This curriculum is part of the Educational Program of Studies of the Rahway Public Schools. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

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1 CURRICULUM FOR SCIENCE GRADE 7

2 This curriculum is part of the Educational Program of Studies of the Rahway Public Schools. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS Christine H. Salcito, Director of Curriculum and Instruction Kevin Robinson, Program Supervisor of STEM The Board acknowledges the following who contributed to the preparation of this curriculum. Patricia Volino-Reinoso Subject/Course Title: Date of Board Adoptions: Science September 18, 2012 Grade 7

3 RAHWAY PUBLIC SCHOOLS CURRICULUM UNIT OVERVIEW Content Area: Planetary Science Unit Title: Investigation 1: Where Am I? Target Course/Grade Level: 7 th Grade Science Unit Summary: The Planetary Science course emphasizes the use of knowledge and evidence to construct explanations for the structures and motions of objects in the Solar System. Students develop the understanding that the Earth and Solar System are comprised of closely coupled systems. Earth is the third planet from the Sun in a system that includes the Moon, the Sun, eight other planets and their moons, and smaller objects, such as asteroids and comets. The Sun, an average star, is the central and largest body in the solar system. Most objects in the Solar System are in regular and predictable motion governed by the force of gravity. Those motions explain such phenomena as the day, the year, seasons, phases of the Moon, and eclipses. Approximate Length of Unit: 4 class periods Primary interdisciplinary connections: Mathematics A, Language Arts: Writing 8.1, 8.2, 8.4, 8.5, 8.6, Speaking and Listening 8.1, 8.4, 8.5, Language st Century Life and Career Skills: Standard st Century Life and Career Skills: All students will demonstrate the creative, critical thinking, collaboration, and problem-solving skills needed to function successfully as both global citizens and workers in diverse ethnic and organizational cultures. Standard 9.3 Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation: All students will apply knowledge about and engage in the process of career awareness, exploration, and preparation in order to navigate the globally competitive work environment of the information age. LEARNING TARGETS Content Area Strand CPI 5.1 Science Practices A. Understand Scientific Explanations 5.1 Science Practices B. Generate Scientific Evidence Through Active Investigations A A A B B B B.4

4 5.1 Science Practices C. Reflect on Scientific Knowledge 5.1. Science Practices D. Participating Productively in Science C C C D D D Physical Science A. Objects in the Universe A A.2 Unit Understandings Students will understand A map is a representation of a place or an area. Elevation is the distance above the Earth s Surface, often measure from sea level. Unit Essential Questions How do maps from various elevations vary from each other? How does your location change your perspective of the world around you? Knowledge and Skills Students will know As your point of view rises in elevation, details on maps decrease. Human-made structures decrease as you rise in elevation, while natural made structures increase. Students will be able to Explain that a person s specific location can be described in many ways, depending on the particular frame of reference. Explain that the number of Earth structures that can be identified decreases with elevation due to the ability of the eye and other optical instruments to resolve detail. EVIDENCE OF LEARNING Assessment Teacher observations Collected Maps Response sheet Where Am I? Response sheet Bird s Eye View Self Assessment Mid Summative Exam #1 Homework Learning Activities Students will draw a map to represent the school environment. Students will establish location in terms of a frame of reference (relationship to other objects). Students will interpret representations of human-made and natural structures in photographs taken from various elevations.

5 RESOURCES Teacher Resources: Full Option Science Systems (FOSS) kit: Teachers Edition Student Planetary Science Resource Book Student Planetary Science Lab Book FOSS Website ( Equipment Needed: Overhead Projector/ Computer and Internet connection as needed DVR/ VCR Laboratory equipment as specified for unit

6 RAHWAY PUBLIC SCHOOLS CURRICULUM Content Area: Planetary Science Unit Title: Investigation 2: Round Earth/Flat Earth Target Course/Grade Level: 7 th Grade Science UNIT OVERVIEW Unit Summary: The Planetary Science course emphasizes the use of knowledge and evidence to construct explanations for the structures and motions of objects in the Solar System. Students develop the understanding that the Earth and Solar System are comprised of closely coupled systems. Earth is the third planet from the Sun in a system that includes the Moon, the Sun, eight other planets and their moons, and smaller objects, such as asteroids and comets. The Sun, an average star, is the central and largest body in the solar system. Most objects in the Solar System are in regular and predictable motion governed by the force of gravity. Those motions explain such phenomena as the day, the year, seasons, phases of the Moon, and eclipses. Approximate Length of Unit: 3-4 class periods Primary interdisciplinary connections: Mathematics A, Language Arts: Writing 8.1, 8.2, 8.4, 8.5, 8.6, Speaking and Listening 8.1, 8.4, 8.5, Language st Century Life and Career Skills: Standard st Century Life and Career Skills: All students will demonstrate the creative, critical thinking, collaboration, and problem-solving skills needed to function successfully as both global citizens and workers in diverse ethnic and organizational cultures. Standard Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation: LEARNING TARGETS Content Area Standard Content Area Strand CPI 5.1 Science Practices A. Understand Scientific Explanations A A Science Practices B. Generate Scientific Evidence Through Active Investigations 5.1 Science Practices C. Reflect on Scientific Knowledge A B B B B C C C.3

