Strengthening family and community engagement in student learning School Assessment Tool (Reflection Matrix)

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1 School Assessment Tool (Reflection Matrix) The purpose of the School Assessment Tool The School Assessment Tool has been developed to assist members of the community (students, parents, staff and community members) assess family and community engagement s and to evaluate their progress when implementing strategies to strengthen engagement. This tool has been developed to align with the seven key dimensions identified by the Family-School Partnerships Framework A guide for s and families (2008). By using the School Assessment Tool, s will be able to identify where they are placed on a continuum of engagement and where work can be celebrated and further developed. of the School Assessment Tool (pages 5-11) 1. The seven dimensions The Family-Schools Partnership Framework classifies activities into seven key dimensions. The dimensions provide the basic structure of the School Assessment Tool. They describe how communities can strengthen engagement with families and the community to improve student learning outcomes. This diagram shows one of the dimensions. 3. Examples to achieve the intended outcome for the dimension. Four examples have been provided for each dimension. 2. statement statements provide s with guidance about the types of s and behaviours the could achieve. The outcomes can be measured or evaluated through the collection of data or observation. Dimension 1: Communicating Effective communication is a two-way exchange between families and s that involves information sharing and opportunities for s and families to learn about each other. Using a variety of communication methods to seek and share information Reporting student achievements in culturally sensitive and respectful ways Consulting with all families to identify issues and concerns within the Ensuring that all families have access to leaders 5. The matrix The matrix combines the descriptions for each element, with examples, across the three s of engagement. Effective two-way communication between families and using a range of strategies to regularly seek and share information about students achievements and learning needs, policies, s and community initiatives. The parent representative body and keep families informed of upcoming events in a variety of ways, including regular print and electronic notices, in the languages spoken in the community. For example, the uses newsletters, fliers, , automated phone calls, and text messages in the home languages of families as needed. Information about student achievement is clearly communicated to families in relevant community languages. For example, interpreters are used during parent-teacher interviews. Leaders of the parent representative body and representatives from the staff complete a parent involvement survey. The results guide the development of parent involvement programs. For example, the executive of the parent representative body and the principal meet to discuss the survey results and plan strategies to address the findings. School leaders have a visible presence within the. For example, leaders make a point of being at the s entrance when families drop-off/pick-up their children. School staff collaborates with the parent representative body to develop connections with families through multiple two-way communication tools, including personal calls, s and notes. For example, parents who are not fluent in English are given up-to-date information through bilingual staff or parent volunteers who are available at times convenient for these families. Teachers implement a systematic effort to maximise family participation at parent-teacher meetings. For example, translating information into community languages, holding the meetings at a variety of locations, offering flexible times, follow-up telephone calls to parents who do not reply to invitations. The parent survey is translated into multiple languages and communicated in various ways, including in person, online, in print and by phone, and made available to all families. Results are posted on the s website and discussed. For example, the parent representative body organises a range of activities to discuss survey results with families and seek additional feedback. The principal and other leaders meet regularly with parents in small groups or one-to-one as needed, in and in different community locations. For example, leaders and leaders of the parent representative body organise meetings with families at various sites to discuss issues such as homework expectations and changes to policy. Overall rating 4. Stages of engagement The three s,,,, within each dimension represent a continuum of engagement. that good s at the and will progress to the. Families, the community, and staff communicate in numerous interactive ways, both formally and informally. For example, and parent leaders take part in community forums, use appropriate forms of media, including community radio and newspapers, and networks, including online social networking, to engage parents. School in collaboration with the parent representative body offers information to families to assist them to participate collaboratively in parent teacher conversations. For example, a calendar of meetings to review assessments and testing programs, such as NAPLAN, is published at the commencement of the year. Parent survey results are reflected in the plan. For example, programs, policies and s are developed collaboratively by students, teachers, leaders, families and community members to meet the needs of families as identified in the survey. The has formal and informal structures to support families to hold conversations with leaders. For example, the provides families with a range of contact options and operates an open door policy for families. 6. Overall rating for the dimension On completion of the matrix s will be able to clearly identify and rate their of engagement for the dimension after all statements in the matrix have been considered. page 1

