Preservation Guidelines for the Historic Districts

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1 City of Anderson, Indiana Preservation Guidelines for the Historic Districts Kevin S. Smith, Mayor Produced by the City of Anderson Long Term Planning January 2012 i

2 Preservation Guidelines for Historic Districts Policies and procedures City of Anderson Historical and Cultural Preservation Commission ii

3 Staff & Officials MAYOR City of Anderson Kevin S. Smith MUNICIPAL DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT Frank Owens, Municipal Development Director & HCPC Staff/Preservation Coordinator Anna Allman, HCPC Secretary William Buyers - Attorney for Commission City Hall, Municipal Development 1 ST Floor, 120 East Eighth Street Anderson, Indiana (765) HISTORICAL AND CULTURAL PRESERVATION COMMISSION President, P. Ernie DeOllos Vice President, Martha Carmichael Ron Harris Gary McKinney Josh Stafford Eugene Yates January 2012 iii

4 Resources BOOKS Old House Dictionary, An illustrated Guide to American Domestic Architecture 1600 to 1940, written and illustrated by Steven J. Phillips The Old-House Journal New Compendium, A complete how-to guide for sensitive rehabilitation, Edited by Patricia Poore and Clem Labine, Compiled by Maris Cakars Illustrated Anderson Indiana, U.S.A., 1966 reproduction of Illustrated Anderson, Indiana, U.S.A Issued with the approval of the Chamber of Commerce of Anderson by Henry R. Fish Anderson A Pictorial History, by Esther Dittlinger Copyright 1990 INTERNET Indiana Dept. of Natural Resources: Division of Historic Preservation & Archaeology: Internet: Click on Indiana Register of Historic Sites and Structures Nomination Form SAMPLE/GUIDE: iv

5 Table of Contents GENERAL INFORMATION... 1 Statement of Purpose... 2 Historical and Cultural Preservation Commission... 3 Historic Districts & Individual Structures... 4 Certificates of Appropriateness... 5 Requirements for Other Permits... 7 GUIDELINES... 8 Existing Buildings... 9 Building Materials... 9 Roofs and Roofing Porches Windows and Doors Environment New Construction Fences Demolition Commercial Buildings Signage Definitions APPENDIX I. Abrasive Cleaning II. Synthetic Siding III. Secretary of the Interiors Standards & Guidelines for Historic Preservation Projects IV. Listing A Property on the State or National Register in Indiana V. Types of National Register Listing VI. City of Anderson Historical and Cultural Preservation Ordinance v

6 GENERAL INFORMATION Page 1

7 STATEMENT OF PURPOSE The structures and amenities which compose the City historic districts serve as a vital tangible link to the historical, architectural and cultural development of Anderson. These manmade environments embody the fine artistic and craft talents of a century and a half of construction. They also symbolize the hopes and dreams and successes and failures of generations of Andersonian's long past. They act as a resource from our past by providing a sense of time and place. For these reasons, the need to preserve and protect the distinctive qualities of historical, architectural and cultural significant buildings or districts is essential in enhancing the quality of life in Anderson. Listing a structure or district as a historic designation is a method for preserving resources which characterize and symbolize our heritage. While the National Register was established to recognize the architectural, historical, and cultural significance of resources within the United States, Anderson's Historical and Cultural Preservation Ordinance was instituted to provide residents in historic districts with a tool to monitor the changes expected to occur in these areas. The West Eighth Street Historic District and the West Central Historic District have a rich diversity of architectural style located within these two districts and in scattered locations which are overseen by the Historical and Cultural Preservation Commission. The construction of buildings within the designated areas began in the late 1850's and continued well into the first half of the twentieth century. The long span of history represented by the historic districts facilitated the great degree of variety of styles. Unlike many historic neighborhoods across the country which exhibited a more homogenous continuity of style, many of the homes in the local districts display characteristics of several styles. This commingling of styles is a result of the construction of homes during periods when styles were in transition or the altering of an established home in a style not original to the structure. There are also several homes which are pure examples of a particular style of architecture. This wide range of style and the many years of history they represent establish the historical and cultural essence of Anderson's historic districts and sites. These design standards were developed to preserve and protect the district s unique characteristics while at the same time permitting new development and growth within these designated historic areas. Page 2

8 HISTORICAL AND CULTURAL PRESERVATION COMMISSION On May 12th, 1977, the Anderson City Council created a seven member historic commission for the purpose of making effective the provisions of the ordinance. Five members are appointed by the Mayor, one appointed by the City Council and one appointed by the Planning Commission to make up the Historical and Cultural Preservation Commission, comprised of professionals and city residents with an interest in historic preservation. The Commission is responsible for the following five functions established by Historic and Cultural Preservation Plan Ordinance. 1. Be concerned with those elements of development, redevelopment, rehabilitation, and preservation that affect the continued existence of, and visual quality in, historic districts; 2. Review and recommend to City Council the designation of local historic districts; 3. Adopt rules consistent with the Historical and Cultural Preservation Ordinance; and, 4. Issue Certificates of Appropriateness for any action required by the ordinance. This document has been compiled to provide historic district residents with a set of policies, procedures, and guidelines relating to the design review process of the Historic and Cultural Preservation Commission. Guidelines presented in the text will assist property owners in determining appropriate exterior modifications. Page 3

