TIME is ENEMY. the. The surprising truth about why today s college students aren t graduating... and what needs to change. Time Is the Enemy n 1

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "TIME is ENEMY. the. The surprising truth about why today s college students aren t graduating... and what needs to change. Time Is the Enemy n 1"

Transcription

1 TIME is the ENEMY The surprising truth about why today s college students aren t graduating... and what needs to change Time Is the Enemy n

2 September 2 Governors Who Get It Some leaders run from challenges; others run toward them. When it comes to college completion, the numbers can be daunting. So troubling, in fact, that some leaders may be tempted to keep the public in the dark. The last thing they want to do is deliver more bad news, especially in times like these. That s not the case for the leaders listed below. By participating in this groundbreaking report, they have courageously committed their states to confronting the college completion challenge head on. These governors understand the consequences of ignoring thousands of college dropouts: the shrinking family incomes, the weakened economic competitiveness, the squandered taxpayer investments, and the hollowing out of our civic engagement. But they know the upside, too. They share our optimism that better days and millions more college graduates are ahead because under their leadership states are on the move. New laws are hitting the books. New policies are taking hold. And students are already beginning to reap the rewards of a reinvented system of higher education designed to meet modern needs. Improving college completion begins by ensuring that we count the success of every student. Thanks to the courageous leaders of these 33 states, we have now done so. Without them, this historic report would not have been possible. College America, the citizens of their states, and all in our country who hope for a brighter future owe them our gratitude. When it comes to the vital importance of college completion, there s no question: These governors get it. n Gov. Jan Brewer (Arizona) n Gov. Mike Beebe (Arkansas) n Gov. Edmund Gerald Brown, Jr. (California) n Gov. John Hickenlooper (Colorado) n Gov. Rick Scott (Florida) n Gov. Nathan Deal (Georgia) n Gov. Neil Abercrombie (Hawaii) n Gov. C.L. Butch Otter (Idaho) n Gov. Pat Quinn (Illinois) n Gov. Mitch Daniels (Indiana) n Gov. Steven L. Beshear (Kentucky) n Gov. Bobby Jindal (Louisiana) n Gov. Martin O Malley (Maryland) n Gov. Deval Patrick (Massachusetts) n Gov. Mark Dayton (Minnesota) n Gov. Haley Barbour (Mississippi) n Gov. Jeremiah W. (Jay) Nixon (Missouri) n Gov. Brian Sandoval (Nevada) n Gov. John Lynch (New Hampshire) n Gov. Susana Martinez (New Mexico) n Gov. Bev Perdue (North Carolina) n Gov. John Kasich (Ohio) n Gov. Mary Fallin (Oklahoma) n Gov. John A. Kitzhaber, MD (Oregon) n Gov. Tom Corbett (Pennsylvania) n Gov. Dennis Daugaard (South Dakota) n Gov. Bill Haslam (Tennessee) n Gov. Rick Perry (Texas) n Gov. Gary Richard Herbert (Utah) n Gov. Robert McDonnell (Virginia) n Gov. Chris Gregoire (Washington) n Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin (West Virginia) n Gov. Matthew Mead (Wyoming) Copyright 2 College America. All rights reserved.

3 CONTENTS Time is the enemy 2 Methodology 4 Part : The College Graduation Crisis Nontraditional students are the new majority 6 students rarely graduate 8 Graduation odds are especially low for students who are, Hispanic, older, or poor Students are wasting time on excess credits And taking too much time to earn a degree 2 Remediation: Too many students need it, and too few succeed when they get it 4 Time is running out: Five essential steps 6 Part 2: Results from the States Total degrees and certificates 8 Graduation rates: Certificates 2 Graduation rates: Associate degrees 24 Graduation rates: Bachelor s degrees 28 Average length of time and credits to degree 32 Enrollment in remedial education 34 Graduation from remedial courses 4 Transfers from two-year to four-year colleges 42 Part 3: State Profiles 43 Time Is the Enemy n

4 Time is the enemy This is not an ordinary introduction. There s no time for that. Unless we move with urgency, today s young people will be the first generation in history to be less educated than their predecessors. Consider this a sobering wake-up call and an urgent appeal for action now. Inside these pages you will get an unprecedented look behind the ivy-covered walls of America s public colleges and universities and into how well they are educating all we repeat, all of today s college students. The all part is what s new. Surprisingly, until this report, no one has bothered to measure and report the success or failure of all U.S. college students. We ve only been tracking students who are on campus for the first-time, going full-time. That s all the federal government requires of colleges and universities, and until now few exceeded this minimal standard. But 4 of every public college students are able to attend only part-time. Which means leaders have been making policy decisions about higher education absent critical information about 4 percent of the students, as if their success or failure was less important than that of traditional full-time students. How can this be? Worse, there s more. Start full-time and then transfer to a different institution? You haven t been counted. Receive some of the billions of dollars in federal grants given out each year to attend college? Few have followed up to check if you dropped out or graduated. Older students, students trapped in, students pursuing valuable career certificates all have been virtually invisible to policymakers, elected officials, and taxpayers until now. College America fundamentally believes that for the United States to have any hope of leading the world again in the proportion of our citizens with a college education, we must first see every student. This includes the part-timers and older students who are struggling to balance jobs and school, the millions who are trapped in the Bermuda Triangle of, and the many firstgeneration freshmen who too often are left to fend for themselves when they arrive on campus. We cannot tackle what s holding them back from success if we do not understand their challenges and the complicated natures of their lives. Thanks to the courageous and enlightened leadership of governors and higher education institutions that shared their data, this historic report finally allows us to see what s really happening on campuses in 33 states. All students now count and are being counted. We now have a much more complete picture of where we stand and what needs to be done so that all students have a fair shot at success. Consider these findings: n There is a new majority on campus. Seventy-five percent of today s students are juggling some combination of families, jobs, and school while commuting to class; according to the U.S. Department of Education, only a quarter go full-time, attend 2 n College America

5 residential colleges, and have most of their bills paid by their parents. our country will simply not be economically competitive if these students don t succeed. n n students rarely graduate. Even when given twice as long to complete certificates and degrees, no more than a quarter ever make it to graduation day. Poor students and students of color struggle the most to graduate. Even though more of these students than ever before are enrolling in college, too few end up with certificates or degrees. Given changing demographics, n n Students are taking too many credits and too much time to complete. Excessive course-taking is slowing down progress to certificates and degrees. And students are spending too much time in school. Remediation is broken, producing few students who ultimately graduate. Sadly, efforts intended to catch students up are most often leaving them behind. The Big Idea: Time is the enemy of college completion. These historic data have revealed a common thread and an animating principle to guide our work to boost college graduation: The longer it takes, the more life gets in the way of success. More students are working, and they are working more hours than ever before. Many can afford to attend only part-time, extending the years until they graduate. More come to our campuses underprepared for college and then get trapped in broken remedial approaches that don t help, as time keeps slipping away. More are overwhelmed by too many choices and too little structure, causing aimless wandering and wasted semesters and years. All of this adds up to more and more time. As the clock runs and the calendar turns, we all know what happens: Students lives fill up with jobs, relationships, marriages, children, and mortgages; the list goes on and on. Not surprisingly, college often gets left behind: a few years of courses, no degree, and a lot of debt. The result is a yawning skills gap caused by too few trained workers for more high-skill jobs than ever. Incomes shrink. And America falls further behind. But the path forward is clear. And thanks to the leadership of the 33 states that provided the historic data in this report and to the commitment of the 29 governors who have pledged their states to significant reform as members of the College America Alliance of States there is great reason for optimism. We can help more students graduate. We can provide a better deal for taxpayers. We can create stronger economies in our communities, states, and country. But we must redouble our efforts to do so now. There s no time to waste. Time Is the Enemy n 3

6 Methodology The data presented in this report were provided by the 33 participating states themselves, using the College America/National Governors Association Common Completion Metrics. National findings in each category were based on the calculated medians of the state data. More than million students enroll in public institutions annually in the states whose data are captured in these findings a clear majority of students in public colleges and universities today. While we recognize that there may be some variance in the data higher education institutions provided to their states, the significant number of students represented means that the most alarming trends can be traced across all of the states represented in these findings. About the Common Completion Metrics Common metrics uniformly designed and applied help us frame our data collection to be most useful for driving change. Moreover, adopting and reporting common metrics unifies us in a shared goal and communicates our commitment to doing the hard work necessary to bring about improvement. In July 2, the National Governors Association (NGA) adopted the College America Common Completion Metrics in announcing its to Compete initiative, placing the metrics at the core of NGA s call to governors to make college completion a priority. This significant action signaled a new national focus on the importance of consistent data to document the progress and success of postsecondary students across all states. For more information on the Common Completion Metrics and the companion Technical Guide, please visit 4 n College America

7 Part : The College Graduation Crisis Time Is the Enemy n 5

8 What have we learned? Finding Nontraditional students are the new majority. 75% 75% of students are college commuters, often juggling families, jobs, and school. 25% 25% of students attend fulltime at residential colleges. And if they attend part-time, the federal government doesn t even track their success as if they re invisible. Graduation counted: 6% students Graduation not counted: 4% students Action Finding It s time to start counting all students. 6 n College America

9 What do we do about it? First things first. States need to understand who today s students are and how they re performing. Otherwise, states are flying blind. Governments are good at counting traditional students: those who are first-time on campus, going full-time. But they are only 25 percent of today s public college students. The federal Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) doesn t count what happens to part-time students, who make up about 4 percent of all students, nor does it count the success of transfer, low-income, or remedial students. The 33 states that submitted data for this report are closing this data gap, but many others still can t answer basic questions such as: What percentage of our public college students are part-time, balancing work, classes, and/or family responsibilities? Which programs are successfully getting students back on track? How many additional years and credits are students taking to earn a certificate or degree? We urge all states to measure what matters most, disaggregating by race/ethnicity, age, gender, fulltime or part-time status, and income level: n Outcome metrics Degrees awarded annually (number and change over time), graduation rates, and transfer rates. n Progress metrics Remediation (entry and success), success in first-year math and English, credit accumulation, retention rates, course completion, and time and credits to degree. progress: 33 states are now reporting the right data The following 33 states gave us data using the College America/National Governors Association Common Completion Metrics. Time Is the Enemy n 7

10 Finding 2 Too few students graduate. For part-timers, results are tragic even when they have twice as much time. -year certificate within 2 years 27.8% 2.2% 2-year associate within 4 years 8.8% 7.8% 4-year bachelor s within 8 years 6.6% 24.3% Action It s time to rethink scheduling and programs to help more students attend full-time. 8 n College America

11 What do we do about it? Today s full-time and part-time students need new, shorter, and faster pathways to degrees and certificates of value. Colleges should: n n n Use block schedules, with fixed and predictable classroom meeting times, so that part-time students who are juggling jobs, families, and school can know with certainty when they can go to work each day. Allow students to proceed toward degrees or certificates at a faster pace, with shorter academic terms, less time off between terms, and year-round scheduling. Simplify the registration process by enrolling students once in a single, coherent program rather than making them sign up every term for individual, unconnected courses. n n n n Reduce the amount of time students must be in class by using online technology and allowing students to move on once they ve demonstrated competency. Form peer support and learning networks among students in the same program. Embed into the regular college curriculum so students don t waste time before they start earning credits. Provide better information on every program s tuition, graduation rates, and job placement outcomes so that students can make more informed decisions at the front end. Progress: Some states are helping students balance priorities New York: The City University of New York offers Accelerated Study in Associate Programs (ASAP) to help students complete associate degrees more quickly. By using block scheduling, student cohorts by major, and other supports, students can effectively balance jobs and school. The results speak for themselves: ASAP students have three times the graduation rate of their peers who do not participate in the program. Tennessee: Only Tennessee has a statewide approach to helping students balance work and school. The 27 Tennessee Tech Centers have average completion rates of 75 percent, with some centers regularly graduating all of their students. Unlike traditional approaches, students enroll in whole academic programs rather than individual courses, streamlining the path to completion by removing the burdens and confusion of individual course selection and availability. Programs are offered from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m., Monday through Friday, providing students with scheduling predictability so they can keep jobs while going to school. Time Is the Enemy n 9

12 Finding 3 Graduation odds are especially low for students who are, Hispanic, older, or poor. -year certificate in.5 years 2-year associate in 3 years 4-year bachelor s in 6 years -year certificate in.5 years 2-year associate in 3 years 4-year bachelor s in 6 years 5.% 7.5% 39.9% 7.8% 2.% 4.5% Hispanic 8.5%.% 46.5% 9.% 2.6% 6.7% Older (25+ years at entry) 3.2% 4.4% 27.%.3% 4.6%.6% Low-income (Pell grant) 23.%.8% 45.2%.9% 4.3% 7.3% Action It s time for completion, not just enrollment, to become the goal. n College America

13 What do we do about it? States must get serious that graduation, not just enrollment, is the goal. Showing up isn t enough. Colleges need incentives to ensure that all their students also finish up, and they must be willing to share the results of their efforts. States should set completion goals, statewide and by campus. And they should tie at least part of colleges funding to their success in meeting these goals. Start with a handful of explicit, easy-tounderstand measures such as gains in the number of certificates and degrees awarded, the percentage of students completing on time and transferring from two-year to four-year colleges successfully, and the number of courses completed. To ensure sustainability, tie a modest percentage of funding to performance and then steadily increase it over time. PROGRESS: 29 states are leading reform efforts Members of the College America Alliance of States have committed to: n Setting statewide and campus-specific degree and credential completion goals through 22; n Collecting and reporting on common measures of progress and sharing those results publicly; and n Reinventing higher education to smooth paths to completion through aggressive state- and campuslevel action plans. Time Is the Enemy n

14 What do we do about it? Colleges need to recognize that time is the enemy. With today s student population, more time and more choices often add up to less success. Being able to engage in an extended period of self-discovery or sample multiple courses out of catalogues the size of phone books might work for students who have the luxury of unlimited time and money. But this approach doesn t work for the nearly 5 percent of students who work more than 2 hours a week or for the 25 percent of community college students who work more than 35 hours a week. Colleges should: n n n n n Require formal, on-time completion plans for every student, updated annually. Enact caps of 2 credit hours for a bachelor s degree and 6 credit hours for an associate degree. Create a common general education core program to ensure consistency. Require full transferability of common core courses. Adopt alternative pathways to help students earn college credits, such as through Advanced Placement, online learning, and accelerated competency-based courses. Progress: Some states are boosting productivity Connecticut: enrollment in community colleges increased dramatically when colleges began using full-time enrollment status as the default when processing student financial aid applications. The strategy shows students that attending college full-time is often more affordable than they expect. Texas: To reduce the likelihood that students will earn unnecessary and excessive credits, colleges and universities lose their state subsidy for students who exceed a certain credit-hour threshold. Additionally, students are charged out-of-state tuition if they exceed limits for repeating courses or if they take classes that have content essentially identical to ones they have already completed. Florida: The state is using comprehensive degree acceleration strategies such as dual enrollment (allowing students to earn college credit while in high school), early admission, credit by examination, and Advanced Placement/International Baccalaureate credit. These strategies are made possible through a common course-numbering system that allows credits from two-year colleges to be easily transferred to four-year institutions. Time Is the Enemy n 3

15 What do we do about it? The current system is broken; too many students start in remedial courses and never earn a credential of any kind. Colleges need to: n Provide alternative pathways to a career certificate or career-related credential for students with major academic weaknesses. n n n n Divert students from traditional remedial programs they aren t working. Mainstream as many students as possible into college-level courses. Provide co-requisite and embedded support for those needing extra help. Intensify instruction and minimize the time necessary to prepare students for entry into college-level courses. Eliminate the many exit points where students are lost by either not passing or not enrolling in courses. n n Answer the fundamental question is what s being taught in developmental education what students really need? It s time to revisit both the structure and goals of remedial math. Math should be a gateway, not a gatekeeper, to successful college and everyday life. Reading and writing should be integrated. Overhaul the current placement system. Current placement tests are not predictive. If placement tests are given, provide students with pretest guidance, practice tests, and time to brush up. Progress: Several states are reinventing Few states have established statewide policies, but many are moving in that direction. In fact, most of the states that have won Completion Innovation Challenge grants from College America are using the funds to implement reforms, including Arkansas, Colorado, Georgia, Indiana, Kentucky, Maryland, Texas, and West Virginia. Time Is the Enemy n 5

16 Time is running out Five essential steps that states should take right now. Count all students, set state- and campus-level goals, and uniformly measure progress and success. By providing data for this report, 33 states have already proven that it s possible to count the success of every student. And the 29 governors who have pledged to fulfill the commitments of membership in the Alliance of States are setting goals and reinventing higher education to create the conditions for higher achievement. More states should do the same. And the federal government should try to catch up by filling damaging gaps in the national database, raising the standard of measurement, and counting every student in our country. 2. Reduce the time it takes to earn a certificate or degree. The surest path to more college completions is the shortest one. This does not mean dumbing down courses or undermining quality. Ensure that unnecessary credit requirements are not added to certificate and degree programs. Demand robust, comprehensive transfer agreements across campuses, systems, and states so students can easily take their hard-earned credits with them instead of losing valuable time when they must continually start over. 3. Transform so that students earn as quickly as possible college credits that count. It s been proven: Current approaches don t make it more likely that students will graduate. Fixing now may be the best thing we can do to boost college completion. And it s clear what needs to be done: Start as many underprepared students as possible in first-year, full-credit classes. Do this by adding extra class time and tutoring support, but don t make the students wait to earn credits that count toward their degrees. 4. Restructure programs to fit busy lives. It s time to face facts: College students today are going to have to work while trying to graduate. What else can they do when college is so expensive? Our response simply cannot be indifference. The best approaches block classes: Students attend full-time by learning from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m., five days a week. Even better, create cohorts so similar students can support one another. Complicated lives are easier when people who understand can lean on one another. 5. Join College America. Governors from 29 states already have, and they re benefitting from access to a hearty band of impatient reformers and experts in higher education policy and practice who understand the necessity of making changes now that can significantly boost college completion. There s no question: A vital movement is building across America to boost college completion. Since time is the enemy, why wait to get on board? 6 n College America

17 Part 2: Results from the States Time Is the Enemy n 7

18 Total Degrees and Certificates Total degrees and certificates Certificates Percent increase Percent increase Arizona 3,4 37,2 23.3% 5,779 7, % Arkansas 4,922 7, % 2,46 3, % California (CSU system only) 5, 69, % 4,485 3, % Colorado 25,3 27,752.9%,832, % Florida 95,697 2, % 26,57 34,83 3.% Georgia 39,73 46,85 7.9%,2 9,55 -.5% Hawaii 5,564 5, % % Idaho 7,3 7, % % Illinois 57,549 6,623 7.% 4,843 5, % Indiana 34,689 37,45 7.9% 2,72 2, % Kentucky 9,85 27, % 2,39 5, % Louisiana 24,822 24, % 2,89 3,68 9.6% Maryland 25,68 3,7 7.2% % Massachusetts 22,883 25,2 9.3% 2,3 2,32 5.% Minnesota 25,427 28,97.9% 6,543 5, % Mississippi* NA NA NA,9 2, % Missouri 25,27 27,842.4%,2, % Nevada 6,875 9,45 33.% % New Hampshire,58, % % New Mexico,672 3,4 25.7%,452 2,4 66.% North Carolina 35,273 39,29.6% 4,57 2,63-43.% Pennsylvania (PASSHE system only) Ohio 52,65 59,979 4.%,546 2, % Oklahoma 2,46 24,39 3.3% % Oregon 8,874 2, %,45, % 26,642 32,6 2.7%,787 2, % South Dakota 3,26 3, % % Tennessee 22,9 24,596.2% % Texas 7,577 28, % 7,26 6,25-6.9% Utah 2,272 2,67 4.4%, % Virginia 37,397 42, %,73,22 3.7% Washington 4,646 4,993.8% 5,44 4,23-7.7% West Virginia 9,498,93 7.8% % Wyoming,99 2, % % * Two-year data from Mississippi are from 25 6, rather than We could not calculate total degree production for Mississippi because two-year and four-year data are from different years. NA = Not applicable Note: As part of our Completion Innovation Challenge, states were asked to submit the comprehensive data found in this report. Seventeen states chose not to participate. Four of these states Connecticut, Maine, Rhode Island, and Vermont already have committed to major improvements in their postsecondary programs by joining our Alliance of States. 8 n College America

19 Total Degrees Associate and bachelor s Associate degrees 5-year percentage change Bachelor s degrees 5-year percentage change Arizona 7,732, % 6,53 8, % Arkansas 4,427 5,35 2.9% 8,449 9,39.3% California (CSU system only) 73,83 83,89 2.6% 6,72 73,32 8.5% Colorado 5,266 5,893.9% 7,933 2,4 2.% Florida 29,37 37, % 39,989 49, % Georgia 7,665, % 2,945 27, % Hawaii 2,499 2, % 2,846 3, % Idaho,774,89 6.6% 4,572 5,3 9.4% Illinois 23,39 25,88 9.3% 29,667 3, % Indiana 8,665 9,77 2.8% 23,33 24,76 6.% Kentucky 5,454 6, % 2,32 4, % Louisiana 4,637 3, % 7,295 7,55.3% Maryland 7,788,7 29.9% 7,529 9,465.% Massachusetts 7,677 8, % 3,76 4,63.% Minnesota 9,968 2, % 8,96 9, % Mississippi 6,68 8, % 9,536 9, % Missouri 7,497 8, % 6,599 7,77 6.7% Nevada 2,3 2, % 4,559 5, % New Hampshire 3,289 3,79-3.3% 8,7 8,46 4.4% New Mexico 3,433 4, % 5,787 6, % North Carolina 5,925 6, % 24,777 29, % Pennsylvania (PASSHE system only) Ohio 6,47 9,72 6.9% 34,652 38,64 9.8% Oklahoma 7,773 8,237 6.% 3,5 5, % Oregon 6,244 6,75 7.4%,225 2,65 2.7% 9,54 2,33 29.% 5,35 7,35 3.% South Dakota % 3,4 3,548 8.% Tennessee 6,357 6, % 5,388 7,6.5% Texas 28,533 37,28 3.7% 6,828 75, % Utah 8,69 8,556 6.%,44 2,63 9.% Virginia, 2,9 8.9% 26,223 29,74 3.3% Washington 2,347 2,37.% 4,55 5, % West Virginia 2,4 2, % 7,349 8, % Wyoming,664 2,3 22.% NP NP NP NP = The state did not provide data for this metric. Time Is the Enemy n 9

20 Graduation Rates Certificates Entry cohort, started fall 25 (headcount) students In year In.5 years In 2 years Entry cohort, started fall 25 (headcount) students In year In.5 years Arizona NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP In 2 years Arkansas,66 8.7% 2.8% 35.9% % 6.8% 2.5% California (CSU system only) NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP Colorado % 34.% 36.5% 39.7% 2.5% 3.8% Florida,655 2.% 7.5% 2.% 2,94 4.% 7.3% 9.4% Georgia 6, % 25.% 27.3% 4,769 8.% 3.% 6.9% Hawaii 36 DS DS DS 34 DS DS DS Idaho % 3.% 33.4% % 2.3% 7.4% Illinois 2, % 8.8% 22.4% 3, 6.2% 9.2%.8% Indiana % 9.7% 2.5% % 9.%.8% Kentucky 38.% 42.% 42.% % 5.5% 52.% Louisiana,57 3.% 2.% 29.% 5 DS 2.4% 9.6% Maryland 85 3.% 6.8% 6.8% 282 DS DS DS Massachusetts % 28.2% 28.2% 55 DS DS DS Minnesota NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP Mississippi,34 36.% 37.8% 38.8% 3 6.7% 8.% 8.% Missouri % 28.% 28.% 24 DS DS DS Nevada NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP New Hampshire NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP New Mexico,992.8% NP 2.7% 6,524.8% NP.4% North Carolina 2,66 4.9% 42.9% 43.% 2,55 4.3% 5.4% 6.4% Pennsylvania (PASSHE system only) Ohio % 2.8% 5.%,9 3.2% 5.2% 7.5% Oklahoma 2.8% 2.7% 2.7% % 2.% 2.% Oregon % 37.3% 42.4% % 23.8% 3.% NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP South Dakota NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP Tennessee NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP Texas 54, % 4.% 4.8% 5,74 2.% 2.8% 3.6% Utah 88 DS DS DS 82 DS DS DS Virginia,39 2.% 4.% 5.%,793 DS DS DS Washington 2, % 24.2% 28.%,4 4.% 8.4% 2.6% West Virginia 94.7% 3.8% 6.% 39 DS DS DS Wyoming % 38.8% 52.% 43 DS DS DS NP = The state did not provide data for this metric. DS = Fewer than students, so data were suppressed. 2 n College America

21 Graduation Rates Certificates (full-time) Entry cohort, started fall 25 (headcount) Transfer students Entry cohort, started fall 25 (headcount) Pell grant recipients In year In.5 years In 2 years In year In.5 years In 2 years Arizona NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP Arkansas DS DS DS DS NP NP NP NP California (CSU system only) NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP Colorado % 35.% 35.7% % 35.4% 37.3% Florida % 22.8% 25.9% 47.5% 7.% 2.8% Georgia 2,84 2.% 26.7% 3.%, % 46.6% 49.9% Hawaii % 43.2% 47.7% NP DS DS DS Idaho 35.% 39.% 42.% % 2.5% 27.8% Illinois NP NP NP NP % 7.4% 23.3% Indiana % 48.8% 5.2% % 8.% 9.8% Kentucky 8 42.% 45.7% 45.7% % 33.9% 33.9% Louisiana % 2.% 25.2% NP NP NP NP Maryland % 2.2% 2.2% NP NP NP NP Massachusetts % 57.3% 6.5% % 26.6% 26.6% Minnesota NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP Mississippi % 5.7% 5.% % 42.5% 43.% Missouri % 3.% 3.% % 43.6% 43.6% Nevada NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP New Hampshire NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP New Mexico 3,455.79% NP 3.% 4,326.9% NP 3.2% North Carolina 7 4.% 43.% 43.6% % 25.5% 25.5% Ohio % 8.3% 2.% %.9% 3.9% Oklahoma NP NP NP NP DS DS DS DS Oregon % 37.9% 42.% % 29.% 35.2% Pennsylvania (PASSHE system only) NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP South Dakota NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP Tennessee NP NP NP NP NP DS 4.% 28.% Texas 29,98 3.7% 4.9% 5.7% 23,7 3.5% 4.7% 5.6% Utah 75 DS DS DS NP NP NP NP Virginia,224.% 2.% 3.% % 4.% 5.% Washington 2,623 2.% 26.8% 29.5%,47 5.8% 24.7% 28.3% West Virginia NP NP NP NP DS DS DS DS Wyoming 27 DS DS DS DS DS DS DS NP = The state did not provide data for this metric. DS = Fewer than students, so data were suppressed. Time Is the Enemy n 2

22 GRADUATION RATES, by race Certificates (full-time) Entry cohort, started fall 25 Hispanic In.5 years, non-hispanic Entry cohort, started fall 25 In.5 years White, non-hispanic Entry cohort, started fall 25 In.5 years Entry cohort, started fall 25 Other In.5 years Arizona NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP Arkansas 9 DS DS DS % 2 DS California (CSU system only) NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP Colorado % DS % 2 DS Florida % % % % Georgia % 2, % 3, % % Hawaii NP NP NP NP NP NP 32 NP Idaho 55 NP NP NP % % Illinois 2 6.% %, % % Indiana 9 DS 33 DS % 5 DS Kentucky DS DS DS DS % 3 DS Louisiana 7 DS % % % Maryland 4 NP 63 DS % 22 DS Massachusetts 28 DS 27 DS % 32 DS Minnesota NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP Mississippi DS DS % % 36 DS Missouri DS DS 7 DS % 3 DS Nevada NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP New Hampshire NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP New Mexico* 4,48 2.5% % 4,465 NP,76 2.5% North Carolina % %,69 4.9% % Pennsylvania (PASSHE system only) Ohio 3 DS 4 8.6% % 38 DS Oklahoma DS DS 3 DS 62 DS 2 DS Oregon 23 DS DS DS % % NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP South Dakota NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP Tennessee DS DS DS DS DS DS DS DS Texas 8,24 4.% 6,66 3.% 26,33 4.3% 3,39 2.4% Utah DS DS DS DS 57 DS 24 DS Virginia 45 DS 32 DS % 49 DS Washington 85 3.% 7 4.%, % % West Virginia DS DS DS DS 86 4.% DS DS Wyoming DS DS DS DS % DS DS * New Mexico data show graduation rates for two years, rather than.5 years. NP = The state did not provide data for this metric. DS = Fewer than students, so data were suppressed. 22 n College America

23 GRADUATION RATES, BY AGE Certificates (full-time) Entry cohort, started fall 25 Students age 7 9 In year In.5 years In 2 years Entry cohort, started fall 25 Students age 2 24 In year In.5 years In 2 years Entry cohort, started fall 25 Students age 25 and over In year In.5 years In 2 years Arizona 6,82 7.6% 7.% 2.7%,8 6.3%.% 4.4% % 9.7% 3.3% Arkansas % 7.7% 3.6% % 8.5% 34.7% % 27.4% 44.8% California (CSU system only) NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP Colorado % 3.% 32.3% % 3.9% 37.7% 39.6% 4.6% 43.6% Florida % 2.% 26.% %.5% 4.3% 47 4.% 5.9% 7.2% Georgia 2, % 22.8% 25.6%, % 2.5% 23.3% 2, % 3.2% 32.% Hawaii 2 DS DS DS DS DS DS DS 2 DS DS DS Idaho % 29.5% 33.9% % 3.% 3.8% % 3.5% 34.6% Illinois,25 7.7% 2.5% 5.9% % 2.3% 22.7% % 3.6% 36.6% Indiana 76.4% 8.2% 2.5% 72 DS DS DS % 25.2% 27.2% Kentucky % 32.% 32.% 3 DS DS DS % 55.9% 55.9% Louisiana 54 DS 6.% 25.8% % 7.9% 25.6% % 28.3% 35.% Maryland 29 DS.%.% 25 DS DS DS % 38.7% 38.7% Massachusetts 8 22.% 22.% 22.% % 39.3% 39.3% 32 5.% 53.% 53.% Minnesota NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP Mississippi % 4.% 4.9% % 34.2% 35.4% % 38.7% 39.9% Missouri % 24.2% 24.2% % 3.4% 3.4% 3.% 3.% 3.% Nevada NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP New Hampshire NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP New Mexico 9,24.% NP.9%, 4.7% NP 5.5% % NP 9.5% North Carolina % 23.% 23.5% % 43.% 43.2%,474 5.% 5.5% 5.7% Pennsylvania (PASSHE system only) Ohio % 3.5% 6.% % 7.9%.6% 35.2% 5.% 6.7% Oklahoma 52 DS DS DS 24 DS DS DS 34 DS DS DS Oregon % 36.2% 42.% % 37.% 42.5% % 38.9% 42.7% NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP South Dakota NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP Tennessee NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP Texas 42,984.9% 2.9% 3.8% 6, % 5.5% 6.3% 4,876 9.%.7%.7% Utah 55 DS DS DS 9 DS DS DS 4 DS DS DS Virginia 89 DS 2.% 3.% 92 DS 7.% 7.% 35 DS 9.%.% Washington, % 23.7% 29.4% % 23.% 26.6%,27 2.4% 25.6% 27.6% West Virginia 38 DS DS DS 25 DS DS DS 3 DS DS DS Wyoming % 38.2% 52.7% 6 DS DS DS 28 DS DS DS NP = The state did not provide data for this metric. DS = Fewer than students, so data were suppressed. Time Is the Enemy n 23

24 Graduation Rates Associate degrees Entry cohort, started fall 24 (headcount) students In 2 years In 3 years In 4 years Entry cohort, started fall 24 (headcount) students In 2 years In 3 years In 4 years Arizona 8,926 7.% 5.4% 9.8% 8,252.% 3.4% 6.2% Arkansas 5,682 5.% 3.6% 7.6%,945.7% 3.% 6.2% California (CSU system only) NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP Colorado 6,5 8.4% 3.7% 7.% 6,38.4% 3.% 5.6% Florida 36, % 7.9% 25.6% 23,482.5% 4.2% 8.8% Georgia 2, % 3.5% 8.% 3,868.9% 6.% 9.7% Hawaii 2, % 2.2% 8.6%,859.8% 3.2% 6.% Idaho 2, % 7.5% 2.4% 658 NP 5.5% 9.% Illinois 22,98 9.5% 2.% 26.% 2, % 6.4%.% Indiana 8, % 3.8% 9.3% 2,97.5% 2.8% 6.% Kentucky 5,54.8% 8.5% 3.5%,73 DS 2.2% 5.5% Louisiana 6,3.% 4.2% 6.7% 2,36.6%.8% 3.7% Maryland 2, 4.5% 2.7% 8.3% 8,3.8% 2.8% 5.8% Massachusetts,74 4.4% 4.3% 9.3% 4,889.% 4.3% 8.9% Minnesota NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP Mississippi 8,57.2% 6.3% 8.8% 8,56.9% 5.% 7.4% Missouri,67 9.8% 8.9% 22.2% 4,38.5% 2.6% 4.3% Nevada,64 3.9%.8% 6.6% 7,625.3%.6% 3.% New Hampshire NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP New Mexico,73 3.3% 5.4% 7.% 7,37.2% 2.4% 3.7% North Carolina 4, % 3.9% 7.5% 4,86 3.9% 6.8%.% Pennsylvania (PASSHE system only) Ohio 23, % 9.4% 6.5% 9,58.2% 3.6% 7.8% Oklahoma,27 8.8% 7.9% 22.% 4,82 3.5% 6.3% 9.2% Oregon 6, % 5.% 9.6% 3,84.4% 5.% 8.% NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP South Dakota 238 DS 5.5% 5.5% 24 DS DS DS Tennessee,867 6.% 8.% 22.3% 2,742.9% 7.5%.9% Texas 57,47 3.% 7.8%.2% 52,283.6% 2.4% 4.7% Utah 7, % 6.5% 2.8% 4,249.9% 2.8% 5.5% Virginia,29 4.% 6.% 2.% 6,65.% 5.% 9.% Washington 3,7 3.6% 26.3% 3.2% 4, %.3% 5.3% West Virginia 3,4 5.2% 2.6% 6.7% 569 DS 4.7% 8.3% Wyoming 2,89 2.9% 32.3% 36.8% % 2.7% 7.6% NP = The state did not provide data for this metric. DS = Fewer than students, so data were suppressed. 24 n College America

25 Graduation Rates Associate degrees (full-time) Entry cohort, started fall 24 (headcount) Transfer students In 2 years In 3 years In 4 years Entry cohort, started fall 24 (headcount) Pell grant recipients In 2 years In 3 years In 4 years Arizona NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP Arkansas % 5.2% 9.7% NP NP NP NP California (CSU system only) NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP Colorado 4,878 8.%.3% 4.% 2,54 7.4% 2.6% 6.% Florida 2,22 4.7% 23.5% 28.7% 4,55 3.5% 3.6% 2.6% Georgia 7,48.6% 8.5% 22.% 4,5 3.8%.2% 5.6% Hawaii 2,93 9.6% 5.5% 8.5% 68 3.%.9% 5.% Idaho % 23.8% 28.9%,5 3.5% 8.6%.8% Illinois NP NP NP NP 7,77 7.2% 6.3% 2.6% Indiana 8 7.% 9.3% 27.7% 3, % 9.2% 4.% Kentucky 2,89 9.% 5.9% 2.4% 4,87.9% 9.% 4.7% Louisiana 3,296 4.% 8.8%.7% NP NP NP NP Maryland 3,75 6.7% 6.% 22.5% 3, % 8.5% 3.2% Massachusetts 3, % 22.8% 27.8% 3,237 3.%.7% 5.3% Minnesota NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP Mississippi 6, % 8.6% 2.% 8,47 8.6% 4.8% 7.2% Missouri 3,847.% 7.3% 9.9% 4, % 4.2% 7.7% Nevada NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP New Hampshire NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP New Mexico 3, % 5.8% 7.% 4,28 3.4% 6.% 8.3% North Carolina 5,384 5.% 8.9% 23.3% 6,5 7.%.8% 5.5% Ohio, % 7.8% 25.9% 9,962 2.% 7.7% 3.% Oklahoma 42 DS DS 23.8% 4,5.6% 9.9% 24.% Oregon,99 2.7% 22.4% 28.8% 2, % 3.7% 8.4% Pennsylvania (PASSHE system only) NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP South Dakota % 56.3% 58.7% DS DS DS Tennessee 5, % 5.5% 53.9% 6, % 5.3% 9.7% Texas 29,8 6.3%.3% 3.4% 25,32 2.6% 7.2%.8% Utah 5,74 7.% 23.6% 27.4% NP NP NP NP Virginia 5,384 8.% 6.% 9.% 3,258 3.% 3.% 7.% Washington 8,8 8.6% 26.6% 3.8% 4,249 2.% 23.7% 28.6% West Virginia,32 5.4% 23.% 26.7%,92 3.9%.6% 4.6% Wyoming % 27.4% 3.5% % 33.7% 37.6% NP = The state did not provide data for this metric. DS = Fewer than students, so data were suppressed. Time Is the Enemy n 25

