The Importance of Coral Reefs 1

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "The Importance of Coral Reefs 1"

Transcription

1 The Importance of Coral Reefs 1 The Importance of Coral Reefs and Their Effects on the World Haley M. Smith East Kentwood High School

2 The Importance of Coral Reefs 2 The Importance of Coral Reefs and Their Effects on the World Perhaps one of the most diverse ecosystems in the world, a place home to thousands of marine species is the coral reef (Fact Sheet Coral Reef, n.d.). It is amazing that a place that covers less than one percent of the earth s surface is able to hold the majority of life contained in the ocean (The Ocean Portal Team, n.d.). Coral reefs are an abundance of important working roles that function together in such a limited space to create something so unique, and this required ecosystem is being destroyed by many factors. A coral colony is made up of many identical polyps; polyps are related to jellyfish and sea anemones (Fact Sheet Coral Reef, n.d.). Polyps eat plankton and other small organisms by extending their small tentacles and stinging their prey before ingesting them (Fact Sheet Coral Reef, n.d.). Corals have a symbiotic relationship with plant like cells called zooxanthellae (What is Coral, n.d.). Zooxanthellae live in the soft tissue of coral and use photosynthesis to create food for the coral to grow. In return the coral gives the zooxanthellae shelter and nutrients (What is Coral, n.d.). The main purpose of all life on Earth is to reproduce; the polyp can reproduce sexually and asexually (The Ocean Portal Team, n.d.). Sexual reproduction is used to create genetic diversity and enable new colonies to arise (The Ocean Portal Team, n.d.). Asexual reproduction is used when they want to expand their existing colony by making identical polyps (The Ocean Portal Team, n.d.). While the polyp is the plant portion, the rock portion in coral reefs is the polyps excretion: calcium carbonate (Fact Sheet Coral Reef, n.d.). This excreted substance creates an exoskeleton identical to shellfish shells (What is Coral, n.d.). The calcium carbonate is

3 The Importance of Coral Reefs 3 excreted at such a slow rate that the fastest corals noted grow 15 centimeters a year (The Ocean Portal Team, n.d.). It takes countless years for all of the exoskeletons and zooxanthellae to build up and create the colorful rocky structures where various species live. All of the diverse species that live on and around the coral reefs depend on the coral and algae. The coral relies on algae for the oxygen given off from photosynthesis. The algae needs one specific aspect in order to live: sun. Owing to the fact of this necessity, coral reefs demand to be in shallow, clear waters (Fact Sheet Coral Reef, n.d.). The algae found in the coral reef tissues prefer a water temperature of between 70 and 85 degrees fahrenheit, therefore, coral reefs are only found in tropical and subtropical weather (The Ocean Portal Team, n.d.). Now that the foundation and requirements have been met for coral reefs we can add the main attraction: fish, turtles, sharks, crabs, shrimp, sponges, urchins, and much more. These species do not live near coral reefs because they are aesthetically appealing to them; coral reefs make it an easy way of living. Who would not want to be handed food and shelter instead of rummaging around all day trying to meet the needs of the day? Species that call coral reefs home are able to escape predators in the crevices of the coral, and find their prey right within their community (What is Coral, n.d.). Predators eating prey is a needed process to keep the reefs healthy by balancing the herbivores, carnivores, and algae (What is Coral, n.d.). Without a balance, too much of a certain species would affect the food web, and have a devastating domino effect on the whole ecosystem (What is Coral, n.d.). Aside from the enemies found in coral reefs, there are many friendships too. For example, the clownfish and anemone, and the polyp and zooxanthellae. Both pairs work closely to benefit each other.

4 The Importance of Coral Reefs 4 Unfortunately, the beautiful reefs that are home to thousands of species are being destroyed by many contributing factors. It is projected that about 75% of remaining reefs are currently threatened (Fact Sheet Coral Reef, n.d.). Aside from the natural dying and breakage from fish feeding off of the coral, another reason for this demolishment is rising water temperatures which cause coral bleaching (The Ocean Portal Team, n.d.). The zooxanthellae have a fixed temperature they can survive in. When it is exceeded, they die. Without zooxanthellae, the bright colors found within coral reefs, and the food produced from it are lost completely (The Ocean Portal Team, n.d.). With rising temperatures comes less healthy coral reefs and an easier environment for any disease causing organisms to thrive. Also, carbon dioxide released into the air is absorbed by saltwater creating higher water acidity; this is a big problem, and can make it harder for the coral to reproduce, and even cause the coral to break apart (Fact Sheet Coral Reef, n.d.). Human activities that play a big role in the destruction are: overfishing, runoff, and water activities (The Ocean Portal Team, n.d.). Overfishing disrupts the food web and creates an unbalanced environment. Fishermen should be concerned with only catching what is necessary, not harvesting during their reproduction period, so they can produce more offspring, and never taking anything from protected areas (What is Coral, n.d.). Runoff can come from many sources such as: lawns, sewage, farms, and cities (The Ocean Portal Team, n.d.). All of these things have an affect on where they are dumped, and usually are taken by streams and deposited into the ocean right into the shallow waters that hold the endangered coral reefs. Some ideas to help with this type of pollution include: reducing