9 HISTORIC DISTRICTS & INDIVIDUAL STRUCTURES The City of Anderson has two historic districts that are under the auspinclude The West 8 th Street Historic District and The West Central Historic District. WEST 8 TH STREET HISTORIC DISTRICT This District is bounded on the South by portions of West 9 th Street; on the West by Henry Street and the alley west of Henry Street; on the East by Jackson Street and on the North by portions of the alley north of West 8 th Street, West 8 th Street, and the alley north of West 7 th Street. WEST CENTRAL HISTORIC DISTRICT This District is bounded on the North by the alley north of West 10 th Street, on the East by portions of Jackson Street, Brown-Delaware Street, and Brown Street; on the South by the alley south of West 13 th Street; and on the west by portions of Lincoln Street, Morton Street and John Street. INDIVIDUAL SITES AND STRUCTURES There are eight individual sites that are listed on the Local Register of Historical Sites, designated by the Historic and Cultural Preservation Commission: 1-Byrum Hall, AU 2-St. Mary s Church 3-Trinity Episcopal Church 4-Fire Station #4 5-Athletic Pool 6-Anderson Fine Arts Building 7-Gruenewald Home 8-Rush Temporaries Page 4

10 CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS A Certificate of Appropriateness is the document issued by the Historical and Cultural Preservation Commission for exterior changes to buildings and characteristic features of the environment within locally designated historic districts. Changes involving new construction, reconstruction, alteration, demolition, major maintenance, and the introduction of fences, walls, lighting fixtures, permanent landscaping, etc., require a certificate before other permits are issued for, or work begins, on exterior projects. Other permits may include: Improvement Certificate of Appropriateness Location Permits (ILP), Building Permits, Sign Permits, Demolition Permit, and/or Building Permits. (See the following section, Requirements for Other Permits.) This approval process is not, however, intended to prevent the ordinary maintenance or repair of any building, structure, or site, provided that such maintenance does not result in a change in the design, form, mass, proportion, configuration, building material, texture, location, or visual appearance of any structure or part Various permits thereof. Blue prints, site plans A Certificate of Appropriateness can be obtained by filing an application with the Commission's staff, located in the City of Anderson's Municipal Development Department. Documentation which completely and effectively explains and illustrates the proposed changes, such as photographs, drawings, site plans, and sample materials must be submitted with the application. There is a $25.00 filing fee charged for filing a Certificate of Appropriateness application. The Petitioner is also required to run a legal advertisement in the local newspaper. (There is a legal ad form included in the Brochures Old photo example packet.) If owners begin rehabilitation efforts PRIOR to submitting their application and obtaining approval from the Commission, they will be subject to a $ application fee. New construction, demolition, the moving of any building, major maintenance requiring replacement of materials and features, cases which do not meet the adopted guidelines, and claims of economic hardship must be approved by the Historical and Cultural Preservation Commission. Page 5

11 The Commission meets regularly on the third (3rd) Monday of every month. Applications must be submitted with all pertinent documentation, twenty-eight (28) days prior to the meeting date to be considered at the regularly scheduled meeting. A meeting calendar can be obtained from the Municipal Development Department for exact meeting dates and times. Written comments and recommendations for action will be prepared by staff for applications. Case reviews will be routed through the Municipal Development Department to solicit comments pertaining to other regulations or ordinances which might apply to Historical and Cultural Preservation Commission cases. Copies of staff reports will be available to applicants, neighborhood associations, and any interested parties prior to Commission review. Public comments during the meeting are encouraged. Once staff reports, documentation, and public comments have been considered, the Commission shall approve, deny, or otherwise act upon an application. If the Commission finds that the documentation submitted is inadequate to take appropriate action on any case, the Commission reserves the right to defer approval or denial until the next scheduled meeting. The Commission shall request an applicant to provide any additional information it finds necessary to make a fair and equitable decision. If an application is approved, a Certificate of Appropriateness shall be issued. The Commission has the authority to set any conditions on an approved application to ensure compliance with the adopted guidelines. If an application is denied, the Commission shall state its reasons for denial. Reconsideration requests on any case denied by the Commission shall be accepted no sooner than six months from the date of Commission action. Such requests for reconsideration must be submitted in written form. Appeals from the decision as to the issuance of Certificates of Appropriateness shall be to the Board of Zoning Appeals. Submitting complete and thorough applications will avoid any potential and unnecessary delays. Applicants who have questions concerning what documentation is appropriate for their proposals should contact the City Municipal Development Department. Page 6

