Recognizing the Role of Early Learning Lab Schools in! Canadian Universities and Colleges

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "Recognizing the Role of Early Learning Lab Schools in! Canadian Universities and Colleges"

Transcription

1 Recognizing the Role of Early Learning Lab Schools in! Canadian Universities and Colleges

2 1 From the Editors In 2009, the faculty in the School of Early Childhood Studies at Ryerson University were inspired to organize a conference focusing on early learning lab schools. We felt that early learning lab schools play a unique role educating and caring for young children, mentoring early childhood education students, engaging in innovative curricula practices, and participating in research. We believed that we had much to share and learn about and from early learning lab schools in other universities and colleges across Canada. The success of our 2009 conference motivated us to co-host a 2nd conference in March 2012.These conferences were a result of partnerships between lab schools; the School of Early Childhood at George Brown College co-hosted both conferences and the Dr. Eric Jackman Institute of Child Study, University of Toronto, co-hosted the second conference. We called these conferences Leading the Way the articles in this on-line publication which are based on conference presentations will describe how Canadian university and college early learning lab schools seek with great commitment to lead the way. You will read that the lab school teachers see themselves as part of a larger system of early childhood education and care. Indeed, because the mission of an early learning lab school is soundly tied to teaching and caring for young children, research and student learning in a university or college, the lab school is compelled to build thriving relationships with multiple stakeholders children and their families, university and/or college faculty and departments, researchers, and various levels of government, among many others. You will read that lab schools teachers are inquisitive and relentless in their exploration of new ideas the authors eloquently describe the pedagogical journeys they have undertaken to enrich their programs and to critically enhance their professional knowledge and practices. You will feel when reading each article the exhilaration that teachers and researchers in early learning lab schools experience when engaged in collaborative pedagogical inquiries and experimentation. These inquiries can be unsettlingly and often lead to more questioning and uncertainty. In their article, Our Learning Story: Journey of Transformation, Williams, Farzaneh, Simon, Salau, Francisco, and Perera- Jones (Seneca College, Ontario) metaphorically describe this process as standing united on the banks of a river, pausing to reflect where we have come from, who we are, who we want to become, and where we travel to from here. You will, of course, discover much more for in each article the complexities of managing, teaching and researching in an early learning lab school are untangled and in doing so pave the path for more complex reflections on theories and practices. An article by Bateman, Hankinson, and Whitty (University of New Brunswick) illustrates these processes of reflection as the authors and the children explore being outdoors in the woods at UNB. In another article, you will discover how Coronel, Feltoe, and Isnor (George Brown College, Ontario) use technology for observing and documenting children s learning and development to inform their curriculum. In their article, Watts, Moher, and the early learning lab school teacherpreceptors (Ryerson University, Ontario) describe the journey they took to redefine their program s philosophical and pedagogical approach to teaching and learning. Similarly, Elliott and Yazbeck (University of Victoria, British Columbia) share their story of two centres and their encounters with children that have challenged, changed, and opened up the way we work. As professionals associated with early learning lab schools you will want to explore the differences between a field placement and a practicum as described by Brophy, Callahan, Campbell, and Reid (University of Guelph, Ontario) and learn about the challenges encountered in the history of this lab school. You can also read about Grove and Lirette s (MacEwan University, Alberta) reflections on children and citizenship as they

3 2 uncover some of the complexities of teaching and learning with child citizens and Kind s (Capilano University Children s Centre British Columbia) work as an atelierista as she describes the evolution of her studio project. Our first on-line publication ends with Hodgins, Kummen, Pacini-Ketchabaw, and Thompson s (University of Victoria, British Columbia) article that reflects on their roles as academicsinstructors-pedagogistas-researchers working in childcare centres linked to university institutions (laboratory schools), their practice and research, and their work with pedagogical narrations. We end with this article as the authors leave us wondering about the implementation of new practices and new questions, paving the way for our next Leading the Way conference. As with our conferences, the articles in this publication are representative of the practices of professionals working in university and college early learning lab schools across Canada. Going forward, we hope we can develop a second on-line publication that features the important work happening in an even broader range of Canadian early learning lab schools. But for now this on-line publication is an important celebration of the exceptional contributions that early learning lab schools are making in advancing the early childhood education and care field in Canada. Rachel Langford PhD Aurelia Di Santo PhD School of Early Childhood Studies, Ryerson University The recommended citation for this publication is: Article authors. (2013). Article Title, in R. Langford & A. Di Santo (Eds.), Leading the way: Recognizing the role of early learning lab schools in Canadian universities and colleges (page numbers of article). Retrieved from

4 Being in the Outdoors! Jill Bateman, Rachael Hankinson, and Pam Whitty University of New Brunswick Early Childhood Centre Fredericton, New Brunswick 3 Since the inception of our demonstration classroom in 1975, the outdoors has been an integral part of our programming. This year Jill Bateman, one of our UNB educators with a longstanding and deep interest in the outdoors, and her colleague Rachael Hankinson (quickly becoming an outdoor enthusiast), have been experimenting with and deepening their understanding of their own and children s involvement in the outdoors within a forested space close by. Our overall intent has been to increase the time, pleasure, and learning we experience with children as we are together in the woods. Influenced by the growing movement of forest classrooms across North America (http://naturekindergarten.sd62.bc.ca/ proposal/) and the longstanding practice of being in the outdoors in Nordic countries, we have taken up the call to spend more time in wild spaces. In this paper we briefly describe some the changes, challenges, and learnings we have encountered in our time with children in the woods at UNB. On our ventures out to the woods, we carry a well-stocked backpack with a first aid kit, tissues, our cell phone to link with the office and parents, and sometimes we take additional pedagogical supplies. When walking in dense woods we teach the children to put their arms and hands in front of their face, and we carry pruners in our backpack in case we come upon a particular tangle. We are quickly learning which outdoor clothing works best heavy duty splash pants, pull-up boots, and warm mittens. We often take snack time outdoors in all weather, including winter, as long as it is warm enough to remove mittens. Only a dangerous wind chill can prevent our daily adventures outdoors. Finding a space in the woods Fortunately for us, the University of New Brunswick (Fredericton) has retained small sections of woods throughout the campus. When we first set out to find a spot that would work for us, we found that university students also spend time in the woods, and it might take a while to find just the right space for us. After visiting several forested areas on campus with and without the children we located our space, chosen for its ideal blend of features that include a clearing for sitting, singing, story-telling, reading, etc.; fallen trees perfect for climbing on; and quite importantly, close proximity to a building with bathrooms. Being in the woods uncovering our assumptions Spending time with the children in the woods brought to light some our assumptions of being outdoors. We share some of our surprises here, as well as our pedagogical responses. On our first forays into the woods, we were taken aback at how some children wandered away from us and out of

5 4 our sight. It startled us we assumed that they would stay within view. To help us all maintain sightlines with each other, we established a visible boundary with yarn. Once we all became more familiar with visual communication and related boundaries, we removed the yarn. The children now know they need to be able to see us. Of course, in the winter with the leaves off the deciduous trees, they can go further, and trailmaking in the snow adds a whole new dimension to our outdoor activities. When some of the children want to follow a trail, one of us goes along and encourages the leader to keep checking to make sure the back of the line is coming a good skill for hiking in the woods today and in the future. During our early visits to the woods, some children were eager to explore and investigate, while others seemed to have a hard time navigating the undergrowth. They appeared to be disoriented, which in hindsight may not be surprising as knowing the woods is different than knowing the playground, for example. We thought this disorientation might be linked to limited experience and comfort in the woods. We also realized early on that children might need time to become accustomed to the outdoors. With this in mind, we incrementally increased our time in the woods. For those children not interested in climbing or exploring, we brought clipboards, paper, notebooks, and pencils, and they settled onto our tarp to draw pictures and maps. Children who were uncomfortable started in this open space with familiar indoor activities and tools, and moved into the woods play when they were ready. Another surprise we experienced was related to dramatic play. Many children in our group are very play-oriented in our classroom and playground spaces; they create multiple and ongoing play scenarios daily. It is very exciting! When we first started visiting the woods, we were surprised that invented play scenarios were not part of our time in the woods climbing yes, play scenarios no. Play entered the woods as a response to the indoor activity of reading The Three Little Pigs in our classroom. Outdoors, the story came alive in the woods as the children spontaneously and collectively acted it out, trying on different roles and using natural props such as sticks for the stick house and large fallen trees for the brick house. We have learned that the woods is a great environment for storytelling and dramatic play! Pleasures of being outdoors We have found that multi-modal literacies are abundant in the woods. In addition to the traditional writing tools we take from the classroom to the woods, writing tools also consist of fingers in the sand or sticks in the snow. When we first brought our indoor art materials into the playground, we noticed that children who rarely created art in the classroom were painting and drawing in this new environment. In the woods, art is created from found natural materials. We have taken glue and paper outdoors, and after collecting natural items such as leaves and sticks, the children created nature collages. A few children created dirt art making borders for their pictures rubbing dirt into the paper. Opportunities for problem solving and leadership abound in the outdoors as well. A Rube Goldberg machine invention contest put on by UNB Engineering students fuelled interest in creating obstacle courses in the woods out of the natural debris. It is a passion with our children that has continued for months. The following examples illustrate problem solving and leadership. When one child s foot got stuck between two pieces of wood, her friends rallied and they all helped to

