam

Chapter 13 & 14 Practice Exam Name: Class: Date: Chapter 13 & 14 Practice Exam Multiple Choice Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question. 1. Acids generally release H 2 gas when they react with a.

More information

1. Read P. 368-375, P. 382-387 & P. 429-436; P. 375 # 1-11 & P. 389 # 1,7,9,12,15; P. 436 #1, 7, 8, 11

1. Read P. 368-375, P. 382-387 & P. 429-436; P. 375 # 1-11 & P. 389 # 1,7,9,12,15; P. 436 #1, 7, 8, 11 SCH3U- R.H.KING ACADEMY SOLUTION & ACID/BASE WORKSHEET Name: The importance of water - MAKING CONNECTION READING 1. Read P. 368-375, P. 382-387 & P. 429-436; P. 375 # 1-11 & P. 389 # 1,7,9,12,15; P. 436

More information

Chapter 3. Chemical Reactions and Reaction Stoichiometry. Lecture Presentation. James F. Kirby Quinnipiac University Hamden, CT

Chapter 3. Chemical Reactions and Reaction Stoichiometry. Lecture Presentation. James F. Kirby Quinnipiac University Hamden, CT Lecture Presentation Chapter 3 Chemical Reactions and Reaction James F. Kirby Quinnipiac University Hamden, CT The study of the mass relationships in chemistry Based on the Law of Conservation of Mass

More information

Molecular Formula: Example

Molecular Formula: Example Molecular Formula: Example A compound is found to contain 85.63% C and 14.37% H by mass. In another experiment its molar mass is found to be 56.1 g/mol. What is its molecular formula? 1 CHAPTER 3 Chemical

More information

EXPERIMENT 10: Electrical Conductivity Chem 111

EXPERIMENT 10: Electrical Conductivity Chem 111 EXPERIMENT 10: Electrical Conductivity Chem 111 INTRODUCTION A. Electrical Conductivity A substance can conduct an electrical current if it is made of positively and negatively charged particles that are

More information

Aqueous Chemical Reactions

Aqueous Chemical Reactions Name: Date: Lab Partners: Lab section: Aqueous Chemical Reactions The purpose of this lab is to introduce you to three major categories of reactions that occur in aqueous solutions: precipitation reactions,

More information

The Mole Concept. A. Atomic Masses and Avogadro s Hypothesis

The Mole Concept. A. Atomic Masses and Avogadro s Hypothesis The Mole Concept A. Atomic Masses and Avogadro s Hypothesis 1. We have learned that compounds are made up of two or more different elements and that elements are composed of atoms. Therefore, compounds

More information

Name period Unit 9: acid/base equilibrium

Name period Unit 9: acid/base equilibrium Name period Unit 9: acid/base equilibrium 1. What is the difference between the Arrhenius and the BronstedLowry definition of an acid? Arrhenious acids give H + in water BronstedLowry acids are proton

More information

1/7/2013. Chapter 9. Chemical Reactions in Aqueous Solutions. Chemistry: Atoms First Julia Burdge & Jason Overby. Reactions in Aqueous Solutions 9.

1/7/2013. Chapter 9. Chemical Reactions in Aqueous Solutions. Chemistry: Atoms First Julia Burdge & Jason Overby. Reactions in Aqueous Solutions 9. Chemistry: Atoms First Julia Burdge & Jason Overby 9 Reactions in Aqueous s Chapter 9 Chemical Reactions in Aqueous s Kent L. McCorkle Cosumnes River College Sacramento, CA Copyright (c) The McGraw-Hill

More information

Molarity of Ions in Solution

Molarity of Ions in Solution APPENDIX A Molarity of Ions in Solution ften it is necessary to calculate not only the concentration (in molarity) of a compound in aqueous solution but also the concentration of each ion in aqueous solution.

More information

Chapter 6 Oxidation-Reduction Reactions. Section 6.1 2. Which one of the statements below is true concerning an oxidation-reduction reaction?