5 The Importance of Coral Reefs 5 freshwater usage that may be dumped into the ocean and minimizing the use of gas powered vehicles to lower greenhouse emissions (What is Coral, n.d.). Harmful water activities can include things such as going to the beach, snorkeling, and scuba diving. Water activities are very good ways to see and learn about coral reefs, but can have consequential actions if done improperly. It is important when partaking in any of these activities to: clean the beach area of any trash, never step on or break off coral, and never take anything from their habitat (What is Coral, n.d.). Coral reefs may seem nonessential to humans and other ecosystems in the world, but that could not be further from the truth. Coral reefs help break up the energy from ocean waves and currents by 75 to 95 percent (Coral Reefs, 2012). This has three positives: decreasing erosion, protection for ecosystems, and protection from tsunami waves (Coral Reefs, 2012). To install a substitutional artificial coral reef to get the same advantages can cost up to $10.7 billion (Coral Reefs, 2012). Coral reefs also supply a portion of sand on beaches across the world in tropical and subtropical places. Many small species feed off of the calcium carbonate and break it into tiny pieces that get swept away and brought to shore (Coral Reefs, 2012). Coral reefs account for one fourth of the total fish caught (Coral Reefs, 2012). Approximately 5 15 tonnes of fish and seafood products can be yielded per km2 of reef on a healthy reef system (Coral Reefs, 2012). Not only are coral reefs big business for food, they are big business for employment of fishers, and markets who sell the fish.

6 The Importance of Coral Reefs 6 Tourism is the most well known advantage of coral reefs, and can bring a great deal of money to the countries that contain coral reefs. In 2010, the global net benefit of reef tourism was around $11.5 billion (Coral Reefs, 2012). Lastly, scientists have found that coral reefs hold chemicals that can be made into medications that help fight cancer, AIDS, and other diseases, as well as anti inflammatories. There is a lot more to coral reefs than what meets the eye; they are very delicate and intricate ecosystems. The web of relationships located in reefs is incredible. Each one is very important to the ecosystem. These beautiful ecosystems serve many purposes. They exist for more than just themselves. They deserve a greater respect than they are given. The worth of coral reefs needs to be acknowledged and promoted so the damage can be stopped, and these fragile, but powerful ecosystem can be rebuilt.

7 The Importance of Coral Reefs 7 References Coral Reefs. (2012). In Endangered Species Internacional. Retrieved February 23, 2016, from Fact Sheet Coral Reef. (n.d.). In Defender of Wildlife. Retrieved February 23, 2016, from reef/basic facts The Ocean Portal Team. (n.d.). Corals and Coral Reefs. In Ocean Portal Find your Blue. Retrieved February 23, 2016, from and coral reefs What is Coral. (n.d.). In Teach Ocean Science. Retrieved February 23, 2016, from d_climate_change/what_is_a_coral/

CORAL REEF ACTIVITY PACKET ANSWER KEY FOR TEACHERS

CORAL REEF ACTIVITY PACKET ANSWER KEY FOR TEACHERS CORAL REEF ACTIVITY PACKET ANSWER KEY FOR TEACHERS CORAL REEF WEBQUEST ANSWER KEY 1 What are coral and what is a coral reef? 3 What percentage of marine life live in coral reefs? Corals are animals related

More information

Coral Reefs Lecture Notes

Coral Reefs Lecture Notes Coral Reefs Lecture Notes (Topic 10D) page 1 Coral Reefs Lecture Notes Corals Polyps & Zooxanthellae Coral Polyps Are coral polyps algae or animals? Description (What do coral polyps look like? Make a

More information

Aquatic Ecosystems Section 2

Aquatic Ecosystems Section 2 Objectives Explain why an estuary is a very productive ecosystem. Compare salt marshes and mangrove swamps. Describe two threats to coral reefs. Describe two threats to ocean organisms. Marine Ecosystems

More information

ECOCARE MALDIVES Environment Awareness Project

ECOCARE MALDIVES Environment Awareness Project - 1 - - 2 - What Are Coral Reefs? The mention of coral reefs generally brings to mind warm climates, colorful fishes and clear waters. However, the reef itself is actually a component of a larger ecosystem.

More information

DEPLETION OF OUR CORAL REEFS

DEPLETION OF OUR CORAL REEFS DEPLETION OF OUR CORAL REEFS A. Good Student Environmental Biology 5 Professor Cumming Beautiful coral reefs, like the picture shown below, have existed for millions of years in their under sea environment.

More information

Coral Reefs. Why are coral reefs special?

Coral Reefs. Why are coral reefs special? Coral Reefs Why are coral reefs special? Millions of humans depend on coral reefs Many countries get a lot of income from tourists attracted to their coral reefs. This tourism creates a lot of jobs. Coral

More information

The Need Is Mutual: The Importance of Biological Interactions

The Need Is Mutual: The Importance of Biological Interactions The Need Is Mutual: The Importance of Biological Interactions Science Topic: Food Webs Grades: 6 th -8 th Essential Question: What kinds of relationships are involved in biological interactions? Lesson

More information

Figure 4. Clown fish and anemone. Figure 5. Sea spider. Page 2 of 6. Saylor URL: www.saylor.org/bio102

Figure 4. Clown fish and anemone. Figure 5. Sea spider. Page 2 of 6. Saylor URL: www.saylor.org/bio102 Symbiosis The phrase symbiotic relationship simply refers to a close ecological relationship between two different species. These relationships differ along a spectrum from positive to negative interactions.