6 5 figure out a way to extract her foot safely. Another child loves taking his friends on treks through the woods, negotiating the dense underbrush and finding ways to navigate the terrain. On one occasion, happening upon the edge of a wooded area, he shouted, Stop! and threw his arms out to the sides to prevent his followers from entering onto the neighbouring parking lot. In another example, we asked the children to think about why we the two adults sank through the snow while they could walk on top; we later added snowshoes into the problem-solving outdoor adventure. Our ongoing learnings Play outside is more conducive to a flow between activities We have been intrigued at the different paths some of the selfdirected activities take. On one occasion a group of children spent time together following animal tracks after a snowfall in the woods. While talking about what kind of animal it could be (a mouse), suddenly Michael stopped to pick up a stick and told us he was writing the mouse s name in the snow. As he worked on making letters, another boy began to experiment with this mark-making in the snow, and a discussion about letters and words ensued. Many times we have been on our special tarp in the woods telling or reading stories when the children have asked to tell their own stories to the group. On one occasion the storytelling began to include more and more of the group until they drifted off the tarp to perform the story they were telling in the woods. We are more attentive to interests We have noticed that as educators, we are more attuned and attentive to the children s interests in the outdoors. Initially drawing from our own childhood memories when we enjoyed building forts and homes for toy animals, we encouraged this activity with the children. We were surprised to find that it failed. As we paid closer attention, we realized that this particular group of children are climbers. They love exploring fallen trees and navigating through the branches, balancing and helping each other along. We also watched an interest develop in maps and map reading on one of our field trips (when we were reading a bus map), leading the children to draw treasure maps for each other and have treasure hunts for hidden gems. Learning in all seasons We have seen learning occur in all types of weather. Playing in the rain, which tends to be avoided because of the mess, has shown us wide grins and raucous laughter from the children. Rainy days result in glorious

7 6 puddles for jumping in and building bridges, pouring drinks of chocolate milk and cooking soup. We aren t afraid of getting a little wet, and the children absolutely love the freedom to splash and explore water and how it moves. Additionally, the children have created beautiful pieces of art using watercolour crayons in the rain and were thrilled at the idea of doing art as the raindrops splashed around them. We are grateful for all kinds of weather and what it teaches us! Valuing unstructured time to play in nature Our most significant discovery thus far in our outdoor experiment is valuing unstructured time to play in nature. Children and adults alike feel a sense of timelessness in the woods and on our playground. Often we are surprised when we look at our watches to discover that the time has flown by. We keep to a relaxed schedule and are much more flexible in letting things happen than when we are faced with the classroom clock on the wall. We are adding many new features to our wooded space but we don t imagine that a clock would be a welcome addition! Contact: Pam Whitty Early Childhood Professor University of New Brunswick Fredericton, NB

8 Our Learning Story: Journey of Transformation! June Williams, Tanya Farzaneh, Maya Simon, Laura Salau, Lerna Francisco, and Niluka Perera-Jones Seneca College Newnham Toronto, Ontario 7 In 1969, Seneca College was one of the first institutions in Ontario to incorporate an early learning centre to enrich the Early Childhood Education program. Seneca College has two lab schools: K.O.L.T.S. (King Campus), and the Newnham Lab School, which opened its doors in 1992 at its current location in Toronto. The Newnham Lab School s designing principles were intended to meet the needs of students, faculty, and children. As a demonstration and observation Centre for the School of Early Childhood Education, the lab school s unique collaborative design effort among faculty, lab staff, and parents provides a superior curriculum and training environment for ECE students applying theory into practice. Learning and teaching should not stand on opposite banks and just watch the river flow by; instead, they should embark together on a journey down the water. Through an active, reciprocal exchange, teaching can strengthen learning how to learn. - Loris Malaguzzi (1993, p. 79), Italian Early Childhood Education Specialist, Quoted in The Hundred Languages of Children, Ch.3, by Carolyn Edwards, Our story We stand united on the banks of a river, pausing to reflect upon our journey where we have come from, who we are, who we want to become, and where we travel to from here. Looking back we notice small tributaries. These are the headwaters, the sources of our existence. We realize through the passage of time we have become wiser and stronger, our passion rolling through each ripple, catching the next, and passing it on. Reflecting on all the rivers and streams that have nourished us, we looked within to define our role as co-constructors of children s learning, recognizing that our views of teaching and learning have changed. Our view of the child has evolved into the image of a strong, capable learner a protagonist. Honouring and respecting the simple ideology that children are born eager to explore, discover, and make sense of their world, our role has shifted to one that supports rather than one that leads. The image of the child is founded with respect to his or her ability and desire to learn. This belief began with a shift in our curriculum and pedagogy as well as with the children s environment. Through this journey we have come to recognize the value of the environment as a third teacher where

9 children are researchers and builders of theories, initiators of inquiry and investigation through their explorations of beautiful quality materials. Our centre s aesthetic appreciation is founded in the belief that children desire and require beautiful materials to help them develop their own aesthetic awareness. Every item is chosen with relevance and purpose. Inspired by Reggio Emilia founder Loris Malaguzzi and his respect for children and their spaces, we have transformed our beliefs and views of teaching and learning. Initially, our research led us to books, photos, and stories of his approach. For example, theme-based displays were cast aside for more authentic natural elements. Through the transformation of the environment we noticed a change in the children. They were building a deeper connection to the space. The centre is now not just a place with simple things, but where we embrace an ideology and belief that respects the learners. Our curriculum has always tried to incorporate and model that of the School of ECE; we work with faculty to design and implement exceptional quality care. Our philosophy was inspired by theorists from John Dewey to Vygotsky and maintains a strong connection to the schools and beliefs of Reggio Emilia. This has led to our own interpretation and representation of the principles that guide our beliefs and steer the direction of our curriculum. A recent highlight for the educators at the Lab School was the privilege of meeting, sharing, and being inspired by Lella Gandini, United States Liaison for the Dissemination of the Reggio Emilia Approach. While touring our school, Lella interacted with the children, reviewed documentation, explored, and collaborated with us. Her visit affirmed the power and beauty of our program and the work we do. She was one wave, one ripple that seemed to propel us forward faster, in anticipation of the next bend down the river. Collaborating with faculty of the Bachelor of Child Development Program has enabled us to delve more deeply into constructivism theory and the theories of Big Ideas. Our curriculum has always been based on the idea to follow the children s interests through play. Over the past two years we have shifted our curriculum to truly understand, interpret, and analyze the what, how, and why we do what we do. The strength of the teacher s voice has matured; we have learned to truly listen with our ears, our eyes, and most importantly, with our hearts. Through our reflective practice we have come to understand the deeper relationship we have with children. On our journey, a noticeable change occurred in our documentation. We shifted from narrating experiences and skills towards revealing a truer sense of the child s voice through our interpretations. As we began to analyze and collaborate on the children s experiences, we were able to see their learning demonstrated through their relationships with peers, teachers, materials, and the environment. This process is shared and developed, allowing children to revisit and extend their learning. It was through more meaningful connections among educators that our documentation revolutionized, becoming richer, more authentic a living, breathing testament to the children s learning. Lella Gandini reminded us of yet another key element in documentation: the verbal story. Verbally sharing the process plays an important role by exposing the underlining meaning within the documentation. This reminded us once again in the value of relationships, collaboration, and the need to share the learning through a variety of languages, photos, anecdotes, and voices of the children, teacher, and parent. 8

10 9 Looking down from the banks of the river, we are in tune to our voice. Our reflection honours the voices of all: the children, the parents, and the Early Childhood Educators. We are beginning to understand and interpret the underlying philosophy of Reggio Emilia. Relationships between and among children, families, educators, students, co-workers, materials, and the environment are all interconnected. Thus emerges a support network centralizing on the child. Our team has grown, now comprising not only the educators of the lab school, but also faculty, student teachers, parents, and the Seneca community. As we grow, we learn and expand together. We push off once again from the river bank. Paddling, we synchronize our oars, encouraging each other to keep tempo, celebrating our accomplishments while supporting each other s strengths through challenging rapids. Respect is given to the changing river landscape. We embrace the uncertainty, knowing that it is part of the journey. With hopeful hearts we share our dream to continue to be a part of Seneca s Strategic Plan, to mentor and inspire future and current educators, and to contribute to the wider community. We hope our passion, dedication, and commitment will inspire a new generation of educators. We listen to the river a new adventure is taking hold, the hidden current is flowing rapidly, and new water is surging. Where it will take us, only the river knows. Seneca College Newnham ECE Lab School Staff, 2013 June Williams, Manager, RECE Tanya Farzaneh, RECE Maya Simon, RECE Laura Salau, RECE Lerna Francisco, RECE Niluka Perera-Jones, RECE References Malaguzzi, L. (1993). History, ideas, and basic philosophy: An interview with Lella Gandini. In C. Edwards, L. Gandini, & G. Forman (Eds). The hundred languages of children (pp ). Norwood, NJ: Ablex Publishing.