Chapter 6 Oxidation-Reduction Reactions. Section 6.1 2. Which one of the statements below is true concerning an oxidation-reduction reaction? Chapter 6 Oxidation-Reduction Reactions 1. Oxidation is defined as a. gain of a proton b. loss of a proton c. gain of an electron! d. loss of an electron e. capture of an electron by a neutron 2. Which

More information

Chemistry B11 Chapter 4 Chemical reactions

Chemistry B11 Chapter 4 Chemical reactions Chemistry B11 Chapter 4 Chemical reactions Chemical reactions are classified into five groups: A + B AB Synthesis reactions (Combination) H + O H O AB A + B Decomposition reactions (Analysis) NaCl Na +Cl

More information

2. Write a balanced chemical equation which corresponds to the following equilibrium constant expression. 1/2 3/ 2

2. Write a balanced chemical equation which corresponds to the following equilibrium constant expression. 1/2 3/ 2 Practice Problems for Chem. 1B Exam 1 F2011 These represent the concepts covered for exam 1. There may be some additional net ionic equations from chem. 1A. This is not the exact exam! Sections 16.1-16.3

More information

Chemical Equations & Stoichiometry

Chemical Equations & Stoichiometry Chemical Equations & Stoichiometry Chapter Goals Balance equations for simple chemical reactions. Perform stoichiometry calculations using balanced chemical equations. Understand the meaning of the term

More information

Strong Acids (Know These) Announcements & Agenda (02/23/07) Strengths of Acids/Bases - Ionization. Last Time: Last Time: nsted-lowry Acids & Bases

Strong Acids (Know These) Announcements & Agenda (02/23/07) Strengths of Acids/Bases - Ionization. Last Time: Last Time: nsted-lowry Acids & Bases Announcements & Agenda (0//07) You should be reading Ch 0 this weekend! Quiz Today! Open Review Sessions @ pm on Wed. Low attendance this week Last Time: Bronsted nsted-lowry Acids & Bases acids donate

More information

Reactions. Balancing Chemical Equations uses Law of conservation of mass: matter cannot be lost in any chemical reaction

Reactions. Balancing Chemical Equations uses Law of conservation of mass: matter cannot be lost in any chemical reaction Reactions Chapter 8 Combustion Decomposition Combination Chapter 9 Aqueous Reactions Exchange reactions (Metathesis) Formation of a precipitate Formation of a gas Formation of a week or nonelectrolyte

More information

Chapter 8: Chemical Equations and Reactions

Chapter 8: Chemical Equations and Reactions Chapter 8: Chemical Equations and Reactions I. Describing Chemical Reactions A. A chemical reaction is the process by which one or more substances are changed into one or more different substances. A chemical

More information

If we write these equations in ionic form, in each case the net ionic equation is the same; H 3 O + (aq) + OH - (aq) H 2H 2 O(l)

If we write these equations in ionic form, in each case the net ionic equation is the same; H 3 O + (aq) + OH - (aq) H 2H 2 O(l) CHEM 1105 ACIDS AND BASES 1. Early Definitions Taste: Effect on Indicators: Neutralization: acids - sour; bases - bitter acids turn blue litmus red; bases turn red litmus blue phenolphthalein is colourless

More information

A) HCl C) 52 g KCl in 100 g water at 80ºC A) temperature of the solution increases B) supersaturated D) low temperature and high pressure D) KClO3

A) HCl C) 52 g KCl in 100 g water at 80ºC A) temperature of the solution increases B) supersaturated D) low temperature and high pressure D) KClO3 1. Which compound becomes less soluble in water as the temperature of the solution is increased? A) HCl B) 2. The solubility of O3(s) in water increases as the A) temperature of the solution increases

More information

Module Seven Including Liquids and Solutions in Stoichiometric Calculations. Chem 170. Stoichiometric Calculations. Module Seven

Module Seven Including Liquids and Solutions in Stoichiometric Calculations. Chem 170. Stoichiometric Calculations. Module Seven Chem 170 Stoichiometric Calculations Module Seven Including Liquids and Solutions in Stoichiometric Calculations DePauw University Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry Page 1 Introduction to Module