More information

Chapter 8 Lower Invertebrates I: Sponges & Radiata

Chapter 8 Lower Invertebrates I: Sponges & Radiata Chapter 8 Lower Invertebrates I: Sponges & Radiata Karleskint Turner Small Key Concepts Sponges are asymmetric, sessile animals that filter food from the water circulating through their bodies. Sponges

More information

INTRODUCTION. PHOTOGRAPHY Doug Perrine/Naturepl.com

INTRODUCTION. PHOTOGRAPHY Doug Perrine/Naturepl.com INTRODUCTION Planet Earth: Shallow Seas 4-D is adapted from the highly-acclaimed BBC series, Planet Earth. This resource guide provides background on what you and your students will see in the film, plus

More information

Life processes. All animals have to carry out seven life processes. These are: 2. Respiration taking in one gas and getting rid of another

Life processes. All animals have to carry out seven life processes. These are: 2. Respiration taking in one gas and getting rid of another Food chains Life processes All animals have to carry out seven life processes. These are: 1. Movement being able to move its body 2. Respiration taking in one gas and getting rid of another 3. Reproduction

More information

Habitats. A habitat is an environment with conditions which are suitable for a certain animal. You could think of it as an animal s home.

Habitats. A habitat is an environment with conditions which are suitable for a certain animal. You could think of it as an animal s home. Habitats What is a habitat? Habitats A habitat is an environment with conditions which are suitable for a certain animal. Photo credit Timo Balk You could think of it as an animal s home. Photo credit

More information

Ecosystems of The Bahamas

Ecosystems of The Bahamas Ecosystems of The Bahamas Krista Sherman GEF FSP Coordinator, BNT Bahamas Nature Tour Guide Certification Workshop Black Point, Exuma Cays June 25, 2012 What is an Ecosystem? The term ecosystem is often

More information

Characteristics of Terrestrial Ecosystems

Characteristics of Terrestrial Ecosystems Characteristics of Terrestrial Ecosystems Terrestrial ecosystems are land-based ecosystems. Rainforests, deciduous forests, and grasslands are all examples of terrestrial ecosystems. The Earth has many

More information

Zooplankton this diverse group of tiny animals feeds on phytoplankton and spend their lives floating freely in the oceans currents and tides. Many org

Zooplankton this diverse group of tiny animals feeds on phytoplankton and spend their lives floating freely in the oceans currents and tides. Many org Mytilus californianus - this mussel is a filter feeder, feeding on plankton. They are the main source of food for both the Ochre Sea Star (Pisaster Ochracus) and the rock whelk (Nucella emarginata). They

More information

Section 3: Trophic Structures

Section 3: Trophic Structures Marine Conservation Science and Policy Service learning Program Trophic Structure refers to the way in which organisms utilize food resources and hence where energy transfer occurs within an ecosystem.

More information

Energy Production. Marine Ecology. Activity 3

Energy Production. Marine Ecology. Activity 3 Energy Production In their daily struggle for survival marine animals perform a variety of activities e.g. movement - squids and octopuses use jet propulsion, scallops clap their shells and fish swim.

More information

Fishers. Small invertebrates e.g. crabs, pippies. Producers e.g. mangroves. seagrasses or algae. Sun s energy

Fishers. Small invertebrates e.g. crabs, pippies. Producers e.g. mangroves. seagrasses or algae. Sun s energy This food pyramid shows who eats who in the food chain. As humans, we are on top of the pyramid and can eat anything below us. Each group only feeds on the groups below them and does not feed on the groups

More information

Climate change and coral reefs key issues and risks for the Maldives

Climate change and coral reefs key issues and risks for the Maldives Climate change and coral reefs key issues and risks for the Maldives PROJECT REGENERATE AN IUCN AND USAID INITIATIVE Climate change is happening now The earth s climate is changing. Around the world people

More information

The concepts developed in this standard include the following: Oceans cover about 70% of the surface of the Earth.

The concepts developed in this standard include the following: Oceans cover about 70% of the surface of the Earth. Name Date Grade 5 SOL 5.6 Review Oceans Made by SOLpass - www.solpass.org solpass100@comcast.net Reproduction is permitted for SOLpass subscribers only. The concepts developed in this standard include

More information

Organism Interactions and Population Dynamics. 1. Which of the following interactions is an example of symbiosis?

Organism Interactions and Population Dynamics. 1. Which of the following interactions is an example of symbiosis? Organism Interactions and Population Dynamics 1. Which of the following interactions is an example of symbiosis? A. a population of hummingbirds migrates during the summer B. a mother bear feeds and protects

More information

Unit III Single-celled Organisms. Introduction to Single-celled Organisms

Unit III Single-celled Organisms. Introduction to Single-celled Organisms Unit III On the cutting edge Dr. Wood at the University of Oregon is on the edge of scientific discovery as she explores some of the microscopic inhabitants of the marine environment. She is studying the

More information

THE NEED IS MUTUAL: THE IMPORTANCE OF BIOLOGICAL INTERACTIONS

THE NEED IS MUTUAL: THE IMPORTANCE OF BIOLOGICAL INTERACTIONS THE NEED IS MUTUAL: THE IMPORTANCE OF BIOLOGICAL INTERACTIONS Subject Area: Science - Food Webs Grades: 6 th -8 th Time: This lesson can be completed in two 45 minute sessions. Essential Question: What