26 GRADUATION RATES, by race Associate degrees (full-time) Entry cohort, started fall 24 Hispanic In 3 years, non-hispanic Entry cohort, started fall 24 In 3 years White, non-hispanic Entry cohort, started fall 24 In 3 years Entry cohort, started fall 24 Other In 3 years Arizona 2,52.9% 533.6% 4, %,276 5.% Arkansas 32.6% % 4,358 5.% % California (CSU system only) NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP Colorado,44.% % 4, % % Florida 8,29 4.% 6,35.% 9,5 2.6% 2, % Georgia % 3,27 7.5% 7,865 6.% 895.6% Hawaii 38 DS 4 DS 299.7% 2, % Idaho % 7 DS, % % Illinois 2,3 2.9% 3,44 6.8% 5, %,69 5.6% Indiana % % 7,328 5.% % Kentucky 74 DS 576 DS 4, % % Louisiana 3 DS 2, % 3,2 5.9% 52.9% Maryland 54 9.% 2,846 5.% 7,375 6.%,385.% Massachusetts,37 7.2%,33 7.6% 7,85 6.2%,54 3.5% Minnesota NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP Mississippi % 8, % 8, %,27.6% Missouri 25 2.%,82 6.5% 9,58 2.8% % Nevada % 99 DS 88.% 49 4.% New Hampshire NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP New Mexico 4,33 5.5% % 4,62 5.4% % North Carolina % 2,74 7.7%, %,.4% Pennsylvania (PASSHE system only) Ohio % 2,578 3.% 9,9.4%,45 8.7% Oklahoma 47.3%,25 7.3% 7,32 9.5% 2,75 2.% Oregon 43.9% 37 DS 5,57 5.4% % NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP South Dakota DS DS DS DS 84 6.% 46 DS Tennessee 34.9%,938 6.% 8,37 2.8% % Texas 9,26 7.2% 6, % 27, % 3,549 9.% Utah % 83 DS 5,524 8.%,55 3.4% Virginia 579.6%,976 9.% 6, % % Washington,42 2.4% % 9,75 28.% 2, % West Virginia 27 DS % 3,39 3.% 65 DS Wyoming % 33 DS 2, % % NP = The state did not provide data for this metric. DS = Fewer than students, so data were suppressed. 26 n College America

27 GRADUATION RATES, BY AGE Associate degrees (full-time) Entry cohort, started fall 24 Students age 7 9 In 2 years In 3 years In 4 years Entry cohort, started fall 24 Students age 2 24 In 2 years In 3 years In 4 years Entry cohort, started fall 24 Students age 25 and over In 2 years In 3 years In 4 years Arizona 6,82 7.6% 7.% 2.7%,8 6.3%.% 4.4% % 9.7% 3.3% Arkansas 4,5 5.8% 4.8% 8.8% 693.6% 6.8% 8.9% % 3.6% 9.2% California (CSU system only) NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP Colorado 4,456 9.% 5.% 8.4%,73 5.6% 8.5%.4% % 3.2% 6.6% Florida 29,48 5.8% 2.% 28.4% 3, % 9.8% 5.% 3,57 2.7% 8.4% 2.4% Georgia 9,95 4.8% 3.9% 8.8%,378 4.% 9.8% 2.7% % 5.% 8.9% Hawaii 2,25 2.5%.8% 8.7% % 2.% 5.4% % 6.5% 2.4% Idaho, % 8.8% 22.6% % 3.6% 8.2% % 5.4% 8.9% Illinois 4, % 23.% 28.8% 5,83.3% 7.2% 2.9%,82 8.8% 6.3% 9.6% Indiana 5, % 4.8% 2.2%, % 8.%.3%, % 4.8% 9.% Kentucky 3,898.8% 8.3% 3.3% 735 DS 5.3% 9.4% %.7% 7.8% Louisiana 3,9.6% 3.8% 6.5%,237.% 4.% 5.9% % 5.9% 8.6% Maryland,33 4.4% 3.2% 9.%,232 5.% 9.7% 3.6% %.4% 5.% Massachusetts 8,62 4.% 4.7% 2.%,67 4.9%.8% 5.7% % 4.9% 7.9% Minnesota NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP Mississippi,72.3% 8.2% 2.9% 4,42 7.%.7% 2.8% 2,975.% 7.4% 9.7% Missouri 9,333.% 2.9% 24.4%, % 9.%.% % 3.2% 6.7% Nevada %.3% 6.3% % 9.9% 6.% % 2.2% 9.4% New Hampshire NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP New Mexico 9, % 4.7% 6.2% % 7.7% 9.9% %.% 4.8% North Carolina 9, % 2.2% 6.6% 2, % 3.2% 5.2% 2,35 6.4% 2.6% 24.4% Pennsylvania (PASSHE system only) Ohio 7,6 2.8% 9.8% 7.7% 3,2 2.% 6.6%.2% 2, %.% 5.% Oklahoma 7,6 9.2% 8.9% 23.4% 2,833.2% 6.3% 9.%, % 2.% 25.3% Oregon 4, % 6.2% 2.3%,49 6.3% 3.9% 8.% %.% 3.3% NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP South Dakota 22 DS 6.4% 6.4% 3 DS DS DS DS DS DS DS Tennessee 8,73 7.% 2.4% 25.4%,636 2.% 8.2%.5%,58 4.2% 3.9% 7.4% Texas 43, % 8.2%.8% 7,7 2.3% 5.3% 7.9% 5, % 8.3%.7% Utah 5,366.5% 9.5% 25.7%,65 4.7% 9.8% 3.2% % 5.% 7.% Virginia 7,976 4.% 6.% 2.%,32 4.% 3.% 7.% % 5.% 9.% Washington,75 4.% 28.% 33.%,927.% 2.% 25.%,47 4.% 24.% 27.% West Virginia 2,3 6.% 3.7% 8.% % 6.9% 9.7% % 4.2% 8.4% Wyoming, % 25.9% 3.9% % 4.3% 43.5% % 52.3% 56.% NP = The state did not provide data for this metric. DS = Fewer than students, so data were suppressed. Time Is the Enemy n 27

28 Graduation Rates Bachelor s degrees Entry cohort, started fall 22 (headcount) students In 4 years In 6 years In 8 years Entry cohort, started fall 22 (headcount) students In 4 years In 6 years In 8 years Arizona 4, % 57.7% 6.8% % 32.9% 38.8% Arkansas 9, % 38.4% 42.5% 367 DS 8.2% 2.% California (CSU system only) 38,43 4.8% 52.% 6.2% 2,55 6.% 32.% 4.6% Colorado 8, % 5.6% 54.5% %.%.% Florida 32, % 64.7% 69.3%,65.7% 36.9% 43.4% Georgia 22, % 56.7% 62.3%,57 3.5% 5.4% 2.8% Hawaii 2, % 5.3% 57.% 3.% 2.% 3.% Idaho 4,28 8.5% 44.3% 5.%,23 4.5%.8% 6.7% Illinois 23, % 6.3% 63.% 8.5% 23.2% 24.3% Indiana 26, % 56.% 6.6%,948.7% 9.3% 5.% Kentucky 4,772 2.% 48.3% 52.9% % 2.7% 25.6% Louisiana 23,75 5.8% 43.7% NP,6.4%.4% NP Maryland 3, % 63.7% 67.% % 5.% 8.2% Massachusetts, % 57.8% 6.8% % 9.9% 24.3% Minnesota NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP Mississippi 7, % 53.4% 56.7% 33.9% 38.9% 42.9% Missouri 3, % 45.8% 46.5% % 8.% 9.% Nevada 2, % 5.5% 57.6%, % 3.8% 38.8% New Hampshire NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP New Mexico,38 6.4% 23.9% 28.% 6,26.% 7.9%.% North Carolina 26, % 63.5% 66.7% % 23.% 26.9% Pennsylvania (PASSHE system only) Ohio 34, % 59.7% 63.7%, %.% 4.4% Oklahoma 3,766 9.% 5.% 55.4%,56.6% 9.9% 3.3% Oregon 9, % 59.5% 64.% % 22.4% 29.3% 7, % 55.3% 56.9% % 3.3% 5.9% South Dakota 3, % 5.3% 55.% 469 DS 7.5%.2% Tennessee 5, % 56.9% 6.7% % 24.8% 32.7% Texas 55, % 56.% 62.6% 2,84 8.4% 3.% 38.7% Utah 4,292 5.% 38.2% 46.3% % 6.% 22.6% Virginia 26, % 72.% 73.% % 23.% 29.% Washington 5, % 63.2% 63.5%, % 33.7% 34.% West Virginia 9, % 48.2% 5.9% 242 DS.3% 4.5% Wyoming NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP = The state did not provide data for this metric. DS = Fewer than students, so data were suppressed. 28 n College America

29 Graduation Rates Bachelor s degrees (full-time) Entry cohort, started fall 22 (headcount) Transfer students In 4 years In 6 years In 8 years Entry cohort, started fall 22 (headcount) Pell grant recipients In 4 years In 6 years In 8 years Arizona 8, % 64.4% 66.4% NP NP NP NP Arkansas % 4.2% 44.6% NP NP NP NP California (CSU system only) 38, % 7.2% 73.7% 2,84 9.7% 44.4% 54.% Colorado 3, % 5.2% 5.2% 3,94 2.2% 4.% 44.7% Florida* 22, % 68.6% 7.9% NP NP NP NP Georgia 4, % 6.4% NP 5, % 44.6% 5.9% Hawaii 2,25 5.% 57.7% 59.7% DS DS DS DS Idaho 2, % 55.% 59.%,99 4.% 34.% 43.4% Illinois 4, % 57.4% 58.% 3, % 45.8% 47.9% Indiana, % 7.5% 73.9% 5, % 4.2% 46.7% Kentucky 5, % 55.% 58.% 3,34 2.2% 5.7% 55.3% Louisiana 6, % 44.2% NP NP NP NP NP Maryland 8, % 68.7% 7.7% NP NP NP NP Massachusetts 7,2 49.% 57.4% 59.7% NP NP NP NP Minnesota NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP Mississippi 5, % 58.6% 6.% 2, % 4.7% 44.5% Missouri 7, % 48.% 48.7% 2, % 38.6% 4.% Nevada NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP New Hampshire NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP New Mexico 2, % 2.4% 23.% 4,3 4.2% 7.4% 2.7% North Carolina, % 64.4% 66.5% 7, % 5.8% 55.7% Ohio, % 55.4% 58.2% 7,53 6.5% 42.2% 47.% Oklahoma % 52.8% 55.6% 3,79 2.% 38.6% 44.4% Oregon 6, % 65.2% 67.4% 2, % 52.2% 57.5% Pennsylvania (PASSHE system only) 5,42 55.% 6.9% 62.3% 5, % 47.% 49.% South Dakota, % 42.4% 45.2%, % 46.8% 5.% Tennessee 8, % 58.3% 6.3% 5,53 9.3% 46.7% 55.9% Texas 42, % 6.4% 64.9% 6, % 42.% 49.6% Utah 5, % 6.% 63.5% NP NP NP NP Virginia 9,375 5.% 6.% 62.% 4, % 56.% 58.% Washington 6, % 6.% 6.3% 3, % 56.6% 57.% West Virginia 2, % 53.4% 55.5% 2, % 38.7% 43.5% Wyoming NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP * Florida did not report data from enough colleges to provide a reliable statistic for the Pell grant measure. NP = The state did not provide data for this metric. DS = Fewer than students, so data were suppressed. Time Is the Enemy n 29

30 GRADUATION RATES, by race Bachelor s degrees (full-time) Entry cohort, started fall 22 Hispanic In 6 years, non-hispanic Entry cohort, started fall 22 In 6 years White, non-hispanic Entry cohort, started fall 22 In 6 years Entry cohort, started fall 22 Other In 6 years Arizona, % %, %, % Arkansas % 2, % 7, % % California (CSU system only) 8, % 2, % 4, % 2, % Colorado, % % 4, %, % Florida 4, % 5, % 2, % 2, % Georgia % 4, % 5,8 59.8%, % Hawaii % 6 DS %, % Idaho % % 3, % % Illinois, % 2, % 6, % % Indiana %, % 23, %, % Kentucky %, % 2,9 5.% % Louisiana % 6, % 4,92 5.5%, % Maryland % 3, % 7, %, % Massachusetts % % 9, %,5 53.2% Minnesota NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP Mississippi % 2, % 4, % % Missouri % %,23 48.% % Nevada % %, % % New Hampshire NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP New Mexico 4,2 2.7% % 4, %,63 5.8% North Carolina % 6,679 5.% 7, %, % Pennsylvania (PASSHE system only) Ohio % 3, % 28, % 2, % Oklahoma % %, % 2, % Oregon % % 7,475 6.%, % %, % 5, % % South Dakota 33 DS 23 DS 3, % % Tennessee % 3, %,44 6.8% % Texas 2, % 7, % 3,6 64.6% 5,95 6.2% Utah % % 3, % % Virginia % 4,42 52.% 8, % 2, % Washington % %, % 4,36 6.9% West Virginia % % 8,4 49.% % Wyoming NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP = The state did not provide data for this metric. DS = Fewer than students, so data were suppressed. 3 n College America

31 GRADUATION RATES, BY AGE Bachelor s degrees (full-time) Entry cohort, started fall 22 Students age 7 9 In 4 years In 6 years In 8 years Entry cohort, started fall 22 Students age 2 24 In 4 years In 6 years In 8 years Entry cohort, started fall 22 Students age 25 and over In 4 years In 6 years In 8 years Arizona 3,82 3.9% 58.6% 62.8% % 33.% 36.3% % 3.% 33.3% Arkansas 9, % 4.3% 44.4% % 2.4% 4.6% % 6.% 22.4% California (CSU system only) 37, % 52.3% 6.6% 59.5% 35.3% 4.9% % 32.4% 37.8% Colorado 7, % 52.6% 55.6% % 23.9% 27.2% % 33.5% 34.6% Florida 3, % 65.3% 69.9% % 35.8% 4.8% 44 DS 34.% 38.6% Georgia 2, % 58.% 63.7% % 28.5% 33.2% % 7.6% 2.7% Hawaii 2,25 4.6% 5.4% 57.2% 27 DS 44.4% 5.9% DS DS DS DS Idaho 3,99 6.% 44.6% 5.7% % 45.8% 52.% % 36.2% 39.6% Illinois 22, % 62.% 63.9% % 34.% 42.% 34.5% 7.9% 8.7% Indiana 25,75 27.% 57.7% 62.3% 8 7.5% 9.9% 26.% % 9.4% 24.8% Kentucky 3, % 49.4% 54.% % 2.% 24.% % 52.% 54.4% Louisiana 2, % 45.8% NP,68 3.5% 4.4% NP % 7.5% NP Maryland 2,67 39.% 65.% 68.4% % 3.3% 35.2% 2 4.2% 22.5% 25.% Massachusetts, % 58.4% 6.4% % 37.8% 4.6% % 43.% 44.8% Minnesota NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP Mississippi 7, % 54.5% 57.9% % 8.7% 2.6% 34 DS DS DS Missouri 2, % 47.2% 47.9% % 22.6% 25.% 85 6.%.4% 3.% Nevada,42 6.3% 5.6% 57.3% % 5.2% 58.2% DS DS DS New Hampshire NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP New Mexico 8,64 7.3% 27.7% 32.4% % 6.6% 7.9% 877.6% 3.8% 5.5% North Carolina 25, % 64.3% 67.4% % 45.% 49.6% 4 8.4% 3.5% 36.2% Pennsylvania (PASSHE system only) Ohio 33,64 3.5% 6.4% 65.3% % 9.% 24.2% % 7.% 2.9% Oklahoma 2,56 2.% 53.% 58.5%, % 33.8% 38.7% % 8.% 2.5% Oregon 9,74 32.% 6.3% 64.8% % 45.5% 5.% % 4.% 44.% 7,5 32.9% 56.4% 58.% % 32.2% 33.7% % 33.% 34.4% South Dakota 3, % 52.9% 56.7% 45 DS 2.4% 26.9% 65 DS 26.2% 29.2% Tennessee 4, % 59.% 63.6% % 23.2% 29.4% % 3.8% 38.% Texas 54, % 57.% 63.6%, % 24.6% 29.7% % 29.3% 33.% Utah 3, % 39.2% 47.9% % 32.7% 37.3% 52 DS 25.% 25.% Virginia 26,27 46.% 72.% 74.% % 43.% 45.% 66 DS 27.% 29.% Washington 2,77 62.% 66.% 66.5%, % 54.% 54.6%, % 44.7% 44.7% West Virginia 8, % 5.5% 54.2% 742.8% 27.9% 32.2% % 23.% 25.4% Wyoming NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP = The state did not provide data for this metric. DS = Fewer than students, so data were suppressed. Time Is the Enemy n 3

32 Average Length of Time to Degree (in Years) For certificates and degrees awarded in 27 8 Certificate-seeking ( year needed) Associate-seeking (2 years needed) Bachelor s-seeking (4 years needed) Arizona NP NP NP NP 4.6 years 5.2 years Arkansas 3.9 years 5.7 years 5.4 years 7. years California (CSU system only) NP NP NP NP Colorado Florida NP NP Georgia Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Massachusetts Minnesota NP NP NP NP NP NP Mississippi: 2-year sector* NA NA Mississippi: 4-year sector* NA NA Missouri Nevada New Hampshire NP NP NP NP NP NP New Mexico NP NP NP NP NP NP North Carolina Ohio Oklahoma Oregon: 2-year sector* NA NA Oregon: 4-year sector* NA NA 4.6 NA Pennsylvania (PASSHE system only) NP NP NP NP NP NP South Dakota NP NP Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming NP NP * State reported average length of time and/or average number of credits accumulated to complete an associate degree separately for four-year and two-year colleges. NP = The state did not provide data for this metric. NA = Not applicable 32 n College America

33 Average Number of Credits Accumulated to Degree For certificates and degrees awarded in 27 8 Certificate-seeking (3 credits needed) Associate-seeking (6 credits needed) Bachelor s-seeking (2 credits needed) Arizona NP NP NP NP 36 credits 33 credits Arkansas 7 credits 78 credits 86 credits 77 credits 3 NP California (CSU system only) NP NP NP NP Colorado Florida NP NP Georgia Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Kentucky Louisiana NP NP NP NP NP NP Maryland NP NP Massachusetts Minnesota NP NP NP NP NP NP Mississippi: 2-year sector* NA NA Mississippi: 4-year sector* NA NA Missouri Nevada New Hampshire NP NP NP NP NP NP New Mexico North Carolina Ohio Oklahoma Oregon: 2-year sector* NA NA Oregon: 4-year sector* NA NA 87 NA 25 9 Pennsylvania (PASSHE system only) NP NP NP NP 3 33 South Dakota NP NP Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington NP NP West Virginia Wyoming NP NP * State reported average length of time and/or average number of credits accumulated to complete an associate degree separately for four-year and two-year colleges. NP = The state did not provide data for this metric. NA = Not applicable Time Is the Enemy n 33

34 Enrollment In Remedial Education Total students in 2-year colleges Total first-time entry students (fall 26) Students enrolling in remedial courses Students completing remedial courses Students completing remedial courses and a college-level course in the same subject within two academic years of entry Arizona 6,744 9, % 2, %, % Arkansas NP NP NP NP NP NP NP California (CSU system only) NP NP NP NP NP NP NP Colorado 6,83 5, % 3,92 66.% 3, % Florida 65,53 35, % 2, % 7, % Georgia 23,987 8, % 5,85 57.%, % Hawaii 4,276 2, %,74 4.6% % Idaho 2,282, % 8 DS % Illinois 4,54 9, % 3, % 6,37 3.9% Indiana 36,478 6, %, % NP NP Kentucky 5,976 5, % 4,5 73.9% 3, % Louisiana 6,454 4,73 63.%, % % Maryland 22,686 3,79 6.5% NP NP NP NP Massachusetts 6,883,42 6.7% 5, % 3,55 3.3% Minnesota NP NP NP NP NP NP NP Mississippi 28,852 2, % 8,8 65.2% 2,596 2.% Missouri 2,937, % NP NP NP NP Nevada,27 4, % 2, % % New Hampshire NP NP NP NP NP NP NP New Mexico 2,237 6,97 57.% 4, % DS DS North Carolina 6,57 9,63 3.8% 9, % 2,364 2.% Pennsylvania (PASSHE system only) Ohio 32,467 8, % 9,4 48.% 4, % Oklahoma,393 6, % 4,84 7.3%, % Oregon,85 6,8 5.6% 4, % 2, % NP NP NP NP NP NP NP South Dakota* NP NP NP NP NP NP NP Tennessee 5,67,5 7.2% 5, % 2,33 2.% Texas 5,52 54,54 5.% 7,79 3.% 7, % Utah 5,662, % % % Virginia 33,984 4, %,95 76.% 3, % Washington 35,265 6, % 8, %, % West Virginia 4,378 3, %, % % Wyoming 2,96, % % % * South Dakota reported data from Board of Regents only, which does not include any two-year-only colleges. NP = The state did not provide data for this metric. DS = Fewer than students, so data were suppressed. 34 n College America

35 Enrollment In Remedial Education Directly from high school in 2-year colleges Total first-time entry students (fall 26) Students enrolling in remedial courses Students completing remedial courses Students completing remedial courses and a college-level course in the same subject within two academic years of entry Arizona,97 6, %, %,3 5.2% Arkansas NP NP NP NP NP NP NP California (CSU system only) NP NP NP NP NP NP NP Colorado 7,35 3,65 43.% 2,27 64.%, % Florida 47,84 25,9 54.6% 5, % 6, % Georgia 2,86 5,26 4.% 2, %,2 23.6% Hawaii 3,32 2, % % % Idaho, % % % Illinois 22,5 2, % 8, % 4, % Indiana 3,83 6, % 4,3 6.4% NP NP Kentucky 6,35 3,2 49.% 2, %, % Louisiana 4,29 2, %,2 45.8% % Maryland 6,353, % NP NP NP NP Massachusetts,25 7, % 3, % 2, % Minnesota NP NP NP NP NP NP NP Mississippi 3,764 6, % 4, %, % Missouri 4,78 7, % NP NP NP % Nevada 5,377 2, %, % % New Hampshire NP NP NP NP NP NP NP New Mexico 7,27 5, % 3,5 58.7% DS DS North Carolina 6, % % NP NP Pennsylvania (PASSHE system only) Ohio 2,275 2, % 6, % 3, % Oklahoma 6,55 3, % 2, %, % Oregon 5,564 2,85 5.6% 2, %, % NP NP NP NP NP NP NP South Dakota* NP NP NP NP NP NP NP Tennessee,889 7, % 3, %, % Texas 75,28 38, % 2, % 5,9 5.2% Utah 3, % % % Virginia 8,255 9,65 53.% 7,87 74.% 2,4 22.2% Washington 6,355 9, % 4, % % West Virginia 2,576, %, % % Wyoming 2,294, % % % * South Dakota reported data from Board of Regents only, which does not include any two-year-only colleges. NP = The state did not provide data for this metric. DS = Fewer than students, so data were suppressed. Time Is the Enemy n 35

36 Enrollment In Remedial Education Total students in 4-year colleges Total first-time entry students (fall 26) Students enrolling in remedial courses Students completing remedial courses Students completing remedial courses and a college-level course in the same subject within two academic years of entry Arizona NP NP NP NP NP NP NP Arkansas NP NP NP NP NP NP NP California (CSU system only) 5,9 29, % 2, % NP NP Colorado 2,295,97 9.3%, % % Florida NP NP NP NP NP NP NP Georgia 36,457 6,595 8.% 3,43 5.8% 2, % Hawaii 2,238 DS DS DS DS DS DS Idaho 6,85, % % % Illinois 26,82 4,53 5.8% 2, %, % Indiana 39,27 4, % 2, % NP NP Kentucky 7,945 5, % 4,67 8.% 85 4.% Louisiana 2,555 4,35 2.% 2, %, % Maryland 5,8 3, % NP NP NP NP Massachusetts 6,64, %, % % Minnesota NP NP NP NP NP NP NP Mississippi 8,397,8 2.4%, % % Missouri 2,28 2,867 4.% NP NP NP NP Nevada 4,524,35 29.%,7 77.3% % New Hampshire NP NP NP NP NP NP NP New Mexico 6, % % DS DS North Carolina 3,868, %, %, % Pennsylvania (PASSHE system only) Ohio 37,934 9,49 25.% 5, % 3, % Oklahoma 7,449 4, % 3, %, % Oregon,9,6.5% 94 8.% % 9,58 5, % 3, %, % South Dakota 4,73, %,54 7.5% % Tennessee* NP NP NP NP NP NP NP Texas 6,863 3, % 6, % 4, % Utah 3,435 2, % 2,22 8.7% % Virginia 38, % 92 8.% % Washington 24,9,39 4.7% NP NP NP NP West Virginia 9,823, %, % % Wyoming NP NP NP NP NP NP NP * Tennessee does not offer remedial eduation at four-year colleges. NP = The state did not provide data for this metric. DS = Fewer than students, so data were suppressed. 36 n College America

37 Enrollment In Remedial Education Directly from high school in 4-year colleges Total first-time entry students (fall 26) Students enrolling in remedial courses Students completing remedial courses Students completing remedial courses and a college-level course in the same subject within two academic years of entry Arizona NP NP NP NP NP NP NP Arkansas NP NP NP NP NP NP NP California (CSU system only) 49,368 29, % 2,78 69.% NP NP Colorado 2,63,634 8.%,6 68.% % Florida NP NP NP NP NP NP NP Georgia 33,265 4,79 4.% 2, %,85 39.% Hawaii 2,74 DS DS DS DS DS DS Idaho 4, % % % Illinois 25,255 3, % 2, %,56 4.6% Indiana 34,32 3,854.% 2,298 6.% NP.% Kentucky 5,697 4, % 3, % 68 7.% Louisiana 9,888 3, % 2, %, % Maryland 4,26 3, % NP NP NP.% Massachusetts 6,424, %,36 8.% % Minnesota NP NP NP NP NP NP NP Mississippi 8,82,73 2.%,27 75.% % Missouri 8,832 2,43 2.8% NP NP NP NP Nevada 3,885,8 29.% % % New Hampshire NP NP NP NP NP NP NP New Mexico 6, % % DS DS North Carolina 29,796,533 5.%,34 87.%, 72.% Pennsylvania (PASSHE system only) Ohio 36,23 8, % 4, % 3,436 4.% Oklahoma 3,988 3, % 2,43 7.%,95 32.% Oregon 9,624,58.% 85 8.% % 8,523 4,98 27.% 3, %, % South Dakota 4,423, %,29 72.% % Tennessee* NP NP NP NP NP NP NP Texas 6,5 3,86 22.% 6,595 5.% 4, % Utah 9,749,34 4.%,49 78.%.% Virginia 3,34.% % % Washington 5,443, 6.% NP NP NP.% West Virginia 9,69,632 8.%,7 72.% % Wyoming NP NP NP NP NP NP NP * Tennessee does not offer remedial eduation at four-year colleges. NP = The state did not provide data for this metric. Time Is the Enemy n 37

38 Enrollment IN Remedial education Pell grant recipients in 2-year colleges Total first-time entry students receiving Pell grants (fall 26) Students enrolling in remedial courses (of total first-time entry students) Arizona NP NP NP Arkansas NP NP NP California (CSU system only) NP NP NP Colorado 4,55 2, % Florida NP NP NP Georgia 8,333 3, % Hawaii % Idaho % Illinois 8,974 5,37 59.% Indiana 5,836 3,46 52.% Kentucky 6,983 3, % Louisiana 2,548, % Maryland 5,679 4, % Massachusetts 5,294 3, % Minnesota NP NP NP Mississippi,45 6, % Missouri 7,92 4, % Nevada NP NP NP New Hampshire NP NP NP New Mexico 3,477 2, % North Carolina 2,58 7, % Pennsylvania (PASSHE system only) Ohio 3,3 8, % Oklahoma 3,327 2, % Oregon 3,54 2,93 6.9% NP NP NP South Dakota* NP NP NP Tennessee 7,8 5, % Texas 34,347 22,32 64.% Utah NP NP NP Virginia 8,673 4, % Washington 8,398 4, % West Virginia 2,78, % Wyoming % * South Dakota reported data from Board of Regents only, which does not include any two-year-only colleges. NP = The state did not provide data for this metric. 38 n College America

39 Enrollment IN Remedial education Pell grant recipients in 4-year colleges Total first-time entry students receiving Pell grants (fall 26) Students enrolling in remedial courses (of total first-time entry students) Arizona NP NP NP Arkansas NP NP NP California (CSU system only) 5,466, % Colorado 3, % Florida NP NP NP Georgia 9,786 3,82 3.5% Hawaii 443 DS DS Idaho 2, % Illinois 5,5, % Indiana 8,748,77 2.% Kentucky 5,35 4, % Louisiana 7,335 2,279 3.% Maryland 3,68, % Massachusetts, % Minnesota NP NP NP Mississippi 3,88, % Missouri 4,43, % Nevada NP NP NP New Hampshire NP NP NP New Mexico, % North Carolina 8, % Pennsylvania (PASSHE system only) Ohio 8,786 3, % Oklahoma 4,39, % Oregon 2, % 5,294 2,39 4.4% South Dakota, % Tennessee* NP NP NP Texas 9,358 6, % Utah NP NP NP Virginia 6, % Washington 4, % West Virginia 2, % Wyoming NP NP NP * Tennessee does not offer remedial eduation at four-year colleges. NP = The state did not provide data for this metric. DS = Fewer than students, so data were suppressed. Time Is the Enemy n 39

40 Graduation rates of Students Enrolling in Remedial Education Entry cohort, started fall 25 Certificates In 2 years Entry cohort, started fall 24 Associate degrees In 3 years Arizona NP NP NP NP NP NP Arkansas % 4, % California (CSU system only) NP NP NP NP NP NP Colorado DS DS DS 3, % Florida NP NP NP NP NP NP Georgia 2, % 5, % Hawaii 2 DS DS, % Idaho % % Illinois, % 2,89,86 4.% Indiana % 5, % Kentucky % 4, % Louisiana % 3, % Maryland NP NP NP 6,9 63.% Massachusetts DS DS DS 6, % Minnesota NP NP NP NP NP NP Mississippi % 8,953,88 3.3% Missouri 53 DS DS 6, % Nevada NP NP NP % New Hampshire NP NP NP NP NP NP New Mexico* 4, % 4, % North Carolina % 7, % Pennsylvania (PASSHE system only) Ohio % 4, % Oklahoma 39 DS.% 6, % Oregon % 2, % NP NP NP NP NP NP South Dakota** NP NP NP 2 5.5% Tennessee NP NP NP 8,7,6 2.6% Texas 34, % 35,974 2,8 5.8% Utah 2 NP NP 2,525,34 5.6% Virginia % 6, % Washington, % 8,86, % West Virginia DS DS DS 2, % Wyoming DS DS DS, % * New Mexico data show graduation rates for two years, rather than.5 years. ** South Dakota reported data from Board of Regents only, which does not include any two-year-only colleges. NP = The state did not provide data for this metric. DS = Fewer than students, so data were suppressed. 4 n College America

41 Graduation rates of Students Enrolling in Remedial Education Entry cohort, started fall 22 Bachelor s degrees In 6 years Arizona NP NP NP Arkansas 4, % California (CSU system only) 23,8,62 46.% Colorado, % Florida NP NP NP Georgia, % Hawaii 3 DS DS Idaho % Illinois 3, % Indiana 5,624 2,38 4.2% Kentucky 5,659,89 32.% Louisiana 5,49, % Maryland 2, % Massachusetts 2,28,38 5.2% Minnesota NP NP NP Mississippi, % Missouri % Nevada % New Hampshire NP NP NP New Mexico 4, % North Carolina 3,29, % Pennsylvania (PASSHE system only) Ohio 7,76 2, % Oklahoma 2, % Oregon, % NP NP NP South Dakota, % Tennessee 4,996 2, % Texas 4,385 4, % Utah % Virginia % Washington NP NP NP West Virginia 2, % Wyoming NP NP NP NP = The state did not provide data for this metric. Time Is the Enemy n 4

42 PERCENTAGE OF ASSOCIATE DEGREE-SEEKING STUDENTS WHO Transfer Out From 2-year to 4-year colleges only Percentage of cohort identified in fall 24 enrolling in a 4-year college (cohorts followed until August 3, 28) Arizona 6.6% 4.7% Arkansas 6.7% 6.% California (CSU system only) NP NP Colorado 23.3% 24.8% Florida 9.9% 5.7% Georgia 2.%.6% Hawaii 3.8% 4.4% Idaho 5.9% 6.5% Illinois 32.6% 8.6% Indiana NP NP Kentucky 8.8%.8% Louisiana 2.7%.9% Maryland 23.8% 9.% Massachusetts 2.8% 4.% Minnesota NP NP Mississippi 9.2%.2% Missouri 25.4% 3.6% Nevada 9.9% 8.5% New Hampshire NP NP New Mexico 2.% 5.3% North Carolina 2.2% 26.3% Pennsylvania (PASSHE system only) Ohio 7.% 7.8% Oklahoma 25.%.% Oregon 2.6%.5% NP South Dakota* NP NP NP Tennessee 2.7%.8% Texas 23.8% 22.% Utah 37.3% 2.7% Virginia 9.% 2.% Washington 8.% 9.7% West Virginia 6.3% 4.5% Wyoming 34.% 4.8% * South Dakota reported data from Board of Regents only, which does not include any two-year-only colleges. NP = The state did not provide data for this metric. 42 n College America

43 Part 3: State Profiles Time Is the Enemy n 43

44

45 ARIZONA 2 For a strong economy, the skills gap must be closed. 64% 3% 33% By 22, jobs requiring a career certificate or college degree Skills gap Too few students make it through college. MEMBER Arizona adults who currently have an associate degree or higher Data: See the Sources and Methodology section on our website. Of students who enroll in a public college or university 2-Year Public College 4-Year Public College Enroll Return as sophomores Graduate on time (% time) 2 4 Additional graduates 5% time 2 2% time 2 Total graduates Graduate in 4 years 7 28 Graduate in 8 years Key to measuring time Associate Bachelor s % time 2 years 4 years 5% time 3 years 6 years 2% time 4 years 8 years Data: 2-year cohort started in fall 24; 4-year cohort started in fall 22 For too many students, the path through college ends with no degree and often lots of debt. Note: This report presents data only from public colleges and universities. College America n

46 ARIZONA 2 We re making great progress in providing access to more students. Total public college enrollment: 322,93 Attending Pursuing Degrees & Certificates 5,327 7,63 4-year colleges 4,858 28,72 2-year colleges Total State Population, 8-24 White 52% College Enrollment White 57% College Graduation White 55% Hispanic 35% Hispanic 2% Hispanic 3% 4% Other races % 5% Other races 8% Data: Fall 29 enrollment from IPEDS; population data from Census ACS PUMS 6-8; degrees by race from 27- state submissions Now we must have more success from all students. 3% Other races 29% For states to compete, their students must earn more degrees and certificates. Overall Credentials Awarded Science, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) Credentials Awarded 6,53 8,675 2,997 3,462,27 7,38 7,732 5, Certificate Associate Bachelor s Certificate Associate Bachelor s And all credentials should provide clear pathways to success. Data: 27 8 College America n 2