12 REQUIREMENTS FOR OTHER PERMITS Although a Certificate of Appropriateness is approved and obtained from the Historic and Cultural Preservation Commission, it does not eliminate the Petitioner from obtaining other City Permits. Other city permits may include: Improvement Location Permits (ILP), Sign Permits, Building Permits, and/or Demolition Permits. All permits may be obtained at the Municipal Development Department. It is the responsibility of the Petitioner to check with this Department to determine whether or not a Permit(s) is required. Certificate of Appropriateness Various City permits All permits may be obtained in the City of Anderson Municipal Development Department: Red Permit - Building Permit Green Permit - Certificate of Appropriateness issued by the Municipal Development upon the approval of the Historic and Cultural Preservation Commission Blue Permit - Improvement Location Permit -Zoning Orange Permit - Demolition Permit Yellow Permit - Mobile Sign Permit - Zoning The Municipal Development Department is located at the City Building, 120 E. 8 th Street, Anderson, Indiana on the1 st Floor. Page 7

13 GUIDELINES Page 8

14 EXISTING BUILDINGS Building Materials Appropriate 1. Wood - Retain original exterior wood siding and trim materials through repair, cleaning, painting, and routine maintenance procedures. Preserve original architectural details and features which characterize the building exterior around and including windows, doors, porches and eaves or replace by using components of the same material and design when deteriorated beyond repair. 2. Masonry - Maintain masonry through proper tuck pointing, and cleaning when necessary. Mortar joints shall be repointed only when there is evidence of moisture problems or when mortar has deteriorated and allows water to penetrate the building through the joint. Pointing mortar shall duplicate the original in composition, strength, color, texture, joint size, method of application, and joint profile. Remove deteriorated mortar by hand raking or a manner equally sensitive to the historic material. Clean, when necessary, by the gentlest method possible, for example using low pressure water and natural bristle brushes, so that the original color and texture of masonry surfaces are preserved. 3. Stucco - Maintain stucco surfaces through gentle cleaning and repainting when applicable. Use a stucco mixture which duplicates the original in composition strength, texture, and general appearance to repair damaged surfaces. 4. Terra Cotta - Retain and preserve architectural terra cotta elements through a program of regular inspection, caulking and replacement of missing pieces, and re-pointing of joints with a mortar compatible to the original in composition, strength, texture, and color. Undertake cleaning with low pressure water, detergent, and natural or nylon bristle brushes. 5. Architectural Metals - Identify, retain, and preserve architectural metal features, such as columns, capitals, window hoods, and stairways, including their finishes and colors, that are important in defining the overall historic character of the building. Protect and maintain architectural metals from corrosion by providing proper drainage. Clean surfaces, when appropriate, Page 9

15 using the gentlest means possible for the particular metal, to remove corrosion prior to repainting or applying other appropriate protective coatings. Repair architectural metal features by patching, splicing, or reinforcing the metal following sympathetic rehabilitation methods. When possible, limit replacement only to extensively deteriorated or missing parts of a feature using in kind materials. If an entire feature is deteriorated beyond repair, replacement units must duplicate the original form and detailing based on physical or photographic evidence. 6. Hardiplank Siding - Hardiplank siding was approved to be used by the Historic Commission only on a case-by-case basis as of The Commission considered Hardiplank siding to be appropriate for use on garages and new construction; however the application on an original dwelling must be carefully considered by the Commission. A high percentage of the existing wooden siding must be considered deteriorated beyond repair in order to be considered to be replaced by Hardiplank siding. Inappropriate The application of siding materials not consistent with the character or style of building or unavailable when the building was constructed and therefore is foreign to the structure, (such as artificial stone or brick, asbestos or asphalt shingle, insulbrick, plywood, particle board, hard board, and aluminum or vinyl siding) is inappropriate. The application of the above mentioned replacement sidings to structures with sound original siding is prohibited. Because artificial sidings have been documented to cause serious, costly, and often irreparable damage to underlying materials and structural members, the Historical and Cultural Preservation Commission has determined that the use of these siding materials in rehabilitating historically designated properties is inappropriate and incongruous with the purpose of the ordinance (refer to Appendix II). Furthermore, the use of artificial siding materials in new construction projects is considered inappropriate and incompatible with the character of designated historic districts. For these reasons, the Commission recommends the rehabilitation of the original siding in local historic districts and sites. Do not use abrasive cleaning methods, such as sandblasting, on any exterior surface. These methods of cleaning erode the material's surface which allows moisture to accelerate deterioration and changes the original texture and appearance of the building material, (refer to Appendix I). Do not re-point masonry with a mortar incompatible with strength, composition, color and texture of the original. Pointing mortars with high Portland Cement content create a bond stronger than the building material itself. Damaging results occur due to the differing porosity and expansion rates of the material and mortar which leads to expensive replacement of the masonry units. Electric saws should not be used to remove mortar as they can cause serious damage to the adjacent brick Page 10