More information

Chapter 14 Solutions

Chapter 14 Solutions Chapter 14 Solutions 1 14.1 General properties of solutions solution a system in which one or more substances are homogeneously mixed or dissolved in another substance two components in a solution: solute

More information

14-Jul-12 Chemsheets A

14-Jul-12 Chemsheets A www.chemsheets.co.uk 14-Jul-12 Chemsheets A2 009 1 BRONSTED-LOWRY ACIDS & BASES Bronsted-Lowry acid = proton donor (H + = proton) Bronsted-Lowry base = proton acceptor (H + = proton) Bronsted-Lowry acid-base

More information

CHEM 102: Sample Test 5

CHEM 102: Sample Test 5 CHEM 102: Sample Test 5 CHAPTER 17 1. When H 2 SO 4 is dissolved in water, which species would be found in the water at equilibrium in measurable amounts? a. H 2 SO 4 b. H 3 SO + 4 c. HSO 4 d. SO 2 4 e.

More information

CHAPTER 3 COMPOUNDS AND MOLECULES

CHAPTER 3 COMPOUNDS AND MOLECULES Chapter 3 Compounds and Molecules Page 1 CHAPTER 3 COMPOUNDS AND MOLECULES 3-1. Octane, a component of gasoline, has eight carbon atoms and eighteen hydrogen atoms per molecule. Its formula is written

More information

Practise Exam Chapter 4

Practise Exam Chapter 4 Practise Exam Chapter 4 1. Which one of the following is a nonelectrolyte? A) aqueous barium nitrate solution B) aqueous calcium chloride solution C) aqueous lithium phosphate solution D) aqueous methyl

More information

Properties of Acids and Bases

Properties of Acids and Bases Lab 22 Properties of Acids and Bases TN Standard 4.2: The student will investigate the characteristics of acids and bases. Have you ever brushed your teeth and then drank a glass of orange juice? What

More information

Appendix D. Reaction Stoichiometry D.1 INTRODUCTION

Appendix D. Reaction Stoichiometry D.1 INTRODUCTION Appendix D Reaction Stoichiometry D.1 INTRODUCTION In Appendix A, the stoichiometry of elements and compounds was presented. There, the relationships among grams, moles and number of atoms and molecules

More information

UNIT (6) ACIDS AND BASES

UNIT (6) ACIDS AND BASES UNIT (6) ACIDS AND BASES 6.1 Arrhenius Definition of Acids and Bases Definitions for acids and bases were proposed by the Swedish chemist Savante Arrhenius in 1884. Acids were defined as compounds that

More information

Sample Exercise 13.1 Predicting Solubility Patterns

Sample Exercise 13.1 Predicting Solubility Patterns Sample Exercise 13.1 Predicting Solubility Patterns Predict whether each of the following substances is more likely to dissolve in the nonpolar solvent carbon tetrachloride (CCl 4 ) or in water: C 7 H

More information

Factors that Affect the Rate of Dissolving and Solubility

Factors that Affect the Rate of Dissolving and Solubility Dissolving Factors that Affect the Rate of Dissolving and Solubility One very important property of a solution is the rate of, or how quickly a solute dissolves in a solvent. When dissolving occurs, there

More information

ionic substances (separate) based on! Liquid Mixtures miscible two liquids that and form a immiscible two liquids that form a e.g.

ionic substances (separate) based on! Liquid Mixtures miscible two liquids that and form a immiscible two liquids that form a e.g. Unit 7 Solutions, Acids & Bases Solution mixture + solvent - substance present in the amount solute - in the solvent solvent molecules solute particles ionic substances (separate) based on! Liquid Mixtures

More information

Honors Unit 10 Notes Solutions

Honors Unit 10 Notes Solutions Name: Honors Unit 10 Notes Solutions [Chapter 10] Objectives: 1. Students will be able to calculate solution concentration using molarity, molality, and mass percent. 2. Students will be able to interpret

More information

MOLARITY = (moles solute) / (vol.solution in liter units)

MOLARITY = (moles solute) / (vol.solution in liter units) CHEM 101/105 Stoichiometry, as applied to Aqueous Solutions containing Ionic Solutes Lect-05 MOLES - a quantity of substance. Quantities of substances can be expressed as masses, as numbers, or as moles.