2 Using the School Assessment Tool 1. Getting started Effective use of this tool requires participation by the whole community-students, families, staff and members of the community. The assessment of can be made by individuals, teacher groups, family groups, student groups or by the whole community. It is important to gain an understanding of how the is operating across the seven dimensions before taking any action. Step 3: Repeat steps 1 and 2 for the other three statements of effective. 2. Individual assessment Step 1: Start with the first element, then read the descriptions for the three s. Read the examples to get a sense of what might be at the different s. As you read the statements, ask yourself: Is this statement true of my? a. If you haven t enough information or knowledge to properly answer, select at the end of the row in the rating column and move down to the next element. b. If you think the statement is not true or there is very little evidence of this, select at the end of the row in the rating column and move down to the next element of effective. Dimension 1: Communicating Effective communication is a two-way exchange between families and s that involves information sharing and opportunities for s and families to learn about each other. Using a variety of communication methods to seek and share information Reporting student achievements in culturally sensitive and respectful ways Consulting with all families to identify issues and concerns within the Ensuring that all families have access to leaders Effective two-way communication between families and using a range of strategies to regularly seek and share information about students achievements and learning needs, policies, s and community initiatives. School staff collaborates with the parent The parent representative body and keep families representative body to develop connections with informed of upcoming events in a variety of ways, families through multiple two-way communication including regular print and electronic notices, in the tools, including personal calls, s and notes. languages spoken in the community. For example, the For example, parents who are not fluent in English uses newsletters, fliers, , automated phone are given up-to-date information through bilingual calls, and text messages in the home languages of families staff or parent volunteers who are available at as needed. times convenient for these families. Information about student achievement is clearly communicated to families in relevant community languages. For example, interpreters are used during parent-teacher interviews. Leaders of the parent representative body and representatives from the staff complete a parent involvement survey. The results guide the development of parent involvement programs. For example, the executive of the parent representative body and the principal meet to discuss the survey results and plan strategies to address the findings. School leaders have a visible presence within the. For example, leaders make a point of being at the s entrance when families drop-off/pick-up their children. Teachers implement a systematic effort to maximise family participation at parent-teacher meetings. For example, translating information into community languages, holding the meetings at a variety of locations, offering flexible times, follow-up telephone calls to parents who do not reply to invitations. The parent survey is translated into multiple languages and communicated in various ways, including in person, online, in print and by phone, and made available to all families. Results are posted on the s website and discussed. For example, the parent representative body organises a range of activities to discuss survey results with families and seek additional feedback. The principal and other leaders meet regularly with parents in small groups or one-to-one as needed, in and in different community locations. For example, leaders and leaders of the parent representative body organise meetings with families at various sites to discuss issues such as homework expectations and changes to policy. Overall rating Step 2: If you think the statement is true, read on to the next. Ask yourself the question again: Is this statement true of my? - If you answer No, then go back to the previous and highlight that cell, select in the last column. Move down to the next element. - If you answer Yes, read on to the next. Once again, ask yourself the question: Is this statement true of my? o If you answer No, then go back to the previous and highlight that cell, select in the last column. Move down to the next element. o If you answer Yes, highlight this cell, select in the last column and then move down to the next element. that good s at the and will progress to the. Families, the community, and staff communicate in numerous interactive ways, both formally and informally. For example, and parent leaders take part in community forums, use appropriate forms of media, including community radio and newspapers, and networks, including online social networking, to engage parents. School in collaboration with the parent representative body offers information to families to assist them to participate collaboratively in parent teacher conversations. For example, a calendar of meetings to review assessments and testing programs, such as NAPLAN, is published at the commencement of the year. Parent survey results are reflected in the plan. For example, programs, policies and s are developed collaboratively by students, teachers, leaders, families and community members to meet the needs of families as identified in the survey. The has formal and informal structures to support families to hold conversations with leaders. For example, the provides families with a range of contact options and operates an open door policy for families. Step 4: Decide the overall rating for the dimension look to see which,, or, has the most highlights, or whether Not here yet or reflects your thinking. Shade the appropriate box in the Overall rating column. Note: In the event of two s having the same number of highlights, it is suggested that you draw on any knowledge you have of other s in the related to this Dimension to help you determine the most appropriate. page 2