11 Recording Early Learning Observations (RELO)! Veroushka Coronel, Sue Feltoe, and Margaret Isnor George Brown College Lab Schools Toronto, Ontario 10 RELO (Recording Early Learning Observations) is a web-based software program developed by Professor Marie Goulet at George Brown College s School of Early Childhood. Working in collaboration with the Early Childhood Lab School team and the college s Information Technology Department, in 2008 Professor Goulet s vision became reality providing a software tool that enables Registered Early Childhood Educators (RECEs) to observe and document children s learning and development for the purpose of informing curriculum planning. The basis of RELO is an Ontario document entitled Early Learning for Every Child Today or ELECT (Best Start Expert Panel on Early Learning, 2007). This document is an early learning framework for Ontario s early childhood programs, containing within its pages the principles that guide quality early childhood programs, plus a continuum of development. The continuum is based on five over-arching domains of development: physical, emotional, social, communication, language & literacy, and cognitive, as well as root skills specific capabilities, processes and competencies that exist within a domain. Although the continuum is divided into larger age-related sections (infant, toddler, preschool/kindergarten), individual children s skills may appear at differing points along the continuum as they learn and develop. ELECT is intended to be a strength-based model of development with an emphasis on skills a child is currently working on or developing. Based on this framework, the RELO tool was designed as a user-friendly interface for RECEs, parents, and other staff members to record and document children s learning. RELO supports several of the principles outlined in ELECT: Principle # 2: Partnerships with families and communities families are able to access their child s profile of development at any time with a simple, unique password. RELO further enriches the dialogue with parents and families about their child s progress and their child s current skills. The benefits to families include ease of access and the ability to retrieve their private child s file from any webenabled device at any time. This accessible program encourages family contributions and sharing of observations, promoting a reciprocity of learning that supports the notion of continuity between home and childcare. Principle #4: A planned curriculum supports early learning educators can collect and organize observations in a meaningful manner. This informs curriculum planning and implementation that is child focused, related to theory, and based on the interests and skills of the individual child. Benefits to educators include RELO s user-friendly interface and informative reports that help to clarify and highlight patterns of development for individual children and groups of children that are recorded in the program. As RECEs, we understand that learning is never isolated to the childcare centre; we know that development takes place in the context of families and communities, respecting that parents and families remain the experts on their own children.

12 11 Using the RELO tool, family members are invited to share observations of their children s learning in day-to-day situations, thereby providing valuable information on child development outside the structure of a formalized childcare centre. Below is a visual of the online format that RECEs and parents will use to submit observation entries about a child: As in the example (see Image 1), when choosing the Observation tab users will be provided with drop-down menus for both Domain and Skill(s); the selections outline the sequence of skills that children at different ages can be expected to acquire across the five broad developmental domains. A quick reference guide provides examples of indicators that support the educators and families in placing their observation in the most likely domain and skill. Domains (five broad areas or dimensions of development): 1. physical 2. emotional 3. social 4. communication, language & literacy 5. cognitive Root Skills: specific capabilities, processes, abilities, and competencies that exist within a domain Image 1 Indicators markers of what a child knows or does which show that the skill is emerging, being practiced, or being elaborated Interactions examples of adult-child communications, contacts and joint activity that support the child s accomplishment of the indicators and related skill development The RELO tool also has a pictorial observation option where the user can capture the child s learning in a very concrete/visual way that supports a deeper understanding of how learning occurs in both planned and natural processes. The RECEs are able to print detailed reports of the development of a child within their group, which informs their curriculum planning to ensure the needs of the individual within the larger group are being met. We are excited to continue using the RELO webbased program to enhance research possibilities in the field of early childhood education, from seeking a better understanding of the patterns of children s play to gaining insight about families who use this tool and their understanding through exposure to child development in a more concrete and succinct way.

13 12 References Best Start Expert Panel on Early Learning (2007). Early learning for every child today: A framework for Ontario early childhood settings. Toronto, Ontario: Ministry of Children and Youth Services.

14 Engaging in Reflective Practice Considering Partnerships with Multiple Stakeholders in a Lab School Environment! Kim Watts and Catherine Moher in collaboration with ELC teachers: Linda Hart, Leslie Cunningham, Karen Wong, Angelique Sanders, Maurice Sweeney, Maria Wysocki, Andrea Thomas, and Sanja Todorovic Early Learning Centre, School of Early Childhood Studies, Ryerson University Toronto, Ontario 13 Ryerson University s Early Learning Centre (ELC) is an early learning and care centre serving 66 children and their families from the university and local community. As part of the School of Early Childhood Studies, the ELC s objective is to model theory-to-practice as a laboratory school and offer field placement opportunities currently to over 130 students per year. The ELC welcomes Ryerson students registered in undergraduate observation and curriculum courses and graduate level research courses to observe and interact with the children who are enrolled in the centre s toddler, preschool, and kindergarten programs. The teacher-preceptors serve as guest speakers for various early childhood studies courses. Observation booths in the centre and a live feed camera situated in one of the university s classrooms offer observation mechanisms for both undergraduate and graduate students. These experiences provide student teachers, the ELC children, and teacher-preceptors with learning and teaching opportunities. Over the last several years, the ELC teacherpreceptors have been engaged in a reflective process of redefining the program s philosophical and pedagogical approach to teaching and learning. In March 2012, we were invited to share our experiences in a presentation at the 2nd National Early Learning Lab School conference. A unique feature of this reflective process is how we consider and include ideas and recommendations put forth by our many stakeholders and partners the children, families, the School of Early Childhood Studies, the Gerrard Resource Centre (GRC) (also a Ryerson University lab facility), and external community organizations such as the City of Toronto and the College of Early Childhood Educators. This paper presents the information shared at the conference and our experiences with the notion of change and sustainability. Background: The Process of Change Our teaching and learning philosophy is driven by the vision and mission of the School of Early Childhood Studies. To understand the reflective process undertaken by the teacher-preceptors, we highlight the context which influenced our decision to redefine this teaching and learning philosophy. Provocations for change included: School of Early Childhood Studies: vision and mission School of Early Childhood Studies Director: her leadership and mentorship Early Learning Centre and the teaching team s core beliefs External stakeholders expectations

15 14 The establishment of the Ontario College of Early Childhood Educators School of Early Childhood Studies: Vision and Mission The University supports the ELC as a site for current and innovative research. Typically four to six faculty-driven research studies and graduate/ undergraduate student research projects are conducted at the ELC over the course of a year. Research is carried out predominately from the School of Early Childhood Studies and departments such as Nutrition and Psychology. Teacher-preceptors act as facilitators for these projects and at times are involved as participants. It is a fine balance ensuring that all stakeholder needs are met. One particular challenge in facilitating the process is the difficulty in scheduling when projects occur simultaneously. We have learned from such initiatives that the benefits far outweigh the challenges. For example, from 2011, the ELC teaching team has worked with Dr. Roma Chumak-Horbatsch to pilot the Linguistically Appropriate Practice (LAP) program based on her research and subsequent book entitled Linguistically Appropriate Practice (Chumack-Horbatsch, 2012). The applications in this program served multiple functions and provided an excellent vehicle in connecting the home and the ELC. Further, the LAP program supports and acknowledges children s diversity and their inclusion in their various communities as critical to their optimal development. This project also engaged parents. After a presentation at our Parent Advisory Committee, a Language Committee was formed. This successful program built a bridge between home and the ELC and increased parent engagement in the classroom as families shared their stories and songs from their diverse culture of languages. Director of the School of Early Childhood Studies: Her Leadership and Mentorship The School of Early Childhood Studies Director, Dr. Rachel Langford, has inspired the ELC teacher-preceptors to view themselves as the main stakeholder in the reflective process. Over several months we were encouraged by Dr. Langford s approach of inquiry and contemplation to delve into provocations and devise strategies that were to become the cornerstone of our own redefined pedagogies. This also included a reflection process that celebrated our multiple perspectives. We began by exploring and examining our beliefs about children, families, and pedagogy. This process included journal writing where we captured our thoughts and feelings about the process of change. We discovered that our program did not fully represent our beliefs about teaching and learning; our pedagogical approach was missing a holistic view of children, and we realized that family input was peripheral. We recognized that we needed a practice that better reflected our beliefs. Early Learning Centre and the Teaching Team s Core Beliefs By engaging in this reflective process we determined that our collective core beliefs include the following: Children are born with an innate curiosity and a determination to understand the world around them. Each child is unique and must be provided with learning opportunities that are adapted to individual needs, interests, and learning styles.