47 ARIZONA 2 Graduation rates are very low, especially if you re poor, part time,, Hispanic, or older. Certificate-Seeking Students All White Hispanic On-time ( year) Within /2 years Within 2 years Within year Within /2 years Within 2 years 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial In most states, very few students seeking certificates ever graduate. Associate Degree- Seeking Students All White Hispanic % On-time (2 years) Within 3 years Within 4 years Within 2 years Within 3 years Within 4 years 6.8% 4.4% 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial 7.% 7.9% 5.5% 6.2% 4.3% 6.3% 7.6% 5.4% 7.9%.9%.6% 9.7%.% 7% 9.8% 22.5% 6.8% 4.4% 3.3% 4.4% 2.7%.%.3%.7%.6%.4%.%.9% 3.4% 4.2% 2.4% 2.% 3.3% 3.2% 3.7% 6.2% 7.6% 4.7% 2.8% 5.6% 5.8% 7.% Associate degree graduation rates are abysmal across the country for Hispanic and students, they re tragic. Bachelor s Degree- Seeking Students All White Hispanic On-time (4 years) Within 6 years Within 8 years Within 4 years Within 6 years Within 8 years 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial 3.5% 33.9% 24.% 7.% 24.% 9.5% 3.9% 57.7% 59.8% 53.7% 43.% 3.% 33.% 58.6% 6.8% 63.5% 59.3% 46.% 33.3% 36.3% 62.8% 4.% 4.5% 2.4% 3.3% 7.6% 6.3% 3.4% 32.9% 32.3% 38.9% 36.7% 27.9% 29.% 34.% 38.8% 38.8% 4.7% 4.% 29.4% 3.2% 4.9% 3.% 58.6% 27.9% Almost no one over the age of 25 graduates; students fresh out of high school are most likely to succeed. Data: Certificate cohort started in 25 6, associate cohort started in 24 5, bachelor's cohort started in 22 3 Given changing demographics, our country will not have enough skilled s to compete unless many more students from all backgrounds and walks of life graduate. = The state did not provide data for this metric. College America n 3

48 ARIZONA 2 Retention rates drop from year to year. Many get discouraged and drop out Students in 2-year colleges who return to campus Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 % % 73.% 48.2% 5.9% 36.6% Students in 4-year colleges who return to campus % 76.9% 67.7% 64.% % 55.8% 45.% 39.5% after falling off track early. Students who earn expected first-year credits (24 credits) Associate Bachelor s (2 credits) Associate Bachelor s 38.3% 7.7% 34.% 64.7% Staying enrolled is particularly tough for part-time students, who must often balance jobs and school. Remediation. 26.8% Data: Associate cohort started in 24 5, bachelor's cohort started in 22 3; earned credits from fall 26 2-Year Colleges 4-Year Colleges 58.8% of freshmen require of those of freshmen require of those 2.8% and associated college-level courses in two years Graduate within 3 years (projected) Current approaches almost always guarantee failure. and associated college-level courses in two years Graduate within 6 years (projected) Data: Fall 25 = The state did not provide data for this metric. College America n 4

49 ARIZONA 2 Precious time and money are lost when students don t graduate on schedule. Students are taking too much time Certificate Associate Bachelor s Should take year for full-time students Should take 2 years for full-time students 4.6 years 5.2 years Should take 4 years for full-time students and too many credits. Certificate Associate Bachelor s 36 credits 33 credits Should take 3 credits Should take 6 credits Should take 2 credits More students must graduate on time. Data: 27 8 = The state did not provide data for this metric. College America n 5

50 ARIZONA 2 More time isn t giving us enough success. For certificate and associate degree students, graduation rates are very low even when more time. Certificate Associate 7.% 5.4% 3.4% 9.8% 6.2% In year In.5 years In 2 years In 2 years In 3 years In 4 years On-time graduation rates for bachelor s degree students are shockingly low. And adding time beyond six years produces little additional success. Bachelor s 3.5% 57.7% 32.9% 6.8% 38.8% In 4 years In 6 years In 8 years Data: Certificate cohort started in 25 6; associate cohort started in 24 5; bachelor's cohort started in 22 3 Even modest progress provides little comfort when overall graduation rates are so low. = The state did not provide data for this metric. College America n 6

51 ARKANSAS 2 For a strong economy, the skills gap must be closed. 54% 26% 28% By 22, jobs requiring a career certificate or college degree Skills gap Too few students make it through college. MEMBER Arkansas adults who currently have an associate degree or higher Data: See the Sources and Methodology section on our website. Of students who enroll in a public college or university 2-Year Public College 4-Year Public College Enroll Return as sophomores Graduate on time (% time) 2 9 Additional graduates 5% time 3 2% time 2 2 Total graduates 7 22 Graduate in 4 years 8 22 Graduate in 8 years Key to measuring time Associate Bachelor s % time 2 years 4 years 5% time 3 years 6 years 2% time 4 years 8 years Data: 2-year cohort started in fall 24; 4-year cohort started in fall 22 For too many students, the path through college ends with no degree and often lots of debt. Note: This report presents data only from public colleges and universities. College America n

52 ARKANSAS 2 We re making great progress in providing access to more students. Total public college enrollment: 35,9 Attending Pursuing Degrees & Certificates 87,582 75,622 47,69 4-year 59,569 2-year colleges colleges Total State Population, 8-24 White 7% College Enrollment White 69% College Graduation White 78% Hispanic 6% Hispanic 3% Hispanic 2% 2% Other races 4% 9% Other races 8% Data: Fall 29 enrollment from IPEDS; population data from Census ACS PUMS 6-8; degrees by race from 27- state submissions Now we must have more success from all students. 5% Other races 5% For states to compete, their students must earn more degrees and certificates. Overall Credentials Awarded Science, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) Credentials Awarded 8,449 9,39,755,542 5,35 4,427 2,46 3, Certificate Associate Bachelor s Certificate Associate Bachelor s And all credentials should provide clear pathways to success. Data: 27 8 College America n 2

53 ARKANSAS 2 Graduation rates are very low, especially if you re poor, part time,, Hispanic, or older. Certificate-Seeking Students All White Hispanic % On-time ( year) Within /2 years Within 2 years Within year Within /2 years Within 2 years 2.5% 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial 8.7% 2.3% 2.% 6.7% 24.2% 7.6% 5.6% 3.6% 2.8% 2.3% 2.% 6.7% 27.4% 8.5% 7.7% 2.% 35.9% 39.8% 3.6% 8.8% 44.8% 34.7% 3.6% 3.9% 4.7% 6.% DS* 2.4% 2.6%.%.8% 8.4% 6.8% 8.2% DS* 4.8% 5.3%.7% 2.9%.% 2.5%.7% DS* 4.3%.8% 5.2% 8.8% 4.3% In most states, very few students seeking certificates ever graduate. Associate Degree- Seeking Students All White Hispanic % On-time (2 years) Within 3 years Within 4 years Within 2 years Within 3 years Within 4 years 5.2% 9.9% 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial 5.% 5.5% 3.8% 2.7% 3.7%.6% 5.8% 2.5% 3.6% 5.%.6% 7.5% 3.6% 6.8% 4.8% 9.4% 7.6% 9.4% 5.2% 9.9% 9.2% 8.9% 8.8% 3.2%.7%.8%.%.3%.8%.2%.8%.6% 3.% 3.5% 2.8%.7% 3.8%.4% 3.% 2.8% 6.2% 7.% 3.7% 2.7% 8.7% 4.8% 4.9% 5.5% Associate degree graduation rates are abysmal across the country for Hispanic and students, they re tragic. Bachelor s Degree- Seeking Students All White Hispanic On-time (4 years) Within 6 years Within 8 years Within 4 years Within 6 years Within 8 years 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial 6.8% 9.9% 3.% 6.% 5.5% 4.% 7.8% 5.3% 38.4% 42.9% 32.3% 23.9% 6.% 2.4% 4.3% 22.% 42.5% 46.8% 39.2% 28.7% 22.4% 4.6% 44.4% 26.9%.9% 2.7% DS*.%.%.2% 2.8%.4% 8.2%.2% DS* 4.7% 5.9% 4.7%.4% 4.3% 2.% 4.% DS* 7.% 2.7% 7.% 4.2% 7.5% 6.% 5.9% 4.3% Almost no one over the age of 25 graduates; students fresh out of high school are most likely to succeed. Data: Certificate cohort started in 25 6, associate cohort started in 24 5, bachelor's cohort started in 22 3 Given changing demographics, our country will not have enough skilled s to compete unless many more students from all backgrounds and walks of life graduate. = The state did not provide data for this metric. DS* = Fewer than students, so data were suppressed. College America n 3

54 ARKANSAS 2 Retention rates drop from year to year. Many get discouraged and drop out Students in 2-year colleges who return to campus Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 % % 5.% 27.4% 34.6% 23.2% Students in 4-year colleges who return to campus % 68.6% 55.8% 49.% % 48.7% 34.9% 25.6% after falling off track early. Students who earn expected first-year credits (24 credits) Associate Bachelor s (2 credits) Associate Bachelor s 24.7% 53.4% 8.9% 3.2% Staying enrolled is particularly tough for part-time students, who must often balance jobs and school. Remediation. Data: Associate cohort started in 24 5, bachelor's cohort started in 22 3; earned credits from fall 26 2-Year Colleges of freshmen require of those 4-Year Colleges of freshmen require of those 22.% and associated college-level courses in two years 9.4% Graduate within 3 years (projected) Current approaches almost always guarantee failure. and associated college-level courses in two years Graduate within 6 years (projected) Data: Fall 26 = The state did not provide data for this metric. College America n 4

55 ARKANSAS 2 Precious time and money are lost when students don t graduate on schedule. Students are taking too much time Certificate Associate Bachelor s 3.9 years 5.7 years 5.4 years 7 years 5.2 years 6.9 years Should take year for full-time students Should take 2 years for full-time students Should take 4 years for full-time students and too many credits. Certificate Associate Bachelor s 69.7 credits 78 credits 85.5 credits 77.3 credits 3.4 credits Should take 2 credits Should take 3 credits Should take 6 credits More students must graduate on time. Data: 27 8 = The state did not provide data for this metric. College America n 5

56 ARKANSAS 2 More time isn t giving us enough success. For certificate and associate degree students, graduation rates are very low even when more time. Certificate Associate 35.9% 8.7% 2.8% 6.8% 2.5% 5.% 3.6% 3.% 7.6% 6.2% In year In.5 years In 2 years In 2 years In 3 years In 4 years On-time graduation rates for bachelor s degree students are shockingly low. And adding time beyond six years produces little additional success. Bachelor s 38.4% 42.5% 6.8% 8.2% 2.% In 4 years In 6 years In 8 years Data: Certificate cohort started in 25 6; associate cohort started in 24 5; bachelor's cohort started in 22 3 Even modest progress provides little comfort when overall graduation rates are so low. College America n 6

57 CALIFORNIA 2 For a strong economy, the skills gap must be closed. 67% 36% 3% By 22, jobs requiring a career certificate or college degree Skills gap Too few students make it through college. MEMBER California adults who currently have an associate degree or higher Data: See the Sources and Methodology section on our website. Of students who enroll in a public college or university 2-Year Public College 4-Year Public College Enroll 95 5 Return as sophomores 77 3 Graduate on time (% time) 4 Additional graduates 5% time 35 2% time 8 Total graduates 57 2 Graduate in 4 years 59 Graduate in 8 years Key to measuring time Associate Bachelor s % time 2 years 4 years 5% time 3 years 6 years 2% time 4 years 8 years = The state did not provide data for this metric. Data: 2-year cohort started in fall 24; 4-year cohort started in fall 22 For too many students, the path through college ends with no degree and often lots of debt. Note: This report presents data only from public colleges and universities. Data from CSU System only. College America n

58 CALIFORNIA 2 We re making great progress in providing access to more students. Total public college enrollment: 2,72,222 Attending Pursuing Degrees & Certificates,27,96 964,262 4-year colleges 54,923,63,299 2-year colleges Total State Population, 8-24 White 37% College Enrollment White 32% College Graduation White 4% Hispanic 4% Hispanic 28% Hispanic 2% 7% Other races 5% 7% Other races 33% Data: Fall 29 enrollment from IPEDS; population data from Census ACS PUMS 6-8; degrees by race from 27- state submissions Now we must have more success from all students. 5% Other races 34% For states to compete, their students must earn more degrees and certificates. Overall Credentials Awarded Science, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) Credentials Awarded 73,83 83,89 6,72 73,32 8,833 9,738 4,485 3, Certificate Associate Bachelor s Certificate Associate Bachelor s And all credentials should provide clear pathways to success. = The state did not provide data for this metric. Data: 27 8 College America n 2

59 CALIFORNIA 2 Graduation rates are very low, especially if you re poor, part time,, Hispanic, or older. Certificate-Seeking Students All White Hispanic On-time ( year) Within /2 years Within 2 years Within year Within /2 years Within 2 years 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial In most states, very few students seeking certificates ever graduate. Associate Degree- Seeking Students All White Hispanic On-time (2 years) Within 3 years Within 4 years Within 2 years Within 3 years Within 4 years 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial Associate degree graduation rates are abysmal across the country for Hispanic and students, they re tragic. Bachelor s Degree- Seeking Students All White Hispanic On-time (4 years) Within 6 years Within 8 years Within 4 years Within 6 years Within 8 years 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial 4.8% 2.3% 9.8% 6.7% 8.9%.5% 4.8% 9.7%.2% 52.% 59.9% 43.9% 35.7% 32.4% 35.3% 52.3% 44.4% 46.% 6.2% 66.2% 53.7% 43.9% 37.8% 4.9% 6.6% 54.% 55.2% 6.% 9.3% 4.% 3.% 6.9% 3.7% 6.2% 4.4% 5.8% 32.% 35.% 3.3% 23.6% 3.8% 22.2% 32.6% 36.4% 32.7% 4.6% 42.3% 4.% 35.8% 3.8% 27.2% 42.6% 47.9% 42.2% 32.4% 52.3% 3.8% Almost no one over the age of 25 graduates; students fresh out of high school are most likely to succeed. Data: Certificate cohort started in 25 6, associate cohort started in 24 5, bachelor's cohort started in 22 3 Given changing demographics, our country will not have enough skilled s to compete unless many more students from all backgrounds and walks of life graduate. = The state did not provide data for this metric. College America n 3

60 CALIFORNIA 2 Retention rates drop from year to year. Many get discouraged and drop out Students in 2-year colleges who return to campus Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 % % Students in 4-year colleges who return to campus % 8.8% 7.8% 68.3% % 6.7% 5.9% 49.4% after falling off track early. Students who earn expected first-year credits (24 credits) Associate Bachelor s (2 credits) Associate Bachelor s Staying enrolled is particularly tough for part-time students, who must often balance jobs and school. Remediation. Data: Associate cohort started in 24 5, bachelor's cohort started in 22 3; earned credits from fall 26 2-Year Colleges 4-Year Colleges 59.6% of freshmen require of those 68.4% of freshmen require of those 46.% and associated college-level courses in two years Graduate within 3 years (projected) Current approaches almost always guarantee failure. and associated college-level courses in two years Graduate within 6 years (projected) Data: Fall 26 = The state did not provide data for this metric. College America n 4

61 CALIFORNIA 2 Precious time and money are lost when students don t graduate on schedule. Students are taking too much time Certificate Associate Bachelor s Should take year for full-time students Should take 2 years for full-time students 5.2 years 5.7 years Should take 4 years for full-time students and too many credits. Certificate Associate Bachelor s 39 credits 39 credits Should take 3 credits Should take 6 credits Should take 2 credits More students must graduate on time. Data: 27 8 = The state did not provide data for this metric. College America n 5

62 CALIFORNIA 2 More time isn t giving us enough success. For certificate and associate degree students, graduation rates are very low even when more time. Certificate Associate In year In.5 years In 2 years In 2 years In 3 years In 4 years On-time graduation rates for bachelor s degree students are shockingly low. And adding time beyond six years produces little additional success. Bachelor s 4.8% 52.% 32.% 6.2% 4.6% In 4 years In 6 years In 8 years Data: Certificate cohort started in 25 6; associate cohort started in 24 5; bachelor's cohort started in 22 3 Even modest progress provides little comfort when overall graduation rates are so low. = The state did not provide data for this metric. College America n 6

63 COLORADO 2 For a strong economy, the skills gap must be closed. 7% 4% 29% By 22, jobs requiring a career certificate or college degree Skills gap Too few students make it through college. MEMBER Colorado adults who currently have an associate degree or higher Data: See the Sources and Methodology section on our website. Of students who enroll in a public college or university 2-Year Public College 4-Year Public College Enroll Return as sophomores 6 4 Graduate on time (% time) 2 6 Additional graduates 5% time 3 2% time 2 Total graduates 5 3 Graduate in 4 years 6 3 Graduate in 8 years Key to measuring time Associate Bachelor s % time 2 years 4 years 5% time 3 years 6 years 2% time 4 years 8 years Data: 2-year cohort started in fall 24; 4-year cohort started in fall 22 For too many students, the path through college ends with no degree and often lots of debt. Note: This report presents data only from public colleges and universities. College America n

64 COLORADO 2 We re making great progress in providing access to more students. Total public college enrollment: 229,43 Attending Pursuing Degrees & Certificates 39,2 3,275 9,229 4-year 98,55 2-year colleges colleges Total State Population, 8-24 White 68% College Enrollment White 69% College Graduation White 76% Hispanic 22% Hispanic 2% Hispanic % 4% Other races 6% 4% Other races 4% Data: Fall 29 enrollment from IPEDS; population data from Census ACS PUMS 6-8; degrees by race from 27- state submissions Now we must have more success from all students. 3% Other races % For states to compete, their students must earn more degrees and certificates. Overall Credentials Awarded Science, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) Credentials Awarded 7,933 2,4 3,829 4,48,832,755 5,266 5, Certificate Associate Bachelor s Certificate Associate Bachelor s And all credentials should provide clear pathways to success. Data: 27 8 College America n 2

65 COLORADO 2 Graduation rates are very low, especially if you re poor, part time,, Hispanic, or older. Certificate-Seeking Students All White Hispanic % On-time ( year) Within /2 years Within 2 years Within year Within /2 years Within 2 years 3.8% 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial 33.2% 34.7% 3.% 8.2% 39.6% 3.9% 3.5% 34.2% 8.2% 34.% 35.6% 32.2% 8.2% 4.6% 3.9% 3.% 35.4% 8.2% 36.5% 37.% 36.8% 8.2% 43.6% 37.7% 32.3% 37.3%.2%.7%.% 3.8% 8.3% 3.2% 6.9% 7.%.4% 3.% 2.5% 3.8% 3.8% 8.3% 6.3% 6.9% 7.% 2.7% 3.% 3.8% 4.7% 7.2% 8.3% 7.9% 8.6% 7.% 3.9% 4.6% In most states, very few students seeking certificates ever graduate. Associate Degree- Seeking Students All White Hispanic % On-time (2 years) Within 3 years Within 4 years Within 2 years Within 3 years Within 4 years 3.5%.8% 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial 8.4% 9.9% 5.4% 4.4% 7.6% 5.6% 9.% 7.4% 3.7% 3.7% 5.6%.% 7.8% 3.2% 8.5% 5.% 2.6% 9.2% 7.% 9.% 3.5%.8% 6.6%.4% 8.4% 6.% 2.6%.4%.6%.4%.6%.8%.4%.%.%.4% 3.% 3.4% 2.4%.8% 3.3% 2.4% 3.% 2.8%.7% 5.6% 6.% 4.7% 3.9% 6.6% 4.3% 5.4% 6.3% 4.3% Associate degree graduation rates are abysmal across the country for Hispanic and students, they re tragic. Bachelor s Degree- Seeking Students All White Hispanic On-time (4 years) Within 6 years Within 8 years Within 4 years Within 6 years Within 8 years 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial 28.8% 3.7% 9.8% 2.5% 2.6% 2.7% 29.4% 2.2% 7.3% 5.6% 53.5% 4.6% 38.% 33.5% 23.9% 52.6% 4.% 2.7% 54.5% 56.3% 45.5% 4.7% 34.6% 27.2% 55.6% 44.7% 24.7% 3.3% 3.3% 2.% 4.% 2.6% 2.5% 3.8%.9% 2.5%.% 2.2% 5.% 4.3% 5.8% 8.% 3.6% 2.3% 9.3%.% 2.2% 5.% 4.3% 5.8% 8.% 3.6% 2.3%.2% 33.5% 5.8% 52.6% Almost no one over the age of 25 graduates; students fresh out of high school are most likely to succeed. Data: Certificate cohort started in 25 6, associate cohort started in 24 5, bachelor's cohort started in 22 3 Given changing demographics, our country will not have enough skilled s to compete unless many more students from all backgrounds and walks of life graduate. College America n 3

66 COLORADO 2 Retention rates drop from year to year. Many get discouraged and drop out Students in 2-year colleges who return to campus Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 % % 47.7% 24.2% 3.8% 8.4% Students in 4-year colleges who return to campus % 73.3% 62.3% 57.6% % 46.% 32.4% 24.7% after falling off track early. Students who earn expected first-year credits (24 credits) Associate Bachelor s (2 credits) Associate Bachelor s 46.3% 7.7% 26.% 32.2% Staying enrolled is particularly tough for part-time students, who must often balance jobs and school. Remediation. 2-Year Colleges of freshmen require of those 66.% 65.3% Data: Associate cohort started in 24 5, bachelor's cohort started in 22 3; earned credits from fall 26 4-Year Colleges 35.3% 9.3% 66.9% of freshmen require of those 9.2% 22.9% 2.7% and associated college-level courses in two years Graduate within 3 years (projected) Current approaches almost always guarantee failure. and associated college-level courses in two years Graduate within 6 years (projected) Data: Fall 26 College America n 4

67 COLORADO 2 Precious time and money are lost when students don t graduate on schedule. Students are taking too much time Certificate Associate Bachelor s 3.9 years 5.4 years 4.5 years 5.8 years 4.6 years 6. years Should take year for full-time students Should take 2 years for full-time students Should take 4 years for full-time students and too many credits. Certificate Associate Bachelor s 74 credits 69 credits 94 credits 92 credits 36 credits 4 credits Should take 2 credits Should take 3 credits Should take 6 credits More students must graduate on time. Data: 27 8 College America n 5

68 COLORADO 2 More time isn t giving us enough success. For certificate and associate degree students, graduation rates are very low even when more time. Certificate Associate 33.2% 34.% 36.5% 2.5% 3.8% 8.4% 3.7% 3.% 7.% 5.6% In year In.5 years In 2 years In 2 years In 3 years In 4 years On-time graduation rates for bachelor s degree students are shockingly low. And adding time beyond six years produces little additional success. Bachelor s 5.6% 54.5% 28.8%.%.% In 4 years In 6 years In 8 years Data: Certificate cohort started in 25 6; associate cohort started in 24 5; bachelor's cohort started in 22 3 Even modest progress provides little comfort when overall graduation rates are so low. College America n 6

69 FLORIDA 2 For a strong economy, the skills gap must be closed. 63% 35% 28% By 22, jobs requiring a career certificate or college degree Skills gap Too few students make it through college. MEMBER Florida adults who currently have an associate degree or higher Data: See the Sources and Methodology section on our website. Of students who enroll in a public college or university 2-Year Public College 4-Year Public College Enroll Return as sophomores Graduate on time (% time) 2 2 Additional graduates 5% time 5 2% time 3 Total graduates 2 23 Graduate in 4 years 2 24 Graduate in 8 years Key to measuring time Associate Bachelor s % time 2 years 4 years 5% time 3 years 6 years 2% time 4 years 8 years Data: 2-year cohort started in fall 24; 4-year cohort started in fall 22 For too many students, the path through college ends with no degree and often lots of debt. Note: This report presents data only from public colleges and universities. College America n

70 FLORIDA 2 We re making great progress in providing access to more students. Total public college enrollment: 79,84 Attending Pursuing Degrees & Certificates 383,9 335,994 4-year colleges 55,236 23,848 2-year colleges Total State Population, 8-24 White 52% College Enrollment White 52% College Graduation White 6% Hispanic 23% Hispanic 2% Hispanic 8% 2% Other races 4% 7% Other races % Data: Fall 29 enrollment from IPEDS; population data from Census ACS PUMS 6-8; degrees by race from 27- state submissions Now we must have more success from all students. 4% Other races 8% For states to compete, their students must earn more degrees and certificates. Overall Credentials Awarded Science, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) Credentials Awarded 49,77 8,66 39,989 37,29 34,83 26,57 29,37 3,8 3, Certificate Associate Bachelor s Certificate Associate Bachelor s And all credentials should provide clear pathways to success. = The state did not provide data for this metric. Data: 27 8 College America n 2

71 FLORIDA 2 Graduation rates are very low, especially if you re poor, part time,, Hispanic, or older. Certificate-Seeking Students All White Hispanic % On-time ( year) Within /2 years Within 2 years Within year Within /2 years Within 2 years 9.4% 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial 2.% 6.4% 5.2% 4.3% 4.% 8.6% 2.5%.5% 3.2% 7.5% 22.% 2.3% 7.2% 5.9%.5% 2.% 7.% 9.% 2.% 25.7% 6.8% 9.8% 7.2% 4.3% 26.% 2.8% 4.7% 4.% 4.9% 3.6% 3.2% 3.4% 4.4% 5.% 7.9%.7% 7.3% 8.8% 5.6% 5.3% 5.8% 7.2% 9.6% 3.5% 4.3% 9.4%.% 6.9% 7.6% 7.5% 9.2% 2.4% 5.8% 7.4% In most states, very few students seeking certificates ever graduate. Associate Degree- Seeking Students All White Hispanic % On-time (2 years) Within 3 years Within 4 years Within 2 years Within 3 years Within 4 years 22.4% 6.% 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial 5.2% 6.8% 3.8% 2.% 2.7% 3.2% 5.8% 3.5%.% 7.9% 2.6% 4.%.% 8.4% 9.8% 2.% 3.6% 9.4% 25.6% 29.5% 22.4% 6.% 2.4% 5.% 28.4% 2.6% 6.8%.5%.6%.3%.4%.6%.5%.5%.5%.% 4.2% 4.9% 3.8% 2.6% 3.6% 3.% 4.9% 3.7% 2.7% 8.8% 9.7% 8.5% 6.% 7.7% 6.3%.3% 8.6% 6.9% Associate degree graduation rates are abysmal across the country for Hispanic and students, they re tragic. Bachelor s Degree- Seeking Students All White Hispanic On-time (4 years) Within 6 years Within 8 years Within 4 years Within 6 years Within 8 years 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial 35.6% 39.3% 3.5% 24.9% 22.7% 9.4% 36.2% 2.%.4% 64.7% 68.% 6.6% 53.5% 34.% 35.8% 65.3% 5.% 45.2% 69.3% 7.8% 67.6% 59.5% 38.6% 4.8% 69.9% 57.% 47.9%.7% 2.3% 8.% 2.2% 7.9% 2.%.9%.5% 36.9% 37.% 32.% 38.7% 28.2% 29.3% 38.5% 43.4% 43.4% 43.% 42.2% 43.3% 3.8% 32.% 45.4% 52.6% 34.% 28.2% 65.3% Almost no one over the age of 25 graduates; students fresh out of high school are most likely to succeed. Data: Certificate cohort started in 25 6, associate cohort started in 24 5, bachelor's cohort started in 22 3 Given changing demographics, our country will not have enough skilled s to compete unless many more students from all backgrounds and walks of life graduate. = The state did not provide data for this metric. College America n 3

72 FLORIDA 2 Retention rates drop from year to year. Many get discouraged and drop out Students in 2-year colleges who return to campus Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 % % 63.% 39.9% 45.2% 3.8% Students in 4-year colleges who return to campus % 86.2% 77.4% 68.4% % 68.7% 57.6% 5.2% after falling off track early. Students who earn expected first-year credits (24 credits) Associate Bachelor s (2 credits) Associate Bachelor s 36.4% 7.2% 42.% 75.3% Staying enrolled is particularly tough for part-time students, who must often balance jobs and school. Remediation. 59.8% Data: Associate cohort started in 24 5, bachelor's cohort started in 22 3; earned credits from fall 26 2-Year Colleges 4-Year Colleges 54.3% of freshmen require of those of freshmen require of those 22.3% and associated college-level courses in two years 9.4% Graduate within 3 years (projected) Current approaches almost always guarantee failure. and associated college-level courses in two years Graduate within 6 years (projected) Data: Fall 26 = The state did not provide data for this metric. College America n 4

73 FLORIDA 2 Precious time and money are lost when students don t graduate on schedule. Students are taking too much time Certificate Associate Bachelor s Should take year for full-time students 3.3 years 5.2 years Should take 2 years for full-time students 4.3 years 4.6 years Should take 4 years for full-time students and too many credits. Certificate Associate Bachelor s 4 credits 4 credits Should take 3 credits 75 credits 75 credits Should take 6 credits Should take 2 credits More students must graduate on time. Data: 27 8 = The state did not provide data for this metric. College America n 5

74 FLORIDA 2 More time isn t giving us enough success. For certificate and associate degree students, graduation rates are very low even when more time. Certificate Associate 25.6% 2.% 7.5% 7.3% 2.% 9.4% 5.2% 7.9% 4.2% 8.8% In year In.5 years In 2 years In 2 years In 3 years In 4 years On-time graduation rates for bachelor s degree students are shockingly low. And adding time beyond six years produces little additional success. Bachelor s 35.6% 64.7% 36.9% 69.3% 43.4% In 4 years In 6 years In 8 years Data: Certificate cohort started in 25 6; associate cohort started in 24 5; bachelor's cohort started in 22 3 Even modest progress provides little comfort when overall graduation rates are so low. College America n 6

75 GEORGIA 2 For a strong economy, the skills gap must be closed. 6% 34% 27% By 22, jobs requiring a career certificate or college degree Skills gap Too few students make it through college. MEMBER Georgia adults who currently have an associate degree or higher Data: See the Sources and Methodology section on our website. Of students who enroll in a public college or university 2-Year Public College 4-Year Public College Enroll Return as sophomores Graduate on time (% time) 4 Additional graduates 5% time 3 4 2% time 2 3 Total graduates Graduate in 4 years 28 Graduate in 8 years Key to measuring time Associate Bachelor s % time 2 years 4 years 5% time 3 years 6 years 2% time 4 years 8 years Data: 2-year cohort started in fall 24; 4-year cohort started in fall 22 For too many students, the path through college ends with no degree and often lots of debt. Note: This report presents data only from public colleges and universities. College America n

76 GEORGIA 2 We re making great progress in providing access to more students. Total public college enrollment: 377,37 Attending Pursuing Degrees & Certificates 25,296 25,84 4-year colleges 22,732 64,45 2-year colleges Total State Population, 8-24 Hispanic 8% White 53% Hispanic 4% College Enrollment White 54% Hispanic 3% College Graduation White 65% 34% Other races 5% 32% Other races % Data: Fall 29 enrollment from IPEDS; population data from Census ACS PUMS 6-8; degrees by race from 27- state submissions Now we must have more success from all students. 24% Other races 8% For states to compete, their students must earn more degrees and certificates. Overall Credentials Awarded Science, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) Credentials Awarded 2,945 27,577 4,464 5,64,2 9,55,28 7,665,456 49, Certificate Associate Bachelor s Certificate Associate Bachelor s And all credentials should provide clear pathways to success. Data: 27 8 College America n 2

77 GEORGIA 2 Graduation rates are very low, especially if you re poor, part time,, Hispanic, or older. Certificate-Seeking Students All White Hispanic % On-time ( year) Within /2 years Within 2 years Within year Within /2 years Within 2 years 6.9% 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial 9.4% 22.4% 9.6% 5.6% 24.8% 6.5% 6.8% 38.9% 9.2% 25.% 28.3% 27.3% 2.4% 3.2% 2.5% 22.8% 46.6% 6.% 27.3% 3.6% 32.9% 22.6% 32.% 23.3% 25.6% 49.9% 8.5% 8.% 8.9% DS* 7.4% 8.6% 7.6% 7.5% 9.9% 3.5% 3.% 4.7% 9.3%.5% 5.%.4%.2% 29.6% 7.6% 6.9% 8.2% 3.% 5.5% 2.% 3.% 4.3% 34.7% 2.8% In most states, very few students seeking certificates ever graduate. Associate Degree- Seeking Students All White Hispanic % On-time (2 years) Within 3 years Within 4 years Within 2 years Within 3 years Within 4 years 2.% 9.9% 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial 4.9% 5.9% 5.% 2.2% 6.4% 4.% 4.8% 3.8%.5% 3.5% 6.% 4.8% 7.5% 5.% 9.8% 3.9%.2% 7.2% 8.% 2.4% 2.% 9.9% 8.9% 2.7% 8.8% 5.6%.4%.9% 2.4% DS*.3% 3.3%.6%.%.6% DS* 6.% 7.3% 8.8% 4.% 7.6% 5.% 5.4% 5.9% 3.5% 9.7%.8% 3.8% 6.4% 2.4% 7.8% 8.8%.% 6.6% Associate degree graduation rates are abysmal across the country for Hispanic and students, they re tragic. Bachelor s Degree- Seeking Students All White Hispanic On-time (4 years) Within 6 years Within 8 years Within 4 years Within 6 years Within 8 years 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial 24.3% 26.3% 25.8% 6.2% 6.% 3.3% 24.9% 6.4% 6.% 56.7% 59.8% 56.5% 44.7% 7.6% 28.5% 58.% 44.6% 24.7% 62.3% 65.2% 6.8% 5.8% 2.7% 33.2% 63.7% 5.9% 29.% 3.5% 3.6% DS* DS* DS* DS* 5.6% 2.9% DS* 5.4% 7.% DS*.% 9.%.4% 23.%.7% 7.% 2.8% 23.4% DS* 6.4% 4.3% 7.% 5.% 7.6% 9.% 58.% Almost no one over the age of 25 graduates; students fresh out of high school are most likely to succeed. Data: Certificate cohort started in 25 6, associate cohort started in 24 5, bachelor's cohort started in 22 3 Given changing demographics, our country will not have enough skilled s to compete unless many more students from all backgrounds and walks of life graduate. = The state did not provide data for this metric. DS* = Fewer than students, so data were suppressed. College America n 3

78 GEORGIA 2 Retention rates drop from year to year. Many get discouraged and drop out Students in 2-year colleges who return to campus Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 % % 54.5% 38.5% 38.3% 26.3% Students in 4-year colleges who return to campus % 82.2% 7.4% 65.4% % 52.4% 37.% 28.7% after falling off track early. Students who earn expected first-year credits (24 credits) Associate Bachelor s (2 credits) Associate Bachelor s 4.% 6.8% 43.% 3.6% Staying enrolled is particularly tough for part-time students, who must often balance jobs and school. Remediation. 57.% Data: Associate cohort started in 24 5, bachelor's cohort started in 22 3; earned credits from fall 26 2-Year Colleges 4-Year Colleges 37.% 8.% of freshmen require of those 7.2% 7.2% 5.8% of freshmen require of those 35.4% 24.7% and associated college-level courses in two years Graduate within 3 years (projected) Current approaches almost always guarantee failure. and associated college-level courses in two years Graduate within 6 years (projected) Data: Fall 26 College America n 4

79 GEORGIA 2 Precious time and money are lost when students don t graduate on schedule. Students are taking too much time Certificate Associate Bachelor s 2.7 years 3.5 years Should take year for full-time students 3.9 years 4.9 years Should take 2 years for full-time students 4.9 years 6.2 years Should take 4 years for full-time students and too many credits. Certificate Associate Bachelor s 99 credits 96 credits 92 credits 97 credits 33 credits 34 credits Should take 2 credits Should take 3 credits Should take 6 credits More students must graduate on time. Data: 27 8 College America n 5