3 Using the School Assessment Tool Step 5: Reread the statements in the dimension and use the Analysing proforma (page 12) to record any effective s that are already evident at your ; note those that are working well and those that need more work. This information will be useful when determining priorities for further action. Step 6: On the Individual assessment sheet proforma (page 13) shade the column of the selected dimension to indicate the you think your community has reached. You can shade all or part of the column, for example, a quarter, half or two thirds to give a clearer idea of where you think your community is now. Analysing proforma - can be used with Step 2 Individual assessment sheet proforma Dimension What are our s? What is working well? What needs more work? 1. Communicating About you Name... Step 1: Record your answers from the School Assessment Tool Communicating Connecting learning at home and at community and identity Recognising the role of the family Consultative decisionmaking Collaborating beyond the Participating 2. Connecting learning at and at home (Tick one) Parent/family member School leader 3. community and identity Student Staff Community member 4. Recognising the role of the family 5. Consultative decisionmaking 6. Collaborating beyond the 7. Participating Step 2: In relation to your responses, answer the following questions 1. Which dimension/s is the already addressing well? 2. Are there any dimensions where you think the has not reached the (Not here yet)? What are they? 3. Are there any dimensions where you are unable to offer an opinion ()? What are they? 4. Which dimension/s should be a priority for action? Not here yet Don t know Optional as required by workshop facilitator/leader Step 3: Compare your responses with others near you/at your table/ in the larger group. 5. How do your responses compare with others? 6. How are your responses the same as other similar people in the group (ie, other parents, other teachers, other students, etc)? 7. How are your responses different from other similar people in the group? Step 7: Repeat Steps 1 to 6 for the other dimensions. Step 8: Complete questions 1 to 4 on the individual assessment sheet. Step 9: Be prepared to share your responses with the larger group. Step 10: (Optional task). Complete questions 5 to 7. page 3

4 Using the School Assessment Tool 3. Group consensus (For facilitators/workshop leaders) Group assessment proforma - for use by workshop facilitator/leader School profile overview proforma - for use by workshop facilitator/leader Step 1: Record the group consensus results from the Group assessment proforma Step 2: Discuss the responses to identify broad trends of the seven dimensions Dimension Communicating Connecting learning at home and at community and identity Recognising the role of the family Consultative decisionmaking Collaborating beyond the Participating 1. Which dimension/s is the already addressing well? Are there any groups who disagreed? Copy this proforma for each dimension Step 1: Ask individual participants (or table groups) to report where they think the is ly at for this dimension. Step 2: Shade in one column for each response. (The facilitator may wish to use a different colour for parents/family staff students community members leaders.) Step 3: As a group come to a consensus about the s. Not here yet Don t know 2. Are there any dimensions where the has not reached the ()? What are they? Were there specific groups who believed this? 3. Are there any dimensions where the group was unable to offer an opinion ()? What are they? Were there specific groups who believed this? 4. What conclusions can be drawn from the results? Step 4: Record this on the School Profile Overview sheet. Step 5: Discuss differences in ratings between the different groups. What conclusions can be made? 5. Which dimension/s should be a priority for action? Step 1: Collate everyone s decision onto the Group assessment proforma (page 14) (The facilitator may wish to use a different colour for parents/family staff students community members leaders.) Step 2: Discuss the range of perceptions and come to a consensus about the s for the dimension-,,, or. Step 3: Record this on the School profile overview proforma (page 15). Step 4: Discuss differences in ratings between the different groups. What conclusions can be made? Step 5: Repeat Steps 1-4 for the remaining six dimensions. Step 6: As a group respond to questions 1 to 5. Alternative process Depending on the size of the group and time available, facilitators may prefer to set up a continuum along the floor with markers to indicate,,, and. Step 1: For each Dimension, the facilitator invites participants to take a position along the continuum. If time permits, participants could be invited to share the reason for their position and given the opportunity to change their position. Step 2: Discuss the range of perceptions and come to a consensus about the s for the dimension-,,, or. Step3 to Step 6: as above. page 4