7 5.1. Science Practices D. Participating Productively in Science D D D Physical Science A. Objects in the Universe A A.2 All students will apply knowledge about and engage in the process of career awareness, exploration, and preparation in order to navigate the globally competitive work environment of the information age. Unit Understandings Students will understand that The horizon is where the sky and the Earth appear to meet. Line of sight is the straight, unimpeded path taken by light from an object to an eye. Illuminated opaque objects cast shadows on the side away from the source of light. The length of the shadow depends (in part) upon the angle of the incoming light. Unit Essential Questions What evidence was historically used to induce that the Earth is round? Is the Earth round? How do you know that the Earth is round? Knowledge and Skills Students will know Various cultures throughout history have used evidence to prove that the Earth is round. Sailors of many cultures understood the Earth to be round because a ship seems to sink into the horizon. The Earth is round. We know the Earth is round from observing ships as they sail out to see over the horizon. Students will be able to Discuss how objects disappear over the horizon. Explain how the apparent disappearance of ships over a horizon is evidence for a round Earth. Explain how the relationship between latitude and shadow length is evidence for a round Earth. Make observations and generate evidence to support an idea. Assessment Informal Notes Work Sheet Shape of the Earth Response Sheet Round Earth/ Flat Earth Self Assessment Teacher observations Homework Mid Summative Exam #2 EVIDENCE OF LEARNING

8 Learning Activities Use models and computer simulations to observe ships sailing on round and flat Earths. Model sunlight shining on poles inserted vertically into round and flat Earths Observe, collect and graph shadow data RESOURCES Teacher Resources: Full Option Science Systems (FOSS) kit: Teachers Edition Student Planetary Science Resource Book Student Planetary Science Lab Book FOSS Website ( Equipment Needed: Overhead Projector/ Computer and Internet connection as needed DVR/ VCR Laboratory equipment as specified for unit

9 RAHWAY PUBLIC SCHOOLS CURRICULUM Content Area: Planetary Science Unit Title: Investigation 3: Day/Night Target Course/Grade Level: 7 th Grade Science UNIT OVERVIEW Unit Summary: The Planetary Science course emphasizes the use of knowledge and evidence to construct explanations for the structures and motions of objects in the Solar System. Students develop the understanding that the Earth and Solar System are comprised of closely coupled systems. Earth is the third planet from the Sun in a system that includes the Moon, the Sun, eight other planets and their moons, and smaller objects, such as asteroids and comets. The Sun, an average star, is the central and largest body in the solar system. Most objects in the Solar System are in regular and predictable motion governed by the force of gravity. Those motions explain such phenomena as the day, the year, seasons, phases of the Moon, and eclipses. Approximate Length of Unit: 6 class periods Primary interdisciplinary connections: Mathematics A, Language Arts: Writing 8.1, 8.2, 8.4, 8.5, 8.6, Speaking and Listening 8.1, 8.4, 8.5, Language st Century Life and Career Skills: Standard st Century Life and Career Skills: All students will demonstrate the creative, critical thinking, collaboration, and problem-solving skills needed to function successfully as both global citizens and workers in diverse ethnic and organizational cultures. Standard 9.3 Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation: All students will apply knowledge about and engage in the process of career awareness, exploration, and preparation in order to navigate the globally competitive work environment of the information age. LEARNING TARGETS Content Area Standard Content Area Strand CPI 5.1 Science Practices A. Understand Scientific Explanations A A A Science Practices B. Generate Scientific Evidence Through Active Investigations B B B B.4