16 and change the joint size. Removal of sound paint from historically painted masonry surfaces is inappropriate. Some buildings constructed of softer brick were originally painted for protection, and removal of intact painted surfaces may hasten deterioration of the exposed surface. A test patch should be tried before extensive paint removal is attempted. The painting of the brick, stone, masonry that has never been painted, i.e. chimneys, walls, porches, or foundations, will not be permitted. Page 11

17 EXISTING BUILDINGS Roofs and Roofing Appropriate Preserve unique and inherently durable materials such as slate, tile, and architectural metal used for their permanence and stability through spot repair and preventative maintenance. Retain the original roof shape and all architectural features and detailing which give the roof area its essential character such as brackets, chimneys, cornices, cresting, cupolas, dormer windows, and weather vanes. Open eaves w/ brackets Replace deteriorated roofing materials as required, with new material that matches the existing in style, color, texture, size, and composition. Where original materials have been lost, roofing which duplicates the appearance of the original materials is encouraged. Open eaves should be retained and NOT boxed in. Existing brackets add to the historic appearance of the house. Rain gutters and down spouts often help to define the character of roof lines while serving to channel water away from the building. Identify and preserve designs and materials of distinctive gutters. When severely deteriorated systems warrant replacement, match new systems with the existing in design, size, scale, material, and color. Inappropriate Stripping a roof of character-defining architectural features, materials, or detailing is inappropriate. Do not change the character or shape of the roof by the addition of incompatible design, materials, or architectural features foreign to the original structure or building style. Placement of mechanical, electrical, and technical equipment such as solar panels and satellite dishes in obtrusive positions on roofs is inappropriate as they physically and visually disturb the character of historic properties and neighborhoods. It is inappropriate to box in eaves that are open, or have brackets. Eaves should be left open to reveal brackets, and the style of the home. Page 12

18 EXISTING BUILDINGS Porches Appropriate Maintain the structural and decorative elements which comprise porches in an effort to avoid costly repair, replacement, or unsafe conditions. Retain existing original porches and steps including features such as handrails, balusters, columns, brackets, spindle work, tiles, roof decorations, etc. Repair or replace missing or deteriorated features with elements that duplicate the originals in design and materials. Porches not original to the building but which contribute to the character of the property, or have developed architectural or historical significance in their own right, should be preserved. Base any reconstruction of missing porches, pieces or sidewalks on photographs, written documentation or existing physical evidence of their existence. In the absence of documented or physical evidence, new porches and sidewalk materials should be simple in design and ornamentation, following the New Construction Guidelines. The construction of a missing porch may require a waiver from present-day zoning setback requirements. Check conformance with current codes when planning any new construction. Porch enclosures, if required, should be done in a manner that does not compromise the architectural or historical integrity of the building or impair historic materials or details. Enclosures must also conform with present zoning setback regulations. It should be noted that most enclosures visibly and physically alter the volume and mass of a building. Therefore, alternatives to porch enclosure should be carefully considered. Page 13

19 Inappropriate Removal or alteration of porches, steps, and details which define the character, style, construction, and historical development of the porch or property is inappropriate. Introduction of elements which represent different construction periods, methods, Brick steps that are a characteristic of the home styles, or innovations as replacements or additions to porches. Lattice and wrought iron support porch posts, for example, are not a characteristic building material in the construction of historic porches in Anderson and is inappropriate for this use. The addition of ornamentation where none previously existed presents a false historical appearance and is inappropriate. Page 14

20 EXISTING BUILDINGS Windows and Doors Appropriate Retain original windows, doors, and their characteristic elements including sash, lintels, sills, shutters, decorative hoods, pediments and molding, hardware, muntins, and decorative glass. When deteriorated beyond repair, replacement units shall duplicate the original in design, size, scale, material, color, texture, and muntin placement and profile, when appropriate. The Anderson Historical and Cultural Preservation Commission has determined that wood windows are the most appropriate option when the replacement of original units in residential districts is warranted. Install shutters only when evidence indicates their original existence or when appropriate to the building style. Applied shutters, whether operable or fixed, must be proportioned to give the appearance of covering the window opening when closed. (See example of old photo with shutters.) Awnings should be of canvas or similar compatible material when used on either commercial or residential buildings. Wooden frame storm windows and doors painted to match or accent the trim are historically preferable to metal units. Metal storm windows and full view storm doors are considered an appropriate alternative when they are painted, anodized, or coated in a color that compliments the building design and color scheme. Before After See example of deteriorated window that has been restored above. Page 15