More information

WEB OF LIFE Kelp keystone species ecosystem extinction decimated predator invertebrates proliferated inhabit herbivorous biodiversity prey profound

WEB OF LIFE Kelp keystone species ecosystem extinction decimated predator invertebrates proliferated inhabit herbivorous biodiversity prey profound WEB OF LIFE Sea otters live in the shallow waters of the Pacific and in various types of habitats that include rocky shores, tidal estuaries, and kelp forests. Kelp forests are a key habitat often associated

More information

2. What kind of energy is stored in food? A. chemical energy B. heat energy C. kinetic energy D. light energy

2. What kind of energy is stored in food? A. chemical energy B. heat energy C. kinetic energy D. light energy Assessment Bank Matter and Energy in Living Things SC.8.L.18.4 1. What is energy? A. anything that takes up space B. anything that has mass C. the ability to conduct current D. the ability to do work 2.

More information

Florida s coral reefs create habitat to support a high diversity of organisms, including many important recreational and commercial fisheries species

Florida s coral reefs create habitat to support a high diversity of organisms, including many important recreational and commercial fisheries species This is a review and discussion of corals off Florida s coast. This presentation describes FWC efforts to monitor and restore corals, as well as the status of several species of Florida corals that have

More information

8.11B: Investigate how ecosystems and populations in an ecosystem depend on and may compete for biotic and abiotic factors

8.11B: Investigate how ecosystems and populations in an ecosystem depend on and may compete for biotic and abiotic factors 8.11B: Investigate how ecosystems and populations in an ecosystem depend on and may compete for biotic and abiotic factors Make a new title page: Ecology Glue in a new table of contents after this title

More information

Over-fishing too much for the Reef

Over-fishing too much for the Reef Over-fishing too much for the Reef Over- aggressive fishing hasn t been much of a problem for The Great Barrier Reef until the past few decades. The Great Barrier Reef, a highly popular tourist destination

More information

All About Butterflies

All About Butterflies All About Butterflies Middle School Life Science TEKS Sixth Grade: 6.12E, 6.12F Seventh Grade: 7.10A, 7.10B, 7.11A, 7.11B, 7.12A, 7.12B, 7.13A Eighth Grade: 8.11A, 8.11B, 8.11C Life Science Vocabulary

More information

Ecology 1 Star. 1. Missing from the diagram of this ecosystem are the

Ecology 1 Star. 1. Missing from the diagram of this ecosystem are the Name: ate: 1. Missing from the diagram of this ecosystem are the 5. ase your answer(s) to the following question(s) on the diagram below and on your knowledge of biology.. biotic factors and decomposers.

More information

Ocean Ecosystems. Target Audience: Middle School. Next Generation Science Standards* 5- LS2; MS- LS2 Ecosystems: Interactions, Energy, and Dynamics

Ocean Ecosystems. Target Audience: Middle School. Next Generation Science Standards* 5- LS2; MS- LS2 Ecosystems: Interactions, Energy, and Dynamics Ocean Ecosystems Abstract What s in the ocean? Only 5% of the ocean has been explored and yet it is the largest ecosystem in the world. It affects the entire planet and this creates a great need to understand

More information

7.1 How and why are some eco-systems threatened with destruction?

7.1 How and why are some eco-systems threatened with destruction? Topic 7: Oceans on the Edge 7.1 How and why are some eco-systems threatened with destruction? How are human activities degrading and destroying marine ecosystems on a global scale? Mangrove removal- over

More information

Ecosystems and Food Webs

Ecosystems and Food Webs Ecosystems and Food Webs How do AIS affect our lakes? Background Information All things on the planet both living and nonliving interact. An Ecosystem is defined as the set of elements, living and nonliving,

More information

Coral Reef. C oral reefs can be found in clear, warm, shallow ocean water, usually around

Coral Reef. C oral reefs can be found in clear, warm, shallow ocean water, usually around Discover the wonders of a reef with this lift-and-look mini-book. Habitat Hallmarks C oral reefs can be found in clear, warm, shallow ocean water, usually around 50 feet (15 m) below the surface. Millions

More information

Extra Credit - Cabrillo Marine Aquarium

Extra Credit - Cabrillo Marine Aquarium Extra Credit - Cabrillo Marine Aquarium You will need a camera for this assignment Take a picture of yourself in front of the aquarium. Print the picture and paste it in this box. Name and Roll Number

More information

Food chains & ecosystems

Food chains & ecosystems SEA LIFE for schools Food chains & ecosystems Age 6-11 years Self-guided learning This guide provides you with information linked to key displays throughout Scarborough SEA LIFE Sanctuary that can be used

More information

North Carolina Aquariums Education Section. Sea Turtle Food Web. Created by the NC Aquarium at Fort Fisher Education Section

North Carolina Aquariums Education Section. Sea Turtle Food Web. Created by the NC Aquarium at Fort Fisher Education Section Essential Question: Sea Turtle Food Web Created by the NC Aquarium at Fort Fisher Education Section How do sea turtles fit into the food web of the ocean? Lesson Overview: Students will learn about sea