10 5.1 Science Practices C. Reflect on Scientific Knowledge C C C Science Practices D. Participating Productively in Science D D D Physical Science A. Objects in the Universe A A A.2 Unit Understandings Students will understand that... At all times, half of the Earth, an opaque sphere, is illuminated (day) and half is dark (night). The sun is a light source. Objects in the path of light are illuminated. Opaque objects stop light, creating shadows (darkness) behind them. Unit Essential Questions What celestial motions result in the day/night cycle on Earth? Knowledge and Skills Students will know Day and Night are caused by the Earth s rotation on its tilted axis. Day and Night are predictable patterns because the Earth s rotation is consistent. Students will be able to Explain the day/night cycle as a consequence of an illuminated sphere rotating on an axis. Explain how to determine the direction of the Earth s rotation. Explain why it is a different time in other parts of the world, using time zones. Assessment Quick Write Explain Day and Night Informal Notes Student Journal Day/Night Focus Questions Teacher observations calculate local noon Response Sheet Thinking in Time Self Assessment Homework Mid Summative Exam #3 EVIDENCE OF LEARNING

11 Learning Activities Use light sources and spheres to model the mechanics of day and night Use light sources and spheres to determine the direction of Earth s rotation. Use computer simulations to model day and night on the Earth Use astronomical data to determine local noon, the time when the Sun is at its highest point overhead. Use maps, globes and Global time Finder to investigate time zones RESOURCES Teacher Resources: Full Option Science Systems (FOSS) kit: Teachers Edition Student Planetary Science Resource Book Student Planetary Science Lab Book FOSS Website ( Equipment Needed: Overhead Projector/ Computer and Internet connection as needed DVR/ VCR Laboratory equipment as specified for unit

12 RAHWAY PUBLIC SCHOOLS CURRICULUM Content Area: Planetary Science Unit Title: Investigation 4: Discover the Moon Target Course/Grade Level: 7 th Grade Science UNIT OVERVIEW Unit Summary: The Planetary Science course emphasizes the use of knowledge and evidence to construct explanations for the structures and motions of objects in the Solar System. Students develop the understanding that the Earth and Solar System are comprised of closely coupled systems. Earth is the third planet from the Sun in a system that includes the Moon, the Sun, eight other planets and their moons, and smaller objects, such as asteroids and comets. The Sun, an average star, is the central and largest body in the solar system. Most objects in the Solar System are in regular and predictable motion governed by the force of gravity. Those motions explain such phenomena as the day, the year, seasons, phases of the Moon, and eclipses. Approximate Length of Unit: 5 class periods Primary interdisciplinary connections: Mathematics A, Language Arts: Writing 8.1, 8.2, 8.4, 8.5, 8.6, Speaking and Listening 8.1, 8.4, 8.5, Language st Century Life and Career Skills: Standard st Century Life and Career Skills: All students will demonstrate the creative, critical thinking, collaboration, and problem-solving skills needed to function successfully as both global citizens and workers in diverse ethnic and organizational cultures. Standard Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation: All students will apply knowledge about and engage in the process of career awareness, exploration, and preparation in order to navigate the globally competitive work environment of the information age. LEARNING TARGETS Content Area Standard Content Area Strand CPI 5.1 Science Practices A. Understand Scientific Explanations A A Science Practices B. Generate Scientific Evidence Through Active Investigations A B B B B.4

13 5.1 Science Practices C. Reflect on Scientific Knowledge 5.1. Science Practices D. Participating Productively in Science C C C D D D D Physical Science A. Objects in the Universe A.1 Unit Understandings Students will understand that The Moon s appearance (shape) changes predictable over a month from our point of view on Earth. The phases are called new, first quarter, full, and third quarter. The Moon has features that can be identified in telescope images: craters, marias, and mountains. Unit Essential Questions What do we know, and what do we want to know about Earth s closest celestial neighbor? Why did we study and investigate the moon? Why is the Moon worthy of further investigation, inquiry, and study? Knowledge and Skills Students will know The Moon has inspired awe and curiosity over the ages. The Moon is worthy of inquiry and study because it possibly can help explain our past and our future. Different cultures explained Moon phenomena in many different ways through myths. Students will be able to Write a modern day Moon myth to explain some aspect of the Moon s natural history. EVIDENCE OF LEARNING Assessment Informal Notes Student Journal Moon Questions Teacher observations Organize Moon questions Student Journal Moon Myth Writing Homework Mid Summative Exam #4 Learning Activities Observe and record the Moon s changing appearance day and night for at least one month. Study an image of the Moon to discover major surface features. Generate a list of questions about the Moon that will guide further study. Read 5 Moon Myths

14 RESOURCES Teacher Resources: Full Option Science Systems (FOSS) kit: Teachers Edition Student Planetary Science Resource Book Student Planetary Science Lab Book FOSS Website ( Equipment Needed: Overhead Projector/ Computer and Internet connection as needed DVR/ VCR Laboratory equipment as specified for unit