21 Inappropriate Do not introduce new window or door openings or changes in existing openings such as enclosure, relocation, reduction, or enlargement that alter the scale and proportion of the building. Do not install window or door features of inappropriate style or material such as vinyl or aluminum frame-insulating glass combinations requiring total removal of existing units when original windows, doors, and hardware can be restored and reused in place. Replacement of original or character-defining doors with insulated steel replacement doors is not considered appropriate on highly visible facades. Metal, fiberglass, and plastic awnings are inappropriate. Do not apply inappropriate historical detailing which seeks to create an earlier appearance. Highly decorative wrought iron security doors are not considered appropriate, although those of simpler design may be acceptable. Page 16

22 The illustration below shows what could happen to the same house after a few common remodeling efforts. Built c. 1885, this house is a striking example of the Queen Anne style. The exterior achieves its unique character through a rich variety of patterned shingles, trim work, windows, and patterns of light and shadow. Inappropriate Alterations 1. Top of tower removed 2. Porches enclosed - large picture window added 3. Trim work removed or covered 4. Door and window openings reduced to accommodate stock replacement units 5. "Colonial" aluminum storm doors added 6. Shutters incorrectly scaled to window size and inappropriate to architectural style 7. Dormer window replaced with vent 8. Textured wall surface covered with aluminum siding. BEFORE AFTER Note: Energy conservation does not necessitate the replacement of historic windows as they can be made thermally efficient by historically and aesthetically acceptable means. In fact, a historic wooden window, coupled with a high quality storm of wood or aluminum, should thermally out-perform a new double-glazed metal window which does not have thermal breaks. This occurs because the wood has far better insulating value than the metal. In addition, most historic windows have high ratios of wood to glass, thus reducing the area of highest heat transfer. The simple application of weather-stripping, caulking, and the installation of channel kits increases energy efficiency while avoiding the expense of replacement windows. Page 17

23 ENVIRONMENT Appropriate Distinctive walkway Retain distinctive character-defining features, materials, and planting patterns of the neighborhood or building site. These features include parks, gardens, walkways, fences, signs, benches, building setbacks, and those public features and facilities such as streets, alleys, sidewalks and curbing, and streetlights. Mature plantings should also be preserved and treated with sensitivity unless they pose a potential threat to the preservation of, or have been placed in poor composition with, buildings or sites. Remove or prune trees and shrubs in close proximity to the building that could cause deterioration of the structure, its materials, or surface finishes. Planting schemes which respect gardening fashions of the time the house was constructed are encouraged. Compatibility of new plant materials, fencing, lighting, signs, benches, and paving materials is based on the character of the site, surrounding properties and neighborhood in size, scale, material, texture, and color. It is advisable that applicants consult City Planning staff prior to undertaking environmental projects. Air conditioning condensers, heat pumps, and other mechanical devices shall be placed in locations not visible from the streets or alley ways or screened so as not to disrupt the integrity of the architecture or site. Mature tree causes damage to house The appropriateness of new, permanent plantings are based on their placement and size at maturity. Large growing shrubs or trees must be placed in areas where they will not block important architectural features and site views or cause building damage through moisture retention, root invasion, and falling or rubbing limbs. Parking areas, when required, must be set away and buffered from buildings in either rear or side yards, be appropriately paved, and screened to maintain building, site, and neighborhood relationships. Page 18

24 Inappropriate Disruptions in the relationship between buildings and their environments through changes in paving, lighting, fencing, or retention walls and traffic flow (pedestrian or vehicular) do not conform to the purpose of the ordinance and are inappropriate. Inappropriate environmental changes also include misplaced and inadequately screened parking areas and signage which blocks or interrupts significant views, rhythms, or architectural features. Do not remove healthy, mature trees that create the overall neighborhood canopy. Do not add or remove fencing, paving, out-buildings, and other elements until their relationship to the property and overall neighborhood environment is evaluated by the Commission. Do not install conspicuous, high-intensity overhead lights. Brightly colored or sharply contrasting stones, tires, trash, miscellaneous debris, logs, etc., are inappropriate. If required, railroad ties, landscaping timbers, and metal and plastic edging materials should be recessed to grade level to facilitate lawn edge maintenance while retaining visual integrity. However, alternative edging materials should be considered. Page 19