More information

Presents: Marine Food Chains and Webs

Presents: Marine Food Chains and Webs Presents: Marine Food Chains and Webs Copyright Sharks4Kids 2015 Vocabulary Abiotic - The non-living parts of an ecosystem (sunlight, soil, air, water). Apex Predator - top predator of an ecosystem, no

More information

STAAR Science Tutorial 52 TEK 8.11D: Food Webs & Symbiosis

STAAR Science Tutorial 52 TEK 8.11D: Food Webs & Symbiosis Name: Teacher: Pd. Date: STAAR Science Tutorial 52 TEK 8.11D: Food Webs & Symbiosis TEK 8.11A: Describe producer/consumer, predator/prey, and parasite/host relationships as they occur in food webs within

More information

Lesson 6: Fisheries Management in the Open Ocean. Open Ocean

Lesson 6: Fisheries Management in the Open Ocean. Open Ocean !!! Open Ocean Concepts How does fishing equipment affect the amount of fish and bycatch caught in a fishery? How can we change the way we fish to use the ocean better? Standards Addressed HCPS 5. & 5.2

More information

Make an Edible Coral Reef

Make an Edible Coral Reef Discover Your World With NOAA Make an Edible Coral Reef Spanish hogfish at reef. Coutesy Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary You have probably seen pictures of coral reefs before lots of colors, fishes,

More information

World Oceans Day at ZSL London Zoo. Trail Worksheets: Teachers Notes KS3 & KS4

World Oceans Day at ZSL London Zoo. Trail Worksheets: Teachers Notes KS3 & KS4 World Oceans Day at ZSL London Zoo Trail Worksheets: Teachers Notes KS3 & KS4 How to use these notes The notes in this pack will help to structure an ocean-focused self-guided activity at ZSL London Zoo

More information

Predator-prey relationships

Predator-prey relationships Predator-prey relationships Can insects hunt for food? When you think of an animal hunting for its food, large animals such as lions may come to mind. But many tiny animals also hunt for their food. For

More information

BAHAMAS CORAL REEF GUIDE

BAHAMAS CORAL REEF GUIDE BAHAMAS CORAL REEF GUIDE for kids of all ages! WHAT IS A CORAL REEF? Coral reefs are delicately balanced underwater environments that are home to millions of kinds of plant and animal life, more than any

More information

A local poacher hides at the beach to capture female turtles as they swim ashore to lay eggs. Two of your female turtles are captured and die.

A local poacher hides at the beach to capture female turtles as they swim ashore to lay eggs. Two of your female turtles are captured and die. A local poacher hides at the beach to capture female turtles as they swim ashore to lay eggs. Two of your female turtles are captured and die. Shore birds come to your island for lunch! Large turtles are

More information

Food chains & ecosystems

Food chains & ecosystems SEA LIFE for schools Food chains & ecosystems Age 6-11 years Self-guided learning This guide provides you with information linked to key displays throughout SEA LIFE London Aquarium that can be used to

More information

plankton eat plankton world

plankton eat plankton world It s a plankton eat plankton world Table of Contents Ask A Biologist activity for classroom and home By Colleen Miks Experiment Overview Food Web Worksheet Marine Organisms Worksheet What do I eat? Worksheet

More information

Effects of Climate Change

Effects of Climate Change Effects of Climate Change LESSON 3 Guiding Question: What are the effects of climate change? State ways in which the warming atmosphere affects ecosystems and organisms. Explain how climate change is affecting

More information

Food chains & ecosystems

Food chains & ecosystems SEA LIFE for schools Food chains & ecosystems Age 6-11 years Self-guided learning This guide provides you with information linked to some of the main displays throughout SEA LIFE Arizona that can be used

More information

How Ecosystems Work: Energy Flow and Nutrient Cycles. Multiple Choice Test

How Ecosystems Work: Energy Flow and Nutrient Cycles. Multiple Choice Test How Ecosystems Work: Energy Flow and Nutrient Cycles Multiple Choice Test 1. The flow of solar energy through an ecosystem is marked by a) plants converting light energy to chemical energy via photosynthesis

More information

Matter and Energy in Ecosystems

Matter and Energy in Ecosystems Matter and Energy in Ecosystems The interactions that take place among biotic and abiotic factors lead to transfers of energy and matter. Every species has a particular role, or niche, in an ecosystem.

More information

Staghorn Corals and Climate Change

Staghorn Corals and Climate Change Better to burn out than to phade away? Summary As well as being the most biodiverse ecosystems in the marine realm, coral reefs provide protein, livelihoods and services to tens of millions of people worldwide.

More information

NOTE TO TEACHER: It is appropriate to introduce the mitochondria (where energy is made) as a major structure common to all cells.