More information

Chapter 4: Reaction in Aqueous Solution

Chapter 4: Reaction in Aqueous Solution Chapter 4: Reaction in Aqueous Solution What is a Solution? Solute + substance dissolved typically smaller quantity Solvent! dissolving medium typically larger quantity Solution homogeneous mixture variable

More information

Chapter 3 Calculation with Chemical Formulas and Equations

Chapter 3 Calculation with Chemical Formulas and Equations Chapter 3 Calculation with Chemical Formulas and Equations Practical Applications of Chemistry Determining chemical formula of a substance Predicting the amount of substances consumed during a reaction

More information

Tutorial 5 NET IONIC EQUATIONS

Tutorial 5 NET IONIC EQUATIONS T-33 Tutorial 5 NET IONIC EQUATIONS The efficiency and extent of a chemical reaction is very much dependent upon the physical state (solid, liquid, gas, or solution) of reactants and products. Not surprisingly,

More information

1. Balancing a chemical equation so that it obeys the law of conservation of matter requires:

1. Balancing a chemical equation so that it obeys the law of conservation of matter requires: General Chemistry I Exam 2 Review 1 1. Balancing a chemical equation so that it obeys the law of conservation of matter requires: a. Adjusting the coefficients in front of the d. Changing the formulas

More information

Ch 8.5 Solution Concentration Units % (m/m or w/w) = mass of solute x 100 total mass of solution mass of solution = mass solute + mass solvent

Ch 8.5 Solution Concentration Units % (m/m or w/w) = mass of solute x 100 total mass of solution mass of solution = mass solute + mass solvent 1 Ch 8.5 Solution Concentration Units % (m/m or w/w) = mass of solute x 100 total mass of solution mass of solution = mass solute + mass solvent % (v/v) = volume of solute x 100 volume of solution filled

More information

CHEMISTRY II FINAL EXAM REVIEW

CHEMISTRY II FINAL EXAM REVIEW Name Period CHEMISTRY II FINAL EXAM REVIEW Final Exam: approximately 75 multiple choice questions Ch 12: Stoichiometry Ch 5 & 6: Electron Configurations & Periodic Properties Ch 7 & 8: Bonding Ch 14: Gas

More information

Chapter 14: Acids and Bases

Chapter 14: Acids and Bases Ch 14 Page 1 Chapter 14: Acids and Bases Properties of Acids Sour taste React with some metals Turns blue litmus paper red React with bases Some Common Acids HCl, hydrochloric acid H 2 SO 4, sulfuric acid

More information

Experiment 1 Chemical Reactions and Net Ionic Equations

Experiment 1 Chemical Reactions and Net Ionic Equations Experiment 1 Chemical Reactions and Net Ionic Equations I. Objective: To predict the products of some displacement reactions and write net ionic equations. II. Chemical Principles: A. Reaction Types. Chemical

More information

Solutions & Colloids

Solutions & Colloids Chemistry 100 Bettelheim, Brown, Campbell & Farrell Ninth Edition Introduction to General, Organic and Biochemistry Chapter 6 Solutions & Colloids Solutions Components of a Solution Solvent: The substance

More information

Chapter 3: Stoichiometry

Chapter 3: Stoichiometry Chapter 3: Stoichiometry Key Skills: Balance chemical equations Predict the products of simple combination, decomposition, and combustion reactions. Calculate formula weights Convert grams to moles and

More information

CHEM 101/105 Aqueous Solutions (continued) Lect-07

CHEM 101/105 Aqueous Solutions (continued) Lect-07 CHEM 101/105 Aqueous Solutions (continued) Lect-07 aqueous acid/base reactions a. a little bit more about water Water is a polar substance. This means water is able to "solvate" ions rather well. Another