25 NEW CONSTRUCTION Appropriate New construction must harmonize with existing, adjacent buildings and neighborhood character in terms of height, scale, mass, setback, materials, rhythm, proportion, and color. Identify and incorporate rhythms and proportions established by existing buildings into new construction (i.e. window to wall area or solid-void ratio, bay division, proportion of openings, entrance and porch projections, space between buildings, and site coverage). Exterior materials used on additions or in new construction must be compatible with the existing structure or the collective character of the district in scale, type, size, finish, texture, and color. Exterior finishes should harmonize and complement existing schemes along the streetscape. Roof form and style should replicate, or be similar to, those found in the neighborhood. Contemporary design and architectural expression in new construction which follows the preceding guidelines is appropriate and strongly encouraged. New construction should be dated. In constructing additions to existing buildings, retain as much of the existing building fabric as possible, so that future removal of the addition could be achieved without significant damage to the original structure. New construction must comply with present zoning and floodplain requirements, when applicable. Applicants should consult with City Planning staff to ensure compliance with applicable land use laws prior to seeking Historical and Cultural Preservation Commission approval. Page 20

26 Inappropriate New construction designs which are incompatible in height, scale, proportion, mass, character rhythm etc. to the existing environment and buildings are inappropriate. Additions that radically change the original scale and architectural character of a building are inappropriate. It is inappropriate that siding materials such as aluminum, vinyl, asbestos, asphalt shingles, or artificial brick be installed on homes within the districts. The use of these materials in new construction is also not recommended. Vinyl siding installed on the addition of the house Designs for new construction which seek to create a false historic appearance through the imitation of historic styles, periods, or details are inappropriate. Inappropriate Infill housing Page 21

27 FENCES Historic fences include a wide variety of styles, scale and materials of construction. Because of the highly diverse makeup of the historic districts in terms of style and scale, many different types of fence may be appropriate to use within the districts. The Historical and Cultural Preservation Commission will decide the appropriateness of any fence to be used within the regulated areas. Fence materials, styles and detail will be major factors on which fence applicability will be determined. 1. All fences to be constructed within historic districts must be approved by the Historical and Cultural Preservation Commission. 2. The fence should be compatible with the house. The style and scale of the fence should relate to the character and historic period of the house. 3. Inappropriate fences currently in existence in the districts must be replaced by appropriate fences, as determined by the commission, when the existing fences have become worn to a point of replacement or extensively damaged. FRONT YARD FENCES Appropriate 1. All front yard fences must be open in style. 2. Front yard fences should be relatively low, usually not to exceed 42 inches. Fences taller than 42 inches may be appropriate in rear or side yards. The size of the fence is subject to Zoning regulations. 3. The following fences are appropriate for front yards: Wooden: Metal: Picket Split Rail Wrought Iron Woven Wire Cast Iron Page 22

28 REAR YARD FENCES Appropriate 4. Rear yard fences can be relatively low in height or can be privacy fences which can be no higher than 7 ft. 5. Appropriate rear yard fences include: Wooden: Picket Vertical board abutted* Vertical board spaced* Split Rail *Abutted and spaced vertical board fence are the most appropriate privacy fencing historically. The detail of these types of fencing will be the major factor in determining its appropriateness. Metal: Wrought Iron Woven Wire Cast Iron Other: Brick Wall Stone Wall Page 23

29 FRONT OR REAR FENCES Inappropriate Chain Link Chain link, stockade, basketweave, lattice, and shadow box/louver fences are inappropriate for the historic districts. Materials of fences are recommended to be natural, and acceptable to the age of the house. For example, vinyl fencing is not Vinyl fencing recommended, regardless of the wood grain look. Since vinyl and plastics were not a material used in the early and mid 1900's for fencing, this material is inappropriate to use in the districts. The stockade fence is the prefabricated fencing which gives the impression of a frontier fort. The boards are abutted with a rounded exterior surface and a pointed top. Stockade Use of any fence regardless of material constructed of is at the discretion of the Commission. Privacy fences should enclose only the rear yard. Privacy fences may extend to a point midway between the front and rear facade of the house (this application is at the discretion of the Commission). Lattice Basketweave Once removed, an inappropriate fence cannot be replaced with anything other than an approved Shadow box/ Louver (vinyl) style of fence. (Wood) Page 24

30 DEMOLITION The purpose of designating historic districts is to preserve and protect buildings and structures which significantly represent the historical and architectural development of Anderson. With historic preservation as the primary goal of local district designation, demolition of buildings, structures, or any apparatus thereof, is considered inappropriate. However, the Historical and Cultural Preservation Ordinance specifies criteria and conditions under which demolition can proceed. Photo from Welcome to Reliable Wrecking, Demolition Company Carol Stream, Illinois, Demolition Criteria The Historical and Cultural Preservation Commission must consider the following criteria and issue a Certificate of Appropriateness before any demolition is undertaken: 1. Potential effect, positive or negative of the demolition to the integrity and character of the historic district; 2. State of deterioration, disrepair, and structural condition of the subject building or structure; 3. Balance of the public interest in preserving the historic building and district integrity with the interest of its use and utilization to the property owner; and, 4. Possible alternatives to demolition. It is the responsibility of the applicant to provide the Commission with thorough and complete documentation regarding a building's overall condition. Documentation should include, but is not limited to, photographs illustrating the state of deterioration or disrepair, the written opinion of a building's structural condition as provided by a licensed architect or structural engineer, and any official notices received by the property owner citing specific violations. Page 25