80 GEORGIA 2 More time isn t giving us enough success. For certificate and associate degree students, graduation rates are very low even when more time. Certificate Associate 9.4% 25.% 3.% 27.3% 6.9% 4.9% 3.5% 6.% 8.% 9.7% In year In.5 years In 2 years In 2 years In 3 years In 4 years On-time graduation rates for bachelor s degree students are shockingly low. And adding time beyond six years produces little additional success. Bachelor s 56.7% 62.3% 24.3% 5.4% 2.8% In 4 years In 6 years In 8 years Data: Certificate cohort started in 25 6; associate cohort started in 24 5; bachelor's cohort started in 22 3 Even modest progress provides little comfort when overall graduation rates are so low. College America n 6

81 HAWAII 2 For a strong economy, the skills gap must be closed. 68% 4% 27% By 22, jobs requiring a career certificate or college degree Skills gap Too few students make it through college. MEMBER Hawaii adults who currently have an associate degree or higher Data: See the Sources and Methodology section on our website. Of students who enroll in a public college or university 2-Year Public College 4-Year Public College Enroll Return as sophomores Graduate on time (% time) 5 Additional graduates 5% time 4 2% time 2 2 Total graduates Graduate in 4 years 9 8 Graduate in 8 years Key to measuring time Associate Bachelor s % time 2 years 4 years 5% time 3 years 6 years 2% time 4 years 8 years Data: 2-year cohort started in fall 24; 4-year cohort started in fall 22 For too many students, the path through college ends with no degree and often lots of debt. Note: This report presents data only from public colleges and universities. College America n

82 HAWAII 2 We re making great progress in providing access to more students. Total public college enrollment: 5,932 Attending Pursuing Degrees & Certificates 27,347 23,585 4-year 22,843 28,89 2-year colleges colleges Total State Population, 8-24 College Enrollment College Graduation White 26% White 2% White 22% Hispanic % Hispanic 3% Hispanic 3% 4% Other races 59% % Other races 76% Now we must have more success from all students. % Other races 74% Data: Fall 29 enrollment from IPEDS; population data from Census ACS PUMS 6-8 For states to compete, their students must earn more degrees and certificates. Overall Credentials Awarded Science, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) Credentials Awarded 2,499 2,242 2,846 3, Certificate Associate Bachelor s Certificate Associate Bachelor s And all credentials should provide clear pathways to success. = The state did not provide data for this metric. Data: 27 8 College America n 2

83 Hawaii 2 Graduation rates are very low, especially if you re poor, part time, Native Hawaiian, Hispanic, or older. Certificate-Seeking Students All White Hispanic % On-time ( year) Within /2 years Within 2 years Within year Within /2 years Within 2 years.8% Native Hawaiian 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial 9.4% DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* 25.% DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* 27.8% DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* 2.9% DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* 5.9% DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS*.8% DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* In most states, very few students seeking certificates ever graduate. Associate Degree- Seeking Students All White Hispanic % On-time (2 years) Within 3 years Within 4 years Within 2 years Within 3 years Within 4 years 2.3% Native Hawaiian 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial 3.2% 5.7% DS* 3.% 9.2% 4.3% 2.5% 3.%.7% 2.2%.7% DS* 8.8% 6.5% 2.%.8%.9%.3% 8.6% 5.7% DS* 2.3% 2.4% 5.4% 8.7% 5.% 6.7%.8% DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* 3.2% 5.3% DS* DS* 5.5% DS* 2.4% 4.3% 2.% 6.% 7.6% DS* 4.% 8.5% 5.% 5.5% 7.5% 5.3% Associate degree graduation rates are abysmal across the country for Native Hawaiian students, they re worse. Bachelor s Degree- Seeking Students All White Hispanic On-time (4 years) Within 6 years Within 8 years Within 4 years Within 6 years Within 8 years Native Hawaiian 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial 4.9% 6.5% DS* 7.3% DS* DS* 4.6% DS* DS* 5.3% 36.8% 29.3% 43.2% DS* 44.4% 5.4% DS* DS* 57.% 4.4% 34.% 53.% DS* 5.9% 57.2% DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* 2.% DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* 3.% DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* Almost no one over the age of 25 graduates; students fresh out of high school are most likely to succeed. Data: Certificate cohort started in 25 6, associate cohort started in 24 5, bachelor's cohort started in 22 3 Given changing demographics, our country will not have enough skilled s to compete unless many more students from all backgrounds and walks of life graduate. DS* = Fewer than students, so data were suppressed. College America n 3

84 HAWAII 2 Retention rates drop from year to year. Many get discouraged and drop out Students in 2-year colleges who return to campus Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 % % 67.4% 45.% 47.9% 29.5% Students in 4-year colleges who return to campus % 8.4% 67.7% 6.4% % 56.7% 46.7% 3.% after falling off track early. Students who earn expected first-year credits (24 credits) Associate Bachelor s (2 credits) Associate Bachelor s 8.4% 74.6% 8.8% 6.4% Staying enrolled is particularly tough for part-time students, who must often balance jobs and school. Remediation. 4.6% Data: Associate cohort started in 24 5, bachelor's cohort started in 22 3; earned credits from fall 26 2-Year Colleges 4-Year Colleges 66.% DS* of freshmen require of those of freshmen require of those 9.4% and associated college-level courses in two years.3% DS* DS* DS* Graduate within 3 years (projected) Current approaches almost always guarantee failure. and associated college-level courses in two years Graduate within 6 years (projected) Data: Fall 26 DS* = Fewer than students, so data were suppressed. College America n 4

85 HAWAII 2 Precious time and money are lost when students don t graduate on schedule. Students are taking too much time Certificate Associate Bachelor s 5 years 7.2 years 5.6 years 7.8 years 5.8 years 8.7 years Should take year for full-time students Should take 2 years for full-time students Should take 4 years for full-time students and too many credits. Certificate Associate Bachelor s 39 credits 36 credits 66 credits 69 credits 76 credits 75 credits Should take 2 credits Should take 3 credits Should take 6 credits More students must graduate on time. Data: 27 8 College America n 5

86 HAWAII 2 More time isn t giving us enough success. For certificate and associate degree students, graduation rates are very low even when more time. Certificate Associate 9.4% 25.% 5.9% 27.8%.8% 3.2% 2.2% 3.2% 8.6% 6.% In year In.5 years In 2 years In 2 years In 3 years In 4 years On-time graduation rates for bachelor s degree students are shockingly low. And adding time beyond six years produces little additional success. Bachelor s 4.9% 5.3% 2.% 57.% 3.% In 4 years In 6 years In 8 years Data: Certificate cohort started in 25 6; associate cohort started in 24 5; bachelor's cohort started in 22 3 Even modest progress provides little comfort when overall graduation rates are so low. College America n 6

87 IDAHO 2 For a strong economy, the skills gap must be closed. 63% 34% 29% By 22, jobs requiring a career certificate or college degree Skills gap Too few students make it through college. MEMBER Idaho adults who currently have an associate degree or higher Data: See the Sources and Methodology section on our website. Of students who enroll in a public college or university 2-Year Public College 4-Year Public College Enroll Return as sophomores Graduate on time (% time) 4 8 Additional graduates 5% time 3 2% time 2 4 Total graduates Graduate in 4 years 26 Graduate in 8 years Key to measuring time Associate Bachelor s % time 2 years 4 years 5% time 3 years 6 years 2% time 4 years 8 years Data: 2-year cohort started in fall 24; 4-year cohort started in fall 22 For too many students, the path through college ends with no degree and often lots of debt. Note: This report presents data only from public colleges and universities. College America n

88 IDAHO 2 We re making great progress in providing access to more students. Total public college enrollment: 56,72 Attending Pursuing Degrees & Certificates 37,73 4,494 8,999 4-year 2-year colleges 4,678 colleges Total State Population, 8-24 White 83% College Enrollment White 8% College Graduation White 84% Hispanic 2% % Other races 5% Hispanic 6% % Other races 2% Data: Fall 29 enrollment from IPEDS; population data from Census ACS PUMS 6-8; degrees by race from 27- state submissions Now we must have more success from all students. Hispanic 5% Other races % For states to compete, their students must earn more degrees and certificates. Overall Credentials Awarded Science, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) Credentials Awarded 4,574 4,94,34 99,774, Certificate Associate Bachelor s Certificate Associate Bachelor s And all credentials should provide clear pathways to success. Data: 27 8 College America n 2

89 IDAHO 2 Graduation rates are very low, especially if you re poor, part time,, Hispanic, or older. Certificate-Seeking Students All White Hispanic % On-time ( year) Within /2 years Within 2 years Within year Within /2 years Within 2 years 7.4% 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial 25.% 26.% DS* DS* 26.% 26.3% 24.% 7.5% 4.% 3.% 3.4% DS* DS* 3.5% 3.% 29.5% 2.5% 8.% 33.4% 34.7% 25.5% DS* 34.6% 3.8% 33.9% 27.8% 2.% 6.2% DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* 2.3%.9% DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* 7.4% 5.4% DS* DS* 2.5% DS* 6.9% DS* 3.3% In most states, very few students seeking certificates ever graduate. Associate Degree- Seeking Students All White Hispanic % On-time (2 years) Within 3 years Within 4 years Within 2 years Within 3 years Within 4 years 6.4% 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial 8.7% 9.4% DS* DS* 7.7% 5.9% 9.6% 3.5% 2.9% 7.5% 8.8% 9.9% DS* 5.4% 3.6% 8.8% 8.6% 6.9% 2.4% 23.% 6.4% DS* 8.9% 8.2% 22.6%.8% 9.5% DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* 5.5% 6.% DS* DS* 4.7% DS* 6.3% 5.9% DS* 9.%.% DS* DS* 9.8% DS* 9.2% 8.4% 5.2% Associate degree graduation rates are abysmal across the country for Hispanic and students, they re tragic. Bachelor s Degree- Seeking Students All White Hispanic On-time (4 years) Within 6 years Within 8 years Within 4 years Within 6 years Within 8 years 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial 8.5% 9.4% 6.3% DS* 2.8% 27.7% 6.% 4.% 4.7% 44.3% 44.% 34.6% 33.3% 33.% 45.3% 4.% 34.% 8.7% 5.% 52.% 4.9% 36.% 39.6% 52.% 48.5% 43.4% 28.5% 4.5% 4.7% DS* DS* 4.8% 6.7% DS* 4.7% DS*.9% 2.4% DS* DS* 2.% 2.9%.5% 4.% 6.8% 6.7% 7.4% DS* DS* 6.4% 6.8% 6.8% 9.8%.9% 33.% 4.% 2.% Almost no one over the age of 25 graduates; students fresh out of high school are most likely to succeed. Data: Certificate cohort started in 25 6, associate cohort started in 24 5, bachelor's cohort started in 22 3 Given changing demographics, our country will not have enough skilled s to compete unless many more students from all backgrounds and walks of life graduate. = The state did not provide data for this metric. DS* = Fewer than students, so data were suppressed. College America n 3

90 IDAHO 2 Retention rates drop from year to year. Many get discouraged and drop out Students in 2-year colleges who return to campus Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 % % 48.4% 25.4% 3.% 2.6% Students in 4-year colleges who return to campus % 64.8% 5.4% 44.2% % 38.9% 28.5% 22.8% after falling off track early. Students who earn expected first-year credits (24 credits) Associate Bachelor s (2 credits) Associate Bachelor s 4.9% 53.5% 3.% 46.3% Staying enrolled is particularly tough for part-time students, who must often balance jobs and school. Remediation. 62.% Data: Associate cohort started in 24 5, bachelor's cohort started in 22 3; earned credits from fall 26 2-Year Colleges of freshmen require of those and associated college-level courses in two years Graduate within 3 years (projected) Current approaches almost always guarantee failure. 4-Year Colleges 57.4% 9.9% 23.5% 65.2% of freshmen require of those 42.2% 6.9% 8.7% and associated college-level courses in two years Graduate within 6 years (projected) Data: Fall 26 College America n 4

91 IDAHO 2 Precious time and money are lost when students don t graduate on schedule. Students are taking too much time Certificate Associate Bachelor s 3.3 years 4.9 years Should take year for full-time students 5 years 5.8 years Should take 2 years for full-time students 5.4 years 6.6 years Should take 4 years for full-time students and too many credits. Certificate Associate Bachelor s 58 credits 62 credits Should take 3 credits 2 credits 93 credits Should take 6 credits 44 credits 47 credits Should take 2 credits More students must graduate on time. Data: 27 8 College America n 5

92 IDAHO 2 More time isn t giving us enough success. For certificate and associate degree students, graduation rates are very low even when more time. Certificate Associate 25.% 3.% 2.3% 33.4% 7.4% 8.7% 7.5% 5.5% 2.4% 9.% In year In.5 years In 2 years In 2 years In 3 years In 4 years On-time graduation rates for bachelor s degree students are shockingly low. And adding time beyond six years produces little additional success. Bachelor s 44.3% 5.% 8.5%.9% 6.7% In 4 years In 6 years In 8 years Data: Certificate cohort started in 25 6; associate cohort started in 24 5; bachelor's cohort started in 22 3 Even modest progress provides little comfort when overall graduation rates are so low. College America n 6

93 ILLINOIS 2 For a strong economy, the skills gap must be closed. 67% 43% 24% By 22, jobs requiring a career certificate or college degree Skills gap Too few students make it through college. MEMBER Illinois adults who currently have an associate degree or higher Data: See the Sources and Methodology section on our website. Of students who enroll in a public college or university 2-Year Public College 4-Year Public College Enroll Return as sophomores Graduate on time (% time) 4 5 Additional graduates 5% time 4 9 2% time 2 Total graduates 2 25 Graduate in 4 years 2 25 Graduate in 8 years Key to measuring time Associate Bachelor s % time 2 years 4 years 5% time 3 years 6 years 2% time 4 years 8 years Data: 2-year cohort started in fall 24; 4-year cohort started in fall 22 For too many students, the path through college ends with no degree and often lots of debt. Note: This report presents data only from public colleges and universities. College America n

94 ILLINOIS 2 We re making great progress in providing access to more students. Total public college enrollment: 536,27 Attending Pursuing Degrees & Certificates 283,3 252,76 4-year colleges 52,67 383,96 2-year colleges Total State Population, 8-24 White 6% College Enrollment White 6% College Graduation White 74% Hispanic 7% Hispanic 4% Hispanic 7% 6% Other races 6% 5% Other races % Data: Fall 29 enrollment from IPEDS; population data from Census ACS PUMS 6-8; degrees by race from 27- state submissions Now we must have more success from all students. % Other races 8% For states to compete, their students must earn more degrees and certificates. Overall Credentials Awarded Science, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) Credentials Awarded 3,62 33,25 6,776 6,73 23,39 25,88 4,843 5, , Certificate Associate Bachelor s Certificate Associate Bachelor s And all credentials should provide clear pathways to success. Data: 27 8 College America n 2

95 ILLINOIS 2 Graduation rates are very low, especially if you re poor, part time,, Hispanic, or older. Certificate-Seeking Students All White Hispanic % On-time ( year) Within /2 years Within 2 years Within year Within /2 years Within 2 years.8% 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial 4.6% 5.3% 9.% 5.8% 27.5% 7.4% 7.7% 3.4% 4.7% 8.8% 9.6% 6.% 7.5% 3.6% 2.3% 2.5% 7.4% 9.% 22.4% 23.2% 2.% 9.8% 36.6% 22.7% 5.9% 23.3% 3.3% 6.2% 5.5% 5.4% 9.6% 7.8% 5.%.7% 4.% 5.2% 9.2% 8.4% 9.% 3.4%.2% 7.3% 4.5% 9.9% 9.4%.8%.%.8% 5.% 2.8% 9.% 6.4%.7% 2.2% In most states, very few students seeking certificates ever graduate. Associate Degree- Seeking Students All White Hispanic % On-time (2 years) Within 3 years Within 4 years Within 2 years Within 3 years Within 4 years 8.3% 9.4% 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial 9.5%.9% 3.8% 2.8% 8.8%.3% 9.3% 7.2% 3.7% 2.% 25.6% 2.9% 6.8% 6.3% 7.2% 23.% 6.3% 4.% 26.% 3.% 8.3% 9.4% 9.6% 2.9% 28.8% 2.6% 9.3% 2.3% 3.2%.4%.9% 2.5% 3.5%.%.3%.5% 6.4% 8.3% 3.% 2.2% 5.9% 6.6% 6.6% 4.2% 4.%.% 2.4% 5.9% 3.8% 8.5% 9.3%.7% 7.2% 7.7% Associate degree graduation rates are abysmal across the country for Hispanic and students, they re tragic. Bachelor s Degree- Seeking Students All White Hispanic On-time (4 years) Within 6 years Within 8 years Within 4 years Within 6 years Within 8 years 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial 37.4% 4.% 23.4% 7.4%.5% 25.2% 37.9% 25.8% 9.% 6.3% 65.% 5.7% 4.9% 7.9% 34.% 62.% 45.8% 43.8% 63.% 66.3% 53.8% 44.2% 8.7% 42.% 63.9% 47.9% 46.9%.5% 9.3% 6.7% DS* DS* DS* 3.% 8.% 4.% 23.2% 23.7% 2.% DS* DS* DS* 28.% 4.8% 4.% 24.3% 25.8% 2.% DS* DS* DS* 28.8% 4.8% 4.% 7.9% 62.% Almost no one over the age of 25 graduates; students fresh out of high school are most likely to succeed. Data: Certificate cohort started in 25 6, associate cohort started in 24 5, bachelor's cohort started in 22 3 Given changing demographics, our country will not have enough skilled s to compete unless many more students from all backgrounds and walks of life graduate. DS* = Fewer than students, so data were suppressed. College America n 3

96 ILLINOIS 2 Retention rates drop from year to year. Many get discouraged and drop out Students in 2-year colleges who return to campus Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 % % 65.7% 4.8% 46.2% 3.4% Students in 4-year colleges who return to campus % 74.9% 64.4% 59.4% % 5.2% 37.8% 32.3% after falling off track early. Students who earn expected first-year credits (24 credits) Associate Bachelor s (2 credits) Associate Bachelor s 4.3% 8.6% 27.9% 49.4% Staying enrolled is particularly tough for part-time students, who must often balance jobs and school. Remediation. 66.2% Data: Associate cohort started in 24 5, bachelor's cohort started in 22 3; earned credits from fall 26 2-Year Colleges of freshmen require of those and associated college-level courses in two years Graduate within 3 years (projected) Current approaches almost always guarantee failure. 4-Year Colleges 48.7% 5.8% 3.9% 4.% 59.6% of freshmen require of those 4.7% and associated college-level courses in two years 44.2% Graduate within 6 years (projected) Data: Fall 26 College America n 4

97 ILLINOIS 2 Precious time and money are lost when students don t graduate on schedule. Students are taking too much time Certificate Associate Bachelor s 3 years 4 years Should take year for full-time students 3 years 5 years Should take 2 years for full-time students 4.5 years 5.5 years Should take 4 years for full-time students and too many credits. Certificate Associate Bachelor s 6 credits 58 credits Should take 3 credits 7 credits 68 credits Should take 6 credits 26 credits 9 credits Should take 2 credits More students must graduate on time. Data: 27 8 College America n 5

98 ILLINOIS 2 More time isn t giving us enough success. For certificate and associate degree students, graduation rates are very low even when more time. Certificate Associate 4.6% 8.8% 9.2% 22.4%.8% 9.5% 2.% 6.4% 26.%.% In year In.5 years In 2 years In 2 years In 3 years In 4 years On-time graduation rates for bachelor s degree students are shockingly low. And adding time beyond six years produces little additional success. Bachelor s 6.3% 63.% 37.4% 23.2% 24.3% In 4 years In 6 years In 8 years Data: Certificate cohort started in 25 6; associate cohort started in 24 5; bachelor's cohort started in 22 3 Even modest progress provides little comfort when overall graduation rates are so low. College America n 6

99 INDIANA 2 For a strong economy, the skills gap must be closed. 58% 36% 22% By 22, jobs requiring a career certificate or college degree Skills gap Too few students make it through college. MEMBER Indiana adults who currently have an associate degree or higher Data: See the Sources and Methodology section on our website. Of students who enroll in a public college or university 2-Year Public College 4-Year Public College Enroll Return as sophomores 43 2 Graduate on time (% time) 4 Additional graduates 5% time 6 2% time 2 Total graduates Graduate in 4 years 5 33 Graduate in 8 years Key to measuring time Associate Bachelor s % time 2 years 4 years 5% time 3 years 6 years 2% time 4 years 8 years Data: 2-year cohort started in fall 24; 4-year cohort started in fall 22 For too many students, the path through college ends with no degree and often lots of debt. Note: This report presents data only from public colleges and universities. College America n

100 INDIANA 2 We re making great progress in providing access to more students. Total public college enrollment: 287,65 Attending Pursuing Degrees & Certificates 9,57 95,494 4-year colleges 87,54 99,9 2-year colleges Total State Population, 8-24 White 8% College Enrollment White 78% College Graduation White 85% Hispanic 6% Hispanic 3% Hispanic 2% % Other races 4% 9% Other races % Data: Fall 29 enrollment from IPEDS; population data from Census ACS PUMS 6-8; degrees by race from 27- state submissions Now we must have more success from all students. 6% Other races 6% For states to compete, their students must earn more degrees and certificates. Overall Credentials Awarded Science, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) Credentials Awarded 23,33 24,76 4,747 4,724 9,77 2,63 8,665,682 2,72 2, Certificate Associate Bachelor s Certificate Associate Bachelor s And all credentials should provide clear pathways to success. Data: 27 8 College America n 2

101 INDIANA 2 Graduation rates are very low, especially if you re poor, part time,, Hispanic, or older. Certificate-Seeking Students All White Hispanic % On-time ( year) Within /2 years Within 2 years Within year Within /2 years Within 2 years.8% 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial 5.2% 7.%.5% 3.% 22.4% 9.7%.4% 3.6% 5.6% 9.7% 22.% 2.% 3.% 25.2% 2.5% 8.2% 8.% 2.4% 2.5% 23.8% 26.3% 3.% 27.2% 2.5% 2.5% 9.8% 22.6% 4.2% 4.9% 4.5%.2% 4.8% 5.5%.3% 4.2% 3.% 9.%.2% 9.% 3.7%.3% 9.8% 2.5%.2% 9.2%.8% 3.% 9.% 8.5% 4.8%.% 5.% 4.7% 3.% In most states, very few students seeking certificates ever graduate. Associate Degree- Seeking Students All White Hispanic % On-time (2 years) Within 3 years Within 4 years Within 2 years Within 3 years Within 4 years 4.7% 7.8% 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial 5.4% 5.9% 2.3% 2.7% 6.3% 3.% 5.8% 3.4% 2.3% 3.8% 5.% 2.4% 5.7% 4.8% 8.8% 4.8% 9.2% 9.2% 9.3% 2.2% 4.7% 7.8% 9.% 3.2% 2.2% 4.% 4.%.5%.6% 8.%.% 2.7%.7%.%.4%.% 2.8% 3.% 2.4%.% 8.% 2.7%.9% 2.3%.7% 6.% 6.6% 4.6% 3.%.3% 5.5% 5.% 5.7% 4.7% Associate degree graduation rates are abysmal across the country for Hispanic and students, they re tragic. Bachelor s Degree- Seeking Students All White Hispanic On-time (4 years) Within 6 years Within 8 years Within 4 years Within 6 years Within 8 years 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial 26.2% 27.3% 6.9% 9.3% 6.9% 7.5% 27.% 4.6% 6.9% 56.% 57.6% 46.5% 35.2% 9.4% 9.9% 52.7% 4.2% 27.3% 6.6% 62.% 52.4% 42.% 24.8% 26.% 62.3% 46.7% 32.8%.7%.%.4%.6%.%.8% 2.6%.2%.3% 9.3% 8.9% 4.2% 3.7% 6.7% 4.9% 3.2% 5.9% 5.3% 5.% 4.5% 4.% 9.9%.2%.2% 9.4% 2.8%.8% 9.4% 6.7% 52.7% Almost no one over the age of 25 graduates; students fresh out of high school are most likely to succeed. Data: Certificate cohort started in 25 6, associate cohort started in 24 5, bachelor's cohort started in 22 3 Given changing demographics, our country will not have enough skilled s to compete unless many more students from all backgrounds and walks of life graduate. College America n 3

102 INDIANA 2 Retention rates drop from year to year. Many get discouraged and drop out Students in 2-year colleges who return to campus Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 % % 55.7% 33.% 4.8% 24.5% Students in 4-year colleges who return to campus % 82.4% 7.3% 6.9% % 6.6% 42.2% 32.% after falling off track early. Students who earn expected first-year credits (24 credits) Associate Bachelor s (2 credits) Associate Bachelor s 4.3% 46.9%.8% 36.7% Staying enrolled is particularly tough for part-time students, who must often balance jobs and school. Remediation. 63.7% Data: Associate cohort started in 24 5, bachelor's cohort started in 22 3; earned credits from fall 26 2-Year Colleges 4-Year Colleges 46.4% 2.4% of freshmen require of those 57.8% of freshmen require of those 9.2% and associated college-level courses in two years Graduate within 3 years (projected) Current approaches almost always guarantee failure. and associated college-level courses in two years 27.3% Graduate within 6 years (projected) Data: Fall 28 = The state did not provide data for this metric. College America n 4

103 INDIANA 2 Precious time and money are lost when students don t graduate on schedule. Students are taking too much time Certificate Associate Bachelor s 3.4 years 4.7 years Should take year for full-time students 3.8 years 5 years Should take 2 years for full-time students 4 years 5.3 years Should take 4 years for full-time students and too many credits. Certificate Associate Bachelor s 38 credits 39 credits 79 credits 68 credits 9 credits 76 credits Should take 2 credits Should take 3 credits Should take 6 credits More students must graduate on time. Data: 27 8 College America n 5

104 INDIANA 2 More time isn t giving us enough success. For certificate and associate degree students, graduation rates are very low even when more time. Certificate Associate 5.2% 9.7% 9.% 2.5%.8% 5.4% 3.8% 2.8% 9.3% 6.% In year In.5 years In 2 years In 2 years In 3 years In 4 years On-time graduation rates for bachelor s degree students are shockingly low. And adding time beyond six years produces little additional success. Bachelor s 56.% 6.6% 26.2% 9.3% 5.% In 4 years In 6 years In 8 years Data: Certificate cohort started in 25 6; associate cohort started in 24 5; bachelor's cohort started in 22 3 Even modest progress provides little comfort when overall graduation rates are so low. College America n 6

105 KENTUCKY 2 For a strong economy, the skills gap must be closed. 57% 32% 25% By 22, jobs requiring a career certificate or college degree Skills gap Too few students make it through college. MEMBER Kentucky adults who currently have an associate degree or higher Data: See the Sources and Methodology section on our website. Of students who enroll in a public college or university 2-Year Public College 4-Year Public College Enroll Return as sophomores 5 63 Graduate on time (% time) Additional graduates 5% time 2 3 2% time 2 Total graduates Graduate in 4 years 6 25 Graduate in 8 years Key to measuring time Associate Bachelor s % time 2 years 4 years 5% time 3 years 6 years 2% time 4 years 8 years Data: 2-year cohort started in fall 24; 4-year cohort started in fall 22 For too many students, the path through college ends with no degree and often lots of debt. Note: This report presents data only from public colleges and universities. College America n

106 KENTUCKY 2 We re making great progress in providing access to more students. Total public college enrollment: 97,793 Attending Pursuing Degrees & Certificates 2,82 4-year 97,68,2 76,6 2-year colleges colleges Total State Population, 8-24 White 85% College Enrollment White 8% College Graduation White 86% Hispanic 3% Hispanic 3% Hispanic % % Other races 3% 9% Other races 8% Data: Fall 29 enrollment from IPEDS; population data from Census ACS PUMS 6-8; degrees by race from 27- state submissions Now we must have more success from all students. 7% Other races 6% For states to compete, their students must earn more degrees and certificates. Overall Credentials Awarded Science, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) Credentials Awarded 4,829 3,7 2,32 3,44 2,968 2,328 5,876 6,749,73 5,454 2, Certificate Associate Bachelor s Certificate Associate Bachelor s And all credentials should provide clear pathways to success. Data: 27 8 College America n 2

107 KENTUCKY 2 Graduation rates are very low, especially if you re poor, part time,, Hispanic, or older. Certificate-Seeking Students All White Hispanic % On-time ( year) Within /2 years Within 2 years Within year Within /2 years Within 2 years 52.% 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial 38.% 4.5% DS*.% 47.% 46.2% 3.2% 28.6% 29.8% 42.% 45.% DS* 25.% 55.9% 46.2% 32.% 33.9% 33.3% 42.% 45.% DS* 25.% 55.9% 46.2% 32.% 33.9% 33.3% 49.6% 5.8% 33.3% 44.7% 54.6% 38.2% 39.7% 43.% 43.8% 5.5% 53.6% 33.3% 46.8% 55.8% 4.8% 42.9% 44.8% 46.3% 52.% 54.3% 33.3% 46.8% 56.2% 4.8% 44.4% 44.8% 48.8% In most states, very few students seeking certificates ever graduate. Associate Degree- Seeking Students All White Hispanic % On-time (2 years) Within 3 years Within 4 years Within 2 years Within 3 years Within 4 years 2.2% 2.3% 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial.8% 2.2% 2.7%.% 2.8%.%.8%.9%.6% 8.5% 9.8% 8.%.5%.7% 5.3% 8.3% 9.% 5.5% 3.5% 5.4% 2.2% 2.3% 7.8% 9.4% 3.3% 4.7%.%.5%.6% DS*.4%.6%.2%.5%.4%.% 2.2% 2.6%.8% 2.% 2.6% 2.% 2.% 2.3% 2.3% 5.5% 6.5% 5.4% 4.% 7.3% 4.4% 4.3% 5.4% 5.8% Associate degree graduation rates are abysmal across the country for Hispanic and students, they re tragic. Bachelor s Degree- Seeking Students All White Hispanic On-time (4 years) Within 6 years Within 8 years Within 4 years Within 6 years Within 8 years 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial 2.% 2.% 5.% 2.8% 25.4% 7.% 2.4% 2.2% 7.7% 48.3% 5.% 37.8% 33.7% 52.% 2.% 49.4% 5.7% 32.% 52.9% 54.6% 42.% 38.3% 54.4% 24.% 54.% 55.3% 37.3% 7.7% 7.4% DS*.9% 3.9% 2.3%.4% 4.3% 2.5% 2.7% 2.4% 2.5% 2.4% 8.6% 8.5% 29.6% 7.3% 3.9% 25.6% 25.4% 25.% 23.8%.7% 2.4% 33.9% 2.4% 8.7% 52.% 8.6% 49.4% Almost no one over the age of 25 graduates; students fresh out of high school are most likely to succeed. Data: Certificate cohort started in 25 6, associate cohort started in 24 5, bachelor's cohort started in 22 3 Given changing demographics, our country will not have enough skilled s to compete unless many more students from all backgrounds and walks of life graduate. DS* = Fewer than students, so data were suppressed. College America n 3

108 KENTUCKY 2 Retention rates drop from year to year. Many get discouraged and drop out Students in 2-year colleges who return to campus Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 % % 55.% 35.2% 2.2% 3.5% Students in 4-year colleges who return to campus % 72.% 6.7% 55.4% % 42.9% 33.7% 26.9% after falling off track early. Students who earn expected first-year credits (24 credits) Associate Bachelor s (2 credits) Associate Bachelor s 35.2% 63.3% 2.% 27.2% Staying enrolled is particularly tough for part-time students, who must often balance jobs and school. Remediation. 73.9% Data: Associate cohort started in 24 5, bachelor's cohort started in 22 3; earned credits from fall 26 2-Year Colleges 4-Year Colleges 34.% 32.% of freshmen require of those 62.2% 8.% of freshmen require of those and associated college-level courses in two years 5.5% Graduate within 3 years (projected) Current approaches almost always guarantee failure. 4.% and associated college-level courses in two years 32.% Graduate within 6 years (projected) Data: Fall 26 College America n 4

109 KENTUCKY 2 Precious time and money are lost when students don t graduate on schedule. Students are taking too much time Certificate Associate Bachelor s 3.8 years 4.4 years 4.9 years 5.8 years 5.5 years 6.6 years Should take year for full-time students Should take 2 years for full-time students Should take 4 years for full-time students and too many credits. Certificate Associate Bachelor s 69 credits 64 credits 92 credits 99 credits 42 credits 43 credits Should take 2 credits Should take 3 credits Should take 6 credits More students must graduate on time. Data: 27 8 College America n 5

110 KENTUCKY 2 More time isn t giving us enough success. For certificate and associate degree students, graduation rates are very low even when more time. Certificate Associate 5.5% 52.% 38.% 42.% 42.%.8% 8.5% 2.2% 3.5% 5.5% In year In.5 years In 2 years In 2 years In 3 years In 4 years On-time graduation rates for bachelor s degree students are shockingly low. And adding time beyond six years produces little additional success. Bachelor s 48.3% 52.9% 2.% 2.7% 25.6% In 4 years In 6 years In 8 years Data: Certificate cohort started in 25 6; associate cohort started in 24 5; bachelor's cohort started in 22 3 Even modest progress provides little comfort when overall graduation rates are so low. College America n 6

111 LOUISIANA 2 For a strong economy, the skills gap must be closed. 53% 28% 25% By 22, jobs requiring a career certificate or college degree Skills gap Too few students make it through college. MEMBER Louisiana adults who currently have an associate degree or higher Data: See the Sources and Methodology section on our website. Of students who enroll in a public college or university 2-Year Public College 4-Year Public College Enroll Return as sophomores Graduate on time (% time) Additional graduates 5% time 9 2% time Total graduates 2 Graduate in 4 years 3 Graduate in 8 years Key to measuring time Associate Bachelor s % time 2 years 4 years 5% time 3 years 6 years 2% time 4 years 8 years = The state did not provide data for this metric. Data: 2-year cohort started in fall 24; 4-year cohort started in fall 22 For too many students, the path through college ends with no degree and often lots of debt. Note: This report presents data only from public colleges and universities. College America n

112 LOUISIANA 2 We re making great progress in providing access to more students. Total public college enrollment: 9,75 Attending Pursuing Degrees & Certificates 3,826 6,925 4-year colleges 2,6 7,5 2-year colleges Hispanic 4% Total State Population, 8-24 White 56% Hispanic 3% College Enrollment White 58% Hispanic 2% College Graduation White 67% 36% Other races 3% 3% Other races 9% Data: Fall 29 enrollment from IPEDS; population data from Census ACS PUMS 6-8; degrees by race from 27- state submissions Now we must have more success from all students. 25% Other races 6% For states to compete, their students must earn more degrees and certificates. Overall Credentials Awarded Science, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) Credentials Awarded 7,295 7,55 3,65 3,6 2,89 3,68 4,637 3, Certificate Associate Bachelor s Certificate Associate Bachelor s And all credentials should provide clear pathways to success. Data: 27 8 College America n 2

113 LOUISIANA 2 Graduation rates are very low, especially if you re poor, part time,, Hispanic, or older. Certificate-Seeking Students All White Hispanic % On-time ( year) Within /2 years Within 2 years Within year Within /2 years Within 2 years 9.6% 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial 3.% 3.9% DS* 2.2% 4.3% 3.2%.6%.5% 2.% 24.9% 29.4% 5.9% 28.3% 7.9% 6.%.8% 29.% 32.6% 4.2% 24.3% 35.% 25.6% 25.8% 7.8% DS*.9% DS*.% 2.2%.3%.% DS* 2.4% 2.3% DS*.9% 7.5%.7% 4.9%.9% 9.6% 9.4% 2.% 2.2% 25.3% 6.% 3.% 8.3% In most states, very few students seeking certificates ever graduate. Associate Degree- Seeking Students All White Hispanic % On-time (2 years) Within 3 years Within 4 years Within 2 years Within 3 years Within 4 years 6.% 4.% 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial.%.5%.5%.4% 2.2%.%.6%.4% 4.2% 5.9% 3.8% 2.4% 5.9% 4.% 3.8% 2.7% 6.7% 9.4% 6.% 4.% 8.6% 5.9% 6.5% 4.8%.6%.9% DS*.3%.2%.3%.%.%.8% 2.6%.%.% 2.6%.5%.3%.4% 3.7% 4.7%.% 2.8% 4.3% 2.9% 3.7% 3.7% Associate degree graduation rates are abysmal across the country for Hispanic and students, they re tragic. Bachelor s Degree- Seeking Students All White Hispanic On-time (4 years) Within 6 years Within 8 years Within 4 years Within 6 years Within 8 years 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial 5.8% 9.% 4.% 8.6% 5.7% 3.5% 6.6% 3.9% 43.7% 5.5% 4.% 28.8% 7.5% 4.4% 45.8% 22.3%.4%.4% 2.6%.2%.8%.%.8%.4%.4% 4.% 3.2% 7.5%.2% 5.2% 4.9% 7.% 7.5%.2% 45.8% Almost no one over the age of 25 graduates; students fresh out of high school are most likely to succeed. Data: Certificate cohort started in 25 6, associate cohort started in 24 5, bachelor's cohort started in 22 3 Given changing demographics, our country will not have enough skilled s to compete unless many more students from all backgrounds and walks of life graduate. = The state did not provide data for this metric. DS* = Fewer than students, so data were suppressed. College America n 3