15 RAHWAY PUBLIC SCHOOLS CURRICULUM Content Area: Planetary Science Unit Title: Investigation 5: Moon Craters Target Course/Grade Level: 7 th Grade Science UNIT OVERVIEW Unit Summary: The Planetary Science course emphasizes the use of knowledge and evidence to construct explanations for the structures and motions of objects in the Solar System. Students develop the understanding that the Earth and Solar System are comprised of closely coupled systems. Earth is the third planet from the Sun in a system that includes the Moon, the Sun, eight other planets and their moons, and smaller objects, such as asteroids and comets. The Sun, an average star, is the central and largest body in the solar system. Most objects in the Solar System are in regular and predictable motion governed by the force of gravity. Those motions explain such phenomena as the day, the year, seasons, phases of the Moon, and eclipses. Approximate Length of Unit: 8 class periods Primary interdisciplinary connections: Mathematics A, Language Arts: Writing 8.1, 8.2, 8.4, 8.5, 8.6, Speaking and Listening 8.1, 8.4, 8.5, Language st Century Life and Career Skills: Standard st Century Life and Career Skills: All students will demonstrate the creative, critical thinking, collaboration, and problem-solving skills needed to function successfully as both global citizens and workers in diverse ethnic and organizational cultures. Standard Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation: All students will apply knowledge about and engage in the process of career awareness, exploration, and preparation in order to navigate the globally competitive work environment of the information age. LEARNING TARGETS Content Area Standard Content Area Strand CPI 5.1 Science Practices A. Understand Scientific Explanations A A Science Practices B. Generate Scientific Evidence Through Active Investigations A B B B B Science Practices C. Reflect on Scientific Knowledge C C C.3

16 5.1 Science Practices D. Participating Productively in Science D D D Physical Science A. Objects in the Universe A.1 Unit Understandings Students will understand that Craters of various sizes result when meteoroids of various sizes hit the Moon s surface. Craters can be categorized by size and physical characteristics such as simple, complex, terraced, ringed (basined), and flooded. Unit Essential Questions How do impacts shape and change the surfaces of planets and satellites? Knowledge and Skills Students will know Planets are hit by objects every day. Impact will be a result of various characteristics of objects including size, speed and angle of impact. Students will be able to Describe the processes that produce craters with various characteristics and various sizes. Reconstruct the history of impact events that resulted in the present appearance and existence of the Moon. Explain the difference in surface appearance between the Moon and the Earth. EVIDENCE OF LEARNING Assessment Informal Notes Teacher observations Experimental Design Collected Data Response Sheet Organizing Lunar Craters Student Journal support one moon origin theory Student Journal Position Paper Homework Mid Summative Exam #5 Learning Activities Simulate impact events to discover the variables that determine crater characteristics. Conduct experiments to determine the effect of meteoroid speed on crater characteristics. Design and conduct experiments to determine the effect of meteoroid size on crater characteristic. Organize data to draw conclusions. Weigh evidence supporting several theories for the origin of the moon.

17 RESOURCES Teacher Resources: Full Option Science Systems (FOSS) kit: Teachers Edition Student Planetary Science Resource Book Student Planetary Science Lab Book FOSS Website ( Equipment Needed: Overhead Projector/ Computer and Internet connection as needed DVR/ VCR Laboratory equipment as specified for unit

18 RAHWAY PUBLIC SCHOOLS CURRICULUM Content Area: Planetary Science Unit Title: Investigation 6: Mapping the Moon Target Course/Grade Level: 7 th Grade Science UNIT OVERVIEW Unit Summary: The Planetary Science course emphasizes the use of knowledge and evidence to construct explanations for the structures and motions of objects in the Solar System. Students develop the understanding that the Earth and Solar System are comprised of closely coupled systems. Earth is the third planet from the Sun in a system that includes the Moon, the Sun, eight other planets and their moons, and smaller objects, such as asteroids and comets. The Sun, an average star, is the central and largest body in the solar system. Most objects in the Solar System are in regular and predictable motion governed by the force of gravity. Those motions explain such phenomena as the day, the year, seasons, phases of the Moon, and eclipses. Approximate Length of Unit: 4-5 class periods Primary interdisciplinary connections: Mathematics A, Language Arts: Writing 8.1, 8.2, 8.4, 8.5, 8.6, Speaking and Listening 8.1, 8.4, 8.5, Language st Century Life and Career Skills: Standard st Century Life and Career Skills: All students will demonstrate the creative, critical thinking, collaboration, and problem-solving skills needed to function successfully as both global citizens and workers in diverse ethnic and organizational cultures. Standard Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation: All students will apply knowledge about and engage in the process of career awareness, exploration, and preparation in order to navigate the globally competitive work environment of the information age. LEARNING TARGETS Content Area Standard Content Area Strand CPI 5.1 Science Practices A. Understand Scientific Explanations A A A Science Practices B. Generate Scientific Evidence Through Active Investigations B B B B Science Practices C. Reflect on Scientific Knowledge C.1