16 15 Learning must provoke inquiry, critical thinking, and above all else, a joy of being. A comprehensive understanding of children s development coupled with observations of what they express as their paths of discovery unfold are essential for intentional teaching to occur. Understanding the whole child will promote learning and development. If we, as teacher-preceptors listen and see, children will tell and show us what they want to learn. Through reflective practice, we can examine children s main inquiries and interests. As coinvestigators with the children, their families, and their community, we collaboratively develop our program. We value diversity, equity, and inclusion. These principles are integral to our program. Families are the most important influence in children s lives. Rich partnerships between teacher-preceptors and families strengthen our ability to meet the children s needs and to understand their personal contexts for learning. Upon reflection of these core beliefs, we discovered that our approach to social constructivism had shifted to an outcomes-based and developmentally focused program. From , we created a developmental continuum which continues to be an excellent tool for articulating child development. Program planning emphasized developmental goals that we had established for the children based on observations. However, we found that this approach breaks up the child s learning into finite skills, thereby compartmentalizing each area of development. As our goal was to explore the children s main inquiries, we took an inquirybased approach to planning. We now develop projects in consultation with the children that support their learning, leading to many interesting discoveries and exciting opportunities for the children. The teacher-preceptors had acknowledged the need for a shift in their beliefs and practice, expressing a desire to let things go referring mainly to classroom rules and an activity-focused program. We now offer the children the opportunity to lead their learning. The diagram below was developed for a presentation we delivered at the International Innovations in Early Childhood Education conference in Victoria, B.C. in July of It illustrates our cognitive shift from a goal and developmental outcome focus for the children s learning to a more bottom up approach which follows the children s main inquiries. As we were engaged in this reflective process we were also in the position to articulate our curriculum to student teachers. During our Leading the Way presentation, the teacherpreceptors noted: We are experiencing challenges articulating our process to students while we are still developing it. We are modeling what we are trying to achieve. We are becoming researchers and learners with the children and students. The way we are looking at children is helping us to reflect on how we interact with our students to encourage them to become critical thinkers. External Stakeholders Expectations Families as Stakeholders Families supply a wealth of resources that provide a context for children s learning. As a result of the LAP project, we began to experiment with new ways to further increase parent engagement and to be more responsive to the voice of parents. The Parent Advisory Committee began to take its direction from parent feedback, and based on this information, we changed our approach to how we communicate with parents about their child s learning. Portfolios for each child were created that include children s stories, photographs documenting their experiences, their artwork, as well as quarterly reports highlighting the child s strengths and next steps in learning. These portfolios also offer parents the opportunity to share stories and information with their children and the teacher-preceptors.

17 16 Community as Stakeholders Like all early learning and care programs, the ELC is influenced by policy development and the City of Toronto s Operating Criteria that assures quality assurance with centres that have a purchase of service agreement with the City. All programs serving children and families in the province of Ontario have been affected by the movement towards the development of integrated models of service delivery. The release of the Ontario Early Years Framework (McCain, Mustard, & McCuaig, 2013) announced the move of all early learning and care and family support programs to the Ministry of Education. This had implications for the ELC as well as the Gerrard Resource Centre (GRC) and the School of Early Childhood Studies family support program. It also prompted a more concerted effort to integrate the two lab centres as we work toward actualizing our beliefs and core values about family partnerships and parent engagement. The Operating Criteria as set out by our local municipality has been an ongoing impetus for reflection by staff. Linda Hart, ELC teacherpreceptor, writes do they [Operating Criteria principles] really celebrate the child as being capable, self-directed and a competent learner? Do they recognize the professional abilities of teachers to be responsive to children and to scaffold their learning? In order to promote higher order thinking the teacher must be comfortable in letting go of controlling children s learning and begin to observe, document, facilitate, and plan provocations that challenge children. It is at this point in the teaching process where teachers must find a balance in planning intentional, guided activities and in planning provocations that will add depth to children s experiences in which they practice critical, convergent, analytical, and divergent thinking. If we are truly allowing children to own and guide their learning, how can we as teachers preplan all experiences and claim we are following the children s lead? With close to 50% of our revenue coming from the City of Toronto, how can we follow our mission and vision and still reflect the requirements necessitated by this stakeholder? Does the Operating Criteria reflect current research in early education, and is it adaptable to the various teaching and learning approaches being used in the field? These are questions with which we continue to struggle.

18 The Establishment of the Ontario College of Early Childhood Educators While we considered other impetus for change, we examined the recently established Ontario College of Early Childhood Educators Code of Ethics and Standards of Practice, enacted in February When asked to present at the 2011 Association of Early Childhood Educators of Ontario conference about this document from a child care perspective, we remarked that now our career has finally been recognized as a profession, and we have a new motivation to further examine our ideals and pedagogy. With this recognition came a heightened sense of responsibility as a lab school to demonstrate exemplary practice in the field. Operational changes, mainly due to staffing, freed money in our budget for group reflective meetings. Our team engaged in several sessions to discuss our interpretation of the document, and in the process we began to examine our own beliefs and practices about teaching children, supporting families, and about ourselves as educators. As part of an institution that values professional learning, we were able to examine the implications of the document and believed that we could sustain the increase in accountability for professionalism, learning, and leadership. Opportunities for professional growth, such as attending and presenting at conferences during the remainder of 2012, were numerous, and each opportunity provided our team with a chance to further reflect on our pedagogy. 17 References Chumak-Horbatsch, R. (2008). Early Bilingualism: Children of Immigrants in an English-Language Childcare Centre. Psychology of Language and Communication, 12(1) Chumak-Horbatsch, R. (2012). Linguistically Appropriate Practice. (1 ed.). Toronto, ON: University of Toronto Press Inc. Ontario College of Early Childhood Educators. (2011). Code of Ethics and Standards of Practice: Recognizing and Honouring our Profession McCain, M.N., Mustard, J.F., & McCuaig, K. (2011). Early Years Study 3:Making Decisions, Taking Action. Toronto: Margaret & Wallace McCain Family Foundation. As we engage in reflective practice we find ourselves on a path to a philosophical approach that breaks away from our previous notions of teaching and learning. Through more holistic, inquiry-based, and reflective practices, we find that we are continually engaged in thinking about our pedagogical approach and how we engage with families, thereby offering children meaningful and authentic learning experiences.

19 18 An Approach to Student Training: Opportunities for Emergent Learning! Kathleen Brophy, Judy Callahan, Rachelle Campbell, and Lorna Reid University of Guelph, Ontario History of Experiential Learning at the Macdonald Institute At the turn of the 20th century, there was an increasing expansion of opportunities for vocational and educational advancement in response to the view that social problems could be solved through further education (Snell, 2003). At about this time in 1901, Adelaide Hoodless, president of the Hamilton Normal School of Domestic Sciences and Art, approached philanthropist Sir William Macdonald to support the development of a domestic science program at the Guelph campus of the Ontario Agricultural College. The program would promote applied and practical education into rural areas (Snell, 2003). The Macdonald Institute was thus established in 1903 and opened in 1904 as a school for rural women operated by the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture in collaboration with the Ontario Agriculture College in Guelph, Ontario. The Institute focused on teacher training with an emphasis on domestic science. Students completed their teaching observations and practice teaching in the nearby Macdonald Consolidated School, initiating a tradition of practicum education for women on the campus (Snell, 2003). By 1932, a half day nursery school was operating at the Institute to facilitate the observation of children and offer guidance for their mothers. In September 1959, the Macdonald Institute Nursery School was opened providing half day programs for children in the community (Snell, 2003). Macdonald Institute students observed the children and analyzed their behaviour as they engaged in daily activities. The school was renamed the Family Studies Laboratory School in 1968; here a practicum experience was provided for students enrolled in the new Child Studies major in the Bachelor of Applied Science degree program. In 1990 the University of Guelph Child Care and Learning Centre (CCLC) opened on campus delivering child care services for members of the University and Guelph community. At this time, a series of pilot studies were conducted to develop a model that would enable students in the Child Studies major to complete their practicum within the CCLC. After successfully developing such a model, in 1996 the Family Studies Laboratory School closed its services for children and families, and the practicum for university students was transferred to the CCLC. Experiential Learning The University of Guelph Child Care and Learning Centre (CCLC) embraced this training component of their mandate. The practical hands-on experience provided valuable opportunities for student and staff professional development by linking research, theory and application. Research in the field of teacher