114 LOUISIANA 2 Retention rates drop from year to year. Many get discouraged and drop out Students in 2-year colleges who return to campus Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 % % 38.7% 39.6% 24.9% 27.% Students in 4-year colleges who return to campus % 79.7% 64.% 62.7% % 49.7% 3.9% 3.2% after falling off track early. Students who earn expected first-year credits (24 credits) Associate Bachelor s (2 credits) Associate Bachelor s 3.5% 62.4% 35.5% 44.5% Staying enrolled is particularly tough for part-time students, who must often balance jobs and school. Remediation. 47.4% Data: Associate cohort started in 24 5, bachelor's cohort started in 22 3; earned credits from fall 26 2-Year Colleges of freshmen require of those and associated college-level courses in two years Graduate within 3 years (projected) Current approaches almost always guarantee failure. 4-Year Colleges 63.% 2.% 66.2% of freshmen require of those 33.8% 3.8% 2.7% 22.3% and associated college-level courses in two years Graduate within 6 years (projected) Data: Fall 26 College America n 4

115 LOUISIANA 2 Precious time and money are lost when students don t graduate on schedule. Students are taking too much time Certificate Associate Bachelor s 5.8 years 6 years 6.4 years 7.3 years 5.5 years 7. years Should take year for full-time students Should take 2 years for full-time students Should take 4 years for full-time students and too many credits. Certificate Associate Bachelor s Should take 3 credits Should take 6 credits Should take 2 credits More students must graduate on time. Data: 27 8 = The state did not provide data for this metric. College America n 5

116 LOUISIANA 2 More time isn t giving us enough success. For certificate and associate degree students, graduation rates are very low even when more time. Certificate Associate 29.% 2.% 9.6% 2.4% 3.% In year In.5 years In 2 years 6.7% 4.2%.%.8% 3.7% In 2 years In 3 years In 4 years On-time graduation rates for bachelor s degree students are shockingly low. And adding time beyond six years produces little additional success. Bachelor s 43.7% 5.8%.4% In 4 years In 6 years In 8 years Data: Certificate cohort started in 25 6; associate cohort started in 24 5; bachelor's cohort started in 22 3 Even modest progress provides little comfort when overall graduation rates are so low. = The state did not provide data for this metric. College America n 6

117 MARYLAND 2 For a strong economy, the skills gap must be closed. 67% 45% 22% By 22, jobs requiring a career certificate or college degree Skills gap Too few students make it through college. MEMBER Maryland adults who currently have an associate degree or higher Data: See the Sources and Methodology section on our website. Of students who enroll in a public college or university 2-Year Public College 4-Year Public College Enroll Return as sophomores Graduate on time (% time) 2 5 Additional graduates 5% time 3 2% time 2 Total graduates 7 26 Graduate in 4 years 26 Graduate in 8 years Key to measuring time Associate Bachelor s % time 2 years 4 years 5% time 3 years 6 years 2% time 4 years 8 years = The state did not provide data for this metric. Data: 2-year cohort started in fall 24; 4-year cohort started in fall 22 For too many students, the path through college ends with no degree and often lots of debt. Note: This report presents data only from public colleges and universities. College America n

118 MARYLAND 2 We re making great progress in providing access to more students. Total public college enrollment: 258,695 Attending Pursuing Degrees & Certificates 4,559 7,36 4-year 8,472 4,223 2-year colleges colleges Total State Population, 8-24 Hispanic 7% White 54% Hispanic 5% College Enrollment White 5% Hispanic 4% College Graduation White 57% 32% Other races 7% 29% Other races 6% Data: Fall 29 enrollment from IPEDS; population data from Census ACS PUMS 6-8; degrees by race from 27- state submissions Now we must have more success from all students. 22% Other races 7% For states to compete, their students must earn more degrees and certificates. Overall Credentials Awarded Science, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) Credentials Awarded 7,529 9,465 3,753 3,996,7 7, Certificate Associate Bachelor s Certificate Associate Bachelor s And all credentials should provide clear pathways to success. = The state did not provide data for this metric. Data: 27 8 College America n 2

119 MARYLAND 2 Graduation rates are very low, especially if you re poor, part time,, Hispanic, or older. Certificate-Seeking Students All White Hispanic % On-time ( year) Within /2 years Within 2 years Within year Within /2 years Within 2 years 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial 3.% 24.4% DS* DS* 35.5% DS* DS* 6.8% 29.% DS* DS* 38.7% DS*.% 6.8% 29.% DS* DS* 38.7% DS*.% DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* In most states, very few students seeking certificates ever graduate. Associate Degree- Seeking Students All White Hispanic % On-time (2 years) Within 3 years Within 4 years Within 2 years Within 3 years Within 4 years 4.7% 8.6% 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial 4.5% 5.8% 2.2%.6% 5.% 5.% 4.4% 2.6% 2.2% 2.7% 6.% 9.% 5.%.4% 9.7% 3.2% 8.5%.% 8.3% 22.7% 4.7% 8.6% 5.% 3.6% 9.% 3.2% 5.9%.8%.% DS*.6%.9%.3%.4% DS* DS* 2.8% 4.% DS*.3% 2.7% 2.7% 2.9% 2.%.7% 5.8% 7.6% DS* 3.3% 5.4% 4.5% 6.5% 4.7% 5.% Associate degree graduation rates are abysmal across the country for Hispanic and students, they re tragic. Bachelor s Degree- Seeking Students All White Hispanic On-time (4 years) Within 6 years Within 8 years Within 4 years Within 6 years Within 8 years 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial 38.3% 48.8% 38.6% 8.6% 4.2% 2.4% 39.% 9.5% 63.7% 74.5% 68.5% 42.7% 22.5% 3.3% 65.% 48.8% 67.% 76.7% 7.5% 47.8% 25.% 35.2% 68.4% 53.6% 8.3%.3% DS* 6.2% 6.3%.7%.% DS* 5.% 6.3% DS* 3.4% 9.9% 6.6% 29.6% DS* 8.2% 8.6% DS* 7.9%.6% 2.7% 35.2% 45.2% 22.5% 65.% 9.9% Almost no one over the age of 25 graduates; students fresh out of high school are most likely to succeed. Data: Certificate cohort started in 25 6, associate cohort started in 24 5, bachelor's cohort started in 22 3 Given changing demographics, our country will not have enough skilled s to compete unless many more students from all backgrounds and walks of life graduate. = The state did not provide data for this metric. DS* = Fewer than students, so data were suppressed. College America n 3

120 MARYLAND 2 Retention rates drop from year to year. Many get discouraged and drop out Students in 2-year colleges who return to campus Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 % % 67.5% 5.5% 45.6% 33.3% Students in 4-year colleges who return to campus % 87.5% 8.% 76.% % 44.% 34.2% 26.2% after falling off track early. Students who earn expected first-year credits (24 credits) Associate Bachelor s (2 credits) Associate Bachelor s 24.3% 69.6% 2.% 9.4% Staying enrolled is particularly tough for part-time students, who must often balance jobs and school. Remediation. Data: Associate cohort started in 24 5, bachelor's cohort started in 22 3; earned credits from fall 26 2-Year Colleges 4-Year Colleges 6.5% 24.9% of freshmen require of those of freshmen require of those 48.8%.% and associated college-level courses in two years Graduate within 3 years (projected) Current approaches almost always guarantee failure. and associated college-level courses in two years Graduate within 6 years (projected) Data: Fall 26 = The state did not provide data for this metric. College America n 4

121 MARYLAND 2 Precious time and money are lost when students don t graduate on schedule. Students are taking too much time Certificate Associate Bachelor s 3. years 4.6 years Should take year for full-time students 3.8 years 5 years Should take 2 years for full-time students 4.3 years 4.7 years Should take 4 years for full-time students and too many credits. Certificate Associate Bachelor s Should take 3 credits 75 credits 76 credits Should take 6 credits 24 credits 26 credits Should take 2 credits More students must graduate on time. Data: 27 8 = The state did not provide data for this metric. College America n 5

122 MARYLAND 2 More time isn t giving us enough success. For certificate and associate degree students, graduation rates are very low even when more time. Certificate Associate 3.% 6.8% DS* 6.8% DS* 4.5% 2.7% 2.8% 8.3% 5.8% In year In.5 years In 2 years In 2 years In 3 years In 4 years On-time graduation rates for bachelor s degree students are shockingly low. And adding time beyond six years produces little additional success. Bachelor s 63.7% 67.% 38.3% 5.% 8.2% In 4 years In 6 years In 8 years Data: Certificate cohort started in 25 6; associate cohort started in 24 5; bachelor's cohort started in 22 3 Even modest progress provides little comfort when overall graduation rates are so low. DS* = Fewer than students, so data were suppressed. College America n 6

123 MASSACHUSETTS 2 For a strong economy, the skills gap must be closed. 7% 53% 7% By 22, jobs requiring a career certificate or college degree Skills gap Too few students make it through college. MEMBER Massachusetts adults who currently have an associate degree or higher Data: See the Sources and Methodology section on our website. Of students who enroll in a public college or university 2-Year Public College 4-Year Public College Enroll Return as sophomores Graduate on time (% time) 2 4 Additional graduates 5% time 4 2% time 2 Total graduates Graduate in 4 years 26 Graduate in 8 years Key to measuring time Associate Bachelor s % time 2 years 4 years 5% time 3 years 6 years 2% time 4 years 8 years Data: 2-year cohort started in fall 24; 4-year cohort started in fall 22 For too many students, the path through college ends with no degree and often lots of debt. Note: This report presents data only from public colleges and universities. College America n

124 MASSACHUSETTS 2 We re making great progress in providing access to more students. Total public college enrollment: 92,38 Attending Pursuing Degrees & Certificates 8,28 2,32 74,63 4-year 9,6 2-year colleges colleges Total State Population, 8-24 White 74% College Enrollment White 66% College Graduation White 77% Hispanic % Hispanic 9% Hispanic 5% 7% Other races 9% 9% Other races 6% Data: Fall 29 enrollment from IPEDS; population data from Census ACS PUMS 6-8; degrees by race from 27- state submissions Now we must have more success from all students. 7% Other races % For states to compete, their students must earn more degrees and certificates. Overall Credentials Awarded Science, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) Credentials Awarded 3,76 4,63 2,77 2,259 7,677 8,258, ,3 2, Certificate Associate Bachelor s Certificate Associate Bachelor s And all credentials should provide clear pathways to success. Data: 27 8 College America n 2

125 MASSACHUSETTS 2 Graduation rates are very low, especially if you re poor, part time,, Hispanic, or older. Certificate-Seeking Students All White Hispanic % On-time ( year) Within /2 years Within 2 years Within year Within /2 years Within 2 years 8.2% 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial 27.8% 34.4%.7% 25.9% 5.% 39.3% 22.% 25.% DS* 28.2% 34.4%.7% 25.9% 53.% 39.3% 22.% 26.6%.% 28.2% 34.4%.7% 25.9% 53.% 39.3% 22.% 26.6%.% DS* 5.6% DS* 6.7% 2.%.% 6.3% DS* 5.3% DS* 25.% DS* 6.7% 24.% 5.4% 6.3% 6.7% 5.3% 8.2% 28.% DS* 6.7% 24.% 23.% 6.3% 6.7% 5.3% In most states, very few students seeking certificates ever graduate. Associate Degree- Seeking Students All White Hispanic % On-time (2 years) Within 3 years Within 4 years Within 2 years Within 3 years Within 4 years.7%.% 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial 4.4% 5.% 2.3%.9% 7.3% 4.9% 4.% 3.%.8% 4.3% 6.2% 7.2% 7.6% 4.9%.8% 4.7%.7%.3% 9.3% 2.5%.7%.% 7.9% 5.7% 2.% 5.3% 5.4%.%.%.3%.%.7%.9%.2%.7%.2% 4.3% 4.8%.3% 4.% 5.2% 4.3% 3.4% 4.4% 2.8% 8.9%.% 3.8% 7.4%.3% 7.8% 7.3% 8.% 6.% Associate degree graduation rates are abysmal across the country for Hispanic and students, they re tragic. Bachelor s Degree- Seeking Students All White Hispanic On-time (4 years) Within 6 years Within 8 years Within 4 years Within 6 years Within 8 years 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial 32.8% 34.7% 8.9% 8.5% 27.6% 6.2% 33.2% 22.3% 57.8% 59.9% 4.7% 43.4% 43.% 37.8% 58.4% 5.2% 6.8% 62.7% 44.5% 47.2% 44.8% 4.6% 6.4% 53.8% 6.3% 6.% 3.%.% 8.% 6.7% 5.9% 5.7% 9.9% 8.6% 2.7% 25.9% 3.5% 3.3% 22.9% 24.5% 24.3% 24.% 26.% 29.6% 8.9% 2.% 26.6% 26.4% 43.% 3.5% 58.4% Almost no one over the age of 25 graduates; students fresh out of high school are most likely to succeed. Data: Certificate cohort started in 25 6, associate cohort started in 24 5, bachelor's cohort started in 22 3 Given changing demographics, our country will not have enough skilled s to compete unless many more students from all backgrounds and walks of life graduate. = The state did not provide data for this metric. DS* = Fewer than students, so data were suppressed. College America n 3

126 MASSACHUSETTS 2 Retention rates drop from year to year. Many get discouraged and drop out Students in 2-year colleges who return to campus Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 % % 53.% 27.7% 39.8% 2.8% Students in 4-year colleges who return to campus % 75.% 6.% 54.7% % 5.9% 33.6% 29.% after falling off track early. Students who earn expected first-year credits (24 credits) Associate Bachelor s (2 credits) Associate Bachelor s 8.4% 69.4% 25.2% 5.2% Staying enrolled is particularly tough for part-time students, who must often balance jobs and school. Remediation. 53.% Data: Associate cohort started in 24 5, bachelor's cohort started in 22 3; earned credits from fall 26 2-Year Colleges of freshmen require of those and associated college-level courses in two years Graduate within 3 years (projected) Current approaches almost always guarantee failure. 4-Year Colleges 6.7% 26.6% 3.3%.3% 79.6% of freshmen require of those 5.8% and associated college-level courses in two years 5.2% Graduate within 6 years (projected) Data: Fall 26 College America n 4

127 MASSACHUSETTS 2 Precious time and money are lost when students don t graduate on schedule. Students are taking too much time Certificate Associate Bachelor s.8 years 2.2 years Should take year for full-time students 3. years 3.3 years Should take 2 years for full-time students 4.3 years 4.7 years Should take 4 years for full-time students and too many credits. Certificate Associate Bachelor s 6 credits 52 credits Should take 3 credits 74 credits 79 credits Should take 6 credits 28 credits 28 credits Should take 2 credits More students must graduate on time. Data: 27 8 College America n 5

128 MASSACHUSETTS 2 More time isn t giving us enough success. For certificate and associate degree students, graduation rates are very low even when more time. Certificate Associate 27.8% 28.2% 28.2% DS* 8.2% 4.4% 4.3% 4.3% 9.3% 8.9% In year In.5 years In 2 years In 2 years In 3 years In 4 years On-time graduation rates for bachelor s degree students are shockingly low. And adding time beyond six years produces little additional success. Bachelor s 57.8% 6.8% 32.8% 9.9% 24.3% In 4 years In 6 years In 8 years Data: Certificate cohort started in 25 6; associate cohort started in 24 5; bachelor's cohort started in 22 3 Even modest progress provides little comfort when overall graduation rates are so low. DS* = Fewer than students, so data were suppressed. College America n 6

129 MINNESOTA 2 For a strong economy, the skills gap must be closed. 7% 48% 22% By 22, jobs requiring a career certificate or college degree Skills gap Too few students make it through college. MEMBER Minnesota adults who currently have an associate degree or higher Data: See the Sources and Methodology section on our website. Of students who enroll in a public college or university 2-Year Public College 4-Year Public College Enroll Return as sophomores Graduate on time (% time) Additional graduates 5% time 2% time Total graduates Graduate in 4 years Graduate in 8 years Key to measuring time Associate Bachelor s % time 2 years 4 years 5% time 3 years 6 years 2% time 4 years 8 years = The state did not provide data for this metric. Data: 2-year cohort started in fall 24; 4-year cohort started in fall 22 For too many students, the path through college ends with no degree and often lots of debt. Note: This report presents data only from public colleges and universities. Data from MNSCU System only. College America n

130 MINNESOTA 2 We re making great progress in providing access to more students. Total public college enrollment: 244,3 Attending Pursuing Degrees & Certificates 5,226 34,458 92,85 4-year 9,573 2-year colleges colleges Total State Population, 8-24 White 83% College Enrollment White 78% College Graduation White 87% Hispanic 5% Hispanic 2% Hispanic % 5% Other races 7% 8% Other races 2% Data: Fall 29 enrollment from IPEDS; population data from Census ACS PUMS 6-8; degrees by race from 27- state submissions Now we must have more success from all students. 4% Other races 8% For states to compete, their students must earn more degrees and certificates. Overall Credentials Awarded Science, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) Credentials Awarded 2,52 9,968 8,96 9,793 6,543 5, Certificate Associate Bachelor s Certificate Associate Bachelor s And all credentials should provide clear pathways to success. = The state did not provide data for this metric. Data: 27 8 College America n 2

131 MINNESOTA 2 Graduation rates are very low, especially if you re poor, part time,, Hispanic, or older. Certificate-Seeking Students All White Hispanic On-time ( year) Within /2 years Within 2 years Within year Within /2 years Within 2 years 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial In most states, very few students seeking certificates ever graduate. Associate Degree- Seeking Students All White Hispanic On-time (2 years) Within 3 years Within 4 years Within 2 years Within 3 years Within 4 years 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial Associate degree graduation rates are abysmal across the country for Hispanic and students, they re tragic. Bachelor s Degree- Seeking Students All White Hispanic On-time (4 years) Within 6 years Within 8 years Within 4 years Within 6 years Within 8 years 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial Almost no one over the age of 25 graduates; students fresh out of high school are most likely to succeed. Data: Certificate cohort started in 25 6, associate cohort started in 24 5, bachelor's cohort started in 22 3 Given changing demographics, our country will not have enough skilled s to compete unless many more students from all backgrounds and walks of life graduate. = The state did not provide data for this metric. College America n 3

132 MINNESOTA 2 Retention rates drop from year to year. Many get discouraged and drop out Students in 2-year colleges who return to campus Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 % % 49.7% 2.% 36.6% 22.9% Students in 4-year colleges who return to campus % 72.8% 6.8% 54.6% % 5.6% 42.6% 35.2% after falling off track early. Students who earn expected first-year credits (24 credits) Associate Bachelor s (2 credits) Associate Bachelor s Staying enrolled is particularly tough for part-time students, who must often balance jobs and school. Remediation. Data: Associate cohort started in 24 5, bachelor's cohort started in 22 3; earned credits from fall 26 2-Year Colleges of freshmen require of those 4-Year Colleges of freshmen require of those and associated college-level courses in two years Graduate within 3 years (projected) Current approaches almost always guarantee failure. and associated college-level courses in two years Graduate within 6 years (projected) Data: = The state did not provide data for this metric. College America n 4

133 MINNESOTA 2 Precious time and money are lost when students don t graduate on schedule. Students are taking too much time Certificate Associate Bachelor s Should take year for full-time students Should take 2 years for full-time students Should take 4 years for full-time students and too many credits. Certificate Associate Bachelor s Should take 3 credits Should take 6 credits Should take 2 credits More students must graduate on time. Data: 27 8 = The state did not provide data for this metric. College America n 5

134 MINNESOTA 2 More time isn t giving us enough success. For certificate and associate degree students, graduation rates are very low even when more time. Certificate Associate In year In.5 years In 2 years In 2 years In 3 years In 4 years On-time graduation rates for bachelor s degree students are shockingly low. And adding time beyond six years produces little additional success. Bachelor s In 4 years In 6 years In 8 years Data: Certificate cohort started in 25 6; associate cohort started in 24 5; bachelor's cohort started in 22 3 Even modest progress provides little comfort when overall graduation rates are so low. = The state did not provide data for this metric. College America n 6

135 MISSISSIPPI 2 For a strong economy, the skills gap must be closed. 57% 32% 25% By 22, jobs requiring a career certificate or college degree Skills gap Too few students make it through college. MEMBER Mississippi adults who currently have an associate degree or higher Data: See the Sources and Methodology section on our website. Of students who enroll in a public college or university 2-Year Public College 4-Year Public College Enroll Return as sophomores Graduate on time (% time) 7 5 Additional graduates 5% time 3 6 2% time Total graduates 2 2 Graduate in 4 years 3 2 Graduate in 8 years Key to measuring time Associate Bachelor s % time 2 years 4 years 5% time 3 years 6 years 2% time 4 years 8 years Data: 2-year cohort started in fall 24; 4-year cohort started in fall 22 For too many students, the path through college ends with no degree and often lots of debt. Note: This report presents data only from public colleges and universities. College America n

136 MISSISSIPPI 2 We re making great progress in providing access to more students. Total public college enrollment: 39,937 Attending Pursuing Degrees & Certificates,75 8,798 28,762 4-year 58,39 2-year colleges colleges Total State Population, 8-24 Hispanic 3% White 52% Hispanic % College Enrollment White 55% Hispanic % College Graduation White 6% 43% Other races 3% 4% Other races 4% Data: Fall 29 enrollment from IPEDS; population data from Census ACS PUMS 6-8; degrees by race from 27- state submissions Now we must have more success from all students. 34% Other races 4% For states to compete, their students must earn more degrees and certificates. Overall Credentials Awarded 6,68 8,736 9,536 9,878 Science, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) Credentials Awarded,79, ,9 2, Certificate Associate Bachelor s Certificate Associate Bachelor s And all credentials should provide clear pathways to success. Data: 27 8 College America n 2

137 MISSISSIPPI 2 Graduation rates are very low, especially if you re poor, part time,, Hispanic, or older. Certificate-Seeking Students All White Hispanic % On-time ( year) Within /2 years Within 2 years Within year Within /2 years Within 2 years 8.% 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial 36.% 45.4% 33.3% 3.7% 38.% 33.3% 37.% 4.6% 32.2% 37.8% 47.% 33.3% 32.5% 38.7% 34.2% 4.% 42.5% 34.7% 38.8% 47.8% 5.% 33.6% 39.9% 35.4% 4.9% 43.% 38.% 6.7% 6.5% 7.% 9.% 6.%.6%.9%.% 8.% 7.7% 8.% 9.% 7.2% 6.6%.9%.% 8.% 7.7% 8.% 9.% 7.2% 6.6%.9%.% In most states, very few students seeking certificates ever graduate. Associate Degree- Seeking Students All White Hispanic % On-time (2 years) Within 3 years Within 4 years Within 2 years Within 3 years Within 4 years 23.4% 6.5% 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial.2%.7%.4% 8.7%.% 7.%.3% 8.6% 7.2% 6.3% 8.7% 6.9% 4.4% 7.4%.7% 8.2% 4.8% 3.3% 8.8% 2.7% 23.4% 6.5% 9.7% 2.8% 2.9% 7.2% 6.%.9%.8% 3.8% 2.3% 2.8%.3%.%.9% 2.6% 5.% 5.4% 7.7% 5.3% 5.5% 3.4% 6.3% 4.8% 6.4% 7.4% 8.% 7.7% 6.7% 7.5% 4.9% 9.7% 6.4% 9.5% Associate degree graduation rates are abysmal across the country for Hispanic and students, they re tragic. Bachelor s Degree- Seeking Students All White Hispanic On-time (4 years) Within 6 years Within 8 years Within 4 years Within 6 years Within 8 years 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial 22.4% 26.3% 27.9% 6.2%.8% 6.2% 22.9% 5.7%.8% 53.4% 62.3% 55.7% 39.9% 2.6% 8.7% 54.5% 4.7% 36.3% 56.7% 65.4% 57.4% 43.8% 26.5% 2.6% 57.9% 44.5% 4.7%.9% 5.4% DS* 6.8% DS* DS* 3.2% 5.8% 6.7% 38.9% 44.6% DS* 29.7% DS* 22.2% 4.9% 33.% 32.% 42.9% 48.% DS* 34.7% DS* 22.2% 46.3% 37.9% 36.% 2.6% DS* 54.5% Almost no one over the age of 25 graduates; students fresh out of high school are most likely to succeed. Data: Certificate cohort started in 25 6, associate cohort started in 24 5, bachelor's cohort started in 22 3 Given changing demographics, our country will not have enough skilled s to compete unless many more students from all backgrounds and walks of life graduate. = The state did not provide data for this metric. DS* = Fewer than students, so data were suppressed. College America n 3

138 MISSISSIPPI 2 Retention rates drop from year to year. Many get discouraged and drop out Students in 2-year colleges who return to campus Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 % % 56.3% 3.9% 3.6% 22.5% Students in 4-year colleges who return to campus % 78.9% 7.% 65.3% % 62.4% 53.8% 52.5% after falling off track early. Students who earn expected first-year credits (24 credits) Associate Bachelor s (2 credits) Associate Bachelor s 3.9% 69.5% 3.6% 36.4% Staying enrolled is particularly tough for part-time students, who must often balance jobs and school. Remediation. 65.2% Data: Associate cohort started in 24 5, bachelor's cohort started in 22 3; earned credits from fall 26 2-Year Colleges of freshmen require of those and associated college-level courses in two years 3.3% Graduate within 3 years (projected) Current approaches almost always guarantee failure. 4-Year Colleges 42.9% 2.4% 2.% 72.8% of freshmen require of those 52.3% and associated college-level courses in two years 36.3% Graduate within 6 years (projected) Data: Fall 26 College America n 4

139 MISSISSIPPI 2 Precious time and money are lost when students don t graduate on schedule. Students are taking too much time Certificate Associate Bachelor s.8 years.9 years Should take year for full-time students 2.6 years 2.7 years Should take 2 years for full-time students 4.4 years 4.7 years Should take 4 years for full-time students and too many credits. Certificate Associate Bachelor s 3 credits 37 credits 48 credits 4 credits Should take 3 credits 65 credits 6 credits Should take 6 credits Should take 2 credits More students must graduate on time. Data: 27 8 College America n 5

140 MISSISSIPPI 2 More time isn t giving us enough success. For certificate and associate degree students, graduation rates are very low even when more time. Certificate Associate 36.% 37.8% 38.8% 8.% 8.%.2% 6.3% 5.% 8.8% 7.4% In year In.5 years In 2 years In 2 years In 3 years In 4 years On-time graduation rates for bachelor s degree students are shockingly low. And adding time beyond six years produces little additional success. Bachelor s 22.4% 53.4% 38.9% 56.7% 42.9% In 4 years In 6 years In 8 years Data: Certificate cohort started in 25 6; associate cohort started in 24 5; bachelor's cohort started in 22 3 Even modest progress provides little comfort when overall graduation rates are so low. College America n 6

141 MISSOURI 2 For a strong economy, the skills gap must be closed. 6% 37% 23% By 22, jobs requiring a career certificate or college degree Skills gap Too few students make it through college. MEMBER Missouri adults who currently have an associate degree or higher Data: See the Sources and Methodology section on our website. Of students who enroll in a public college or university 2-Year Public College 4-Year Public College Enroll Return as sophomores Graduate on time (% time) 4 5 Additional graduates 5% time 3 5 2% time 2 Total graduates 9 2 Graduate in 4 years 2 Graduate in 8 years Key to measuring time Associate Bachelor s % time 2 years 4 years 5% time 3 years 6 years 2% time 4 years 8 years Data: 2-year cohort started in fall 24; 4-year cohort started in fall 22 For too many students, the path through college ends with no degree and often lots of debt. Note: This report presents data only from public colleges and universities. College America n

142 MISSOURI 2 We re making great progress in providing access to more students. Total public college enrollment: 29,44 Attending Pursuing Degrees & Certificates 4,89 4,788 4-year 4,652 78,55 2-year colleges colleges Total State Population, 8-24 White 8% College Enrollment White 76% College Graduation White 83% Hispanic 4% Hispanic 2% Hispanic 2% 3% Other races 4% % Other races % Data: Fall 29 enrollment from IPEDS; population data from Census ACS PUMS 6-8; degrees by race from 27- state submissions Now we must have more success from all students. 7% Other races 8% For states to compete, their students must earn more degrees and certificates. Overall Credentials Awarded Science, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) Credentials Awarded 6,599 7,77 3,24 3,42 7,497 8,743,2, Certificate Associate Bachelor s Certificate Associate Bachelor s And all credentials should provide clear pathways to success. Data: 27 8 College America n 2

143 MISSOURI 2 Graduation rates are very low, especially if you re poor, part time,, Hispanic, or older. Certificate-Seeking Students All White Hispanic % On-time ( year) Within /2 years Within 2 years Within year Within /2 years Within 2 years DS* 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial 24.8% 26.6% DS* DS* 3.% 28.3% 2.5% 43.6% DS* 28.% 3.% DS* DS* 36.% 3.4% 24.2% 43.6% DS* 28.% 3.% DS* DS* 36.% 3.4% 24.2% 43.6% DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* In most states, very few students seeking certificates ever graduate. Associate Degree- Seeking Students All White Hispanic % On-time (2 years) Within 3 years Within 4 years Within 2 years Within 3 years Within 4 years 7.2% 8.7% 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial 9.8%.% 6.% 2.9% 5.8% 3.9%.% 6.8% 4.2% 8.9% 2.8% 2.% 6.5% 3.2% 9.% 2.9% 4.2% 2.5% 22.2% 24.2% 7.2% 8.7% 6.7%.% 24.4% 7.7% 5.9%.5%.7% DS* DS* DS* DS*.% DS* DS* 2.6% 3.3% DS* DS*.4% 2.% 3.7% 2.%.7% 4.3% 5.2% DS* DS* 3.% 3.5% 5.7% 3.5% 3.4% Associate degree graduation rates are abysmal across the country for Hispanic and students, they re tragic. Bachelor s Degree- Seeking Students All White Hispanic On-time (4 years) Within 6 years Within 8 years Within 4 years Within 6 years Within 8 years 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial 33.7% 35.7% 26.9% 7.4% 6.% 6.8% 34.8% 25.4%.3% 45.8% 48.% 42.3% 27.4%.4% 22.6% 47.2% 38.6% 2.2% 46.5% 48.8% 42.8% 29.% 3.% 25.% 47.9% 4.% 22.% 2.6% 5.5% DS* DS* DS* DS* 8.3% 7.9% DS* 8.% 22.% DS* DS* DS* DS* 24.8% 3.7% DS* 9.% 23.4% DS* DS* DS* DS* 25.5% 4.4% DS*.4% DS* 47.2% Almost no one over the age of 25 graduates; students fresh out of high school are most likely to succeed. Data: Certificate cohort started in 25 6, associate cohort started in 24 5, bachelor's cohort started in 22 3 Given changing demographics, our country will not have enough skilled s to compete unless many more students from all backgrounds and walks of life graduate. DS* = Fewer than students, so data were suppressed. College America n 3

144 MISSOURI 2 Retention rates drop from year to year. Many get discouraged and drop out Students in 2-year colleges who return to campus Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 % % 58.4% 26.7% 43.6% 26.% Students in 4-year colleges who return to campus % 8.4% 7.2% 66.% % 63.5% 53.% 48.% after falling off track early. Students who earn expected first-year credits (24 credits) Associate Bachelor s (2 credits) Associate Bachelor s 67.4% 93.6% 7.9% 87.3% Staying enrolled is particularly tough for part-time students, who must often balance jobs and school. Remediation. Data: Associate cohort started in 24 5, bachelor's cohort started in 22 3; earned credits from fall 26 2-Year Colleges 4-Year Colleges 52.3% 4.% of freshmen require of those of freshmen require of those 2.2% and associated college-level courses in two years 2.5% Graduate within 3 years (projected) Current approaches almost always guarantee failure. and associated college-level courses in two years Graduate within 6 years (projected) Data: Fall 26 = The state did not provide data for this metric. College America n 4

145 MISSOURI 2 Precious time and money are lost when students don t graduate on schedule. Students are taking too much time Certificate Associate Bachelor s 3.7 years.4 years Should take year for full-time students 2.6 years 3.6 years Should take 2 years for full-time students 4.2 years 4.6 years Should take 4 years for full-time students and too many credits. Certificate Associate Bachelor s 27 credits 23 credits 47 credits 65 credits Should take 3 credits 69 credits 72 credits Should take 6 credits Should take 2 credits More students must graduate on time. Data: 27 8 College America n 5

146 MISSOURI 2 More time isn t giving us enough success. For certificate and associate degree students, graduation rates are very low even when more time. Certificate Associate 24.8% 28.% DS* 28.% DS* 9.8% 8.9% 2.6% 22.2% 4.3% In year In.5 years In 2 years In 2 years In 3 years In 4 years On-time graduation rates for bachelor s degree students are shockingly low. And adding time beyond six years produces little additional success. Bachelor s 33.7% 45.8% 46.5% 8.% 9.% In 4 years In 6 years In 8 years Data: Certificate cohort started in 25 6; associate cohort started in 24 5; bachelor's cohort started in 22 3 Even modest progress provides little comfort when overall graduation rates are so low. DS* = Fewer than students, so data were suppressed. College America n 6

147 NEVADA 2 For a strong economy, the skills gap must be closed. 58% 28% 3% By 22, jobs requiring a career certificate or college degree Skills gap Too few students make it through college. MEMBER Nevada adults who currently have an associate degree or higher Data: See the Sources and Methodology section on our website. Of students who enroll in a public college or university 2-Year Public College 4-Year Public College Enroll Return as sophomores Graduate on time (% time) 3 Additional graduates 5% time 7 3 2% time Total graduates Graduate in 4 years 5 5 Graduate in 8 years Key to measuring time Associate Bachelor s % time 2 years 4 years 5% time 3 years 6 years 2% time 4 years 8 years Data: 2-year cohort started in fall 24; 4-year cohort started in fall 22 For too many students, the path through college ends with no degree and often lots of debt. Note: This report presents data only from public colleges and universities. College America n

148 NEVADA 2 We re making great progress in providing access to more students. Total public college enrollment: 2,56 Attending Pursuing Degrees & Certificates 44,665 57,85 4-year colleges 89,574 2,942 2-year colleges Total State Population, 8-24 White 53% College Enrollment White 54% College Graduation White 62% Hispanic 29% Hispanic 9% Hispanic % 9% Other races % 7% Other races 2% Data: Fall 29 enrollment from IPEDS; population data from Census ACS PUMS 6-8; degrees by race from 27- state submissions Now we must have more success from all students. 5% Other races 23% For states to compete, their students must earn more degrees and certificates. Overall Credentials Awarded Science, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) Credentials Awarded 5, , ,93 2, Certificate Associate Bachelor s Certificate Associate Bachelor s And all credentials should provide clear pathways to success. Data: 27 8 College America n 2