19 5.1. Science Practices D. Participating Productively in Science C C D D D Physical Science A. Objects in the Universe A.1 Unit Understandings Students will understand that Scale is the size relationship between a representation of an object and the object. Scale can be expressed as a ratio when an object and its representation are measured in the same units. Unit Essential Questions What are some of the major features of the Moon? What are the sizes and distances between those features? How do the sizes and distances between those features relative to features on Earth? Knowledge and Skills Students will know Craters are impacts on the moon. Marias is the shiny dark areas on the moon. Rilles are canyons or stream like structures on the Moon. Regolith is the dusty outer layer of the Moon. Highlands are the white bumpy areas of the Moon with many craters. Students will be able to Use mathematical reasoning to describe how to determine the size of lunar features. Describe a sequence of events that accounts for the formation and appearance of lunar marias. EVIDENCE OF LEARNING Assessment Informal Notes Teacher observations calculate dimensions, scale craters to map Quick Write Mare origin Self Assessment Quick Write revision Collected Data Homework Mid Summative Exam #6

20 Learning Activities Identify and measure craters on a Mon photo and transfer the data to a map. Calculate actual dimensions of lunar structures from photographs. Draw accurately scaled representations of lunar craters on a map of your state. RESOURCES Teacher Resources: Full Option Science Systems (FOSS) kit: Teachers Edition Student Planetary Science Resource Book Student Planetary Science Lab Book FOSS Website ( Equipment Needed: Overhead Projector/ Computer and Internet connection as needed DVR/ VCR Laboratory equipment as specified for unit

21 RAHWAY PUBLIC SCHOOLS CURRICULUM Content Area: Planetary Science Unit Title: Investigation 7: Landing on the Moon Target Course/Grade Level: 7 th Grade Science UNIT OVERVIEW Unit Summary: The Planetary Science course emphasizes the use of knowledge and evidence to construct explanations for the structures and motions of objects in the Solar System. Students develop the understanding that the Earth and Solar System are comprised of closely coupled systems. Earth is the third planet from the Sun in a system that includes the Moon, the Sun, eight other planets and their moons, and smaller objects, such as asteroids and comets. The Sun, an average star, is the central and largest body in the solar system. Most objects in the Solar System are in regular and predictable motion governed by the force of gravity. Those motions explain such phenomena as the day, the year, seasons, phases of the Moon, and eclipses. Approximate Length of Unit: 7 class periods Primary interdisciplinary connections: Mathematics A, Language Arts: Writing 8.1, 8.2, 8.4, 8.5, 8.6, Speaking and Listening 8.1, 8.4, 8.5, Language st Century Life and Career Skills: Standard st Century Life and Career Skills: All students will demonstrate the creative, critical thinking, collaboration, and problem-solving skills needed to function successfully as both global citizens and workers in diverse ethnic and organizational cultures. Standard Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation: All students will apply knowledge about and engage in the process of career awareness, exploration, and preparation in order to navigate the globally competitive work environment of the information age. LEARNING TARGETS Content Area Standard Content Area Strand CPI 5.1 Science Practices A. Understand Scientific Explanations A A Science Practices B. Generate Scientific Evidence Through Active Investigations A B B B B.4

22 5.1 Science Practices C. Reflect on Scientific Knowledge C C C Science Practices D. Participating Productively in Science D D D Physical Science A. Objects in the Universe A A A A.2 Unit Understandings Students will understand that The Moon s rotation causes Lunar day and night. Moon exploration involves robotic probes and manned spacecraft. Moon missions are planned over long periods of time, using contributions from many projects and types of scientists. Unit Essential Questions What understandings and knowledge need to be considered when planning a successful mission to the moon? Knowledge and Skills Students will know Scientists have to consider many factors when planning lunar missions. Choosing the landing sites for the Apollo Missions were the results of many lunar probe missions, satellites, and research. Students will be able to Discuss the similarities and differences between day and night on the Earth and the Moon. Describe the sequence and timing of events that will result in a successful moon mission. Assessment Teacher observations productive questions Teacher Observation Earth/ Moon System Informal Notes Homework Mid Summative Exam #7 EVIDENCE OF LEARNING