NOTE TO TEACHER: It is appropriate to introduce the mitochondria (where energy is made) as a major structure common to all cells. 5.2.1 Recall the cell as the smallest unit of life and identify its major structures (including cell membrane, cytoplasm, nucleus, and vacuole). Taxonomy level: 1.1 and 1.2-A Remember Factual Knowledge

More information

Lesson 1: Make the Connection

Lesson 1: Make the Connection Lesson 1: Make the Connection Activity: Students work with paper cutouts to learn about the parts of a food chain, specifically herbivores, carnivores, and producers. Grade level: 4-8 Subjects: Science,

More information

JUNIORRANGERS.COM.AU

JUNIORRANGERS.COM.AU JUNIORRANGERS.COM.AU JUNIOR RANGERS www.juniorrangers.com.au JUNIOR RANGERS SEAWEED DISCOVERY EXPLORE VICTORIA S BEACHES AND DISCOVER WHY SEAWEED ISN T JUST A SMELLY WEED. Seaweed is very important,

More information

Chapter 5 The Roles of Organisms in an Ecosystem 5.1: The Roles of Organisms in an Ecosystems

Chapter 5 The Roles of Organisms in an Ecosystem 5.1: The Roles of Organisms in an Ecosystems Chapter 5 The Roles of Organisms in an Ecosystem 5.1: The Roles of Organisms in an Ecosystems photosynthesis a process by which plants use water, carbon dioxide, and sunlight to produce sugars (food) Types

More information

food chain Encyclopedic Entry

food chain Encyclopedic Entry This website would like to remind you: Your browser (Apple Safari 7) is out of date. Update your browser for more security, comfort and the best experience on this site. Encyclopedic Entry food chain For

More information

4 th Grade Science Unit B: Life Sciences Chapter 3: Flow of Energy and Matter Lesson 1: How does energy flow?

4 th Grade Science Unit B: Life Sciences Chapter 3: Flow of Energy and Matter Lesson 1: How does energy flow? 4 th Grade Science Unit B: Life Sciences Chapter 3: Flow of Energy and Matter Lesson 1: How does energy flow? ecosystem Ecosystem is the living and nonliving things and the way they interact in an environment.

More information

Habitats & Adaptations

Habitats & Adaptations SEA LIFE for schools Habitats & Adaptations Age 6-11 years Self-guided learning This guide provides you with information and student activities linked to some of the main displays throughout SEA LIFE Arizona

More information

Life on Earth. Page 1. Energy (sunlight) Energy (heat) Nutrients. Nutrients. Chapter 28: How Do Ecosystems Work?

Life on Earth. Page 1. Energy (sunlight) Energy (heat) Nutrients. Nutrients. Chapter 28: How Do Ecosystems Work? Chapter 28: How Do Ecosystems Work? Introduction to Ecology Ecology - Increasing Levels of Complexity: Population: All members of a particular species living within a defined area Organism Community: All

More information

How do organisms interact?

How do organisms interact? Lesson 1 Energy Flow in Ecosystems Lesson 2 Relationships in Ecosystems Lesson 3 Adaptation and Survival How do organisms interact? ecosystem population community food chain food web predator prey energy

More information

Dear Teachers: Welcome to dynamic science

Dear Teachers: Welcome to dynamic science Educator s Resource Guide GRADES 6 8 Dear Teachers: Welcome to dynamic science activities inspired by the IMAX film. These materials, created by Scholastic Inc., IMAX Corporation, and Warner Bros. Pictures,

More information

2. Fill in the blank. The of a cell is like a leader, directing and telling the different parts of the cell what to do.

2. Fill in the blank. The of a cell is like a leader, directing and telling the different parts of the cell what to do. 1. Plant and animal cells have some similarities as well as differences. What is one thing that plant and animal cells have in common? A. cell wall B. chlorophyll C. nucleus D. chloroplasts 2. Fill in

More information

Almost all living things are closely interconnected.

Almost all living things are closely interconnected. SECTION 5 We re All in this Together Marine Interdependence Almost all living things are closely interconnected. Species are linked through relationships based on food, the need for protection, or to meet

More information

What can we do to protect our coral reefs from climate change?

What can we do to protect our coral reefs from climate change? What can we do to protect our coral reefs from climate change? Effects of Climate Change on Coral Bleaching Teacher Introduction This unit of work is designed for middle year students. It has a student

More information

Working to Conserve Key Species: EWS-WWF s Marine Turtle Conservation Project. Envirocities emagazine

Working to Conserve Key Species: EWS-WWF s Marine Turtle Conservation Project. Envirocities emagazine 42 Working to Conserve Key Species: EWS-WWF s Marine Turtle Conservation Project Envirocities emagazine 43 Issue 6, Sep 2013 Emirates Wildlife Society - WWF Dubai United Arab Emirates Marine turtles are

More information

Effect of Technology on the Environment 5 th Grade Kelley Dunbar, Mr. Bellamy and Mrs. Cargle

Effect of Technology on the Environment 5 th Grade Kelley Dunbar, Mr. Bellamy and Mrs. Cargle References: (Checked 1/2005) Effect of Technology on the Environment 5 th Grade Kelley Dunbar, Mr. Bellamy and Mrs. Cargle http://www.epa.gov/oilspill/elemlab.htm http://gk-12.osu.edu/lessons/02-03/oilspills_web.pdf

More information

OIMB GK12 CURRICULUM. Coral Reef Energy and Trophic Levels

OIMB GK12 CURRICULUM. Coral Reef Energy and Trophic Levels 6th Grade 45-60 minutes Coral Reef Energy and Trophic Levels Oregon Science Content Standards: 6.2 Interaction and Change: The related parts within a system interact and change 6.2L.2 Explain how individual

More information

Seagrasses. What are seagrasses? Why seagrass isn t seaweed!