5 Dimension 1: Communicating Effective communication is a two-way exchange between families and s that involves information sharing and opportunities for s and families to learn about each other. Effective two-way communication between families and using a range of strategies to regularly seek and share information about students achievements and learning needs, policies, s and community initiatives. that good s at the and will progress to the. Using a variety of communication methods to seek and share information The parent representative body and keep families informed of upcoming events in a variety of ways, including regular print and electronic notices, in the languages spoken in the community. For example, the uses newsletters, fliers, , automated phone calls, and text messages in the home languages of families as needed. School staff collaborates with the parent representative body to develop connections with families through multiple two-way communication tools, including personal calls, s and notes. For example, parents who are not fluent in English are given up-to-date information through bilingual staff or parent volunteers who are available at times convenient for these families. Families, the community, and staff communicate in numerous interactive ways, both formally and informally. For example, and parent leaders take part in community forums, use appropriate forms of media, including community radio and newspapers, and networks, including online social networking, to engage parents. Reporting student achievements in culturally sensitive and respectful ways Consulting with all families to identify issues and concerns within the Ensuring that all families have access to leaders Information about student achievement is clearly communicated to families in relevant community languages. For example, interpreters are used during parent-teacher interviews. Leaders of the parent representative body and representatives from the staff complete a parent involvement survey. The results guide the development of parent involvement programs. For example, the executive of the parent representative body and the principal meet to discuss the survey results and plan strategies to address the findings. School leaders have a visible presence within the. For example, leaders make a point of being at the s entrance when families drop-off/pick-up their children. Teachers implement a systematic effort to maximise family participation at parent-teacher meetings. For example, translating information into community languages, holding the meetings at a variety of locations, offering flexible times, followup telephone calls to parents who do not reply to invitations. The parent survey is translated into multiple languages and communicated in various ways, including in person, online, in print and by phone, and made available to all families. Results are posted on the s website and discussed. For example, the parent representative body organises a range of activities to discuss survey results with families and seek additional feedback. The principal and other leaders meet regularly with parents in small groups or one-to-one as needed, in and in different community locations. For example, leaders and leaders of the parent representative body organise meetings with families at various sites to discuss issues such as homework expectations and changes to policy. School in collaboration with the parent representative body offers information to families to assist them to participate collaboratively in parent teacher conversations. For example, a calendar of meetings to review assessments and testing programs, such as NAPLAN, is published at the commencement of the year. Parent survey results are reflected in the plan. For example, programs, policies and s are developed collaboratively by students, teachers, leaders, families and community members to meet the needs of families as identified in the survey. The has formal and informal structures to support families to hold conversations with leaders. For example, the provides families with a range of contact options and operates an open door policy for families. Overall rating page 5