20 19 training (Berliner, 1988) has long recognized that the complex world of human relations is dynamic and essentially a creative process, and that professional training cannot be based solely according to a list of competencies that have been previously defined (Brophy, Ryan & Stuart 1998). The primary goal of professional training beyond the provision of relevant knowledge and specific competencies is the creation in each student of a sense of themselves as professionals (Brophy, Ryan & Stuart 1998). One of the primary ways that students can experience the development of a professional identity is through the experiential courses offered in their respective programs. In particular, students must be placed in settings where their sense of themselves and their understandings of professional practice are required to undergo reconstruction and reintegration (Brophy, Ryan & Stuart, 1998). The various ways this can be accomplished may be viewed on a continuum that focuses on the intensity of the supervision provided. While all such approaches are used in training programs for early childhood educators, it is the distinction between the latter two approaches field placement and practicum that will be further developed (Unpublished Department Memo, Lero et al, 1993). Field placements provide instructional opportunities in service settings where students learn through observation and develop skills by working alongside professionals. However, student learning is limited by what the field supervisor and/or the agency judge as appropriate experiences in which students can be engaged (Unpublished Department Memo, 1993). In the field placement model, the course instructor meets with students in weekly seminars to discuss issues that have arisen in practice and to guide students in the resolution of such issues by providing personal insights and theoretical knowledge. The faculty/course instructor observes students in their placements anywhere from one to three times per semester and supports the work done in the field, but is not directly involved. There is a reliance on the onsite supervisor to provide direct feedback and instruction to students regarding day to day practice. Previous and/or concurrent coursework is expected to help the students function in their field placements. Faculty cannot arrange or structure student learning experiences, but they can offer their support. Although the course instructor will monitor the quality of the experiences provided in the field placement setting, and may support, troubleshoot, and evaluate the quality of the environment and the supervision provided, there is often great variability across settings and the resulting quality of student experiences. The role of the onsite supervisor becomes vital in providing support (Unpublished Department Memo, 1993). The practicum model such as the one offered at the CCLC offers a more direct approach to education in professional practice. Here students work within a context that has been specifically designed to offer instruction in practical and professional aspects of early education and care. In particular, the faculty/course instructor and the INTENSITY OF SUPERVISION None Low Medium High Volunteer/paid Observation in real settings Coop work Field placement Practicum

Program of Studies. Preschool 2015-16

Program of Studies. Preschool 2015-16 Program of Studies Preschool 2015-16 PRESCHOOL BCD s preschool program provides a nurturing and stimulating educational environment for young children. Self-confidence and the ability to work with others

More information

NUNAVUT. EDUCATION CAREERS Early Childhood Education PROGRAM REPORT. 171 Early Childhood Education DIPLOMA

NUNAVUT. EDUCATION CAREERS Early Childhood Education PROGRAM REPORT. 171 Early Childhood Education DIPLOMA NUNAVUT EDUCATION CAREERS Early Childhood Education PROGRAM REPORT 171 Early Childhood Education DIPLOMA Start Term: No Specified Start Date End Term: No Specified End Date Program Status: Approved Action

More information

Teaching Dossier (2007) LAURA KERR. Queen s University School of Nursing, Faculty of Health Sciences

Teaching Dossier (2007) LAURA KERR. Queen s University School of Nursing, Faculty of Health Sciences 1 Teaching Dossier (2007) Of LAURA KERR Queen s University School of Nursing, Faculty of Health Sciences 2 CONTENTS 1. Brief Biography 2. Teaching Philosophy 3. Teaching Responsibilities 3.1 Nurs 315 3.2

More information

Preparation for Teaching in Catholic Schools

Preparation for Teaching in Catholic Schools PREPARATION FOR TEACHING IN CATHOLIC SCHOOLS Preparation for Teaching in Catholic Schools (Initial Teacher Education Course) 2012 1. Introduction 1 The Institute for Catholic Education periodically updates

More information

Family Engagement and Ongoing Child Assessment

Family Engagement and Ongoing Child Assessment Family Engagement and Ongoing Child Assessment The partnership between parents and Head Start staff is fundamental to children s current and future success and their readiness for school. This relationship

More information

Collaborating with Children for Effective Programming

Collaborating with Children for Effective Programming Self Guided Learning Package Collaborating with Children for Effective Programming Community Child Care Victoria 2010 (PSCTas updated December 2010) - 1 - PSCTas is a program of Lady Gowrie Tasmania funded

More information

OSHC Program Examples Ideas and Inspiration

OSHC Program Examples Ideas and Inspiration OSHC Program Examples Ideas and Inspiration This professional learning opportunity is provided by the Professional Support Coordinator for South Australia, Gowrie SA under the Inclusion and Professional

More information

Your Image of the Child: Where Teaching Begins

Your Image of the Child: Where Teaching Begins Your Image of the Child: Where Teaching Begins by Loris Malaguzzi These comments are translated and adapted from a seminar presented by Professor Loris Malaguzzi in Reggio Emilia, Italy, June 1993. There

More information

Early Childhood Studies MA

Early Childhood Studies MA Early Childhood Studies MA School of Graduate Studies www.ryerson.ca/ece/graduate Ryerson University 350 Victoria Street Toronto, ON M5B 2K3 Canada December 2009 (66074) Early Childhood Studies MA The

More information

Program Outcomes and Assessment

Program Outcomes and Assessment Program Outcomes and Assessment BS Child Development Program Outcomes October 2013 Creative and Critical Thinkers Program Outcomes Courses Courses Standard 1. Understanding and Applying Developmental Knowledge

More information

Additional Qualification Course Guideline Special Education, Specialist

Additional Qualification Course Guideline Special Education, Specialist Additional Qualification Course Guideline Special Education, Specialist Schedule D Teachers Qualifications Regulation April 2014 Ce document est disponible en français sous le titre Ligne directrice du

More information

DIABLO VALLEY COLLEGE CATALOG 2015-2016

DIABLO VALLEY COLLEGE CATALOG 2015-2016 EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION ECE Obed Vazquez, Dean Social Sciences Division Faculty Office Building, Room 136 Possible career opportunities Early childhood educators focus on children from zero to age five.

More information

OISE Community Learning Garden

OISE Community Learning Garden OISE Community Learning Garden Year-End Report TD Friends of the Environment Foundation June 2014 Introduction Over the last five years faculty and students at OISE have been investigating new ways of

More information

Elementary MEd I. The Relationship of the Program with the Unit s Conceptual Framework

Elementary MEd I. The Relationship of the Program with the Unit s Conceptual Framework Elementary MEd I. The Relationship of the Program with the Unit s Conceptual Framework Shaping Tomorrow: Ideas to Action The Early Elementary Education program for prospective elementary education candidates

More information

Australian Professional Standard for Principals

Australian Professional Standard for Principals AITSL is funded by the Australian Government Australian Professional Standard for Principals July 2011 Formerly the National Professional Standard for Principals 2011 Education Services Australia as the

More information

University of Guelph DEPARTMENT OF FAMILY RELATIONS AND APPLIED NUTRITION FRHD*3200: Practicum Child COURSE OUTLINE Winter 2016

University of Guelph DEPARTMENT OF FAMILY RELATIONS AND APPLIED NUTRITION FRHD*3200: Practicum Child COURSE OUTLINE Winter 2016 University of Guelph DEPARTMENT OF FAMILY RELATIONS AND APPLIED NUTRITION FRHD*3200: Practicum Child COURSE OUTLINE Winter 2016 Course Instructor Tricia van Rhijn, PhD, RECE Office: MINS 215 Phone: 519-824-4120

More information

Child Development and Family Studies

Child Development and Family Studies Early Childhood Education (Formerly Early Childhood Education and Human Development) Program Description This program offers comprehensive study of child development, strategies for child guidance, techniques

More information

School Psychology Program Goals, Objectives, & Competencies

School Psychology Program Goals, Objectives, & Competencies RUTGERS SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY PROGRAM PRACTICUM HANDBOOK Introduction School Psychology is a general practice and health service provider specialty of professional psychology that is concerned with the science

More information

BOK Course Title Course Description Access to Children

BOK Course Title Course Description Access to Children ECE Online Courses Course Number BOK Course Title Course Description Access to Children 18CI1001 TI Educational Technology This course encompasses effectively analyzing, designing, Must videotape a developing,

More information

Nurturing Early Learners

Nurturing Early Learners Nurturing Early Learners A Curriculum Framework for Kindergartens in Singapore A Guide for Parents A Strong Start for Every Child 1 A Strong Start for Every Child A Word to Parents Parents know that the

More information

Best Choices: The Ethical Journey Guides A project of the Canadian Child Care Federation and ECEBC

Best Choices: The Ethical Journey Guides A project of the Canadian Child Care Federation and ECEBC Best Choices: The Ethical Journey Guides A project of the Canadian Child Care Federation and ECEBC Mary Burgaretta (Lower Mainland) Mary Burgaretta works for the BC Aboriginal Child Care Society in a Child

More information

Conceptual Framework for the Master of Arts in Teaching at Earlham College:

Conceptual Framework for the Master of Arts in Teaching at Earlham College: Conceptual Framework for the Master of Arts in Teaching at Earlham College: Awakening the Teacher Within It is worth acknowledging, in all humility, that, though there are many great, beautiful, noble

More information

KidsMatter Early Childhood Connecting with the Early Childhood Education and Care National Quality Framework