Seagrasses. What are seagrasses? Why seagrass isn t seaweed! Seagrasses What are seagrasses? Seagrasses are plants that grow underwater but they are not the same as seaweeds (algae). Some species of seagrass look very much like terrestrial (land) grass, with straplike

More information

ECOSYSTEM RESPONSES. reflect

ECOSYSTEM RESPONSES. reflect reflect There is a saying, No man is an island, which means that people need one another in order to survive. Everyone on Earth is interconnected in some way. This is not only true of human beings, but

More information

Unit 1 Lesson 3: Corals, Forams, and Reef Health. Corals and Forams

Unit 1 Lesson 3: Corals, Forams, and Reef Health. Corals and Forams Unit 1 Lesson 3: Corals, Forams, and Reef Health Lesson Objectives: Students will understand the plight of coral reefs, and the diseases and factors responsible for their decline. Vocabulary: coral bleaching,

More information

Name Class Date WHAT I KNOW. life by observing many different kinds of life forms. sunlight for their energy. Other animals eat food to get energy.

Name Class Date WHAT I KNOW. life by observing many different kinds of life forms. sunlight for their energy. Other animals eat food to get energy. The Biosphere Matter of Energy, Interdependence in Nature Q: How do Earth s living and nonliving parts interact and affect the survival of organisms? 3.1 How do we study life? WHAT I KNOW SAMPLE ANSWER:

More information

Coral Bleaching. Ann-Tin Cheng, ID#0628482 Cathy Wu, ID#0633019

Coral Bleaching. Ann-Tin Cheng, ID#0628482 Cathy Wu, ID#0633019 Coral Bleaching Ann-Tin Cheng, ID#0628482 Cathy Wu, ID#0633019 1. Elevated/ Decreased Sea Water Temperature Causes 2. 3. Solar Irradiance Subaerial Exposure 4. Sedimentation 5. Fresh Water Dilution 6.

More information

Bio EOC Topics for Ecology, Evolution and Natural Selection:

Bio EOC Topics for Ecology, Evolution and Natural Selection: Bio EOC Topics for Ecology, Evolution and Natural Selection: UEvolutionU Difference between macroevolution and microevolution Sexual reproduction and natural selection are mechanisms of microevolution

More information

Bridging STRI s Marine Education Program Activities with the Panamanian Curricula: A Synergistic Approach. Working as a team

Bridging STRI s Marine Education Program Activities with the Panamanian Curricula: A Synergistic Approach. Working as a team Bridging STRI s Marine Education Program Working as a team Objective: Learn that the interactions between organisms go beyond the predator/prey relationship. Learning Skills: Interpretation of text, observation,

More information

Coral Reefs. warm food home waters Coral plant red found In brilliant communities starfish water protection brown

Coral Reefs. warm food home waters Coral plant red found In brilliant communities starfish water protection brown Cloze Passage - Instructions: Cover some of the words in the book with post-it notes. Read the book pages 4-12 with the students. Ask students to predict the word that is covered over. Students complete

More information

Imagine a Kelp Forest

Imagine a Kelp Forest Imagine a Kelp Forest Students will explore the kelp forest ecosystem by conducting research and by writing imaginary narratives through an activity that integrates science and language arts. subject Science

More information

FOOD CHAINS AND FOOD WEBS PHYTOPLANKTON ZOOPLANKTON SILVERSIDE BLUEFISH

FOOD CHAINS AND FOOD WEBS PHYTOPLANKTON ZOOPLANKTON SILVERSIDE BLUEFISH FOOD CHAINS AND FOOD WEBS Food Chains All living organisms (plants and animals) must eat some type of food for survival. Plants make their own food through a process called photosynthesis. Using the energy

More information

Lesson 1. Objectives: ocus: Subjects:

Lesson 1. Objectives: ocus: Subjects: Lesson 1 The Web of Life Objectives: 1. Understand the concept of an ecosystem. 2. Understand the interdependence of members of an ecosystem. Subjects: 1. Ecology 2. Language 3. Art MATERIALS: Copies of

More information

4.3 Physical Variables

4.3 Physical Variables CHAPTER 4 PHYSICAL SCIENCE CONNECTIONS 4.3 Physical Variables You have read about the compounds that make up living things. The presence and amount of other compounds like oxygen and water are variables

More information

Rainforest Concern Module 2 Why do we need rainforests?

Rainforest Concern Module 2 Why do we need rainforests? Rainforest Concern Module 2 Why do we need rainforests? Rainforest Concern Module 2: Why do we need Rainforest? Before we go any further, there are some words you may not understand, and these words and

More information

Student Worksheets. 9th Grade. Name

Student Worksheets. 9th Grade. Name Student Worksheets 9th Grade Name Ecosystems Ecosystems are complex entities made up of interacting inorganic and biotic elements. In this worksheet, we will mainly be concerned with one particular ecosystem

More information

INTERACTIONS IN ECOSYSTEMS: Video & READINGS: Watch the BrainPop video on Ecosystems

INTERACTIONS IN ECOSYSTEMS: Video & READINGS: Watch the BrainPop video on Ecosystems INTERACTIONS IN ECOSYSTEMS: Video & READINGS: Watch the BrainPop video on Ecosystems The two readings below cover many of the same terms and concepts. Read them when you have time. Pay particular attention