23 Learning Activities Identify important elements of a mission to the Moon. Construct a model Earth/Moon system. Calculate the time needed to complete a Moon mission. Collect and analyze data for the purpose of selecting a moon-mission landing site. RESOURCES Teacher Resources: Full Option Science Systems (FOSS) kit: Teachers Edition Student Planetary Science Resource Book Student Planetary Science Lab Book FOSS Website ( Equipment Needed: Overhead Projector/ Computer and Internet connection as needed DVR/ VCR Laboratory equipment as specified for unit

24 RAHWAY PUBLIC SCHOOLS CURRICULUM Content Area: Planetary Science Unit Title: Investigation 8: Moon Rocks Target Course/Grade Level: 7 th Grade Science UNIT OVERVIEW Unit Summary: The Planetary Science course emphasizes the use of knowledge and evidence to construct explanations for the structures and motions of objects in the Solar System. Students develop the understanding that the Earth and Solar System are comprised of closely coupled systems. Earth is the third planet from the Sun in a system that includes the Moon, the Sun, eight other planets and their moons, and smaller objects, such as asteroids and comets. The Sun, an average star, is the central and largest body in the solar system. Most objects in the Solar System are in regular and predictable motion governed by the force of gravity. Those motions explain such phenomena as the day, the year, seasons, phases of the Moon, and eclipses. Approximate Length of Unit: 6 class periods Primary interdisciplinary connections: Mathematics A, Language Arts: Writing 8.1, 8.2, 8.4, 8.5, 8.6, Speaking and Listening 8.1, 8.4, 8.5, Language st Century Life and Career Skills: Standard st Century Life and Career Skills: All students will demonstrate the creative, critical thinking, collaboration, and problem-solving skills needed to function successfully as both global citizens and workers in diverse ethnic and organizational cultures. Standard Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation: All students will apply knowledge about and engage in the process of career awareness, exploration, and preparation in order to navigate the globally competitive work environment of the information age. LEARNING TARGETS Content Area Standard Content Area Strand CPI 5.1 Science Practices A. Understand Scientific Explanations A A Science Practices B. Generate Scientific Evidence Through Active Investigations A B B B B Science Practices C. Reflect on Scientific Knowledge C C.2

25 5.1. Science Practices D. Participating Productively in Science C D D D Physical Science A. Objects in the Universe A.1 Unit Understandings Students will understand that The Moon is composed of rocks and minerals similar to those found on Earth, including basalt, breccia, pryroxene, ilmenite, feldspar, olivine. On the Moon denser mineral are in low-lying areas, less dense minerals are in the highlands. Unit Essential Questions How do rocks and minerals found on Earth compare to those found on the moon? What evidence of Moon origin can be found in moon rocks? Knowledge and Skills Students will know There are similarities between rocks on the moon and those found on Earth. Students will be able to Explain the mineral composition of rocks collected from different locations on the Moon in terms of the density of those minerals. Discuss several theories of the origin of the Moon and support one theory with evidence. Assessment EVIDENCE OF LEARNING Informal Notes Teacher observations identify samples Collected Data Student Response Sheet Determine Rock Density Homework Mid Summative Exam #8 Learning Activities Establish and apply criteria for rock sampling, and analyze the results of a sample. Observe, measure and organize the properties of lunar rocks, including cleavage, color, lusters, texture and density. Describe the Apollo program

26 RESOURCES Teacher Resources: Full Option Science Systems (FOSS) kit: Teachers Edition Student Planetary Science Resource Book Student Planetary Science Lab Book FOSS Website ( Equipment Needed: Overhead Projector/ Computer and Internet connection as needed DVR/ VCR Laboratory equipment as specified for unit

27 RAHWAY PUBLIC SCHOOLS CURRICULUM UNIT OVERVIEW Content Area: Planetary Science Unit Title: Investigation 9: Phases of the Moon Target Course/Grade Level: 7 th Grade Unit Summary: The Planetary Science course emphasizes the use of knowledge and evidence to construct explanations for the structures and motions of objects in the Solar System. Students develop the understanding that the Earth and Solar System are comprised of closely coupled systems. Earth is the third planet from the Sun in a system that includes the Moon, the Sun, eight other planets and their moons, and smaller objects, such as asteroids and comets. The Sun, an average star, is the central and largest body in the solar system. Most objects in the Solar System are in regular and predictable motion governed by the force of gravity. Those motions explain such phenomena as the day, the year, seasons, phases of the Moon, and eclipses. Approximate Length of Unit: 5-7 class periods Primary interdisciplinary connections: Mathematics A, Language Arts: Writing 8.1, 8.2, 8.4, 8.5, 8.6, Speaking and Listening 8.1, 8.4, 8.5, Language st Century Life and Career Skills: Standard st Century Life and Career Skills: All students will demonstrate the creative, critical thinking, collaboration, and problem-solving skills needed to function successfully as both global citizens and workers in diverse ethnic and organizational cultures. Standard Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation: All students will apply knowledge about and engage in the process of career awareness, exploration, and preparation in order to navigate the globally competitive work environment of the information age. LEARNING TARGETS Content Area Standard Content Area Strand CPI 5.1 Science Practices A. Understand Scientific Explanations A A Science Practices B. Generate Scientific Evidence Through Active Investigations A B B B B.4