6 Dimension 2: Connecting learning at home and at Connections between families and that promote student learning and high expectations from both teachers and family contribute to students success at. Families and the share responsibility for student learning and wellbeing. They work together to create positive attitudes to learning, develop shared understandings of how children learn and learning programs and build on families capacity to support learning at home. that good s at the and will progress to the. Providing multiple opportunities for all families and teachers to discuss students social and academic progress Families can contact teachers in person or through , notes or phone and receive a timely response. Teachers make personal contact with all parents at the beginning of the year to establish positive relationships. For example, teachers send home a welcome note to all families inviting their comments and providing an address or phone number. Teachers and leaders regularly contact families with positive news as well as concerns about their children. Families have an easy way to communicate with teachers on a regular basis. For example, the has a website where student work and other wide events are posted. Parents can ask general questions or organise meetings with teachers as needed. Teachers and families discuss students individual learning styles, family cultural experiences, strengths, and academic and personal needs, then develop learning goals to support academic success at and at home. For example, families, students and teachers are involved in the development of individual learning plans for students. Supporting families to participate in their child s learning families understanding of learning programs and expected learning outcomes Smoothing transitions for students and families at key points in the education continuum The offers programs to parents that will help promote learning in the home. For example, the offers a series of year-based workshops to help parents better understand what is taught in mathematics. Student work is displayed throughout the in a way that shows how it meets academic standards. For example, teachers display students writing tasks to demonstrate how students used skills such as clear and concise language, proper spelling and grammar. Programs are conducted to help prepare students and families for the next step in ing. For example, a primary collaborates with the local high to implement a transition program for families and students. The provides families with tools to support student learning in a variety of settings. For example, information packages for families of students participating in community based programs include strategies to support their child s learning.. Teachers explain to families what students are learning throughout the year and what good work looks like for the student s of learning. For example, teachers maintain portfolios of student s work for parents to view at key times during the year. School staff, students and parent leaders reach out to new students and their families, offering an orientation to the, opportunities to participate in activities and to meet other students and families. For example, student leaders assign buddies to new students and the parent representative body connects families to parent mentors. Teachers and parent representative body leaders plan regular family learning events at and community locations. For example, workshops on a variety of topics that help parents support learning are held in a community centre during lunchtime or at a childcare centre late in the afternoon. Teachers and families have regular, scheduled discussions about how each program or activity links to student learning. For example, teachers and families discuss the various curriculum outcomes addressed by student participation in the annual concert. A transition program developed by the parent representative body leaders and staff helps families feel connected and remain involved as their children progress through. For example, information sessions explain how expectations, teaching approaches and learning skills change from primary to junior secondary to senior secondary and to tertiary study. Overall rating page 6

7 Dimension 3: community and identity Inclusive policies, s and programs build a culture of welcome, inclusion and belonging for all families that reflects and respects diversity within the s community. School policies and s, learning activities and community building initiatives have built a culture of welcome, inclusion and belonging that reflects and respects the diversity within the community. that good s at the and will progress to the. strong relationships with all families Families are made feel welcome when they enter the. For example, a staff member, using the family s home language, gives new families information about the and a tour of the. Family volunteers work in the front office to provide information and support to families and s. For example, a help desk is established and staffed by family volunteers, fluent in various community languages. The employs a liaison officer to help families and community members become more engaged in. For example, the liaison officer calls new families to invite them to attend activities, offering to pick them up or meet them at the front of the. Creating a family-friendly atmosphere Facilitating connections between families Respecting and celebrating the diversity within the community The is easy for visitors to navigate, and the community knows what is going on at the. For example, signs clearly direct visitors to the front office and an outside noticeboard keeps the community informed of upcoming events. The takes steps to help families get to know other families in the. For example, the organises welcome social events throughout the year and maintains a blog for parents to stay connected. Teachers ensure that resources, classroom lessons and activities are inclusive of the diversity within the community. For example, Aboriginal Education committees are involved in planning and implementing Aboriginal studies and education programs. The is welcoming to families and community members. For example, morning teas playgroups and other activities scheduled for families to meet staff, learn what is happening at and celebrate children s learning. The parent representative body provides opportunities for families to get to know each other. For example, the parent representative body s newsletters provide information about its activities and strategies to help families build networks. School, families and community members work together to celebrate the diversity within the. For example, the community coordinates a whole approach to a specific day for celebrating the diversity within the such as on Harmony Day. The is a welcoming place where all families can drop in and connect with staff and other families. For example, the s parent representative body and staff together create a family resource centre, with information in various languages about the and community, and staffed with family volunteers or staff. The parent representative body and staff jointly develop programs to help parents connect with each other. For example, the parent representative body collaborates with staff to jointly plan an orientation program at the beginning of the year and distributes a calendar and wide directory with staff and parent listings. School collaborates with families and community agencies representing all backgrounds to improve cultural understandings. For example, the and community jointly deliver Cultural Awareness training for staff. Overall rating page 7