KidsMatter Early Childhood Connecting with the Early Childhood Education and Care National Quality Framework KidsMatter Early Childhood Connecting with the Early Childhood Education and Care National Quality Framework KidsMatter Early Childhood KidsMatter Early Childhood Mental Health Initiative has been developed

More information

UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION MISSION, VISION & STRATEGIC PRIORITIES. Approved by SBA General Faculty (April 2012)

UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION MISSION, VISION & STRATEGIC PRIORITIES. Approved by SBA General Faculty (April 2012) UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION MISSION, VISION & STRATEGIC PRIORITIES Approved by SBA General Faculty (April 2012) Introduction In 1926, we embarked on a noble experiment the creation

More information

Arkansas Teaching Standards

Arkansas Teaching Standards Arkansas Teaching Standards The Arkansas Department of Education has adopted the 2011 Model Core Teaching Standards developed by Interstate Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium (InTASC) to replace

More information

Early Childhood Program Guidance for Children Ages Birth through Eight

Early Childhood Program Guidance for Children Ages Birth through Eight Early Childhood Program Guidance for Children Ages Birth through Eight Technology and Interactive Media in the Early Years Technology and interactive media are rapidly expanding the materials and experiences

More information

Learning Center System. Preschool Resource Guide. Muriel Wong

Learning Center System. Preschool Resource Guide. Muriel Wong Learning Center System Preschool Resource Guide Muriel Wong TABLE OF CONTENTS Overview and purpose 3 Page Supporting Children s Learning 4 Daily Routine 8 The Classroom Environment 10 Learning Centers

More information

DRAFT THE CONTEXT: NORTHEASTERN 2015

DRAFT THE CONTEXT: NORTHEASTERN 2015 DRAFT NORTHEASTERN 2025: THE GLOBAL UNIVERSITY THE CONTEXT: NORTHEASTERN 2015 Northeastern University attracts students and faculty from around the world who value experiential learning as a cornerstone

More information

Revised 2012. Ontario College of Teachers Foundations of Professional Practice INTRODUCTION 2

Revised 2012. Ontario College of Teachers Foundations of Professional Practice INTRODUCTION 2 Revised 2012 Ontario College of Teachers Foundations of Professional Practice INTRODUCTION 2 Table of Contents 3 Foundations of Professional Practice 4 Introduction 5 Self-Regulation and Standards 7

More information

Child Development and Family Studies

Child Development and Family Studies Early Childhood Education (Formerly Early Childhood Education and Human Development) Program Description This program offers comprehensive study of child development, strategies for child guidance, techniques

More information

Early Childhood Special Education

Early Childhood Special Education TLLSC TEACHING, LEARNING, AND LEADING WITH SCHOOLS AND COMMUNITIES TLLSC Teaching, Learning and Leading with Schools and Communities Loyola University Chicago ECSE Scholarships Available Early Childhood

More information

Conference April 10 & 11, 2015 Scottsdale, Arizona

Conference April 10 & 11, 2015 Scottsdale, Arizona Conference April 10 & 11, 2015 Scottsdale, Arizona Conference April 10 & 11, 2015 Scottsdale, Arizona The Inspire Early Childhood Leadership Series is designed for early childhood educators and organizations

More information

Seeking the Next Director for

Seeking the Next Director for Seeking the Next Director for Mission Statement The mission of St. Anne s Day School, a ministry of St. Anne s Episcopal Church in Atlanta, GA, is to promote a nurturing, enriching environment where each

More information

DIABLO VALLEY COLLEGE CATALOG 2016-2017

DIABLO VALLEY COLLEGE CATALOG 2016-2017 EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION ECE Obed Vazquez, Dean Social Sciences Division Faculty Office Building, Room 136 Possible career opportunities Early childhood educators focus on children from zero to age five.

More information

Master of Science in Early Childhood Education Singapore, 2005 2006

Master of Science in Early Childhood Education Singapore, 2005 2006 Master of Science in Early Childhood Education Singapore, 2005 2006 Offered by RTRC Asia in Collaboration with Wheelock College s Center for International Education, Leadership, and Innovation Background

More information

Full-service community schools: A strategy not a program

Full-service community schools: A strategy not a program Community schools are one solution to the fact that schools can t do it alone. Today s youth need comprehensive, coordinated support services provided in schools through partnerships. 1 Full-service community

More information

CPC Certified Professional CoaCh training Program

CPC Certified Professional CoaCh training Program Participant Manual CPC Certified Professional CoaCh training Program ICF Accredited Coach Training Program 142 Contact Learning Hours 110 3rd Avenue North, Suite 102 Certified Professional CoaCh training

More information

A PhD in Public Affairs?

A PhD in Public Affairs? A PhD in Public Affairs? The Basics A Doctor of Philosophy degree, abbreviated Ph.D. for the Latin Philosophiae Doctor, is an advanced academic degree earned in many fields, signifying major interests

More information

PLAN YOUR CAREER. Horizon Career Centre CONTENT

PLAN YOUR CAREER. Horizon Career Centre CONTENT Horizon Career Centre Here at the AASW Horizon Career Centre we want to encourage you to develop clarity around your purpose in social work. Plan Your Career was developed to help you articulate your values

More information

Doctor of Education - Higher Education

Doctor of Education - Higher Education 1 Doctor of Education - Higher Education The University of Liverpool s Doctor of Education - Higher Education (EdD) is a professional doctoral programme focused on the latest practice, research, and leadership

More information

Coach Training Program Syllabus A Guide for the Learner

Coach Training Program Syllabus A Guide for the Learner International Coach Academy Coach Training Programs June 2012 Coach Training Program Syllabus A Guide for the Learner SUMMARY This document provides an overview of ICA Coach Training Programs - features,

More information

SELF-ASSESSMENT TOOL. Professional Learning Plan PSCA

SELF-ASSESSMENT TOOL. Professional Learning Plan PSCA SELF-ASSESSMENT TOOL Professional Learning Plan PSCA CONTENTS Introduction... 3 The Steps to your Professional Learning Plan... 3 Section 1... 4 Service Overview... 4 Section 2... 6 Quality Improvement

More information

Master of Science in Early Childhood Education Singapore, 2004 2005

Master of Science in Early Childhood Education Singapore, 2004 2005 Master of Science in Early Childhood Education Singapore, 2004 2005 Sponsored by Wheelock College s Center for International Education, Leadership, and Innovation and RTRC Asia in Singapore Background

More information

C118 Early Childhood Education MTCU Code 51211 Program Learning Outcomes

C118 Early Childhood Education MTCU Code 51211 Program Learning Outcomes C118 Early Childhood Education MTCU Code 51211 Program Learning Outcomes Synopsis of the Vocational Learning Outcomes The graduate has reliably demonstrated the ability to 1. design, implement and evaluate

More information

Child Development. Child Development. Associate Degrees. Contact Information. Full-Time Faculty. Associate in Arts Degrees

Child Development. Child Development. Associate Degrees. Contact Information. Full-Time Faculty. Associate in Arts Degrees Child Associate Degrees The Child program explores the social/emotional, cognitive/language, and physical/motor growth and development skills of children from conception through adolescence. Students take

More information

Humber College SCHool of HealtH SCienCeS StrategiC Plan 2014 2019

Humber College SCHool of HealtH SCienCeS StrategiC Plan 2014 2019 Humber College School of Health Sciences Strategic Plan 2014 2019 Vision and Strategy Overview Vision To prepare graduates who are skilled, adaptable, compassionate, global citizens. To ensure graduates

More information

RUNNING HEAD: INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN AND PEDOGIGCAL ISSUES. Instructional Design and Pedagogical Issues with Web 2.0 Tools

RUNNING HEAD: INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN AND PEDOGIGCAL ISSUES. Instructional Design and Pedagogical Issues with Web 2.0 Tools Instructional Design 1 RUNNING HEAD: INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN AND PEDOGIGCAL ISSUES Instructional Design and Pedagogical Issues with Web 2.0 Tools Amelia W. Cheney Robert L. Sanders Nita J. Matzen John H.