28 5.1 Science Practices C. Reflect on Scientific Knowledge C C C Science Practices D. Participating Productively in Science D D D D Physical Science A. Objects in the Universe A A A.4 Unit Understandings Students will understand that The moon has regular and predictable phases as a result of the moon s revolution around the Earth and our point of view from Earth. Kepler s laws explain the apparent motion of all celestial objects. Celestial bodies are in orbit. Unit Essential Questions How does the Earth and the Moon move in relation to the Sun? How do the movements of the Earth and Moon result in the moon phases that we observe on Earth? What are Kepler s Laws of Planetary Motion? Knowledge and Skills Students will know The moon revolves around the Earth, while the Earth revolves around the Sun. The motions of the Earth and the Moon, cause tidal activity, eclipses and moon phases. The motions of the Earth and the moon relative to the Sun are constant, therefore tidal activity, moon phases, and eclipses are predictable. The major phases of the moon are Full Moon, first and Last Quarter Moon, New Moon. If the moon is increasing in size it is waxing. If the moon is decreasing in size it is waning. Objects closer to the Sun move at a faster speed than objects further away. A celestial object s speed is relative to the objects orbit. Students will be able to Explain the roes of rotation and revolution of the Earth and the Moon in the presentation of phases, and when and where they are observed in the heavens. Predict relative positions of the Sun, Earth, and Moon when shown a representation of a Moon phase. Describe how the Moon revolves around the Earth once a month, resulting in the Moon rising about 50 minutes later each day. Observe and predict apparent motions of celestial bodies. Calculate speed of planets using Kepler s Laws

29 EVIDENCE OF LEARNING Assessment Quick Write Explain phases Informal Notes Teacher observations model moon phases Student Journal Explain Moon phases Student Response Sheet Looking at the Moon from Earth Teacher Observation Sequence Phase images Self Assessment Revise Quick Write Homework Mid Summative Exam #9 Learning Activities Use movements of the Sun, Moon, and Earth to explain the mechanics of Moon phases and Eclipses. Sequence representations of the phases of the Moon. Observe apparent motion of the moons of Jupiter. Calculate speed of planets based upon size of the orbital and distance from the Sun. Analyze data regarding the motion of comets, planets, and moons to find general patterns of orbital motion. RESOURCES Teacher Resources: Full Option Science Systems (FOSS) kit: Teachers Edition Student Planetary Science Resource Book Student Planetary Science Lab Book FOSS Website ( Equipment Needed: Overhead Projector/ Computer and Internet connection as needed DVR/ VCR Laboratory equipment as specified for unit

30 RAHWAY PUBLIC SCHOOLS CURRICULUM Content Area: Planetary Science Unit Title: Investigation 10: Explore the Planets Target Course/Grade Level: 7 th Grade Science UNIT OVERVIEW Unit Summary: The Planetary Science course emphasizes the use of knowledge and evidence to construct explanations for the structures and motions of objects in the Solar System. Students develop the understanding that the Earth and Solar System are comprised of closely coupled systems. Earth is the third planet from the Sun in a system that includes the Moon, the Sun, eight other planets and their moons, and smaller objects, such as asteroids and comets. The Sun, an average star, is the central and largest body in the solar system. Most objects in the Solar System are in regular and predictable motion governed by the force of gravity. Those motions explain such phenomena as the day, the year, seasons, phases of the Moon, and eclipses. Approximate Length of Unit: 7 class periods Primary interdisciplinary connections: Mathematics A, Language Arts: Writing 8.1, 8.2, 8.4, 8.5, 8.6, Speaking and Listening 8.1, 8.4, 8.5, Language st Century Life and Career Skills: Standard st Century Life and Career Skills: All students will demonstrate the creative, critical thinking, collaboration, and problem-solving skills needed to function successfully as both global citizens and workers in diverse ethnic and organizational cultures. Standard Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation: All students will apply knowledge about and engage in the process of career awareness, exploration, and preparation in order to navigate the globally competitive work environment of the information age. LEARNING TARGETS Content Area Standard Content Area Strand CPI 5.1 Science Practices A. Understand Scientific Explanations A A Science Practices B. Generate Scientific Evidence Through Active Investigations A B B B B Science Practices C. Reflect on Scientific Knowledge C C C.3