8 Dimension 4: Recognising the role of the family Families, as the first and continuing educators of their children, assist and encourage their children s learning in and out of and support goals, directions and ethos. School policies, s and programs acknowledge families as partners in their children s education. Schools recognise and build on the capacity of families to assist and encourage their children s learning in and out of and support goals, directions and ethos. that good s at the and will progress to the. Valuing and building on families knowledge of their children Teachers consult with families at the beginning of the year about their child s goals, strengths and talents. For example, teachers send a written survey in relevant community languages home with the child. The uses information provided by families to develop individual learning plans and activities. For example, a teacher and local community member organises an after- chess club for students and interested families. Schools and families work together to develop strategies to use in the home to build on students strengths. For example, successful programs are written up as a resource for other families and s. Recognising and supporting the needs of families Removing barriers to family involvement Acknowledging the critical role of families in their child s learning Teachers consult with families to find out what would help them to support their child s learning at home. For example, teachers send a written survey in relevant community languages home with the child. School consults with families to find out what would help them to support their child s learning at or at home. For example, the uses staff and members of the parent body with multi-lingual skills to conduct a telephone survey of families. Teachers find out what they can do to help parents support their children s learning at home. For example, Homework sheets contain a brief outline of the expected outcomes of the tasks, and include opportunities for feedback from families and students. Schools provide culturally appropriate resources in relevant community languages to support families with their child s learning. For example, bilingual numeracy and literacy resources are developed and made available to families. The uses the results of the consultation to develop strategies to remove barriers to family and community engagement in activities. For example, interpreter services, transport and childcare are made available. Families have input into the s homework and assessment policy. For example, homework and assessment tasks include interactive activities that show parents and families how they can use everyday activities to support learning. School, families and community agencies collaborate to develop a program of activities to support families. For example, a series of information sessions and workshops on parenting related topics is delivered by professionals in the field of child development. The collaborates with the parent representative body to review and representative body policies and programs to ensure that barriers to family involvement are eliminated. For example, students are given choice of technology options, depending on availability, to complete learning tasks at home. The makes its facilities and resources available outside hours for homework and study. For example, the opens the library or computer room for afternoon or evening homework sessions where families can assist their children and gain support from teachers. Overall rating page 8

9 Dimension 5: Consultative decision-making Families play meaningful roles in the decision-making processes through parent representative bodies, committees and other forums. Families and community members are active contributors to decision making and planning processes. They engage in relevant decisions about supporting student learning, policy and and community building initiatives. that good s at the and will progress to the. Ensuring that all families have a voice in decisions that affect their children The informs families about issues or proposed changes, and gives them an opportunity to respond. For example, the informs families in advance about changes in activities, and offers contact information in case families have questions. Family and community networks are used by the to involve families in relevant decision making. For example, the has strong links with local community groups who provide advice about Aboriginal education or resources for culturally and linguistically diverse communities and uses these links to reach out to families. The develops a policy to ensure that parents have an equal voice in all relevant decisions that affect children. For example, the policy establishes a mechanism for parent initiated suggestions to change policy and review programs. Involving families and community members in whole- planning and evaluation processes an effective parent representative body that represents all families parent leadership capacity School uses a variety of strategies to seek input and involvement from families and community members. For example, the holds focus groups and community discussions throughout the community to identify issues. Schools encourage and support the development of a parent representative body. School and parent leaders reach out to families who are not involved at the to identify interests, concerns and priorities. For example, parent leaders and staff meet with families at community gathering spots and activities to build membership of the representative body. Parent representative body leaders reach out to parents from diverse backgrounds and invite them to become involved in the. For example, leaders greet families as they bring their children to events, and get their ideas for family learning activities. The and parent representative body hosts meetings with families and personnel about programs and policies to gain their ideas and feedback. For example, meetings are held, at the and community settings during the day and evening with interpreters as needed, to evaluate the s literacy program. Families from different cultural groups are supported to become involved in the activities of the representative body. For example, services such as interpreters during meetings, transportation and childcare are consistently provided for -based events and events held in community locations. Principal and parent representative body leaders recruit interested families from all backgrounds to volunteer, sit on committees and run for office. For example, leaders survey families to find out their interests and skills, and follow up with opportunities where they might be able to help. The develops a policy to ensure that families and community members contribute to whole- planning and evaluation processes. For example, the diversity within the community is reflected in the composition of all committees. Parent committee leaders participate in a leadership induction program and attend ongoing leadership training. For example, all parents interested in leadership roles in the are invited to participate in leadership induction program. Parents trained to co- facilitate parent workshops. For example, parent leaders are trained in facilitation skills such as brainstorming, role-plays, and small group activities that encourage everyone to speak out. Overall rating page 9