31 COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS Evaluating Sensitive Design Approaches: Commercial buildings of the 19th and early 20th century, which establish the historic or architectural feeling and association of a majority of commercial historic districts, were comprised of three unified components: the storefront (located along street level), the upper facade, and the cornice. In approaching an appropriate rehabilitation, the character of these principal units should be identified, retained, and treated with sensitivity. STORE FRONTS Changes in fashions and tastes, merchandising techniques, business ventures, and "updating" public images have subjected the faces of commercial buildings to frequent alteration. As businesses competed for the attention of pedestrian and vehicular traffic, several layers of storefronts often accumulated on the same building. On most surviving late 19th - early 20th century urban commercial buildings, the traditional focus on street-level activity and the secondary usage of upper floors allowed the first floor storefronts to bear the brunt of insensitive alteration. It is not unusual though, to find buildings which have been completely covered from top to bottom with a "modern" cladding such as aluminum or stucco panels. The typical 19th century storefront consisted of single or double doors flanked by display windows. The entrance was frequently recessed to create space for the door to swing out without injuring pedestrians, to protect the customer from the weather, and to increase the amount of space in which to display merchandise. In some cases an additional side door afforded access to the upper floors. Thin structural members of cast iron, wood, or (less commonly) masonry, usually framed the store front. The windows themselves were raised off the ground by panels or bulkheads of wood, cast iron, pressed metal, or masonry which occasionally incorporated small areas of glass to light basement space. Transoms of single or multiple glass panes were placed above windows and doors to provide a source of natural light for the deep interior space. The signboard above the storefront (the fascia covering the structural beam) became a prominent part of the building and was generally capped by a small cornice of metal, wood, or masonry. Canvas awnings, generally mounted just above or below the transoms, often shaded turn of the century store fronts to reduce fading and the mirror effects of the glass. Store front design remained basically unchanged until the 1920's and 1930's when design elements were simplified and streamlined. A variety of new materials were introduced during this period, including aluminum and stainless steel, pigmented structural glass, tinted and mirrored glass, glass block, and neon. In evaluating whether the existing store front is worthy of preservation, recognize that good design can exist in any period. A storefront added in 1930 may have greater architectural merit than what is replaced. In commercial historic districts, it is often the diversity of styles and detailing that contribute to the areas character. If the store front design is a good example of its Page 26

32 period it may have gained significance over time, and should be retained as part of the historical evolution of the building. UPPER FACADE AND CORNICE The upper facades of commercial buildings, located immediately above the store front, can range from a single story to multiple stories. Constructed of wood, masonry, architectural metal, or a mixture of building materials, upper facades are generally divided into bays, a vertical division of the exterior marked by window placement or architectural features. Windows are often residentially scaled, as the upper levels of commercial buildings were often used as residential space. By the turn of the century, commercial facades became more decorative with corbeling, recessed panels divided by pilasters, ornamental window hoods, and various other architectural elaborations being introduced into the overall design. Cornices distinctively complete the unified design by capping commercial facades along the roof line. Whether constructed of wood, metal, or masonry, cornices usually project above the upper facade in the form of corbeling or being visually supported by brackets. Similar to the designs of upper facades, cornices became more elaborate as the 19th century progressed. However, as architectural trends changed, cornices were simplified during the early decades of the 20th century. Rehabilitation Options: It is essential to understand that the best design approaches for rehabilitating historic commercial properties are generally the most simple and obvious, not necessarily the most creative. An evaluation of the store front's architectural features and physical condition will help determine the best course of action in the actual rehabilitation work. An initial step in this evaluation should be the removal of any inappropriate covering materials in several places to determine just how much of the original character remains. The standards and guidelines used to direct the appropriate rehabilitation of residential properties, including building materials, windows and doors, new construction, demolition, and the environment, are equally applicable to historic commercial districts. Page 27