More information

food chain checkers Lesson Plans and Activities for the Classroom

food chain checkers Lesson Plans and Activities for the Classroom Lesson Plans and Activities for the Classroom www.windows2universe.org food chain checkers Summary Students play a game that models dynamics of a simple food chain, then they improve the model by making

More information

The Importance of Protecting Marine Biodiversity. Jeff Hilchey

The Importance of Protecting Marine Biodiversity. Jeff Hilchey The Importance of Protecting Marine Biodiversity Jeff Hilchey January 12 th, 2003 Earth is a closed system and therefore, all of its life is interdependent, relying upon each other as resources. The more

More information

Ocean Journey. Tropical Cove

Ocean Journey. Tropical Cove Grades 6-8 Welcome to the Tennessee Aquarium! While enjoying your visit today, look closely at the animals, the graphics and the exhibits as you search for answers to the following questions. Ocean Journey

More information

Commensalism is a symbiotic relationship in which one organism benefits and the other organism is not affected.. What they might ask:

Commensalism is a symbiotic relationship in which one organism benefits and the other organism is not affected.. What they might ask: B-6.1 Explain how the interrelationships among organisms (including predation, competition, parasitism, mutualism, and commensalism) generate stability within ecosystems. ecosystem - biotic community (all

More information

Who can harvest a walleye?

Who can harvest a walleye? Ecological Relationships 55 Who can harvest a walleye? The Great Lakes are an example of a natural community. In this community the small organisms (living things) outnumber the large organisms. The smaller

More information

How Ecosystems Work ( Holt Environmental Science Chapter 5)

How Ecosystems Work ( Holt Environmental Science Chapter 5) How Ecosystems Work ( Holt Environmental Science Chapter 5) Study online at quizlet.com/_i2rl5 1. AUTOTROPH OR PRODUCER Organism that makes its own food by photosynthesis 2. Biodiversity When an ecosystem

More information

Answers. Food Webs. Year 7 Science Chapter 3. p43. p45. p47

Answers. Food Webs. Year 7 Science Chapter 3. p43. p45. p47 Answers Food Webs Year 7 Science hapter 3 p43 p45 1 erbivores are animals that eat primary producers such as plants. 2 arnivores eat primary consumers such as herbivores. 3 Omnivores eat plants and animals.

More information

Life Science Study Guide. Environment Everything that surrounds and influences (has an effect on) an organism.

Life Science Study Guide. Environment Everything that surrounds and influences (has an effect on) an organism. Life Science Study Guide Environment Everything that surrounds and influences (has an effect on) an organism. Organism Any living thing, including plants and animals. Environmental Factor An environmental

More information

Relationships in Ecosystems. Vocabulary

Relationships in Ecosystems. Vocabulary Relationships in Ecosystems Vocabulary Relationships in Ecosystems Big Ideas Diversity and Evolution of Living Organisms Explore the scientific theory of evolution by relating how the inability of a species

More information

Listening Comprehension Sharkwater (Youtube series)

Listening Comprehension Sharkwater (Youtube series) Listening Comprehension Sharkwater (Youtube series) YouTube Sharkwater Part 1 Introduction to Sharks Pair and group warm-up discussion: What do you know about sharks? 1. Sharks are Rob s favourite animals

More information

Fish Form & Function Inside & Out

Fish Form & Function Inside & Out Fish Form & Function Inside & Out East Coast MARE Materials For the leader: Whiteboard Markers (different colors) PowerPoint slides (projector) For the activity: Fish Dissecting Kit Gloves (1 for each

More information

Who Can Harvest a Walleye?

Who Can Harvest a Walleye? The Great Lakes are an example of a natural community. In this community the small organisms (living things) outnumber the large organisms. The smaller organisms may be eaten by the larger ones. If we

More information

7 Energy Flow Through an Ecosystem investigation 2 c l a s s se s s i o n s

7 Energy Flow Through an Ecosystem investigation 2 c l a s s se s s i o n s 7 Energy Flow Through an Ecosystem investigation 2 c l a s s se s s i o n s Overview Students create a food web of a kelp forest ecosystem with which they explore the flow of energy between ecosystem organisms.

More information

LIMITED RESOURCES: "A SHORTAGE IN THE SEA" QUESTION Are the things that we use from the ocean unlimited? Can we run out?

LIMITED RESOURCES: A SHORTAGE IN THE SEA QUESTION Are the things that we use from the ocean unlimited? Can we run out? LIMITED RESOURCES: "A SHORTAGE IN THE SEA" QUESTION Are the things that we use from the ocean unlimited? Can we run out? UNDERLYING CONCEPT Resources are limited and we must take care in how we use them.

More information

Dinosaur Extinction Theories. Student Packet

Dinosaur Extinction Theories. Student Packet Dinosaur Extinction Theories Student Packet 1 Dinosaur Extinction Theories Introduction Why did the dinosaurs become extinct? What happened over 65 million years ago to kill a species that had survived

More information

BOTTLE-NOSE DOLPHIN. By Lauren McLean

BOTTLE-NOSE DOLPHIN. By Lauren McLean BOTTLE-NOSE DOLPHIN By Lauren McLean Introduction Bottlenose Dolphins are actually small whales, and belong to the group known as 'toothed whales'. They are air breathing mammals so even though they have

More information