More information

Quality for All and All for Quality

Quality for All and All for Quality Quality for All and All for Quality The motto above, Quality for All and All for Quality, was designed to represent all we stand for and value. It is the essence of our mission statement which itself encompasses

More information

The search for a Visionary and Inspirational leader. for PRESIDENT of Lorain County Community College

The search for a Visionary and Inspirational leader. for PRESIDENT of Lorain County Community College The search for a Visionary and Inspirational leader for PRESIDENT of Lorain County Community College The District Board of Trustees and the Presidential Search Advisory Committee invite nominations and

More information

Energizing Engineering Leadership

Energizing Engineering Leadership Schulich School of Engineering Energizing Engineering Leadership Strategic Plan 2015-2020 Thinker Creator Designer Innovator Entrepreneur Communicator Team Player Leader What inspires us flip Engineers

More information

Rhode Island School of Design Strategic Plan Summary for 2012 2017. critical making. making critical

Rhode Island School of Design Strategic Plan Summary for 2012 2017. critical making. making critical Rhode Island School of Design Strategic Plan Summary for 2012 2017 critical making making critical executive summary This strategic plan serves as a guide for Rhode Island School of Design (RISD) over

More information

B.A. in Education Specialization: Early Childhood Education (P-3) Student Handbook

B.A. in Education Specialization: Early Childhood Education (P-3) Student Handbook B.A. in Education Specialization: Early Childhood Education (P-3) Student Handbook Rowan University College of Education Teacher Education Department 1 Table of Contents Program Description 3 ECED Program

More information

Educational Practices REFERENCE GUIDE. Aligned to the AdvancED Standards for Quality Schools

Educational Practices REFERENCE GUIDE. Aligned to the AdvancED Standards for Quality Schools Educational Practices REFERENCE GUIDE Aligned to the AdvancED Standards for Quality Schools Table of Contents Introduction... 3 Purpose and Direction... 4 Governance and Leadership... 5 Duties of the Governing

More information

ONE PrOgrams. Contact. First Year Learning Options. U of T St. George, Faculty of Arts & Science U of T Mississauga U of T Scarborough

ONE PrOgrams. Contact. First Year Learning Options. U of T St. George, Faculty of Arts & Science U of T Mississauga U of T Scarborough Contact U of T St. George, U of T Mississauga U of T Scarborough innis one www.utoronto.ca/innis new one www.newcollege.utoronto.ca smc one http://stmikes.utoronto.ca trinity one www.trinity.utoronto.ca

More information

More Caring College Admissions: 5 Tips for Parents

More Caring College Admissions: 5 Tips for Parents More Caring College Admissions: 5 Tips for Parents The college admissions process is a major rite of passage and a formative experience in which students receive powerful messages from adults including

More information

Self Assessment Tool for Principals and Vice-Principals

Self Assessment Tool for Principals and Vice-Principals The Institute for Education Leadership (IEL) brings together representatives from the principals' associations, the supervisory officers' associations, councils of directors of education and the Ministry

More information

Clinical Psychology. PsyD in Clinical Psychology. School of Professional Psychology and Health. www.ciis.edu/psyd

Clinical Psychology. PsyD in Clinical Psychology. School of Professional Psychology and Health. www.ciis.edu/psyd Clinical Psychology PsyD in Clinical Psychology School of Professional Psychology and Health www.ciis.edu/psyd Program Description The Doctor of Psychology in Clinical Psychology (PsyD) program prepares

More information

The Power of Documentation

The Power of Documentation The Power of Documentation in the Early Childhood Classroom A parent eyes something on the wall in the hallway near her child s classroom. She stops and looks across the entire wall, as if trying to determine

More information

Early Childhood Studies MA

Early Childhood Studies MA Early Childhood Studies MA School of Graduate Studies w w w.r yerson.ca/graduate Early Childhood Studies MA The School of Early Childhood Education offers an innovative program leading to a Master of Arts

More information

THINKING IT THROUGH: TEACHING AND LEARNING IN THE KINDERGARTEN CLASSROOM

THINKING IT THROUGH: TEACHING AND LEARNING IN THE KINDERGARTEN CLASSROOM THINKING IT THROUGH: TEACHING AND LEARNING IN THE KINDERGARTEN CLASSROOM This position statement provides educators of young children with important assessment guidelines. It also highlights some of the

More information

Early Childhood Education Program (ECE) Program Outline

Early Childhood Education Program (ECE) Program Outline Early Childhood Education Program (ECE) Program Outline PROGRAM IMPLEMENTATION DATE: September 1977 OUTLINE EFFECTIVE DATE: September 2015 PROGRAM OUTLINE REVIEW DATE: April 2020 GENERAL PROGRAM DESCRIPTION:

More information

TOOL KIT for RESIDENT EDUCATOR and MENT OR MOVES

TOOL KIT for RESIDENT EDUCATOR and MENT OR MOVES Get to Know My RE Observe Collect Evidence Mentor Moments Reflect Review Respond Tailor Support Provide Provide specific feedback specific Feedback What does my RE need? Practice Habits Of Mind Share Data

More information

Degree Level Expectations for Graduates Receiving the

Degree Level Expectations for Graduates Receiving the Degree Level Expectations for Graduates Receiving the Degree of Bachelor of Education, B.Ed. Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) University of Toronto 1 Introduction Teacher education has

More information

My name is Sheila Neuburger and I graduated from the University of Toronto, Factor- Inwentash Faculty of Social Work in 1979.

My name is Sheila Neuburger and I graduated from the University of Toronto, Factor- Inwentash Faculty of Social Work in 1979. Profiles in Social Work Episode 29 Sheila Neuburger Intro - Hi, I m Charmaine Williams, Associate Professor and Associate Dean, Academic, for the University of Toronto, Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social

More information

Principal Internships Five Tips for a Successful and Rewarding Experience

Principal Internships Five Tips for a Successful and Rewarding Experience Grey, Teresa I. (2001, May). Principal Internships: Five tips for a successful and rewarding experience. Phi Delta Kappan, 82 (9), 663-665. Principal Internships Five Tips for a Successful and Rewarding

More information

Additional Qualification Course Guideline. Primary Education Specialist

Additional Qualification Course Guideline. Primary Education Specialist Additional Qualification Course Guideline Primary Education Specialist Schedule D Regulation 184/97 Teachers Qualifications Standards of Practice and Education April 2003 Ce document est disponible en

More information

Fighting Diabetes through a Service Learning Partnership between Turtle Mountain Community College and the University of North Dakota

Fighting Diabetes through a Service Learning Partnership between Turtle Mountain Community College and the University of North Dakota Introduction Fighting Diabetes through a Service Learning Partnership between Turtle Mountain Community College and the University of North Dakota Peggy Johnson, Turtle Mountain Community College, and

More information

Credit: 61 credits. Campus. Education. Ellen Hamilton* New Program

Credit: 61 credits. Campus. Education. Ellen Hamilton* New Program PROGRAM OUTLINE Program Title: Early Childhood Education DIPLOMA Program Code: 016 Level: Credit: 61 credits Delivery: Fulltime, 7 semesters, 2 academic years Credential: Eligible for RPL: Diploma RPL

More information

21 st Century Learner: Schools for the Future

21 st Century Learner: Schools for the Future 21 st Century Learner: Schools for the Future October 2010 Article As a school district, we recognize the importance of our role in ensuring the best education for our students. We appreciate that the

More information

Preparing for the Vice-Principal Selection Process

Preparing for the Vice-Principal Selection Process Preparing for the Vice-Principal Selection Process 2014-15 Education Centre Aurora, 60 Wellington Street West, Aurora, Ontario, L4G 3H2 MESSAGE FROM THE DIRECTOR Dear Colleagues: Congratulations on aspiring

More information

Holistic education: An interpretation for teachers in the IB programmes

Holistic education: An interpretation for teachers in the IB programmes IB position paper Holistic education: An interpretation for teachers in the IB programmes John Hare International International Baccalaureate Baccalaureate Organization Organization 2010 2010 1 Language

More information

The Changing Landscapes of Early Childhood Education

The Changing Landscapes of Early Childhood Education The Changing Landscapes of Early Childhood Education Opportunities and Challenges of Integrating Early Learning and Child Care with Education Early Childhood Education and the School System A national

More information

LITERACY. Paying Attention to. Six Foundational Principles for Improvement in Literacy, K 12

LITERACY. Paying Attention to. Six Foundational Principles for Improvement in Literacy, K 12 K 12 Paying Attention to LITERACY Six Foundational Principles for Improvement in Literacy, K 12 Focus on literacy. Build an understanding of effective literacy instruction. Design a responsive literacy

More information

EDU 520: CURRICULUM, INSTRUCTION AND ASSESSMENT IN INTERNATIONAL SCHOOLS

EDU 520: CURRICULUM, INSTRUCTION AND ASSESSMENT IN INTERNATIONAL SCHOOLS EDU 520: CURRICULUM, INSTRUCTION AND ASSESSMENT IN INTERNATIONAL SCHOOLS George Mason University Summer Semester Tina Thuermer, Noel Sheppard For Tina: phone (703) 522-7640 (home) phone (202) 243-1860

More information

POLICY MONITOR #6. Children with Special Educational Needs in Early Childhood: Concept Paper prepared for the Atkinson Centre Early Years Task Force

POLICY MONITOR #6. Children with Special Educational Needs in Early Childhood: Concept Paper prepared for the Atkinson Centre Early Years Task Force POLICY MONITOR #6 Children with Special Educational Needs in Early Childhood: Concept Paper prepared for the Atkinson Centre Early Years Task Force Prepared by Kathryn Underwood and Rachel Langford School

More information

Healthy People 2020 and Education For Health Successful Practices in Undergraduate Public Health Programs