33 Appropriate In applying the standards to determine the most sympathetic method of rehabilitating a historic commercial property, the following guidelines should be applied. Any proposal which does not comply with the following shall be considered inappropriate. 1) Retain the original commercial usage or select a use which respects the design of the existing building. A compatible use will avoid disturbing or destroying the materials and elements which define the property's historical and architectural character. 2) Identify and sensitively rehabilitate original or other character defining features and materials of the building or the environment. As commercial buildings are recognized as products of time and place, retain significant building fabric in its original location. 3) Identify and retain changes to the property which have gained significance in their own right, reflect significant trends in the evolution of the building, or help to define the structure's architectural integrity. 4) Appropriate preventative maintenance and repair will ensure the protection of original elements while reducing potential replacement costs. Replacement shall be limited only to those features and materials which are deteriorated beyond repair. If replacement is warranted, new features shall duplicate the originals in size, scale, design, configuration, color, texture, and other visual qualities, and, where possible, materials. 5) Cleaning, when required, shall be undertaken by the gentlest possible means. The appropriate cleaning agents shall be determined in consideration of the building material to be cleaned and the desired results (i.e., removal of light or heavy soils or removal of paint). Cleaning methods should be considered in consultation with a qualified professional and tested in an inconspicuous location on the building. 6) Designs for new construction or missing architectural features should be derived from similar surrounding properties or elements present on the subject building. Avoid creating a false historical appearance by incorporating ornamental features which are insufficiently documented physically or photographically. When replacing missing features, keep the new design simple, yet compatible, and avoid the destruction of the building's original integrity. Designs for infill buildings should respect the height, scale, mass, setback, materials, spatial rhythm, proportion, and color of adjacent properties. The guidelines for new construction projects in residential districts are equally applicable to commercial areas. 7) The reversibility of any proposed rehabilitation in locally designated commercial districts shall be considered in the design review process. Page 28

34 SIGNAGE The City of Anderson enforces ordinances which regulate signage in various zoning districts throughout the city. In addition, signs and awnings which encroach into the public right-of-way are subject to approval through the Board of Public Works. Although the Historical and Cultural Preservation Commission has jurisdiction over signage in locally designated historic districts, these signs must comply with city ordinances. Therefore, it is recommended that applicants consult with applicable City departments for regulations concerning signage. Appropriate: As signage plays a vital role in commercial historic districts by increasing visibility and commercial appeal, the Board shall be concerned with the size, placement, content, legibility, letter size, color contrast, and other visual or design qualities which potentially affect the character of a property or the collective integrity which comprises the district. The style of the subject building and the location selected for a sign influences its size and choices of colors, materials, and method of illumination. As each building is architecturally diverse, every sign proposal will be considered individually. The variety of sign types listed in this section, and executed in accordance with the locations and materials noted under each type, are considered appropriate. Signage colors must be compatible with the character of the surrounding district by utilizing similar or slightly brighter colors than those located elsewhere on the subject building or within the district. SIGN TYPES Signboards Historically, signboards were the most common and popular type of commercial signage at the turn of the century. Located just above the storefront transom windows, these long, narrow, flush mounted sign panels were an integral part of the store front's design. In addition to advertising, signboards served as a transition point between the commercial activity along street level and the residential upper floors. Simple and effective, signboards generally consist of painted or gold-leaf lettering against a dark painted background. Separate wooden letters, either painted or gilded, were often affixed to signboards. Overhanging Signs Overhanging or bracket mounted signs consist of a twosided, painted wooden panel mounted by a metal bracket projecting from the building's facade. As with signboards, lettering could be painted, carved or routed, or individually applied wooden letters. Today, sandblasting is frequently Page 29

35 used to obtain a carved appearance. However, a "rustic look", which is incompatible with the polished character of urban historic districts, is not appropriate. It is appropriate to shape overhanging signs to mimic an architectural element of the building or to reinforce an established theme. Mounting brackets shall be simple in design so attention is not drawn away from the sign itself. Window and Door Signs Store front display windows, glass panels in entry doors, and upper floor windows offer alternative locations for historically appropriate signage. Window signs may be placed directly onto the interior surface of the glass by painting, silk screening, or gilding where a thin layer of gold leaf is burnished onto the glass. The traditional look of painted window signs may also be achieved through the application of thin, vinyl lettering. Windows may also be etched with acid or sandblasting to create translucent letters or motifs that contrast dramatically with the transparent areas of the windows. While simple lettering is generally the most legible and appropriate choice, window signs frequently utilized more ornate letter styles. Gold leaf script characterizes the highest quality example of more ornate letter styling. An alternative to applying signage directly to the window surface is to prepare a sign on a separate piece of clear glass or acrylic which can be hung in the window. This option is easily reversible if a business or property use changes. Painted Wall Signs Though viewed primarily as faded "ghost" advertisements on blank sidewalls and upper stories of older buildings, painted wall signs have a limited application in historic districts. While it is not appropriate to paint a sign on a building's main facade, a blank rear or sidewall is a suitable location for signage with simple lettering or a business logo painted with colors taken from those used elsewhere on the building. Awnings and Banners Since the nineteenth century, awnings have been used to shade store windows and offer shelter to pedestrians. Awnings also provide another location for signage. Graphics can be painted or silk screened onto the material, or letters sewn onto the valance, side panels, or sloping surface of the awning. In either case, awnings attract direct attention to storefronts and add visual interest in historic districts. Canvas or nylon banners, which employ the same graphic techniques as Page 30

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