149 NEVADA 2 Graduation rates are very low, especially if you re poor, part time,, Hispanic, or older. Certificate-Seeking Students All White Hispanic On-time ( year) Within /2 years Within 2 years Within year Within /2 years Within 2 years 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* In most states, very few students seeking certificates ever graduate. Associate Degree- Seeking Students All White Hispanic % On-time (2 years) Within 3 years Within 4 years Within 2 years Within 3 years Within 4 years 6.8% 4.% 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial 3.9% 3.7% 2.%.% 5.9% 3.8% 3.4% 2.4%.8%.% 9.8% 3.% 2.2% 9.9%.3% 9.7% 6.6% 5.6% 6.8% 4.% 9.4% 6.% 6.3% 7.5%.3%.2%.%.%.3%.3%.%.2%.6%.6%.8%.9%.3%.% 2.5% 2.3% 3.% 3.2% 2.2%.4% 2.4% 2.% 4.9% 5.% Associate degree graduation rates are abysmal across the country for Hispanic and students, they re tragic. Bachelor s Degree- Seeking Students All White Hispanic On-time (4 years) Within 6 years Within 8 years Within 4 years Within 6 years Within 8 years 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial 6.7% 6.3%.9% 6.9% 3.% 7.% 6.3% 9.% 5.5% 52.% 47.4% 44.9% 5.% 5.2% 5.6% 36.8% 57.6% 57.7% 55.2% 47.5% 5.% 58.2% 57.3% 44.8% 4.4% 3.5% 3.7% 4.5% DS* 4.% 4.7%.6% 3.8% 3.8% 27.3% 27.8% DS* 3.2% 32.8% 3.8% 38.8% 38.9% 39.% 33.8% DS* 37.3% 4.6% 38.8% 5.% 5.6% DS* Almost no one over the age of 25 graduates; students fresh out of high school are most likely to succeed. Data: Certificate cohort started in 25 6, associate cohort started in 24 5, bachelor's cohort started in 22 3 Given changing demographics, our country will not have enough skilled s to compete unless many more students from all backgrounds and walks of life graduate. = The state did not provide data for this metric. DS* = Fewer than students, so data were suppressed. College America n 3

150 NEVADA 2 Retention rates drop from year to year. Many get discouraged and drop out Students in 2-year colleges who return to campus Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 % % 73.% 52.% 4.3% 28.4% Students in 4-year colleges who return to campus % 85.7% 77.8% 73.2% % 76.2% 64.5% 58.9% after falling off track early. Students who earn expected first-year credits (24 credits) Associate Bachelor s (2 credits) Associate Bachelor s 9.9% 52.9% 27.2% 34.4% Staying enrolled is particularly tough for part-time students, who must often balance jobs and school. Remediation. 68.9% Data: Associate cohort started in 24 5, bachelor's cohort started in 22 3; earned credits from fall 26 2-Year Colleges 4-Year Colleges 4.6% 29.% of freshmen require of those 2.6% 9.7% 77.3% of freshmen require of those 48.% 36.8% and associated college-level courses in two years Graduate within 3 years (projected) Current approaches almost always guarantee failure. and associated college-level courses in two years Graduate within 6 years (projected) Data: Fall 26 College America n 4

151 NEVADA 2 Precious time and money are lost when students don t graduate on schedule. Students are taking too much time Certificate Associate Bachelor s 2.7 years 4 years Should take year for full-time students 3.7 years 4.7 years Should take 2 years for full-time students 5 years 5.4 years Should take 4 years for full-time students and too many credits. Certificate Associate Bachelor s 34 credits 33 credits 64 credits 53 credits Should take 3 credits 78 credits 78 credits Should take 6 credits Should take 2 credits More students must graduate on time. Data: 27 8 College America n 5

152 NEVADA 2 More time isn t giving us enough success. For certificate and associate degree students, graduation rates are very low even when more time. Certificate Associate 6.6% 3.9%.8%.6% 3.% In year In.5 years In 2 years In 2 years In 3 years In 4 years On-time graduation rates for bachelor s degree students are shockingly low. And adding time beyond six years produces little additional success. Bachelor s 6.7% 5.5% 3.8% 57.6% 38.8% In 4 years In 6 years In 8 years Data: Certificate cohort started in 25 6; associate cohort started in 24 5; bachelor's cohort started in 22 3 Even modest progress provides little comfort when overall graduation rates are so low. = The state did not provide data for this metric. College America n 6

153 NEW HAMPSHIRE 2 For a strong economy, the skills gap must be closed. 67% 46% 2% By 22, jobs requiring a career certificate or college degree Skills gap Too few students make it through college. MEMBER New Hampshire adults who currently have an associate degree or higher Data: See the Sources and Methodology section on our website. Of students who enroll in a public college or university 2-Year Public College 4-Year Public College Enroll Return as sophomores Graduate on time (% time) Additional graduates 5% time 2% time Total graduates Graduate in 4 years Graduate in 8 years Key to measuring time Associate Bachelor s % time 2 years 4 years 5% time 3 years 6 years 2% time 4 years 8 years = The state did not provide data for this metric. Data: 2-year cohort started in fall 24; 4-year cohort started in fall 22 For too many students, the path through college ends with no degree and often lots of debt. Note: This report presents data only from public colleges and universities. College America n

154 NEW HAMPSHIRE 2 We re making great progress in providing access to more students. Total public college enrollment: 38,43 Attending Pursuing Degrees & Certificates 28,5 24,562,398 4-year 3,85 2-year colleges colleges Total State Population, 8-24 White 92% College Enrollment White 79% College Graduation White 77% Hispanic 3% Hispanic 2% Hispanic 2% 2% Other races 3% % Other races 7% Now we must have more success from all students. 2% Other races 9% Data: Fall 29 enrollment from IPEDS; population data from Census ACS PUMS 6-8 For states to compete, their students must earn more degrees and certificates. Overall Credentials Awarded Science, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) Credentials Awarded 8,7 8,46 3,289 3, Certificate Associate Bachelor s Certificate Associate Bachelor s And all credentials should provide clear pathways to success. = The state did not provide data for this metric. Data: 27 8 College America n 2

155 NEW HAMPSHIRE 2 Graduation rates are very low, especially if you re poor, part time,, Hispanic, or older. Certificate-Seeking Students All White Hispanic On-time ( year) Within /2 years Within 2 years Within year Within /2 years Within 2 years 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial In most states, very few students seeking certificates ever graduate. Associate Degree- Seeking Students All White Hispanic On-time (2 years) Within 3 years Within 4 years Within 2 years Within 3 years Within 4 years 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial Associate degree graduation rates are abysmal across the country for Hispanic and students, they re tragic. Bachelor s Degree- Seeking Students All White Hispanic On-time (4 years) Within 6 years Within 8 years Within 4 years Within 6 years Within 8 years 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial Almost no one over the age of 25 graduates; students fresh out of high school are most likely to succeed. Data: Certificate cohort started in 25 6, associate cohort started in 24 5, bachelor's cohort started in 22 3 Given changing demographics, our country will not have enough skilled s to compete unless many more students from all backgrounds and walks of life graduate. = The state did not provide data for this metric. College America n 3

156 NEW HAMPSHIRE 2 Retention rates drop from year to year. Many get discouraged and drop out Students in 2-year colleges who return to campus Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 % % Students in 4-year colleges who return to campus % % after falling off track early. Students who earn expected first-year credits (24 credits) Associate Bachelor s (2 credits) Associate Bachelor s Staying enrolled is particularly tough for part-time students, who must often balance jobs and school. Remediation. Data: Associate cohort started in 24 5, bachelor's cohort started in 22 3; earned credits from fall 26 2-Year Colleges of freshmen require of those 4-Year Colleges of freshmen require of those and associated college-level courses in two years Graduate within 3 years (projected) Current approaches almost always guarantee failure. and associated college-level courses in two years Graduate within 6 years (projected) Data: = The state did not provide data for this metric. College America n 4

157 NEW HAMPSHIRE 2 Precious time and money are lost when students don t graduate on schedule. Students are taking too much time Certificate Associate Bachelor s Should take year for full-time students Should take 2 years for full-time students Should take 4 years for full-time students and too many credits. Certificate Associate Bachelor s Should take 3 credits Should take 6 credits Should take 2 credits More students must graduate on time. Data: 27 8 = The state did not provide data for this metric. College America n 5

158 NEW HAMPSHIRE 2 More time isn t giving us enough success. For certificate and associate degree students, graduation rates are very low even when more time. Certificate Associate In year In.5 years In 2 years In 2 years In 3 years In 4 years On-time graduation rates for bachelor s degree students are shockingly low. And adding time beyond six years produces little additional success. Bachelor s In 4 years In 6 years In 8 years Data: Certificate cohort started in 25 6; associate cohort started in 24 5; bachelor's cohort started in 22 3 Even modest progress provides little comfort when overall graduation rates are so low. = The state did not provide data for this metric. College America n 6

159 NEW MEXICO 2 For a strong economy, the skills gap must be closed. 6% 29% 32% By 22, jobs requiring a career certificate or college degree Skills gap Too few students make it through college. MEMBER New Mexico adults who currently have an associate degree or higher Data: See the Sources and Methodology section on our website. Of students who enroll in a public college or university 2-Year Public College 4-Year Public College Enroll Return as sophomores Graduate on time (% time) Additional graduates 5% time 4 2% time 2 Total graduates 6 Graduate in 4 years 7 Graduate in 8 years Key to measuring time Associate Bachelor s % time 2 years 4 years 5% time 3 years 6 years 2% time 4 years 8 years = The state did not provide data for this metric. Data: 2-year cohort started in fall 24; 4-year cohort started in fall 22 For too many students, the path through college ends with no degree and often lots of debt. Note: This report presents data only from public colleges and universities. College America n

160 NEW MEXICO 2 We re making great progress in providing access to more students. Total public college enrollment: 29,97 Attending Pursuing Degrees & Certificates 64,344 65,627 4-year colleges 48,62 8,369 2-year colleges Total State Population, 8-24 College Enrollment White 37% College Graduation White 45% White 34% Hispanic 5% Indian % Other races 5% Hispanic 4% Indian 9% Other races 3% Hispanic 4% Indian 3% Other races % Data: Fall 29 enrollment from IPEDS; population data from Census ACS PUMS 6-8; degrees by race from 27- state submissions Now we must have more success from all students. For states to compete, their students must earn more degrees and certificates. Overall Credentials Awarded Science, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) Credentials Awarded 5,787 6,525,9,52 4,475 3,433 2,4, Certificate Associate Bachelor s Certificate Associate Bachelor s And all credentials should provide clear pathways to success. Data: 27 8 College America n 2

161 New Mexico 2 Graduation rates are very low, especially if you re poor, part time,, Indian, Hispanic, or older. Certificate-Seeking Students All White Hispanic % On-time ( year) Within /2 years Within 2 years Within year Within /2 years Within 2 years.4% Indian 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial.8% 2.%.3% 2.5% 7.3% 4.7%.%.9%.8% 2.7% 3.6% 9.5% 5.5%.9% 3.2% 3.3%.8%.8%.8%.%.9%.%.6%.9%.9%.4% DS*.5%.9%.%.7%.5% In most states, very few students seeking certificates ever graduate. Associate Degree- Seeking Students All White Hispanic % On-time (2 years) Within 3 years Within 4 years Within 2 years Within 3 years Within 4 years 7.5% 8.2% Indian 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial 3.3% 3.7% 2.9% 3.7% 7.3% 4.8% 2.8% 3.4% 3.8% 5.4% 5.4% 5.5% 6.%.% 7.7% 4.7% 6.% 6.9% 7.% 6.9% 7.5% 8.2% 4.8% 9.9% 6.2% 8.3% 9.6%.2%.%.5%.3%.4%.%.%.4%.9% 2.4% 2.% 3.% 2.2% 2.4% 2.6% 2.4% 3.6% 2.7% 3.7% 3.% 4.9% 2.7% 3.4% 4.3% 4.% 6.% 4.6% Associate degree graduation rates are abysmal across the country. Bachelor s Degree- Seeking Students All White Hispanic On-time (4 years) Within 6 years Within 8 years Within 4 years Within 6 years Within 8 years 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial 6.4% 8.6% 5.% 4.7%.6% 2.% 7.3% 4.2%.2% 23.9% 29.4% 2.7% 7.7% 3.8% 6.6% 27.7% 7.4% 6.9% 28.% 33.3% 26.6% 2.5% 5.5% 7.9% 32.4% 2.7%.3%.%.%.% 2.4%.3%.3%.7%.5%.3% 7.9% 7.7% 9.%.%.% 3.% 6.4%.6% 3.4%.% 9.5%.9% 3.4%.6% 4.3% 2.5% 5.8% 6.9% 3.8%.% 27.7% Almost no one over the age of 25 graduates; students fresh out of high school are most likely to succeed. Data: Certificate cohort started in 25 6, associate cohort started in 24 5, bachelor's cohort started in 22 3 Given changing demographics, our country will not have enough skilled s to compete unless many more students from all backgrounds and walks of life graduate. = The state did not provide data for this metric. DS* = Fewer than students, so data were suppressed. College America n 3

162 NEW MEXICO 2 Retention rates drop from year to year. Many get discouraged and drop out Students in 2-year colleges who return to campus Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 % % 44.9% 22.% 9.6% 9.% Students in 4-year colleges who return to campus % 7.2% 55.4% 47.% % 54.8% 36.7% 28.5% after falling off track early. Students who earn expected first-year credits (24 credits) Associate Bachelor s (2 credits) Associate Bachelor s 64.4% 88.3% 4.% 97.9% Staying enrolled is particularly tough for part-time students, who must often balance jobs and school. Remediation. 63.% Data: Associate cohort started in 24 5, bachelor's cohort started in 22 3; earned credits from fall 26 2-Year Colleges 4-Year Colleges 57.% 2.% of freshmen require of those 74.6% of freshmen require of those DS* 6.9% DS* 6.9% and associated college-level courses in two years Graduate within 3 years (projected) Current approaches almost always guarantee failure. and associated college-level courses in two years Graduate within 6 years (projected) Data: Fall 26 DS* = Fewer than students, so data were suppressed. College America n 4

163 NEW MEXICO 2 Precious time and money are lost when students don t graduate on schedule. Students are taking too much time Certificate Associate Bachelor s Should take year for full-time students Should take 2 years for full-time students Should take 4 years for full-time students and too many credits. Certificate Associate Bachelor s 63 credits 47 credits Should take 3 credits 99 credits 87 credits Should take 6 credits 48 credits 42 credits Should take 2 credits More students must graduate on time. Data: 27 8 = The state did not provide data for this metric. College America n 5

164 NEW MEXICO 2 More time isn t giving us enough success. For certificate and associate degree students, graduation rates are very low even when more time. Certificate Associate.8% 2.7%.4% In year In.5 years In 2 years 3.3% 5.4% 7.% 2.4% 3.7% In 2 years In 3 years In 4 years On-time graduation rates for bachelor s degree students are shockingly low. And adding time beyond six years produces little additional success. Bachelor s 6.4% 23.9% 7.9% 28.%.% In 4 years In 6 years In 8 years Data: Certificate cohort started in 25 6; associate cohort started in 24 5; bachelor's cohort started in 22 3 Even modest progress provides little comfort when overall graduation rates are so low. = The state did not provide data for this metric. College America n 6

165 NORTH CAROLINA 2 For a strong economy, the skills gap must be closed. 63% 36% 27% By 22, jobs requiring a career certificate or college degree Skills gap Too few students make it through college. MEMBER North Carolina adults who currently have an associate degree or higher Data: See the Sources and Methodology section on our website. Of students who enroll in a public college or university 2-Year Public College 4-Year Public College Enroll Return as sophomores Graduate on time (% time) 4 6 Additional graduates 5% time 2 2% time 5 Total graduates 3 29 Graduate in 4 years 3 29 Graduate in 8 years Key to measuring time Associate Bachelor s % time 2 years 4 years 5% time 3 years 6 years 2% time 4 years 8 years Data: 2-year cohort started in fall 24; 4-year cohort started in fall 22 For too many students, the path through college ends with no degree and often lots of debt. Note: This report presents data only from public colleges and universities. College America n

166 NORTH CAROLINA 2 We re making great progress in providing access to more students. Total public college enrollment: 424,9 Attending Pursuing Degrees & Certificates 255,43 248,58 68,76 4-year colleges 76,33 2-year colleges Total State Population, 8-24 White 82% Hispanic 4% College Enrollment White 62% Hispanic 2% College Graduation White 69% Hispanic % Other races 7% 24% Other races 9% Data: Fall 29 enrollment from IPEDS; population data from Census ACS PUMS 6-8; degrees by race from 27- state submissions Now we must have more success from all students. 22% Other races 7% For states to compete, their students must earn more degrees and certificates. Overall Credentials Awarded Science, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) Credentials Awarded 24,777 29,462 5,368 5,793 4,57 2,63 5,925 6, Certificate Associate Bachelor s Certificate Associate Bachelor s And all credentials should provide clear pathways to success. Data: 27 8 College America n 2

167 NORTH CAROLINA 2 Graduation rates are very low, especially if you re poor, part time,, Hispanic, or older. Certificate-Seeking Students All White Hispanic % On-time ( year) Within /2 years Within 2 years Within year Within /2 years Within 2 years 6.4% 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial 4.9% 39.9% 46.8% 44.9% 5.% 42.5% 22.8% 25.% 7.5% 42.9% 4.9% 47.9% 45.7% 5.5% 43.% 23.% 25.5% 9.% 43.% 4.2% 47.9% 45.7% 5.7% 43.2% 23.5% 25.5% 9.6% 4.3% 4.2% 4.3% 3.6% 6.7%.6%.5%.8% 6.% 5.4% 5.3% 5.6% 4.5% 7.3%.6% 3.7% 4.% 6.4% 6.4% 6.4% 6.9% 5.2% 8.3%.6% 5.5% 5.4% 7.6% In most states, very few students seeking certificates ever graduate. Associate Degree- Seeking Students All White Hispanic % On-time (2 years) Within 3 years Within 4 years Within 2 years Within 3 years Within 4 years 6.4%.3% 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial 8.8%.% 7.% 4.8% 6.4% 9.9% 6.6% 7.% 4.5% 3.9% 5.9% 2.7% 7.7% 2.6% 3.2% 2.2%.8% 9.7% 7.5% 9.8% 6.4%.3% 24.4% 5.2% 6.6% 5.5% 3.9% 3.9% 4.6% 3.7% 2.2% 6.% 4.3% 2.3% 3.%.4% 6.8% 8.% 5.% 3.8% 9.3% 5.6% 5.8% 5.5% 3.9%.%.7% 8.8% 6.% 2.2% 7.7% 9.9% 9.3% 6.9% Associate degree graduation rates are abysmal across the country for Hispanic and students, they re tragic. Bachelor s Degree- Seeking Students All White Hispanic On-time (4 years) Within 6 years Within 8 years Within 4 years Within 6 years Within 8 years 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial 36.5% 4.% 3.2% 24.% 8.4% 25.4% 37.% 25.4% 2.8% 63.5% 68.5% 6.3% 5.% 3.5% 45.% 64.3% 5.8% 49.4% 66.7% 7.5% 63.5% 53.5% 36.2% 49.6% 67.4% 55.7% 53.4% 5.6% DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* 23.% 29.9% DS* 4.8% 4.3% DS* 3.4% 25.% DS* 26.9% 33.6% DS* 5.9% 9.% DS* 32.4% 3.% DS* 3.5% 4.3% 64.3% Almost no one over the age of 25 graduates; students fresh out of high school are most likely to succeed. Data: Certificate cohort started in 25 6, associate cohort started in 24 5, bachelor's cohort started in 22 3 Given changing demographics, our country will not have enough skilled s to compete unless many more students from all backgrounds and walks of life graduate. DS* = Fewer than students, so data were suppressed. College America n 3

168 NORTH CAROLINA 2 Retention rates drop from year to year. Many get discouraged and drop out Students in 2-year colleges who return to campus Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 % % 49.3% 25.% 29.7% 7.% Students in 4-year colleges who return to campus % 84.% 76.2% 72.% % 49.5% 47.2% 4.3% after falling off track early. Students who earn expected first-year credits (24 credits) Associate Bachelor s (2 credits) Associate Bachelor s 7.% 76.5% 35.7% 27.2% Staying enrolled is particularly tough for part-time students, who must often balance jobs and school. Remediation. 5.4% Data: Associate cohort started in 24 5, bachelor's cohort started in 22 3; earned credits from fall 26 2-Year Colleges of freshmen require of those and associated college-level courses in two years Graduate within 3 years (projected) Current approaches almost always guarantee failure. 4-Year Colleges 3.8% 5.3% 2.% 9.7% 86.8% of freshmen require of those 69.8% and associated college-level courses in two years 49.4% Graduate within 6 years (projected) Data: Fall 26 College America n 4

169 NORTH CAROLINA 2 Precious time and money are lost when students don t graduate on schedule. Students are taking too much time Certificate Associate Bachelor s 2. years 2.4 years Should take year for full-time students 3. years 3.6 years Should take 2 years for full-time students 4.8 years 7.2 years Should take 4 years for full-time students and too many credits. Certificate Associate Bachelor s 32 credits 3 credits Should take 3 credits 78 credits 7 credits Should take 6 credits 27 credits 2 credits Should take 2 credits More students must graduate on time. Data: 27 8 College America n 5

170 NORTH CAROLINA 2 More time isn t giving us enough success. For certificate and associate degree students, graduation rates are very low even when more time. Certificate Associate 4.9% 42.9% 43.% 5.4% 6.4% 8.8% 3.9% 6.8% 7.5%.% In year In.5 years In 2 years In 2 years In 3 years In 4 years On-time graduation rates for bachelor s degree students are shockingly low. And adding time beyond six years produces little additional success. Bachelor s 63.5% 66.7% 36.5% 23.% 26.9% In 4 years In 6 years In 8 years Data: Certificate cohort started in 25 6; associate cohort started in 24 5; bachelor's cohort started in 22 3 Even modest progress provides little comfort when overall graduation rates are so low. College America n 6

171 MEMBER OHIO 2 For a strong economy, the skills gap must be closed. 59% 36% 23% By 22, jobs requiring a career certificate or college degree Ohio adults who currently have an associate degree or higher Skills gap Too few students make it through college. Data: See the Sources and Methodology section on our website. Of students who enroll in a public college or university 2-Year Public College 4-Year Public College Enroll Return as sophomores Graduate on time (% time) 5 Additional graduates 5% time 2 5 2% time 4 2 Total graduates 7 32 Graduate in 4 years 8 32 Graduate in 8 years Key to measuring time Associate Bachelor s % time 2 years 4 years 5% time 3 years 6 years 2% time 4 years 8 years Data: 2-year cohort started in fall 24; 4-year cohort started in fall 22 For too many students, the path through college ends with no degree and often lots of debt. Note: This report presents data only from public colleges and universities. College America n

172 OHIO 2 We re making great progress in providing access to more students. Total public college enrollment: 464,85 Attending Pursuing Degrees & Certificates 37,25 57,564 4-year colleges 265,75 99,65 2-year colleges Total State Population, 8-24 White 8% College Enrollment White 76% College Graduation White 83% Hispanic 3% Hispanic 2% Hispanic 2% 3% Other races 4% 3% Other races 9% Data: Fall 29 enrollment from IPEDS; population data from Census ACS PUMS 6-8; degrees by race from 27- state submissions Now we must have more success from all students. 8% Other races 8% For states to compete, their students must earn more degrees and certificates. Overall Credentials Awarded Science, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) Credentials Awarded 34,652 38,64 6,294 6,325 6,47 9,72 2,96 3,68,546 2, Certificate Associate Bachelor s Certificate Associate Bachelor s And all credentials should provide clear pathways to success. Data: 27 8 College America n 2

173 OHIO 2 Graduation rates are very low, especially if you re poor, part time,, Hispanic, or older. Certificate-Seeking Students All White Hispanic % On-time ( year) Within /2 years Within 2 years Within year Within /2 years Within 2 years 7.5% 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial 9.% 9.8% 6.7% 2.9%.2% 6.4% 8.7% 8.6% 7.9% 2.8% 3.4%.% 8.6% 5.% 7.9% 3.5%.9%.7% 5.% 5.8% 3.3% 9.3% 6.7%.6% 6.% 3.9% 3.8% 3.2% 3.7% 4.6%.3% 3.6% 2.7% 2.8% 3.2%.8% 5.2% 5.8% 9.%.9% 6.5% 3.2% 3.3% 4.8% 4.5% 7.5% 8.6% 9.% 2.5% 7.4% 7.3% 7.8% 7.6% 7.7% In most states, very few students seeking certificates ever graduate. Associate Degree- Seeking Students All White Hispanic % On-time (2 years) Within 3 years Within 4 years Within 2 years Within 3 years Within 4 years.7% 5.3% 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial 2.8% 3.%.3%.% 3.7% 2.% 2.8% 2.%.3% 9.4%.4% 5.5% 3.%.% 6.6% 9.8% 7.7% 6.4% 6.5% 8.2%.7% 5.3% 5.%.2% 7.7% 3.% 2.%.2%.4% DS*.5%.4%.5%.8%.%.3% 3.6% 4.% 2.5%.% 3.8% 3.6% 3.4% 3.2% 2.2% 7.8% 8.9% 3.9% 2.8% 8.4% 6.4% 8.2% 6.9% 6.% Associate degree graduation rates are abysmal across the country for Hispanic and students, they re tragic. Bachelor s Degree- Seeking Students All White Hispanic On-time (4 years) Within 6 years Within 8 years Within 4 years Within 6 years Within 8 years 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial 29.5% 32.% 22.7% 2.% 7.% 6.7% 3.5% 6.5% 7.9% 59.7% 63.2% 49.9% 34.4% 7.% 9.% 6.4% 42.2% 33.8% 63.7% 67.2% 55.% 38.9% 2.9% 24.2% 65.3% 47.% 39.5% 3.5% 4.% 2.9%.2%.9%.9% 5.6% 2.3%.6%.%.8% 5.9% 3.5% 4.9% 6.% 6.4% 6.8% 5.3% 4.4% 7.4% 5.9% 6.2% 6.8%.7% 23.% 9.5% 9.5% 7.% 4.9% 6.4% Almost no one over the age of 25 graduates; students fresh out of high school are most likely to succeed. Data: Certificate cohort started in 25 6, associate cohort started in 24 5, bachelor's cohort started in 22 3 Given changing demographics, our country will not have enough skilled s to compete unless many more students from all backgrounds and walks of life graduate. DS* = Fewer than students, so data were suppressed. College America n 3

174 OHIO 2 Retention rates drop from year to year. Many get discouraged and drop out Students in 2-year colleges who return to campus Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 % % 6.9% 45.% 44.4% 32.2% Students in 4-year colleges who return to campus % 85.6% 78.3% 72.% % 5.2% 43.2% 34.% after falling off track early. Students who earn expected first-year credits (24 credits) Associate Bachelor s (2 credits) Associate Bachelor s 26.3% 67.2% 25.9% 44.% Staying enrolled is particularly tough for part-time students, who must often balance jobs and school. Remediation. 48.% Data: Associate cohort started in 24 5, bachelor's cohort started in 22 3; earned credits from fall 26 2-Year Colleges of freshmen require of those and associated college-level courses in two years Graduate within 3 years (projected) Current approaches almost always guarantee failure. 4-Year Colleges 58.5% 25.% 24.6% 6.4% 56.9% of freshmen require of those 38.4% and associated college-level courses in two years 33.8% Graduate within 6 years (projected) Data: Fall 26 College America n 4

175 OHIO 2 Precious time and money are lost when students don t graduate on schedule. Students are taking too much time Certificate Associate Bachelor s 3.6 years 3.9 years 3.8 years 4.9 years 4.4 years 5.4 years Should take year for full-time students Should take 2 years for full-time students Should take 4 years for full-time students and too many credits. Certificate Associate Bachelor s 69 credits 52 credits Should take 3 credits 86 credits 8 credits Should take 6 credits 37 credits 32 credits Should take 2 credits More students must graduate on time. Data: 27 8 College America n 5

176 OHIO 2 More time isn t giving us enough success. For certificate and associate degree students, graduation rates are very low even when more time. Certificate Associate 9.% 2.8% 5.2% 5.% 7.5% 2.8% 9.4% 3.6% 6.5% 7.8% In year In.5 years In 2 years In 2 years In 3 years In 4 years On-time graduation rates for bachelor s degree students are shockingly low. And adding time beyond six years produces little additional success. Bachelor s 59.7% 63.7% 29.5%.% 4.4% In 4 years In 6 years In 8 years Data: Certificate cohort started in 25 6; associate cohort started in 24 5; bachelor's cohort started in 22 3 Even modest progress provides little comfort when overall graduation rates are so low. College America n 6

177 OKLAHOMA 2 For a strong economy, the skills gap must be closed. 59% 3% 29% By 22, jobs requiring a career certificate or college degree Skills gap Too few students make it through college. MEMBER Oklahoma adults who currently have an associate degree or higher Data: See the Sources and Methodology section on our website. Of students who enroll in a public college or university 2-Year Public College 4-Year Public College Enroll Return as sophomores Graduate on time (% time) 3 8 Additional graduates 5% time 3 4 2% time 2 2 Total graduates Graduate in 4 years 25 Graduate in 8 years Key to measuring time Associate Bachelor s % time 2 years 4 years 5% time 3 years 6 years 2% time 4 years 8 years Data: 2-year cohort started in fall 24; 4-year cohort started in fall 22 For too many students, the path through college ends with no degree and often lots of debt. Note: This report presents data only from public colleges and universities. College America n

178 OKLAHOMA 2 We re making great progress in providing access to more students. Total public college enrollment: 79,622 Attending Pursuing Degrees & Certificates 8,9,5 7,722 4-year 78,472 2-year colleges colleges Total State Population, 8-24 White 66% College Enrollment White 67% College Graduation White 74% Hispanic 9% Hispanic 5% Hispanic 3% 8% Other races 7% 9% Other races 9% Data: Fall 29 enrollment from IPEDS; population data from Census ACS PUMS 6-8; degrees by race from 27- state submissions Now we must have more success from all students. 6% Other races 6% For states to compete, their students must earn more degrees and certificates. Overall Credentials Awarded Science, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) Credentials Awarded 5,726 2,886 3,5 2,285 7,773 8, Certificate Associate Bachelor s Certificate Associate Bachelor s And all credentials should provide clear pathways to success. Data: 27 8 College America n 2

179 OKLAHOMA 2 Graduation rates are very low, especially if you re poor, part time,, Hispanic, or older. Certificate-Seeking Students All White Hispanic % On-time ( year) Within /2 years Within 2 years Within year Within /2 years Within 2 years 2.% 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial.8%.3% DS* DS* 4.7% 6.7% 5.8% DS* DS* 2.7% 4.5% DS* DS* 7.6% 6.7% 7.7% DS* DS* 2.7% 4.5% DS* DS* 7.6% 6.7% 7.7% DS* DS* 8.8% 22.% DS* 2.% 24.% 4.3% 4.8% DS*.% 2.% 23.7% DS* 2.% 24.% 9.% 9.5% DS*.% 2.% 23.7% DS* 2.% 24.% 9.% 9.5% DS*.% In most states, very few students seeking certificates ever graduate. Associate Degree- Seeking Students All White Hispanic % On-time (2 years) Within 3 years Within 4 years Within 2 years Within 3 years Within 4 years 5.9% 9.4% 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial 8.8% 9.4% 3.4% 4.3% 2.3%.2% 9.2%.6% 2.5% 7.9% 9.5%.3% 7.3% 2.% 6.3% 8.9% 9.9% 9.2% 22.% 24.% 5.9% 9.4% 25.3% 9.% 23.4% 24.% 3.% 3.5% 3.7%.%.3% 6.% 2.9% 2.2% 6.9%.4% 6.3% 6.6%.% 2.5% 9.% 4.8% 5.4%.2% 2.% 9.2% 9.7% 3.6% 3.9% 2.8% 6.9% 8.3% 4.4% 4.6% Associate degree graduation rates are abysmal across the country for Hispanic and students, they re tragic. Bachelor s Degree- Seeking Students All White Hispanic On-time (4 years) Within 6 years Within 8 years Within 4 years Within 6 years Within 8 years 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial 9.% 2.5% 5.3% 3.4% 8.8% 6.6% 2.% 2.% 6.2% 5.% 53.5% 46.% 38.6% 8.% 33.8% 53.% 38.6% 3.6% 55.4% 58.7% 53.9% 45.7% 2.5% 38.7% 58.5% 44.4% 36.7%.6%.9% DS*.8%.2%.7% 2.2%.6%.5% 9.9%.2% 5.9% 9.2% 4.6% 7.6% 6.% 5.3% 2.9% 3.3% 4.%.8%.7% 5.8%.5% 2.5% 2.% 7.3% 8.% 4.6% 53.% Almost no one over the age of 25 graduates; students fresh out of high school are most likely to succeed. Data: Certificate cohort started in 25 6, associate cohort started in 24 5, bachelor's cohort started in 22 3 Given changing demographics, our country will not have enough skilled s to compete unless many more students from all backgrounds and walks of life graduate. DS* = Fewer than students, so data were suppressed. College America n 3

180 OKLAHOMA 2 Retention rates drop from year to year. Many get discouraged and drop out Students in 2-year colleges who return to campus Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 % % 58.% 42.% 42.% 3.% Students in 4-year colleges who return to campus % 8.% 73.% 67.% % 4.% 3.% 24.% after falling off track early. Students who earn expected first-year credits (24 credits) Associate Bachelor s (2 credits) Associate Bachelor s 26.% 56.5% 26.2% 3.5% Staying enrolled is particularly tough for part-time students, who must often balance jobs and school. Remediation. 7.3% Data: Associate cohort started in 24 5, bachelor's cohort started in 22 3; earned credits from fall 26 2-Year Colleges 4-Year Colleges 59.6% 28.6% of freshmen require of those 66.3% of freshmen require of those 24.% and associated college-level courses in two years 9.2% Graduate within 3 years (projected) Current approaches almost always guarantee failure. 28.2% and associated college-level courses in two years 3.6% Graduate within 6 years (projected) Data: Fall 26 College America n 4

181 OKLAHOMA 2 Precious time and money are lost when students don t graduate on schedule. Students are taking too much time Certificate Associate Bachelor s.8 years.5 years Should take year for full-time students 2.8 years 2.8 years Should take 2 years for full-time students 5 years 5.7 years Should take 4 years for full-time students and too many credits. Certificate Associate Bachelor s 4 credits 36 credits 39 credits 32 credits Should take 3 credits 74 credits 79 credits Should take 6 credits Should take 2 credits More students must graduate on time. Data: 27 8 College America n 5

182 OKLAHOMA 2 More time isn t giving us enough success. For certificate and associate degree students, graduation rates are very low even when more time. Certificate Associate.8% 2.% 2.7% 2.% 2.7% 8.8% 7.9% 6.3% 22.% 9.2% In year In.5 years In 2 years In 2 years In 3 years In 4 years On-time graduation rates for bachelor s degree students are shockingly low. And adding time beyond six years produces little additional success. Bachelor s 5.% 55.4% 9.% 9.9% 3.3% In 4 years In 6 years In 8 years Data: Certificate cohort started in 25 6; associate cohort started in 24 5; bachelor's cohort started in 22 3 Even modest progress provides little comfort when overall graduation rates are so low. College America n 6

183 OREGON 2 For a strong economy, the skills gap must be closed. 67% 36% 3% By 22, jobs requiring a career certificate or college degree Skills gap Too few students make it through college. MEMBER Oregon adults who currently have an associate degree or higher Data: See the Sources and Methodology section on our website. Of students who enroll in a public college or university 2-Year Public College 4-Year Public College Enroll Return as sophomores Graduate on time (% time) 3 4 Additional graduates 5% time 3 3 2% time 2 Total graduates Graduate in 4 years 9 29 Graduate in 8 years Key to measuring time Associate Bachelor s % time 2 years 4 years 5% time 3 years 6 years 2% time 4 years 8 years Data: 2-year cohort started in fall 24; 4-year cohort started in fall 22 For too many students, the path through college ends with no degree and often lots of debt. Note: This report presents data only from public colleges and universities. College America n