More information

Chapter 4 Three Major Classes of Chemical Reactions. As will likely come as no surprise, chemical reactions can be categorized in a variety of

Chapter 4 Three Major Classes of Chemical Reactions. As will likely come as no surprise, chemical reactions can be categorized in a variety of Chapter 4 Three Major Classes of Chemical Reactions As will likely come as no surprise, chemical reactions can be categorized in a variety of different ways, with nearly all reactions falling into more

More information

H 2 O + HNO 3 H 3 O + + NO 3

H 2 O + HNO 3 H 3 O + + NO 3 Properties Unit 12 Acids & Bases electrolytes sour taste turn litmus red react with metals to form 2 gas vinegar, soda, citrus fruits electrolytes bitter taste turn litmus blue slippery feel ammonia, lye,

More information

Steps for balancing a chemical equation

Steps for balancing a chemical equation The Chemical Equation: A Chemical Recipe Dr. Gergens - SD Mesa College A. Learn the meaning of these arrows. B. The chemical equation is the shorthand notation for a chemical reaction. A chemical equation

More information

AP Chemistry- Acids and Bases General Properties of Acids and Bases. Bases- originally defined as any substance that neutralized an acid

AP Chemistry- Acids and Bases General Properties of Acids and Bases. Bases- originally defined as any substance that neutralized an acid AP Chemistry Acids and Bases General Properties of Acids and Bases Acids Electrolyte Taste Litmus Phenolphthalein React with metals to give off H 2 gas H 2 SO 4 (aq) + Mg (s) MgSO 4 (aq) + H 2 (g) Ionize

More information

UNIT (4) CALCULATIONS AND CHEMICAL REACTIONS

UNIT (4) CALCULATIONS AND CHEMICAL REACTIONS UNIT (4) CALCULATIONS AND CHEMICAL REACTIONS 4.1 Formula Masses Recall that the decimal number written under the symbol of the element in the periodic table is the atomic mass of the element. 1 7 8 12

More information

10. Calculate the mass percent nitrogen in (NH 4 ) 2 CO 3 (molar mass = 96.09 g/mol). a. 29.1 % c. 17.9 % e. 14.6 % b. 35.9 % d. 0.292 % f. 96.

10. Calculate the mass percent nitrogen in (NH 4 ) 2 CO 3 (molar mass = 96.09 g/mol). a. 29.1 % c. 17.9 % e. 14.6 % b. 35.9 % d. 0.292 % f. 96. Chem 171-2-3: Final Exam Review Multiple Choice Problems 1. What is the molar mass of barium perchlorate, Ba(ClO 4 ) 2? a. 189.90 g/mol c. 272.24 g/mol e. 336.20 g/mol b. 240.24 g/mol d. 304.24 g/mol f.

More information

Reactions in Aqueous Solutions

Reactions in Aqueous Solutions Chem 101 Reactions in Aqueous Solutions Lectures 15 and 16 Predicting Whether a Reaction Will Occur Forces that drive a reaction Formation of a solid Formation of water Transfer of electrons Formation

More information

Answer the following questions on notebook paper, to be collected and graded for correctness.

Answer the following questions on notebook paper, to be collected and graded for correctness. nswer the following questions on notebook paper, to be collected and graded for correctness. 1. Name the following binary acids: a. HCl hydrochloric acid b. HF hydrofluoric acid c. H 2 S hydrosulfuric

More information

Note: (H 3 O + = hydronium ion = H + = proton) Example: HS - + H 2 O H 3 O + + S 2-

Note: (H 3 O + = hydronium ion = H + = proton) Example: HS - + H 2 O H 3 O + + S 2- AcidBase Chemistry Arrhenius acid: Substance that dissolves in water and provides H + ions Arrhenius base: Substance that dissolves in water and provides OH ions Examples: HCl H + and Cl Acid NaOH Na +

More information