10 Dimension 6: Collaborating beyond the relationships with government and nongovernment agencies, community groups, businesses and other educational providers strengthens the ability of s and families to support their children s learning and development outcomes. School has strategically developed on-going relationships with government and non-government agencies, community groups, businesses and other educational providers which enhance learning opportunities and outcomes for students and families. that good s at the and will progress to the. Connecting families and students with community resources School leaders and teachers work with community agencies to identify resources and programs that support student learning. For example, local officials and community leaders are invited to staff meetings to raise staff awareness of resources in the community. Schools work with the parent representative body to identify families who may not know how to access community resources. For example, a multilingual handbook of community resources is developed and made available to families in the s resource centre and in community locations such as doctor s surgeries, shopping centres, real estate agents and libraries. School and community agencies help families better understand student options for additional resources to support their learning needs. For example, a register of the groups and resources available in the community is developed and made available to families through the and electronically on the s website. Providing families with access to community resources Creating a community hub within the capacity in community organisations to engage with s and support families School staff collects information for families about community resources. For example, the office and community room has a notice board and resource table with brochures about local training colleges, health services, sports teams, and service -learning opportunities. School staff and the parent representative body create a family-friendly space within the where staff and parent volunteers inform families about services and programs and plan activities. For example, the space is available to the community to provide on-site services. School staff reaches out to community organisations and businesses seeking support for activities. For example, workers in local businesses support the s literacy program by volunteering an hour a week to listen to children read. The distributes information in multiple languages on local services about available programs and resources. For example, the provides information about after- tutorial programs provided at the local youth centre. Outreach courses for families and community members are conducted in facilities at various times. For example, the local TAFE uses the s computer room to conduct evening computer related courses for families and community members. The invites community leaders to be involved in based programs. For example, the establishes a mentoring program with local businesses to work with students and families to help students achieve their goals. The is an active member of regular interagency meetings where information is shared and strategies to promote services are developed. For example, a community resource expo is held every year to provide information for families about their services. Government and non government agencies locate on grounds. For example, the local council uses the community room to conduct play groups for parents and pre- age children. School and parent leaders work with community and business representatives to develop programs to support student learning. For example, the community jointly develop submissions for funding for grants to enhance community engagement. Overall rating page 10