184 OREGON 2 We re making great progress in providing access to more students. Total public college enrollment: 83,332 Attending Pursuing Degrees & Certificates 6,52 76,82 4-year 76,9 7,24 2-year colleges colleges Total State Population, 8-24 White 76% College Enrollment White 69% College Graduation White 75% Hispanic 3% Hispanic 6% Hispanic 4% 2% Other races 9% 2% Other races 22% Data: Fall 29 enrollment from IPEDS; population data from Census ACS PUMS 6-8; degrees by race from 27- state submissions Now we must have more success from all students. 2% Other races 9% For states to compete, their students must earn more degrees and certificates. Overall Credentials Awarded Science, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) Credentials Awarded,225 2,65 2,328 2,432 6,244 6,75,45, Certificate Associate Bachelor s Certificate Associate Bachelor s And all credentials should provide clear pathways to success. Data: 27 8 College America n 2

185 OREGON 2 Graduation rates are very low, especially if you re poor, part time,, Hispanic, or older. Certificate-Seeking Students All White Hispanic % On-time ( year) Within /2 years Within 2 years Within year Within /2 years Within 2 years 3.% 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial 27.5% 27.5% 7.4%.% 33.% 3.5% 22.2% 2.8% 6.4% 37.3% 37.6% 2.7% 5.% 38.9% 37.% 36.2% 29.% 34.4% 42.4% 42.2% 3.4% 5.% 42.7% 42.5% 42.% 35.2% 44.3% 2.6%.9% 2.8% DS*.5%.6% 4.2% 3.6% 3.2% 23.8% 23.% 29.2% DS* 7.5% 3.2% 24.5% 24.7% 5.8% 3.% 29.7% 37.5%.% 26.3% 3.2% 34.% 29.6% 23.7% In most states, very few students seeking certificates ever graduate. Associate Degree- Seeking Students All White Hispanic % On-time (2 years) Within 3 years Within 4 years Within 2 years Within 3 years Within 4 years 5.8% 8.8% 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial 6.3% 6.5% 3.9% 2.9% 4.9% 6.3% 6.5% 5.5% 3.4% 5.% 5.4%.9% 5.8%.% 3.9% 6.2% 3.7% 3.8% 9.6% 2.% 5.8% 8.8% 3.3% 8.% 2.3% 8.4% 2.3%.4%.5%.8%.% 2.2% 2.%.9%.9%.6% 5.% 5.3% 2.9%.8% 4.4% 4.9% 5.2% 4.3% 3.8% 8.% 8.4% 5.7%.8% 6.6% 8.% 8.6% 7.5% 7.7% Associate degree graduation rates are abysmal across the country for Hispanic and students, they re tragic. Bachelor s Degree- Seeking Students All White Hispanic On-time (4 years) Within 6 years Within 8 years Within 4 years Within 6 years Within 8 years 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial 3.6% 32.9% 22.3% 2.4% 2.8% 22.3% 32.% 24.6% 22.% 59.5% 6.% 52.3% 45.7% 4.% 45.5% 6.3% 52.2% 5.5% 64.% 64.5% 57.6% 53.% 44.% 5.% 64.8% 57.5% 54.9% 6.7% 6.9% 4.2%.% 5.9% 5.% 7.3% 7.% 2.% 22.4% 22.7% 6.7%.% 7.6% 3.9% 25.2% 7.9% 2.8% 29.3% 29.3% 2.8%.% 25.5% 2.3% 32.2% 23.2% 7.% 4.% 7.6% 6.3% Almost no one over the age of 25 graduates; students fresh out of high school are most likely to succeed. Data: Certificate cohort started in 25 6, associate cohort started in 24 5, bachelor's cohort started in 22 3 Given changing demographics, our country will not have enough skilled s to compete unless many more students from all backgrounds and walks of life graduate. DS* = Fewer than students, so data were suppressed. College America n 3

186 OREGON 2 Retention rates drop from year to year. Many get discouraged and drop out Students in 2-year colleges who return to campus Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 % % 56.6% 33.3% 4.7% 28.% Students in 4-year colleges who return to campus % 77.% 65.5% 6.4% % 42.7% 33.% 29.3% after falling off track early. Students who earn expected first-year credits (24 credits) Associate Bachelor s (2 credits) Associate Bachelor s 4.2% 74.% 4.7% 48.3% Staying enrolled is particularly tough for part-time students, who must often balance jobs and school. Remediation. 79.7% Data: Associate cohort started in 24 5, bachelor's cohort started in 22 3; earned credits from fall 26 2-Year Colleges of freshmen require of those and associated college-level courses in two years Graduate within 3 years (projected) Current approaches almost always guarantee failure. 4-Year Colleges 5.6%.5% 4.4% 3.8% 8.% of freshmen require of those 6.5% and associated college-level courses in two years 5.5% Graduate within 6 years (projected) Data: Fall 26 College America n 4

187 OREGON 2 Precious time and money are lost when students don t graduate on schedule. Students are taking too much time Certificate Associate Bachelor s 2.6 years 3.4 years Should take year for full-time students 3.4 years 4. years Should take 2 years for full-time students 4.4 years 5.4 years Should take 4 years for full-time students and too many credits. Certificate Associate Bachelor s 53 credits 56 credits Should take 3 credits 75 credits 72 credits Should take 6 credits 25 credits 9 credits Should take 2 credits More students must graduate on time. Data: 27 8 College America n 5

188 OREGON 2 More time isn t giving us enough success. For certificate and associate degree students, graduation rates are very low even when more time. Certificate Associate 27.5% 37.3% 23.8% 42.4% 3.% 6.3% 5.% 5.% 9.6% 8.% In year In.5 years In 2 years In 2 years In 3 years In 4 years On-time graduation rates for bachelor s degree students are shockingly low. And adding time beyond six years produces little additional success. Bachelor s 59.5% 64.% 3.6% 22.4% 29.3% In 4 years In 6 years In 8 years Data: Certificate cohort started in 25 6; associate cohort started in 24 5; bachelor's cohort started in 22 3 Even modest progress provides little comfort when overall graduation rates are so low. College America n 6

189 PENNSYLVANIA 2 For a strong economy, the skills gap must be closed. 6% 43% 7% By 22, jobs requiring a career certificate or college degree Skills gap Too few students make it through college. MEMBER Pennsylvania adults who currently have an associate degree or higher Data: See the Sources and Methodology section on our website. Of students who enroll in a public college or university 2-Year Public College 4-Year Public College Enroll 99 Return as sophomores Graduate on time (% time) 32 Additional graduates 5% time 23 2% time Total graduates 56 Graduate in 4 years 56 Graduate in 8 years Key to measuring time Associate Bachelor s % time 2 years 4 years 5% time 3 years 6 years 2% time 4 years 8 years = The state did not provide data for this metric. Data: 2-year cohort started in fall 24; 4-year cohort started in fall 22 For too many students, the path through college ends with no degree and often lots of debt. Note: This report presents data only from public colleges and universities. Data from PASSHE System only. College America n

190 PENNSYLVANIA 2 We re making great progress in providing access to more students. Total public college enrollment: 378,724 Attending Pursuing Degrees & Certificates 275,248 3,476 4-year colleges 23,848 47,876 2-year colleges Total State Population, 8-24 White 78% College Enrollment White 74% College Graduation White 75% Hispanic 6% Hispanic 3% Hispanic 3% 2% Other races 5% % Other races 3% Now we must have more success from all students. % Other races 2% Data: Fall 29 enrollment from IPEDS; population data from Census ACS PUMS 6-8 For states to compete, their students must earn more degrees and certificates. Overall Credentials Awarded Science, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) Credentials Awarded 5,35 7,35,78,928 9,54 2,33,787 2, Certificate Associate Bachelor s Certificate Associate Bachelor s And all credentials should provide clear pathways to success. = The state did not provide data for this metric. Data: 27 8 College America n 2

191 PENNSYLVANIA 2 Graduation rates are very low, especially if you re poor, part time,, Hispanic, or older. Certificate-Seeking Students All White Hispanic On-time ( year) Within /2 years Within 2 years Within year Within /2 years Within 2 years 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial In most states, very few students seeking certificates ever graduate. Associate Degree- Seeking Students All White Hispanic On-time (2 years) Within 3 years Within 4 years Within 2 years Within 3 years Within 4 years 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial Associate degree graduation rates are abysmal across the country for Hispanic and students, they re tragic. Bachelor s Degree- Seeking Students All White Hispanic On-time (4 years) Within 6 years Within 8 years Within 4 years Within 6 years Within 8 years 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial 32.2% 34.4% 2.4% 4.8% 2.7% 6.4% 32.9% 24.4% 55.3% 57.8% 42.5% 35.7% 33.% 32.2% 56.4% 47.% 56.9% 59.3% 44.5% 38.2% 34.4% 33.7% 58.% 49.% 6.3% 7.2% DS* DS* 7.8% 3.4% 6.4% 7.6% 3.3% 4.8% DS* DS* 7.6%.2%.% 9.% 5.9% 7.7% DS* DS* 2.6%.2% 4.7% 22.8% 33.% 56.4% 7.6% Almost no one over the age of 25 graduates; students fresh out of high school are most likely to succeed. Data: Certificate cohort started in 25 6, associate cohort started in 24 5, bachelor's cohort started in 22 3 Given changing demographics, our country will not have enough skilled s to compete unless many more students from all backgrounds and walks of life graduate. = The state did not provide data for this metric. DS* = Fewer than students, so data were suppressed. College America n 3

192 PENNSYLVANIA 2 Retention rates drop from year to year. Many get discouraged and drop out Students in 2-year colleges who return to campus Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 % % Students in 4-year colleges who return to campus % % after falling off track early. Students who earn expected first-year credits (24 credits) Associate Bachelor s (2 credits) Associate Bachelor s 76.2% 54.3% Staying enrolled is particularly tough for part-time students, who must often balance jobs and school. Remediation. Data: Associate cohort started in 24 5, bachelor's cohort started in 22 3; earned credits from fall 26 2-Year Colleges 4-Year Colleges 27.8% of freshmen require of those 2.% of freshmen require of those 32.2% and associated college-level courses in two years Graduate within 3 years (projected) Current approaches almost always guarantee failure. and associated college-level courses in two years Graduate within 6 years (projected) Data: Fall 26 = The state did not provide data for this metric. College America n 4

193 PENNSYLVANIA 2 Precious time and money are lost when students don t graduate on schedule. Students are taking too much time Certificate Associate Bachelor s Should take year for full-time students Should take 2 years for full-time students Should take 4 years for full-time students and too many credits. Certificate Associate Bachelor s 3 credits 33 credits Should take 3 credits Should take 6 credits Should take 2 credits More students must graduate on time. Data: 27 8 = The state did not provide data for this metric. College America n 5

194 PENNSYLVANIA 2 More time isn t giving us enough success. For certificate and associate degree students, graduation rates are very low even when more time. Certificate Associate In year In.5 years In 2 years In 2 years In 3 years In 4 years On-time graduation rates for bachelor s degree students are shockingly low. And adding time beyond six years produces little additional success. Bachelor s 55.3% 56.9% 32.2% 3.3% 5.9% In 4 years In 6 years In 8 years Data: Certificate cohort started in 25 6; associate cohort started in 24 5; bachelor's cohort started in 22 3 Even modest progress provides little comfort when overall graduation rates are so low. = The state did not provide data for this metric. College America n 6

195 SOUTH DAKOTA 2 For a strong economy, the skills gap must be closed. 63% 44% 9% By 22, jobs requiring a career certificate or college degree Skills gap Too few students make it through college. MEMBER South Dakota adults who currently have an associate degree or higher Data: See the Sources and Methodology section on our website. Of students who enroll in a public college or university 2-Year Public College 4-Year Public College Enroll 5 84 Return as sophomores 64 4 Graduate on time (% time) 5 Additional graduates 5% time 28 2% time 4 Total graduates 47 Graduate in 4 years Graduate in 8 years Key to measuring time Associate Bachelor s % time 2 years 4 years 5% time 3 years 6 years 2% time 4 years 8 years = The state did not provide data for this metric. Data: 2-year cohort started in fall 24; 4-year cohort started in fall 22 For too many students, the path through college ends with no degree and often lots of debt. Note: This report presents data only from public colleges and universities. College America n

196 SOUTH DAKOTA 2 We re making great progress in providing access to more students. Total public college enrollment: 36,365 Attending Pursuing Degrees & Certificates 25,83,534 4-year colleges 3,92 6,73 2-year colleges Total State Population, 8-24 White 83% College Enrollment White 82% College Graduation White 92% Hispanic 3% Hispanic % Hispanic % % Other races 3% % Other races 6% Data: Fall 29 enrollment from IPEDS; population data from Census ACS PUMS 6-8; degrees by race from 27- state submissions Now we must have more success from all students. % Other races 7% For states to compete, their students must earn more degrees and certificates. Overall Credentials Awarded Science, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) Credentials Awarded 3,548,56 3, Certificate Associate Bachelor s Certificate Associate Bachelor s And all credentials should provide clear pathways to success. Data: 27 8 College America n 2

197 SOUTH DAKOTA 2 Graduation rates are very low, especially if you re poor, part time,, Hispanic, or older. Certificate-Seeking Students All White Hispanic On-time ( year) Within /2 years Within 2 years Within year Within /2 years Within 2 years 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial In most states, very few students seeking certificates ever graduate. Associate Degree- Seeking Students All White Hispanic On-time (2 years) Within 3 years Within 4 years Within 2 years Within 3 years Within 4 years 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* 5.5% 6.% DS* DS* DS* DS* 6.4% DS* 5.5% 5.5% 6.% DS* DS* DS* DS* 6.4% DS* 5.5% DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* Associate degree graduation rates are abysmal across the country for Hispanic and students, they re tragic. Bachelor s Degree- Seeking Students All White Hispanic On-time (4 years) Within 6 years Within 8 years Within 4 years Within 6 years Within 8 years 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial 7.9% 8.6% DS*.% DS* DS* 8.5% 4.9% 7.9% 5.3% 52.6% DS* DS* 26.2% 2.4% 52.9% 46.8% 37.7% 55.% 56.4% DS* DS* 29.2% 26.9% 56.7% 5.% 4.7% DS* DS*.% DS* DS*.% DS* DS* DS* 7.5% 8.% DS* DS* DS* DS*.% DS* 5.8%.2%.% DS* DS* DS* DS* 3.6% 9.% 7.7% 26.2% 52.9% Almost no one over the age of 25 graduates; students fresh out of high school are most likely to succeed. Data: Certificate cohort started in 25 6, associate cohort started in 24 5, bachelor's cohort started in 22 3 Given changing demographics, our country will not have enough skilled s to compete unless many more students from all backgrounds and walks of life graduate. = The state did not provide data for this metric. DS* = Fewer than students, so data were suppressed. College America n 3

198

199 SOUTH DAKOTA 2 Precious time and money are lost when students don t graduate on schedule. Students are taking too much time Certificate Associate Bachelor s Should take year for full-time students 4 years 5.4 years Should take 2 years for full-time students 4.7 years 6.9 years Should take 4 years for full-time students and too many credits. Certificate Associate Bachelor s Should take 3 credits 86 credits credits Should take 6 credits 4 credits 47 credits Should take 2 credits More students must graduate on time. Data: 27 8 = The state did not provide data for this metric. College America n 5

200 SOUTH DAKOTA 2 More time isn t giving us enough success. For certificate and associate degree students, graduation rates are very low even when more time. Certificate Associate DS* 5.5% DS* 5.5% DS* In year In.5 years In 2 years In 2 years In 3 years In 4 years On-time graduation rates for bachelor s degree students are shockingly low. And adding time beyond six years produces little additional success. Bachelor s 5.3% 55.% 7.9% 7.5%.2% In 4 years In 6 years In 8 years Data: Certificate cohort started in 25 6; associate cohort started in 24 5; bachelor's cohort started in 22 3 Even modest progress provides little comfort when overall graduation rates are so low. = The state did not provide data for this metric. DS* = Fewer than students, so data were suppressed. College America n 6

201 TENNESSEE 2 For a strong economy, the skills gap must be closed. 56% 3% 25% By 22, jobs requiring a career certificate or college degree Skills gap Too few students make it through college. MEMBER Tennessee adults who currently have an associate degree or higher Data: See the Sources and Methodology section on our website. Of students who enroll in a public college or university 2-Year Public College 4-Year Public College Enroll Return as sophomores Graduate on time (% time) 2 7 Additional graduates 5% time 4 3 2% time 2 2 Total graduates 8 32 Graduate in 4 years 9 33 Graduate in 8 years Key to measuring time Associate Bachelor s % time 2 years 4 years 5% time 3 years 6 years 2% time 4 years 8 years Data: 2-year cohort started in fall 24; 4-year cohort started in fall 22 For too many students, the path through college ends with no degree and often lots of debt. Note: This report presents data only from public colleges and universities. College America n

202 TENNESSEE 2 We re making great progress in providing access to more students. Total public college enrollment: 28,859 Attending Pursuing Degrees & Certificates 5,948 66,9 4-year colleges 3,576 5,283 2-year colleges Hispanic 4% Total State Population, 8-24 White 72% Hispanic 2% College Enrollment White 73% Hispanic 2% College Graduation White 74% 2% Other races 3% 9% Other races 6% Data: Fall 29 enrollment from IPEDS; population data from Census ACS PUMS 6-8; degrees by race from 27- state submissions Now we must have more success from all students. 8% Other races 6% For states to compete, their students must earn more degrees and certificates. Overall Credentials Awarded Science, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) Credentials Awarded 5,388 7,6 2,599 2,74 6,357 6, DS* Certificate Associate Bachelor s Certificate Associate Bachelor s And all credentials should provide clear pathways to success. DS* = Fewer than students, so data were suppressed. Data: 27 8 College America n 2

203 TENNESSEE 2 Graduation rates are very low, especially if you re poor, part time,, Hispanic, or older. Certificate-Seeking Students All White Hispanic On-time ( year) Within /2 years Within 2 years Within year Within /2 years Within 2 years 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* 35.% DS* DS* 4.% DS* 6.% DS* DS* 28.% DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* In most states, very few students seeking certificates ever graduate. Associate Degree- Seeking Students All White Hispanic % On-time (2 years) Within 3 years Within 4 years Within 2 years Within 3 years Within 4 years 6.4% 8.9% 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial 6.% 7.2% DS*.% 4.2% 2.% 7.% 4.6% 3.% 8.% 2.8%.9% 6.% 4.7% 8.2% 2.4% 5.3% 2.6% 22.3% 25.4% 6.4% 8.9% 7.4%.5% 25.4% 9.7% 5.9%.9%.% DS* DS* DS* DS*.3%.6%.6% 7.5% 8.7% DS* 4.3%.2% 4.6% 7.2% 7.3% 6.8%.9% 2.5% DS* 6.% 5.2% 7.% 9.9%.%.% Associate degree graduation rates are abysmal across the country for Hispanic and students, they re tragic. Bachelor s Degree- Seeking Students All White Hispanic On-time (4 years) Within 6 years Within 8 years Within 4 years Within 6 years Within 8 years 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial 3.9% 35.% 3.2% 2.8% 2.9% 7.9% 33.4% 9.3% 7.3% 56.9% 6.8% 48.2% 44.6% 3.9% 23.2% 59.% 46.7% 44.4% 6.7% 65.3% 5.4% 49.8% 38.% 29.4% 63.6% 55.9% 5.2% 6.3% 6.7% DS* DS* DS* DS*.2% 4.9% 5.% 24.8% 27.7% DS* 9.% 3.6% 2.% 42.6% 3.4% 28.% 32.7% 38.% DS* 22.8% 9.2% 2.2% 5.9% 45.% 38.% 3.9% 59.% 3.6% Almost no one over the age of 25 graduates; students fresh out of high school are most likely to succeed. Data: Certificate cohort started in 25 6, associate cohort started in 24 5, bachelor's cohort started in 22 3 Given changing demographics, our country will not have enough skilled s to compete unless many more students from all backgrounds and walks of life graduate. = The state did not provide data for this metric. DS* = Fewer than students, so data were suppressed. College America n 3

204 TENNESSEE 2 Retention rates drop from year to year. Many get discouraged and drop out Students in 2-year colleges who return to campus Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 % % 54.% 32.% 42.2% 27.9% Students in 4-year colleges who return to campus % 8.2% 7.7% 65.8% % 39.8% 34.4% 27.4% after falling off track early. Students who earn expected first-year credits (24 credits) Associate Bachelor s (2 credits) Associate Bachelor s 7.% 92.% 56.9% 58.7% Staying enrolled is particularly tough for part-time students, who must often balance jobs and school. Remediation. 46.5% Data: Associate cohort started in 24 5, bachelor's cohort started in 22 3; earned credits from fall 26 2-Year Colleges 4-Year Colleges 7.2% of freshmen require of those of freshmen require of those 44.4% 2.% and associated college-level courses in two years 2.6% Graduate within 3 years (projected) Current approaches almost always guarantee failure. and associated college-level courses in two years Graduate within 6 years (projected) Data: Fall 26 = The state did not provide data for this metric. College America n 4

205 TENNESSEE 2 Precious time and money are lost when students don t graduate on schedule. Students are taking too much time Certificate Associate Bachelor s 4.5 years 4.5 years 4.2 years 4.8 years 4.9 years 5.4 years Should take year for full-time students Should take 2 years for full-time students Should take 4 years for full-time students and too many credits. Certificate Associate Bachelor s 35 credits 34 credits 6 credits 5 credits Should take 3 credits 79 credits 8 credits Should take 6 credits Should take 2 credits More students must graduate on time. Data: 27 8 College America n 5

206 TENNESSEE 2 More time isn t giving us enough success. For certificate and associate degree students, graduation rates are very low even when more time. Certificate Associate 6.% 8.% 7.5% 22.3%.9% In year In.5 years In 2 years In 2 years In 3 years In 4 years On-time graduation rates for bachelor s degree students are shockingly low. And adding time beyond six years produces little additional success. Bachelor s 56.9% 6.7% 3.9% 24.8% 32.7% In 4 years In 6 years In 8 years Data: Certificate cohort started in 25 6; associate cohort started in 24 5; bachelor's cohort started in 22 3 Even modest progress provides little comfort when overall graduation rates are so low. = The state did not provide data for this metric. College America n 6

207 TEXAS 2 For a strong economy, the skills gap must be closed. 6% 3% 29% By 22, jobs requiring a career certificate or college degree Skills gap Too few students make it through college. MEMBER Texas adults who currently have an associate degree or higher Data: See the Sources and Methodology section on our website. Of students who enroll in a public college or university 2-Year Public College 4-Year Public College Enroll Return as sophomores Graduate on time (% time) 2 5 Additional graduates 5% time 7 2% time 2 Total graduates Graduate in 4 years 7 3 Graduate in 8 years Key to measuring time Associate Bachelor s % time 2 years 4 years 5% time 3 years 6 years 2% time 4 years 8 years Data: 2-year cohort started in fall 24; 4-year cohort started in fall 22 For too many students, the path through college ends with no degree and often lots of debt. Note: This report presents data only from public colleges and universities. College America n

208 TEXAS 2 We re making great progress in providing access to more students. Total public college enrollment:,3,425 Attending Pursuing Degrees & Certificates 582, ,89 4-year colleges 468,79 662,634 2-year colleges Total State Population, 8-24 White 43% College Enrollment White 46% College Graduation White 54% Hispanic 39% Hispanic 32% Hispanic 26% 3% Other races 5% 3% Other races % Data: Fall 29 enrollment from IPEDS; population data from Census ACS PUMS 6-8; degrees by race from 27- state submissions Now we must have more success from all students. % Other races 9% For states to compete, their students must earn more degrees and certificates. Overall Credentials Awarded Science, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) Credentials Awarded 6,828 75,623 3,39 5,5 37,28 28,533 7,26 6,25 2,93 2,76 4,277 3, Certificate Associate Bachelor s Certificate Associate Bachelor s And all credentials should provide clear pathways to success. Data: 27 8 College America n 2

209 TEXAS 2 Graduation rates are very low, especially if you re poor, part time,, Hispanic, or older. Certificate-Seeking Students All White Hispanic % On-time ( year) Within /2 years Within 2 years Within year Within /2 years Within 2 years 3.6% 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial 2.9% 3.% 3.% 2.2% 9.% 4.4%.9% 3.5%.% 4.% 4.3% 4.% 3.%.7% 5.5% 2.9% 4.7% 2.% 4.8% 5.2% 4.9% 3.8%.7% 6.3% 3.8% 5.6% 2.9% 2.%.8% 2.% 2.4% 5.% 2.2%.% 3.%.% 2.8% 2.7% 3.% 3.% 6.6% 3.%.7% 4.3%.9% 3.6% 3.5% 3.9% 3.8% 7.5% 3.8% 2.4% 5.3% 2.8% In most states, very few students seeking certificates ever graduate. Associate Degree- Seeking Students All White Hispanic % On-time (2 years) Within 3 years Within 4 years Within 2 years Within 3 years Within 4 years.3% 8.% 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial 3.% 3.6% 2.4% 2.4% 3.3% 2.3% 3.2% 2.6%.6% 7.8% 8.5% 7.2% 5.9% 8.3% 5.3% 8.2% 7.2% 5.8%.2%.7%.3% 8.%.7% 7.9%.8%.8% 9.2%.6%.6%.5%.7%.%.7%.4%.7%.2% 2.4% 2.5% 2.%.8% 3.% 2.2% 2.2% 2.6%.6% 4.7% 5.% 4.5% 3.7% 5.4% 3.9% 4.7% 4.9% 3.8% Associate degree graduation rates are abysmal across the country for Hispanic and students, they re tragic. Bachelor s Degree- Seeking Students All White Hispanic On-time (4 years) Within 6 years Within 8 years Within 4 years Within 6 years Within 8 years 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial 25.% 3.3% 5.%.7% 5.4% 2.5% 25.4% 4.5% 6.5% 56.% 64.6% 44.7% 35.6% 29.3% 24.6% 57.% 42.% 29.6% 62.6% 7.% 52.9% 42.8% 33.% 29.7% 63.6% 49.6% 37.8% 8.4%.7% 4.9% 4.6% 6.5% 4.3% 9.% 5.5% 3.3% 3.% 36.5% 7.7% 2.3% 3.% 3.4% 34.% 2.8% 8.6% 38.7% 46.% 26.4% 27.3% 8.3% 9.5% 43.6% 28.3% 25.7% 29.3% 3.% 57.% Almost no one over the age of 25 graduates; students fresh out of high school are most likely to succeed. Data: Certificate cohort started in 25 6, associate cohort started in 24 5, bachelor's cohort started in 22 3 Given changing demographics, our country will not have enough skilled s to compete unless many more students from all backgrounds and walks of life graduate. College America n 3

210 TEXAS 2 Retention rates drop from year to year. Many get discouraged and drop out Students in 2-year colleges who return to campus Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 % % 63.8% 48.2% 54.2% 43.6% Students in 4-year colleges who return to campus % 87.5% 8.4% 73.4% % 72.5% 64.2% 57.8% after falling off track early. Students who earn expected first-year credits (24 credits) Associate Bachelor s (2 credits) Associate Bachelor s 28.3% 7.6% 34.% 64.% Staying enrolled is particularly tough for part-time students, who must often balance jobs and school. Remediation. Data: Associate cohort started in 24 5, bachelor's cohort started in 22 3; earned credits from fall 26 2-Year Colleges 4-Year Colleges 5.% 22.5% of freshmen require of those 49.2% of freshmen require of those 3.% 32.% 29.6% 4.3% 5.8% and associated college-level courses in two years Graduate within 3 years (projected) Current approaches almost always guarantee failure. and associated college-level courses in two years Graduate within 6 years (projected) Data: Fall 26 College America n 4

211 TEXAS 2 Precious time and money are lost when students don t graduate on schedule. Students are taking too much time Certificate Associate Bachelor s 3.5 years 3.6 years Should take year for full-time students 4.5 years 5 years Should take 2 years for full-time students 5.3 years 6 years Should take 4 years for full-time students and too many credits. Certificate Associate Bachelor s 49 credits 49 credits 7 credits 58 credits Should take 3 credits 98 credits 92 credits Should take 6 credits Should take 2 credits More students must graduate on time. Data: 27 8 College America n 5

212 TEXAS 2 More time isn t giving us enough success. For certificate and associate degree students, graduation rates are very low even when more time. Certificate Associate 2.9% 4.% 4.8% 2.8% 3.6% 3.% 7.8% 2.4%.2% 4.7% In year In.5 years In 2 years In 2 years In 3 years In 4 years On-time graduation rates for bachelor s degree students are shockingly low. And adding time beyond six years produces little additional success. Bachelor s 25.% 56.% 3.% 62.6% 38.7% In 4 years In 6 years In 8 years Data: Certificate cohort started in 25 6; associate cohort started in 24 5; bachelor's cohort started in 22 3 Even modest progress provides little comfort when overall graduation rates are so low. College America n 6

213 MEMBER UTAH 2 For a strong economy, the skills gap must be closed. 68% 38% 3% By 22, jobs requiring a career certificate or college degree Utah adults who currently have an associate degree or higher Skills gap Too few students make it through college. Data: See the Sources and Methodology section on our website. Of students who enroll in a public college or university 2-Year Public College 4-Year Public College Enroll Return as sophomores Graduate on time (% time) 4 4 Additional graduates 5% time 3 6 2% time 3 2 Total graduates 2 Graduate in 4 years 3 Graduate in 8 years Key to measuring time Associate Bachelor s % time 2 years 4 years 5% time 3 years 6 years 2% time 4 years 8 years Data: 2-year cohort started in fall 24; 4-year cohort started in fall 22 For too many students, the path through college ends with no degree and often lots of debt. Note: This report presents data only from public colleges and universities. College America n

214 UTAH 2 We re making great progress in providing access to more students. Total public college enrollment: 62,65 Attending Pursuing Degrees & Certificates 82,5 8,39 4-year colleges,45 5,245 2-year colleges Total State Population, 8-24 White 83% College Enrollment White 76% College Graduation White 8% Hispanic % Hispanic 6% Hispanic 3% % Other races 6% % Other races 6% Data: Fall 29 enrollment from IPEDS; population data from Census ACS PUMS 6-8; degrees by race from 27- state submissions Now we must have more success from all students. % Other races 5% For states to compete, their students must earn more degrees and certificates. Overall Credentials Awarded Science, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) Credentials Awarded,44 2,63,924,983 8,69 8,556 76, Certificate Associate Bachelor s Certificate Associate Bachelor s And all credentials should provide clear pathways to success. Data: 27 8 College America n 2

215 UTAH 2 Graduation rates are very low, especially if you re poor, part time,, Hispanic, or older. Certificate-Seeking Students All White Hispanic DS* On-time ( year) Within /2 years Within 2 years Within year Within /2 years Within 2 years DS* 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial DS*.8%.% DS* DS* DS*.8% DS* DS*.8%.% DS* DS* DS*.8% DS* DS* 3.5% DS* DS* DS* DS* 3.6% DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* In most states, very few students seeking certificates ever graduate. Associate Degree- Seeking Students All White Hispanic % On-time (2 years) Within 3 years Within 4 years Within 2 years Within 3 years Within 4 years.5%.% 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial 9.5%.8% 2.6% 2.4% 2.3% 4.7%.5%.8% 6.5% 8.% 8.4% 8.% 5.% 9.8% 9.5% 5.6% 2.8% 23.8%.5%.% 7.% 3.2% 25.7%.7%.9%.9% DS* DS*.7%.8%.%.2% 2.8% 2.9%.2% DS* 2.% 2.8% 3.%.2% 5.5% 5.8% 3.6% DS* 4.5% 5.3% 6.2% 3.7% Associate degree graduation rates are abysmal across the country for Hispanic and students, they re tragic. Bachelor s Degree- Seeking Students All White Hispanic On-time (4 years) Within 6 years Within 8 years Within 4 years Within 6 years Within 8 years 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial 5.% 5.4% 8.9%.% 3.5% 3.% 5.3% 5.4% 38.2% 38.7% 32.9% 22.2% 25.% 32.7% 39.2% 23.4% 46.3% 47.2% 34.8% 22.2% 25.% 37.3% 47.9% 28.8% 3.4% 3.7% DS* DS*.% 5.% 3.%.% 6.% 7.% 9.4% DS*.6% 4.9% 7.5% 6.7% 22.6% 23.7% 5.6% DS* 6.7% 8.4% 25.3% 4.7% 25.%.6% 39.2% Almost no one over the age of 25 graduates; students fresh out of high school are most likely to succeed. Data: Certificate cohort started in 25 6, associate cohort started in 24 5, bachelor's cohort started in 22 3 Given changing demographics, our country will not have enough skilled s to compete unless many more students from all backgrounds and walks of life graduate. = The state did not provide data for this metric. DS* = Fewer than students, so data were suppressed. College America n 3

216 UTAH 2 Retention rates drop from year to year. Many get discouraged and drop out Students in 2-year colleges who return to campus Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 % % 53.8% 29.5% 4.6% 32.2% Students in 4-year colleges who return to campus % 58.2% 45.% 4.5% % 4.7% 3.9% 27.7% after falling off track early. Students who earn expected first-year credits (24 credits) Associate Bachelor s (2 credits) Associate Bachelor s 52.3% 59.8% 28.3% 4.5% Staying enrolled is particularly tough for part-time students, who must often balance jobs and school. Remediation. 75.2% Data: Associate cohort started in 24 5, bachelor's cohort started in 22 3; earned credits from fall 26 2-Year Colleges 4-Year Colleges 22.8% 8.4% of freshmen require of those 3.3% 5.6% 8.7% of freshmen require of those 32.8% 23.4% and associated college-level courses in two years Graduate within 3 years (projected) Current approaches almost always guarantee failure. and associated college-level courses in two years Graduate within 6 years (projected) Data: Fall 26 College America n 4

217 UTAH 2 Precious time and money are lost when students don t graduate on schedule. Students are taking too much time Certificate Associate Bachelor s 4.9 years 5.7 years 5. years 6. years 6.7 years 7.8 years Should take year for full-time students Should take 2 years for full-time students Should take 4 years for full-time students and too many credits. Certificate Associate Bachelor s 47 credits 46 credits 92 credits 89 credits 89 credits 87 credits Should take 2 credits Should take 3 credits Should take 6 credits More students must graduate on time. Data: 27 8 College America n 5

218 UTAH 2 More time isn t giving us enough success. For certificate and associate degree students, graduation rates are very low even when more time. Certificate Associate DS* 9.5% 6.5% 2.8% 2.8% 5.5% In year In.5 years In 2 years In 2 years In 3 years In 4 years On-time graduation rates for bachelor s degree students are shockingly low. And adding time beyond six years produces little additional success. Bachelor s 5.% 38.2% 6.% 46.3% 22.6% In 4 years In 6 years In 8 years Data: Certificate cohort started in 25 6; associate cohort started in 24 5; bachelor's cohort started in 22 3 Even modest progress provides little comfort when overall graduation rates are so low. DS* = Fewer than students, so data were suppressed. College America n 6

219 VIRGINIA 2 For a strong economy, the skills gap must be closed. 66% 42% 24% By 22, jobs requiring a career certificate or college degree Skills gap Too few students make it through college. MEMBER Virginia adults who currently have an associate degree or higher Data: See the Sources and Methodology section on our website. Of students who enroll in a public college or university 2-Year Public College 4-Year Public College Enroll Return as sophomores Graduate on time (% time) 26 Additional graduates 5% time 2 5 2% time 2 Total graduates Graduate in 4 years 7 42 Graduate in 8 years Key to measuring time Associate Bachelor s % time 2 years 4 years 5% time 3 years 6 years 2% time 4 years 8 years Data: 2-year cohort started in fall 24; 4-year cohort started in fall 22 For too many students, the path through college ends with no degree and often lots of debt. Note: This report presents data only from public colleges and universities. College America n

220 VIRGINIA 2 We re making great progress in providing access to more students. Total public college enrollment: 349,425 Attending Pursuing Degrees & Certificates 28,55 9,854 4,27 4-year 58,57 2-year colleges colleges Total State Population, 8-24 White 63% College Enrollment White 62% College Graduation White 69% Hispanic 7% Hispanic 5% Hispanic 4% 23% Other races 7% 9% Other races 5% Data: Fall 29 enrollment from IPEDS; population data from Census ACS PUMS 6-8; degrees by race from 27- state submissions Now we must have more success from all students. 4% Other races 3% For states to compete, their students must earn more degrees and certificates. Overall Credentials Awarded Science, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) Credentials Awarded 26,223 29,74 5,3 6,9 2,9,,73, ,26, Certificate Associate Bachelor s Certificate Associate Bachelor s And all credentials should provide clear pathways to success. Data: 27 8 College America n 2