Healthy People 2020 and Education For Health Successful Practices in Undergraduate Public Health Programs University of Massachusetts Amherst Amherst, MA Undergraduate Degree in Public Health Sciences Bachelor in Science & 4 Plus 1 BS/MPH http://www.umass.edu/sphhs/public_health/academics/undergraduate/index.html

More information

Additional Qualification Course Guideline Teaching Students with Communication Needs (Learning Disability)

Additional Qualification Course Guideline Teaching Students with Communication Needs (Learning Disability) Additional Qualification Course Guideline Teaching Students with Communication Needs (Learning Disability) Schedule C Teachers Qualifications Regulation December 2011 Ce document est disponible en français

More information

EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION (AS) Associate Degree, Certificate of Achievement & Department Certificate Programs (formerly Child Development)

EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION (AS) Associate Degree, Certificate of Achievement & Department Certificate Programs (formerly Child Development) A Course of Study for EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION (AS) Associate Degree, Certificate of Achievement & Department Certificate Programs (formerly Child Development) Early Childhood Education majors will be

More information

2015 KAMAROI PARENT EDUCATION PROGRAM TERM 4

2015 KAMAROI PARENT EDUCATION PROGRAM TERM 4 2015 KAMAROI PARENT EDUCATION PROGRAM TERM 4 This term there are four evening sessions scheduled. The first is specifically for current Kamaroi Kindergarten parents with children moving to Class 1 in 2016.

More information

Course Guide Masters of Education Program (UOIT)

Course Guide Masters of Education Program (UOIT) Course Guide Masters of Education Program (UOIT) Note: 1 course = 3 credits Students need 12 credits (4 courses) to obtain Graduate Diploma Students need 30 credits (10 courses) to obtain M.Ed. Or M.A

More information

STUDENT OUTCOMES ASSESSMENT PLAN (SOAP)

STUDENT OUTCOMES ASSESSMENT PLAN (SOAP) Masters of Arts in Education, Early Childhood Education Option Kremen School of Education and Human Development STUDENT OUTCOMES ASSESSMENT PLAN (SOAP) I. Mission Statement Empower Early Childhood Education

More information

Kouzes, J. M., & Posner, B. Z. (2007). The leadership challenge (4th ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Kouzes, J. M., & Posner, B. Z. (2007). The leadership challenge (4th ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass. Kouzes, J. M., & Posner, B. Z. (2007). The leadership challenge (4th ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass. Reviewed by Chelsea Truesdell Introduction The Leadership Challenge serves as a resource for any

More information

M.A. EDUCATION M.A. DEVELOPMENT M.A. PUBLIC POLICY AND GOVERNANCE Specialisations in. Specialisations in

M.A. EDUCATION M.A. DEVELOPMENT M.A. PUBLIC POLICY AND GOVERNANCE Specialisations in. Specialisations in About Us, Our Vision and Mission Azim Premji University was established by the Azim Premji Foundation, in 2010. The Foundation s vision is to contribute to the realization of a just, equitable, humane

More information

National Standards. Council for Standards in Human Service Education. http://www.cshse.org 2013 (2010, 1980, 2005, 2009)

National Standards. Council for Standards in Human Service Education. http://www.cshse.org 2013 (2010, 1980, 2005, 2009) Council for Standards in Human Service Education National Standards BACCALAUREATE DEGREE IN HUMAN SERVICES http://www.cshse.org 2013 (2010, 1980, 2005, 2009) I. GENERAL PROGRAM CHARACTERISTICS A. Institutional

More information

Handbook For Credit for Prior Learning/Work Experience. Early Childhood Education Associate Degree

Handbook For Credit for Prior Learning/Work Experience. Early Childhood Education Associate Degree Handbook For Credit for Prior Learning/Work Experience Early Childhood Education Associate Degree Approved April 12, 2012 Table of Contents Page number Explanation of the process 3-4 Am I a Good Candidate

More information

u Field Experience Handbook for Supervising Library Media Teacher or Teacher Librarian

u Field Experience Handbook for Supervising Library Media Teacher or Teacher Librarian u Field Experience Handbook for Supervising Library Media Teacher or Teacher Librarian Revised 2010 Dear Supervising Teacher Librarian: Thank you for your willingness to have a student perform fieldwork

More information

Preparing Early Childhood Professionals

Preparing Early Childhood Professionals Preparing Early Childhood Professionals NAEYC s Standards for Programs Marilou Hyson, Editor NAEYC s Standards for Initial Licensure, Advanced, and Associate Degree Programs Also includes standards material

More information

EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION

EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION MIDDLE STATES ASSOCIATION OF COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS COMMISSIONS ON ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY SCHOOLS AN INTRODUCTION TO THE EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION PROGRAM OF DISTINCTION V. 2 3624 Market Street 2 West

More information

Towson University Strategic Academic Plan 2010-2016

Towson University Strategic Academic Plan 2010-2016 Towson University Strategic Academic Plan 2010-2016 University Summary Mission Statement Towson University, as the state s comprehensive Metropolitan University, offers a broad range of undergraduate and

More information

Dr. Candice McQueen, Dean, College of Education 168 LIPSCOMB UNIVERSITY 2009-10

Dr. Candice McQueen, Dean, College of Education 168 LIPSCOMB UNIVERSITY 2009-10 Dr. Candice McQueen, Dean, College of Education 168 LIPSCOMB UNIVERSITY 2009-10 Department of Education Junior High, Associate Professor and Academic Chair Charles A. Beaman, Visiting Professor Keith Nikolaus,

More information

Technology: A Tool for Knowledge Construction in a Reggio Emilia Inspired Teacher Education Program

Technology: A Tool for Knowledge Construction in a Reggio Emilia Inspired Teacher Education Program Early Childhood Education Journal, Vol. 32, No. 2, October 2004 (Ó 2004) Technology: A Tool for Knowledge Construction in a Reggio Emilia Inspired Teacher Education Program Seong B. Hong 1,2 and Mary Trepanier-Street

More information

Beacon s Education Program:

Beacon s Education Program: Beacon s Education Program: Why it works 2101 Livingston Street Oakland, CA 94606 510.436.4466 beaconday.org Part One: Curriculum Spirals Beacon s Education Program is based upon a system which we call

More information

Philosophy Statement. Jason Champagne. Wright State University

Philosophy Statement. Jason Champagne. Wright State University J. Champagne Philosophy 1 Running Head: PHILOSOPHY STATEMENT Philosophy Statement Jason Champagne Wright State University J. Champagne Philosophy 2 Philosophy Statement Over the course of my career, I

More information

NIH Executive Leadership Program

NIH Executive Leadership Program NIH Executive Leadership Program The Partnership for Public Service and NIH Developing Strong Leaders The NIH Executive Leadership Program brings together change-makers in government and strong executive

More information

COLLEGE TEACHERS TRAINING FOR INTERNATIONALLY EDUCATED PROFESSIONALS (ONLINE) - POSTGRADUATE PROGRAM (R413)

COLLEGE TEACHERS TRAINING FOR INTERNATIONALLY EDUCATED PROFESSIONALS (ONLINE) - POSTGRADUATE PROGRAM (R413) COLLEGE TEACHERS TRAINING FOR INTERNATIONALLY EDUCATED PROFESSIONALS (ONLINE) - POSTGRADUATE PROGRAM (R413) PROGRAM NAME COURSE CODE SCHOOL CENTRE LOCATION DURATION College Teachers Training for Internationally

More information

The Manitoba Government. Corporate Human Resource Plan

The Manitoba Government. Corporate Human Resource Plan The Manitoba Government Corporate Human Resource Plan 2012 2014 2 This information is available in alternate formats upon request. Introductory Message from the Deputy Ministers Working for the Manitoba

More information

Reflecting on creativity and cognitive challenge: visual representations and mathematics in early childhood some evidence from research

Reflecting on creativity and cognitive challenge: visual representations and mathematics in early childhood some evidence from research Reflecting on creativity and cognitive challenge: visual representations and mathematics in early childhood some evidence from research Maulfry Worthington What does research tell us about cognitive challenge,

More information

Team-Building Report, Spring 2013

Team-Building Report, Spring 2013 Team-Building Experiences to Promote Critical Thinking Community Outreach and Health Promotion (HWP 310) Spring 2013 Report by Ameena Batada, HWP Department Background During the Spring 2013 semester,

More information

Standards for Certification in Early Childhood Education [26.110-26.270]

Standards for Certification in Early Childhood Education [26.110-26.270] I.B. SPECIFIC TEACHING FIELDS Standards for Certification in Early Childhood Education [26.110-26.270] STANDARD 1 Curriculum The competent early childhood teacher understands and demonstrates the central

More information

Health and Physical Education, Intermediate and Senior Specialist

Health and Physical Education, Intermediate and Senior Specialist Additional Qualification Course Guideline Health and Physical Education, Intermediate and Senior Specialist Schedule D Teachers Qualifications Regulation July 2011 Ce document est disponible en français

More information