11 Dimension 7: Participating Every member of the community has something to offer and families time, energy and expertise supports learning and programs in many ways. Families and community members contribute to the life of the in ways that reflect their interests, skills, experience and capacity to do so. that good s at the and will progress to the. Providing opportunities for families and community to participate in the life of the The identifies opportunities for the participation of families and other community members at all levels of the s operation. For example, staff is surveyed at the beginning of the year to identify opportunities to family and community participation. The parent representative body works with the to organise formal participation programs. For example, the parent organisation helps develop a volunteer program, sends invitation forms to all families in their home language, and coordinates the response. The participation program reaches out to all families and offers opportunities for volunteering and paid employment. For example, leaders of the parent representative body make personal phone calls to parents from diverse backgrounds to connect them to volunteering and employment opportunities. Supporting families to engage in student learning activities Training parents and community members as classroom helpers the capacity of family and community members to lead the learning of others Teachers and families work together to develop resources to support teaching and learning programs. For example, families and community members help to produce numeracy resource kits that can be used to support learning in the classroom or at home. Individual teachers train parents to work with students in their classroom. For example, a Year 2 teacher trains a small group of parents to work one-on-one with students during reading lessons. Family and community members with an interest and experience in conducting workshops for other families are identified. For example, and parent representative body surveys parents and community members and develops a data base of workshop leaders. The and parent organisation implement strategies to overcome barriers to family and community engagement in teaching programs. For example, interpreter services, transportation and childcare facilities are made available. Families and community members are invited to participate in -wide training programs to support teaching and learning programs. For example, workshops, on specific aspects of literacy and numeracy, are offered throughout the year to build the capacity of families and community members to assist in classrooms. School staff and parent representative body develop parent leaders who help meet other parent s learning needs. For example, parent leaders are trained in workshop facilitation skills and strategies for working in culturally diverse settings. The organises a database of family and community skills, expertise, and backgrounds, though which teachers can find resources. For example, a parent who is writer is invited to be a Writer-in-residence during Literacy/ Numeracy Week to work with students to improve writing skills. School partners with training providers to deliver accredited courses for families and community members. For example, the and local TAFE jointly train parents from diverse backgrounds as tutors to support students literacy and numeracy learning. School and parent leaders work with parents on a regular basis to develop ways to improve parents capacity to support student learning. For example, the annual plan includes strategies to build the capacity of family and community members to support the learning of others through ongoing parent leadership development. Overall rating page 11

12 Analysing proforma Dimension What are our s? What is working well? What needs more work? 1. Communicating 2. Connecting learning at and at home 3. community and identity 4. Recognising the role of the family 5. Consultative decisionmaking 6. Collaborating beyond the 7. Participating page 12

13 Individual assessment sheet proforma Step 1: Record your overall rating for each dimension from the School Assessment Tool About you Name... Communicating Connecting learning at home and at community and identity Recognising the role of the family Consultative decisionmaking Collaborating beyond the Participating (Tick one) Parent/family member School leader Student Staff Community member Step 2: In relation to your responses, answer the following questions 1. Which dimension/s is the already addressing well? Not here yet Don t know 2. Are there any dimensions where you think the has not reached the (Not here yet)? What are they? 3. Are there any dimensions where you are unable to offer an opinion ()? What are they? 4. Which dimension/s should be a priority for action? Optional as required by workshop facilitator/leader Step 3: Compare your responses with others near you/at your table/ in the larger group. 5. How do your responses compare with others? 6. How are your responses the same as other similar people in the group (ie, other parents, other teachers, other students, etc)? 7. How are your responses different from other similar people in the group? page 13

14 Group assessment proforma - for use by workshop facilitator/leader Dimension Copy this proforma for each dimension Step 1: Ask individual participants (or table groups) to report where they think the is ly at for this dimension. Step 2: Shade in one column for each response. (The facilitator may wish to use a different colour for parents/family staff students community members leaders.) Step 3: As a group come to a consensus about the s. Step 4: Record this on the School Profile Overview sheet. Step 5: Discuss differences in ratings between the different groups. What conclusions can be made? page 14

15 School profile overview proforma - for use by workshop facilitator/leader Step 1: Record the group consensus results from the Group assessment proforma Step 2: Discuss the responses to identify broad trends of the seven dimensions Communicating Connecting learning at home and at community and identity Recognising the role of the family Consultative decisionmaking Collaborating beyond the Participating 1. Which dimension/s is the already addressing well? Are there any groups who disagreed? Not here yet Don t know 2. Are there any dimensions where the has not reached the ()? What are they? Were there specific groups who believed this? 3. Are there any dimensions where the group was unable to offer an opinion ()? What are they? Were there specific groups who believed this? 4. What conclusions can be drawn from the results? 5. Which dimension/s should be a priority for action? page 15

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