221 VIRGINIA 2 Graduation rates are very low, especially if you re poor, part time,, Hispanic, or older. Certificate-Seeking Students All White Hispanic % On-time ( year) Within /2 years Within 2 years Within year Within /2 years Within 2 years.% 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial 2.%.9%.% DS* DS* DS* DS* 2.2% DS* 4.% 5.%.% DS* 9.% 7.% 2.% 4.% 2.% 5.% 6.% DS* 3.2%.% 7.% 3.% 5.% 3.% DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS*.%.% DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS*.% DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* In most states, very few students seeking certificates ever graduate. Associate Degree- Seeking Students All White Hispanic % On-time (2 years) Within 3 years Within 4 years Within 2 years Within 3 years Within 4 years 6.2% 2.% 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial 4.% 5.3% 2.2%.% 5.% 4.% 4.% 3.% 2.% 6.% 7.7%.6% 9.% 5.% 3.% 6.% 3.% 2.% 2.% 22.2% 6.2% 2.% 9.% 7.% 2.% 7.% 7.%.%.% DS* DS*.%.%.3% DS*.% 5.% 6.% 4.% 3.% 6.% 4.% 6.% 7.% 4.% 9.%.% 7.% 5.% 9.% 7.% 9.%.% 7.% Associate degree graduation rates are abysmal across the country for Hispanic and students, they re tragic. Bachelor s Degree- Seeking Students All White Hispanic On-time (4 years) Within 6 years Within 8 years Within 4 years Within 6 years Within 8 years 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial 45.% 5.4% 39.8% 24.7% 5.% 22.% 46.% 27.% 2.% 72.% 76.% 69.% 52.% 27.% 43.% 72.% 56.% 4.% 73.% 77.6% 7.8% 54.3% 29.% 45.% 74.% 58.% 44.% 7.%.% DS* DS*.% DS* 8.% DS* DS* 23.% 26.% DS* 5.%.% DS* 27.% 7.% DS* 29.% 3.% DS* 2.% DS* DS* 33.% 22.% DS* 27.%.% 72.% Almost no one over the age of 25 graduates; students fresh out of high school are most likely to succeed. Data: Certificate cohort started in 25 6, associate cohort started in 24 5, bachelor's cohort started in 22 3 Given changing demographics, our country will not have enough skilled s to compete unless many more students from all backgrounds and walks of life graduate. = The state did not provide data for this metric. DS* = Fewer than students, so data were suppressed. College America n 3

222 VIRGINIA 2 Retention rates drop from year to year. Many get discouraged and drop out Students in 2-year colleges who return to campus Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 % % 57.% 34.% 38.% 26.% Students in 4-year colleges who return to campus % 84.% 75.% 7.% % 47.% 35.% 34.% after falling off track early. Students who earn expected first-year credits (24 credits) Associate Bachelor s (2 credits) Associate Bachelor s 37.% 88.% 3.5% 7.% Staying enrolled is particularly tough for part-time students, who must often balance jobs and school. Remediation. 76.% Data: Associate cohort started in 24 5, bachelor's cohort started in 22 3; earned credits from fall 26 2-Year Colleges 4-Year Colleges 43.%.3% of freshmen require of those 8.% of freshmen require of those 22.3% 2.% and associated college-level courses in two years Graduate within 3 years (projected) Current approaches almost always guarantee failure. 38.3% and associated college-level courses in two years 4.% Graduate within 6 years (projected) Data: Fall 26 College America n 4

223 VIRGINIA 2 Precious time and money are lost when students don t graduate on schedule. Students are taking too much time Certificate Associate Bachelor s 3.5 years 5.4 years Should take year for full-time students 4 years 5.6 years Should take 2 years for full-time students 4.4 years 5.6 years Should take 4 years for full-time students and too many credits. Certificate Associate Bachelor s 28 credits 3 credits 68 credits 68 credits 79 credits 8 credits Should take 2 credits Should take 3 credits Should take 6 credits More students must graduate on time. Data: 27 8 College America n 5

224 VIRGINIA 2 More time isn t giving us enough success. For certificate and associate degree students, graduation rates are very low even when more time. Certificate Associate 2.% 4.%.% 5.%.% In year In.5 years In 2 years 6.% 2.% 4.% 5.% 9.% In 2 years In 3 years In 4 years On-time graduation rates for bachelor s degree students are shockingly low. And adding time beyond six years produces little additional success. Bachelor s 72.% 73.% 45.% 23.% 29.% In 4 years In 6 years In 8 years Data: Certificate cohort started in 25 6; associate cohort started in 24 5; bachelor's cohort started in 22 3 Even modest progress provides little comfort when overall graduation rates are so low. College America n 6

225 WASHINGTON 2 For a strong economy, the skills gap must be closed. 7% 39% 3% By 22, jobs requiring a career certificate or college degree Skills gap Too few students make it through college. MEMBER Washington adults who currently have an associate degree or higher Data: See the Sources and Methodology section on our website. Of students who enroll in a public college or university 2-Year Public College 4-Year Public College Enroll Return as sophomores Graduate on time (% time) 6 23 Additional graduates 5% time 5 2 2% time 2 Total graduates Graduate in 4 years 5 26 Graduate in 8 years Key to measuring time Associate Bachelor s % time 2 years 4 years 5% time 3 years 6 years 2% time 4 years 8 years Data: 2-year cohort started in fall 24; 4-year cohort started in fall 22 For too many students, the path through college ends with no degree and often lots of debt. Note: This report presents data only from public colleges and universities. College America n

226 WASHINGTON 2 We re making great progress in providing access to more students. Total public college enrollment: 36,239 Attending Pursuing Degrees & Certificates 88,827 4-year 48,792 57,447 7,42 2-year colleges colleges Total State Population, 8-24 White 7% College Enrollment White 62% College Graduation White 68% Hispanic 2% Hispanic 7% Hispanic 6% 4% Other races 3% 4% Other races 27% Data: Fall 29 enrollment from IPEDS; population data from Census ACS PUMS 6-8; degrees by race from 27- state submissions Now we must have more success from all students. 4% Other races 22% For states to compete, their students must earn more degrees and certificates. Overall Credentials Awarded 2,347 2,37 Science, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) Credentials Awarded 2,463 4,55 5,392,7,5 5,44 4, Certificate Associate Bachelor s Certificate Associate Bachelor s And all credentials should provide clear pathways to success. = The state did not provide data for this metric. Data: 27 8 College America n 2

227 WASHINGTON 2 Graduation rates are very low, especially if you re poor, part time,, Hispanic, or older. Certificate-Seeking Students All White Hispanic % On-time ( year) Within /2 years Within 2 years Within year Within /2 years Within 2 years 2.6% 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial 6.5% 7.3% 6.5%.6% 2.4% 7.5% 2.9% 5.8% 9.8% 24.2% 25.6% 3.% 4.% 25.6% 23.% 23.7% 24.7% 2.% 28.% 29.6% 7.3% 5.3% 27.6% 26.6% 29.4% 28.3% 26.2% 4.% 3.6% 2.3% 7.8% 3.3% 6.% 3.9% 8.6% 3.3% 8.4% 7.9% 5.7% 7.8% 7.5% 9.8% 9.% 5.7% 7.8% 2.6% 2.8% 8.% 3.7%.4% 4.2% 3.8% 25.4% 3.5% In most states, very few students seeking certificates ever graduate. Associate Degree- Seeking Students All White Hispanic % On-time (2 years) Within 3 years Within 4 years Within 2 years Within 3 years Within 4 years 24.6% 8.5% 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial 3.6% 5.% 8.4% 8.% 3.9%.5% 4.% 2.% 9.% 26.3% 28.% 2.4% 4.9% 23.8% 2.3% 27.6% 23.7% 22.7% 3.2% 33.% 24.6% 8.5% 27.% 24.5% 33.% 28.6% 28.5% 4.4% 4.5% 2.% 7.% 4.6% 8.7% 4.8% 3.9% 2.3%.3%.5% 4.8%.2%.% 26.2%.2% 2.% 8.8% 5.3% 5.7% 9.3% 6.% 4.4% 29.7% 6.% 8.4% 4.9% Associate degree graduation rates are abysmal across the country for Hispanic and students, they re tragic. Bachelor s Degree- Seeking Students All White Hispanic On-time (4 years) Within 6 years Within 8 years Within 4 years Within 6 years Within 8 years 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial 59.6% 6.6% 5.3% 43.5% 44.% 52.3% 62.% 53.2% 63.2% 64.5% 56.% 47.4% 44.7% 54.% 66.% 56.6% 63.5% 64.9% 56.5% 48.5% 44.7% 54.6% 66.5% 57.% 3.7% 33.8% 29.7% 27.3% 27.5% 47.6% 33.9% 48.5% 33.7% 36.4% 29.7% 27.3% 29.% 49.3% 38.4% 5.9% 34.% 36.7% 29.7% 27.3% 29.3% 49.3% 38.8% 5.5% 44.7% 29.% 66.% Almost no one over the age of 25 graduates; students fresh out of high school are most likely to succeed. Data: Certificate cohort started in 25 6, associate cohort started in 24 5, bachelor's cohort started in 22 3 Given changing demographics, our country will not have enough skilled s to compete unless many more students from all backgrounds and walks of life graduate. = The state did not provide data for this metric. College America n 3

228 WASHINGTON 2 Retention rates drop from year to year. Many get discouraged and drop out Students in 2-year colleges who return to campus Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 % % 57.2% 29.3% 4.7% 26.6% Students in 4-year colleges who return to campus % 8.9% 69.4% 62.8% % 22.5% 5.% 9.8% after falling off track early. Students who earn expected first-year credits (24 credits) Associate Bachelor s (2 credits) Associate Bachelor s 49.6% 38.6% Staying enrolled is particularly tough for part-time students, who must often balance jobs and school. Remediation. 53.4% Data: Associate cohort started in 24 5, bachelor's cohort started in 22 3; earned credits from fall 26 2-Year Colleges of freshmen require of those 4-Year Colleges 45.9% 4.7% of freshmen require of those 9.5% and associated college-level courses in two years 22.7% Graduate within 3 years (projected) Current approaches almost always guarantee failure. and associated college-level courses in two years Graduate within 6 years (projected) Data: Fall 26 = The state did not provide data for this metric. College America n 4

229 WASHINGTON 2 Precious time and money are lost when students don t graduate on schedule. Students are taking too much time Certificate Associate Bachelor s 2.2 years 4. years Should take year for full-time students 3. years 4.7 years Should take 2 years for full-time students 4. years 4.4 years Should take 4 years for full-time students and too many credits. Certificate Associate Bachelor s 63 credits 63 credits 7 credits 68 credits Should take 2 credits Should take 3 credits Should take 6 credits More students must graduate on time. Data: 27 8 = The state did not provide data for this metric. College America n 5

230 WASHINGTON 2 More time isn t giving us enough success. For certificate and associate degree students, graduation rates are very low even when more time. Certificate Associate 6.5% 24.2% 8.4% 28.% 2.6% 3.6% 26.3%.3% 3.2% 5.3% In year In.5 years In 2 years In 2 years In 3 years In 4 years On-time graduation rates for bachelor s degree students are shockingly low. And adding time beyond six years produces little additional success. Bachelor s 59.6% 63.2% 63.5% 33.7% 34.% In 4 years In 6 years In 8 years Data: Certificate cohort started in 25 6; associate cohort started in 24 5; bachelor's cohort started in 22 3 Even modest progress provides little comfort when overall graduation rates are so low. College America n 6

231 WEST VIRGINIA 2 For a strong economy, the skills gap must be closed. 53% 28% 25% By 22, jobs requiring a career certificate or college degree Skills gap Too few students make it through college. MEMBER West Virginia adults who currently have an associate degree or higher Data: See the Sources and Methodology section on our website. Of students who enroll in a public college or university 2-Year Public College 4-Year Public College Enroll Return as sophomores Graduate on time (% time) 5 Additional graduates 5% time 2 8 2% time 3 2 Total graduates 6 35 Graduate in 4 years 6 35 Graduate in 8 years Key to measuring time Associate Bachelor s % time 2 years 4 years 5% time 3 years 6 years 2% time 4 years 8 years Data: 2-year cohort started in fall 24; 4-year cohort started in fall 22 For too many students, the path through college ends with no degree and often lots of debt. Note: This report presents data only from public colleges and universities. College America n

232 WEST VIRGINIA 2 We re making great progress in providing access to more students. Total public college enrollment: 82,58 Attending Pursuing Degrees & Certificates 6,777 59,95 2,74 4-year 2-year colleges 22,568 colleges Total State Population, 8-24 White 9% College Enrollment White 86% College Graduation White 87% Hispanic 2% Hispanic 2% Hispanic 2% 5% Other races 3% 6% Other races 7% Now we must have more success from all students. 5% Other races 6% Data: Fall 29 enrollment from IPEDS; population data from Census ACS PUMS 6-8 For states to compete, their students must earn more degrees and certificates. Overall Credentials Awarded Science, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) Credentials Awarded 7,349 8,298,245, ,4 2, Certificate Associate Bachelor s Certificate Associate Bachelor s And all credentials should provide clear pathways to success. Data: 27 8 College America n 2

233 WEST VIRGINIA 2 Graduation rates are very low, especially if you re poor, part time,, Hispanic, or older. Certificate-Seeking Students All White Hispanic % On-time ( year) Within /2 years Within 2 years Within year Within /2 years Within 2 years DS* 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial.7%.6% DS* DS* 22.6%.%.5% DS*.3% 3.8% 4.% DS* DS* 22.6% 4.% 3.2% DS* 4.5% 6.% 6.3% DS* DS* 22.6% 8.% 5.8% DS* 7.7% DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* 5.3% DS* DS* DS* 9.% DS* DS* DS* DS* 5.3% DS* DS* DS* 9.% In most states, very few students seeking certificates ever graduate. Associate Degree- Seeking Students All White Hispanic % On-time (2 years) Within 3 years Within 4 years Within 2 years Within 3 years Within 4 years.% 9.6% 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial 5.2% 5.6% 7.4%.7% 4.8% 2.6% 6.% 3.9%.8% 2.6% 3.%.% 7.5% 4.2% 6.9% 3.7%.6% 8.4% 6.7% 7.4%.% 9.6% 8.4% 9.7% 8.% 4.6% 2.5%.5%.6% DS* DS*.9% DS* DS* DS*.3% 4.7% 5.% DS* DS* 6.% 2.6% 3.2% 2.5% 3.4% 8.3% 8.8%.% DS*.% 6.% 5.6% 6.4% 7.7% Associate degree graduation rates are abysmal across the country for Hispanic and students, they re tragic. Bachelor s Degree- Seeking Students All White Hispanic On-time (4 years) Within 6 years Within 8 years Within 4 years Within 6 years Within 8 years 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial 22.2% 23.% 6.4%.6% 8.7%.8% 23.6% 5.4% 8.2% 48.2% 49.% 42.2% 34.6% 23.% 27.9% 5.5% 38.7% 3.8% 5.9% 52.9% 43.% 36.9% 25.4% 32.2% 54.2% 43.5% 36.7%.2%.3% DS* DS*.9% 2.2% DS* DS*.%.3% 9.8% DS*.% 8.4% 3.%.2% 6.% 8.8% 4.5% 4.2% DS*.% 4.% 5.2% 4.6% 9.6% 2.% 23.% 8.4% 5.5% Almost no one over the age of 25 graduates; students fresh out of high school are most likely to succeed. Data: Certificate cohort started in 25 6, associate cohort started in 24 5, bachelor's cohort started in 22 3 Given changing demographics, our country will not have enough skilled s to compete unless many more students from all backgrounds and walks of life graduate. DS* = Fewer than students, so data were suppressed. College America n 3

234 WEST VIRGINIA 2 Retention rates drop from year to year. Many get discouraged and drop out Students in 2-year colleges who return to campus Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 % % 6.% 4.4% 4.9% 29.8% Students in 4-year colleges who return to campus % 77.9% 67.7% 63.2% % 49.2% 37.9% 32.4% after falling off track early. Students who earn expected first-year credits (24 credits) Associate Bachelor s (2 credits) Associate Bachelor s 32.9% 65.4% 32.9% 35.9% Staying enrolled is particularly tough for part-time students, who must often balance jobs and school. Remediation. 63.7% Data: Associate cohort started in 24 5, bachelor's cohort started in 22 3; earned credits from fall 26 2-Year Colleges 4-Year Colleges 69.3% 9.6% of freshmen require of those 69.9% of freshmen require of those 9.2% 8.4% and associated college-level courses in two years Graduate within 3 years (projected) Current approaches almost always guarantee failure. 3.5% and associated college-level courses in two years 3.8% Graduate within 6 years (projected) Data: Fall 26 College America n 4

235 WEST VIRGINIA 2 Precious time and money are lost when students don t graduate on schedule. Students are taking too much time Certificate Associate Bachelor s 4.4 years 5. years 5 years 6.2 years 5.3 years 7 years Should take year for full-time students Should take 2 years for full-time students Should take 4 years for full-time students and too many credits. Certificate Associate Bachelor s 77 credits 75 credits 99 credits 9 credits 44 credits 46 credits Should take 2 credits Should take 3 credits Should take 6 credits More students must graduate on time. Data: 27 8 College America n 5

236 WEST VIRGINIA 2 More time isn t giving us enough success. For certificate and associate degree students, graduation rates are very low even when more time. Certificate Associate.7% 3.8% DS* 6.% DS* 5.2% 2.6% 4.7% 6.7% 8.3% In year In.5 years In 2 years In 2 years In 3 years In 4 years On-time graduation rates for bachelor s degree students are shockingly low. And adding time beyond six years produces little additional success. Bachelor s 48.2% 5.9% 22.2%.3% 4.5% In 4 years In 6 years In 8 years Data: Certificate cohort started in 25 6; associate cohort started in 24 5; bachelor's cohort started in 22 3 Even modest progress provides little comfort when overall graduation rates are so low. DS* = Fewer than students, so data were suppressed. College America n 6

237 WYOMING 2 For a strong economy, the skills gap must be closed. 65% 34% 3% By 22, jobs requiring a career certificate or college degree Skills gap Too few students make it through college. MEMBER Wyoming adults who currently have an associate degree or higher Data: See the Sources and Methodology section on our website. Of students who enroll in a public college or university 2-Year Public College 4-Year Public College Enroll Return as sophomores 47 9 Graduate on time (% time) 7 2 Additional graduates 5% time 8 2% time 4 Total graduates 29 4 Graduate in 4 years 33 Graduate in 8 years Key to measuring time Associate Bachelor s % time 2 years 4 years 5% time 3 years 6 years 2% time 4 years 8 years = The state did not provide data for this metric. Data: 2-year cohort started in fall 24; 4-year cohort started in fall 22 For too many students, the path through college ends with no degree and often lots of debt. Note: This report presents data only from public colleges and universities. College America n

238 WYOMING 2 We re making great progress in providing access to more students. Total public college enrollment: 33,3 Attending Pursuing Degrees & Certificates 7,929 23,255 5,74 4-year 2-year colleges 9,748 colleges Total State Population, 8-24 White 86% College Enrollment White 84% College Graduation White 9% Hispanic 8% Hispanic 5% Hispanic 5% % Other races 5% % Other races % Data: Fall 29 enrollment from IPEDS; population data from Census ACS PUMS 6-8; degrees by race from 27- state submissions Now we must have more success from all students. % Other races 5% For states to compete, their students must earn more degrees and certificates. Overall Credentials Awarded Science, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) Credentials Awarded 2,3 652, Certificate Associate Bachelor s Certificate Associate Bachelor s And all credentials should provide clear pathways to success. = The state did not provide data for this metric. Data: 27 8 College America n 2

239 WYOMING 2 Graduation rates are very low, especially if you re poor, part time,, Hispanic, or older. Certificate-Seeking Students All White Hispanic % On-time ( year) Within /2 years Within 2 years Within year Within /2 years Within 2 years 4.% 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial 33.7% 34.% 5.% DS* 2.4% 37.5% 38.2% DS* 2.9% 38.8% 39.4% 5.% DS* 39.3% 37.5% 38.2% DS* 9.4% 52.% 52.% 5.% DS* 53.6% 43.8% 52.7% DS* 35.5% 4.7% 5.4% DS* DS* 8.% DS* DS* DS* DS* 9.3%.8% DS* DS* 6.% DS* DS* DS* 6.7% 4.% 6.2% DS* DS* 24.% DS*.% DS* 6.7% In most states, very few students seeking certificates ever graduate. Associate Degree- Seeking Students All White Hispanic % On-time (2 years) Within 3 years Within 4 years Within 2 years Within 3 years Within 4 years 32.3% 9.% 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial 2.9% 22.5% 8.9% 9.% 42.2% 32.6% 4.4% 23.% 9.7% 32.3% 33.2% 26.% 9.% 52.3% 4.3% 25.9% 33.7% 2.7% 36.8% 37.7% 32.3% 9.% 56.% 43.5% 3.9% 37.6% 27.5% 7.7% 7.8% 8.3% 2.5%.7%.9%.4%.8% 3.% 2.7% 2.6% 9.4% 2.5% 8.3% 4.3% 4.4% 6.9% 5.6% 7.6% 7.5% 25.% 2.5% 23.7% 9.5% 8.4% 2.7%.3% Associate degree graduation rates are abysmal across the country for Hispanic and students, they re tragic. Bachelor s Degree- Seeking Students All White Hispanic On-time (4 years) Within 6 years Within 8 years Within 4 years Within 6 years Within 8 years 25 and Over 2 24 Directly from HS (age 7 9) Pell Grant Recipients (at entry) Remedial Almost no one over the age of 25 graduates; students fresh out of high school are most likely to succeed. Data: Certificate cohort started in 25 6, associate cohort started in 24 5, bachelor's cohort started in 22 3 Given changing demographics, our country will not have enough skilled s to compete unless many more students from all backgrounds and walks of life graduate. = The state did not provide data for this metric. DS* = Fewer than students, so data were suppressed. College America n 3

240 WYOMING 2 Retention rates drop from year to year. Many get discouraged and drop out Students in 2-year colleges who return to campus Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 % % 6.4% 3.8% 43.% 3.4% Students in 4-year colleges who return to campus % % after falling off track early. Students who earn expected first-year credits (24 credits) Associate Bachelor s (2 credits) Associate Bachelor s 53.9% 45.% Staying enrolled is particularly tough for part-time students, who must often balance jobs and school. Remediation. 46.% Data: Associate cohort started in 24 5, bachelor's cohort started in 22 3; earned credits from fall 26 2-Year Colleges of freshmen require of those and associated college-level courses in two years Graduate within 3 years (projected) Current approaches almost always guarantee failure. 4-Year Colleges 49.3% 3.% 2.7% of freshmen require of those and associated college-level courses in two years Graduate within 6 years (projected) Data: Fall 26 = The state did not provide data for this metric. College America n 4

241 WYOMING 2 Precious time and money are lost when students don t graduate on schedule. Students are taking too much time Certificate Associate Bachelor s 2 years 6.9 years Should take year for full-time students 3.6 years 6.7 years Should take 2 years for full-time students Should take 4 years for full-time students and too many credits. Certificate Associate Bachelor s 56 credits 55 credits Should take 3 credits 83 credits 82 credits Should take 6 credits Should take 2 credits More students must graduate on time. Data: 27 8 = The state did not provide data for this metric. College America n 5

242 WYOMING 2 More time isn t giving us enough success. For certificate and associate degree students, graduation rates are very low even when more time. Certificate Associate 33.7% 38.8% 9.3% 52.% 4.% 2.9% 32.3% 2.7% 36.8% 7.6% In year In.5 years In 2 years In 2 years In 3 years In 4 years On-time graduation rates for bachelor s degree students are shockingly low. And adding time beyond six years produces little additional success. Bachelor s In 4 years In 6 years In 8 years Data: Certificate cohort started in 25 6; associate cohort started in 24 5; bachelor's cohort started in 22 3 Even modest progress provides little comfort when overall graduation rates are so low. = The state did not provide data for this metric. College America n 6

243 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS This is an unprecedented report, which would not have been possible without the support and hands-on expertise and assistance of many people and institutions. The 33 states: their governors, higher education leaders, and higher education institutions. They showed real courage in providing these data, the good and the bad. Our philanthropic partners: Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Carnegie Corporation of New York, Ford Foundation, Lumina Foundation for Education, and the W.K. Kellogg Foundation. Our staff: Stan Jones (President), Cheryl Orr Dixon (Senior Vice President), Tom Sugar (Senior Vice President and Project Lead), Mike Baumgartner (Vice President, Finance and Special Projects), Dominique Raymond (Director, Alliance State Relations), Wes Moore (Research Analyst), Renee Davidson (Executive Assistant), and Jeff Stanley (Associate Vice President, State Higher Education Executive Officers). And our production partners: KSA-Plus Communications, which provided editorial assistance and graphic design.

244 about complete college america It s really about the states... we re just here to help. Established in 29, College America is a national nonprofit with a single mission: to work with states to significantly increase the number of s with quality career certificates or college degrees and to close attainment gaps for traditionally underrepresented populations. The need for this work is compelling. Between 97 and 29, undergraduate enrollment in the United States more than doubled, while the completion rate has been virtually unchanged. We ve made progress in giving students from all backgrounds access to college but we haven t finished the all-important job of helping them achieve a degree. Counting the success of all students is an essential first step. And then we must move with urgency to reinvent higher education to meet the needs of the new majority of students on our campuses, delicately balancing the jobs they need with the education they desire. College America believes there is great reason for optimism... and a clear path forward. With a little more support and a lot of common sense we can ensure that many more young people get the high-quality college education that will help them live productive and fulfilling lives. All s will share in the benefits of their success. 25 H Street, NW, Suite 85 Washington, DC 25 completecollege.org

remediation Higher Education s Bridge to Nowhere

remediation Higher Education s Bridge to Nowhere remediation Higher Education s Bridge to Nowhere Remediation is a broken system. There s a better way start many more students in college with just-in-time support. April 2012 Reformers Who Lead It In

More information

remediation Higher Education s Bridge to Nowhere

remediation Higher Education s Bridge to Nowhere Higher Education s Bridge to Nowhere Remediation is a broken system. There s a better way start many more students in college with just-in-time support. April 2012 Reformers Who Lead It In our groundbreaking

More information

Four-Year MYTH Restore the promise of graduating on time.

Four-Year MYTH Restore the promise of graduating on time. Four-Year MYTH Make college more affordable. Restore the promise of graduating on time. The vast majority of American college students do not graduate on time but many more can saving themselves and their

More information

EDUCATION BLUEPRINT: AN ECONOMY BUILT TO LAST

EDUCATION BLUEPRINT: AN ECONOMY BUILT TO LAST EDUCATION BLUEPRINT: AN ECONOMY BUILT TO LAST Table of Contents Educating Our Way to An Economy Built to Last 1 Higher Education Access and Success: Securing America s Economic Competitiveness 3 Reforming

More information

California is facing a serious shortfall in its supply of college-educated workers. Projections

California is facing a serious shortfall in its supply of college-educated workers. Projections Closing the Gap Meeting California s Need for College Graduates Hans Johnson Ria Sengupta with contributions from Patrick Murphy Supported with funding from The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation istockphoto

More information

When Girls Don t Graduate. A Call to Improve High School Graduation Rates for Girls

When Girls Don t Graduate. A Call to Improve High School Graduation Rates for Girls F When Girls Don t Graduate WE ALL FAIL A Call to Improve High School Graduation Rates for Girls The National Women s Law Center is a nonprofit organization that has been working since 1972 to advance

More information

MEASURING UP THE NATIONAL REPORT CARD ON HIGHER EDUCATION

MEASURING UP THE NATIONAL REPORT CARD ON HIGHER EDUCATION MEASURING UP 2008 THE NATIONAL REPORT CARD ON HIGHER EDUCATION THE NATIONAL CENTER FOR PUBLIC POLICY AND HIGHER EDUCATION BOARD OF DIRECTORS Chairman THE HONORABLE JAMES B. HUNT JR. Womble Carlyle Sandridge

More information

BEYOND NEED AND MERIT Strengthening State Grant Programs

BEYOND NEED AND MERIT Strengthening State Grant Programs May 2012 BEYOND NEED AND MERIT Strengthening State Grant Programs Getty, Peter Glass Brookings Institution State Grant Aid Study Group Sandy Baum, Chair David W. Breneman Matthew M. Chingos Ronald G. Ehrenberg

More information

January 2014 IN THIS TOGETHER: The Hidden Cost of Young Adult Unemployment. a policy brief by: Rory O Sullivan, Konrad Mugglestone, and Tom Allison

January 2014 IN THIS TOGETHER: The Hidden Cost of Young Adult Unemployment. a policy brief by: Rory O Sullivan, Konrad Mugglestone, and Tom Allison January 2014 IN THIS TOGETHER: The Hidden Cost of Young Adult Unemployment a policy brief by: Rory O Sullivan, Konrad Mugglestone, and Tom Allison IN THIS TOGETHER Acknowledgements The authors would like

More information

Cracking the Credit Hour

Cracking the Credit Hour september 2012 Cracking the Credit Hour amy laitinen New America Foundation and Education Sector This report is funded through generous grants from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and the Lumina

More information

TIME TO LEAD. The Need for Excellence in Public Higher Education

TIME TO LEAD. The Need for Excellence in Public Higher Education TIME TO LEAD The Need for Excellence in Public Higher Education A Report to the People of Massachusetts From the Massachusetts Department of Higher Education September 2012 Time to Lead There is a knowledge

More information

Table of Contents. Raising Their Voices 1

Table of Contents. Raising Their Voices 1 Table of Contents Letter to Communities... 3 Introduction... 5 Raising Their Voices... 9 Locating the Causes of Student Dropout...10 High Standards and Expectations... 17 Parental Engagement...24 Conclusion...28

More information

Out-of-Field Teaching: The Great Obstacle to Meeting the Highly Qualified Teacher Challenge

Out-of-Field Teaching: The Great Obstacle to Meeting the Highly Qualified Teacher Challenge Issue Brief Education Division Contact: Bridget Curran, 202/624-5386 or bcurran@nga.org July 21, 2004 Out-of-Field Teaching: The Great Obstacle to Meeting the Highly Qualified Teacher Challenge By Richard

More information

Sinking or Swimming: Findings from a Survey of State Adult Education Tuition and Financing Policies

Sinking or Swimming: Findings from a Survey of State Adult Education Tuition and Financing Policies N C S D A E National Council of State Directors of Adult Education Sinking or Swimming: Findings from a Survey of State Adult Education Tuition and Financing Policies June 2012 Marcie Foster with Lennox

More information

FLORIDA TEACHERS AND THE TEACHING PROFESSION

FLORIDA TEACHERS AND THE TEACHING PROFESSION FLORIDA TEACHERS AND THE TEACHING PROFESSION Teaching Profession Committee January 2003 FLORIDA TEACHERS and the TEACHING PROFESSION Overview Table of Contents I. THE TEACHER WORKFORCE 2 A. THE RECRUITMENT

More information

Borrowers Who Drop Out

Borrowers Who Drop Out A Neglected Aspect of the College Student Loan Trend By Lawrence Gladieux and Laura Perna May 2005 The National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education National Center Report #05-2 2005 by The National

More information

The Health of the Public Charter School Movement: A State-By-State Analysis

The Health of the Public Charter School Movement: A State-By-State Analysis The Health of the Public Charter School Movement: A State-By-State Analysis OCTOBER 2014 Table of Contents 1 Introduction 3 Methodological Overview 7 The 2014 Health of the Public Charter School Movement

More information

July 2014. Some College, No Degree: A National View of Students with Some College Enrollment, but No Completion

July 2014. Some College, No Degree: A National View of Students with Some College Enrollment, but No Completion 7 July 2014 Some College, No Degree: A National View of Students with Some College Enrollment, but No Completion Some College, No Degree: A National View of Students with Some College Enrollment, but No

More information

Locked Up and Locked Out:

Locked Up and Locked Out: Locked Up and Locked Out: An Educational Perspective on the U.S. Prison Population Policy Information Report Listening. Learning. Leading. This report was written by: Richard J. Coley Paul E. Barton Educational

More information

Who Pays? A Distributional Analysis of the Tax Systems in All 50 States Fifth Edition

Who Pays? A Distributional Analysis of the Tax Systems in All 50 States Fifth Edition Who Pays? A Distributional Analysis of the Tax Systems in All 50 States Fifth Edition Institute on Taxation & Economic Policy January 2015 About The Institute on Taxation & Economic Policy The Institute

More information

Who Will Teach? Experience Matters

Who Will Teach? Experience Matters Who Will Teach? Experience Matters Thomas G. Carroll,Ph.D., President Elizabeth Foster, Director of Strategic Initiatives January 2010 The National Commission on Teaching and America s Future (NCTAF) is

More information

Parity or Disparity: The State of Mental Health in America

Parity or Disparity: The State of Mental Health in America Parity or Disparity: The State of Mental Health in America 2015 Acknowledgements Mental Health America (MHA), formerly the National Mental Health Association, was founded in 1909 and is the nation s leading

More information

Improving Student Transfer from Community Colleges to Four-Year Institutions The Perspective of Leaders from Baccalaureate-Granting Institutions

Improving Student Transfer from Community Colleges to Four-Year Institutions The Perspective of Leaders from Baccalaureate-Granting Institutions Transfer and the Four-Year Institution Improving Student Transfer from Community Colleges to Four-Year Institutions The Perspective of Leaders from Baccalaureate-Granting Institutions July 2011 The College

More information

Beyond One-Size-Fits-All College Dreams Alternative Pathways to Desirable Careers

Beyond One-Size-Fits-All College Dreams Alternative Pathways to Desirable Careers Beyond One-Size-Fits-All College Dreams Alternative Pathways to Desirable Careers ILLUSTRATIONS BY KENNETH MCMILLAN By James E. Rosenbaum, Jennifer L. Stephan, and Janet E. Rosenbaum Ask middle and high

More information

Trends in0. Trends Higher Education Series COLLEGE PRICING 2014

Trends in0. Trends Higher Education Series COLLEGE PRICING 2014 Trends in0 1 Trends Higher Education Series COLLEGE PRICING 2014 See the Trends in Higher Education website at trends.collegeboard.org for the figures and tables in this report and for more information

More information

Can I Get a Little Advice Here? How an Overstretched High School Guidance System Is Undermining Students College Aspirations

Can I Get a Little Advice Here? How an Overstretched High School Guidance System Is Undermining Students College Aspirations Can I Get a Little Advice Here? How an Overstretched High School Guidance System Is Undermining Students College Aspirations A Public Agenda Report for THE Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation Can I get a little

More information

The Silent Epidemic Perspectives of High School Dropouts

The Silent Epidemic Perspectives of High School Dropouts The Silent Epidemic Perspectives of High School Dropouts A report by Civic Enterprises in association with Peter D. Hart Research Associates for the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation March 2006 By: John

More information

Chapter 2. PROJECTIONS OF HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES

Chapter 2. PROJECTIONS OF HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES Chapter 2. PROJECTIONS OF HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES The U.S. population which numbered 311.6 million in 2011, according to U.S. Census Bureau estimates has grown by almost 4 percent in the five years since

More information

With Their Whole Lives Ahead of Them. Myths and Realities About Why So Many Students Fail to Finish College

With Their Whole Lives Ahead of Them. Myths and Realities About Why So Many Students Fail to Finish College With Their Whole Lives Ahead of Them Myths and Realities About Why So Many Students Fail to Finish College A Public Agenda Report for THE Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation With Their Whole Lives Ahead of

More information

The Price of Prisons What Incarceration Costs Taxpayers

The Price of Prisons What Incarceration Costs Taxpayers CENTER ON SENTENCING AND CORRECTIONS The Price of Prisons What Incarceration Costs Taxpayers JANUARY 2012 (UPDATED 7/20/12) Christian Henrichson Ruth Delaney Executive Summary Persistent fiscal challenges

More information