31 5.1. Science Practices D. Participating Productively in Science D D D Physical Science A. Objects in the Universe A A A A A.4 Unit Understandings Students will understand that The Solar system includes nine planets, scores of moons, and millions of asteroids and comets. All of these objects orbit the sun. Unit Essential Questions How do the rest of the planets revolving around the sun compare to Earth? Knowledge and Skills Students will know Each planet has unique characteristics that can be researched and reported upon from the perspective of an Historian, a Geologist, an Astronomer, and a Meteorologist. Students will be able to Prepare and deliver to the class a presentation describing one of the planets in the Solar system. Compare and contrast major features of the planets to each other and to the Earth. EVIDENCE OF LEARNING Assessment Informal Notes Teacher observations Class presentations Homework Mid Summative Exam #10 Learning Activities Simulate a photographic technique for determining the difference between stars and planets in the night sky. Simulate producing a digital image of a distant object. Review the current knowledge about planets and propose a planetary tour to apply the knowledge.

32 RESOURCES Teacher Resources: Full Option Science Systems (FOSS) kit: Teachers Edition Student Planetary Science Resource Book Student Planetary Science Lab Book FOSS Website ( Equipment Needed: Overhead Projector/ Computer and Internet connection as needed DVR/ VCR Laboratory equipment as specified for unit

33 RAHWAY PUBLIC SCHOOLS CURRICULUM Content Area: Energy, Machines and Motion UNIT OVERVIEW Unit Title: Lesson 1 Circuit of Inquiries Pre-Assessment Target Course/Grade Level: 7 th Grade Science Unit Summary: In this module, students investigate energy and the different forms it can take, how forces do work to change energy from one form to another, how machines reduce the effort force needed to do work, and how forces change the motion of objects. By engaging in inquiries that provide opportunities to explore these relationships and concepts, students begin constructing a knowledge base of their own. Part one of the module focuses on energy, the nature of various forces, and the work done when forces act on an object. Approximate Length of Unit: 3 class periods Primary interdisciplinary connections: : Mathematics A, Language Arts: Writing 8.1, 8.2, 8.4, 8.5, 8.6, Speaking and Listening 8.1, 8.4, 8.5, Language st Century Life and Career Skills: Standard st Century Life and Career Skills: All students will demonstrate the creative, critical thinking, collaboration, and problem-solving skills needed to function successfully as both global citizens and workers in diverse ethnic and organizational cultures. Standard Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation: All students will apply knowledge about and engage in the process of career awareness, exploration, and preparation in order to navigate the globally competitive work environment of the information age. LEARNING TARGETS Content Area Standard Content Area Strand CPI 5.1 Science Practices A. Understand Scientific Explanations A A Science Practices B. Generate Scientific Evidence Through Active Investigations A B B B Science Practices C. Reflect on Scientific Knowledge C C C Science Practices D. Participating Productively in Science D D D.3

34 5.2 Physical Science D. Energy Transfer and Conservation D D Physical Science E. Forces and Motion E E E.2 Unit Understandings Students will understand that Energy can be converted from one form to another. Different forces exist and act on bodies in different ways. Machines help people do work. Unbalanced forces change the motion of an object. Relationships among objects can be determined by plotting and analyzing graphs of collected data. Unit Essential Questions How much do students know about energy, machines, and motion? Knowledge and Skills Students will know Energy, forces, and motion are closely related. A force is a push or pull on an object. Forces that act on a body can be balanced or unbalanced. Unbalanced forces cause motion. Students will be able to Observe, describe, and hypothesize about physical phenomena produced during each activity. Relate observations to personal experiences. EVIDENCE OF LEARNING Assessment Teacher Observation Student Sheet Lab Journal Reflection Questions Homework Learning Activities Students will perform a series of activates to investigate forces, energy transformations, and machines.

35 RESOURCES Teacher Resources: Science and Technology Concepts for Middle Schools (STC) Energy Machines and Motion: Teachers Edition Student Energy, Machines, and Motion Book Student Energy, Machines, and Motion Lab Sheets Equipment Needed: Overhead Projector/ Computer and Internet connection as needed Laboratory equipment as specified for unit

36 RAHWAY PUBLIC SCHOOLS CURRICULUM UNIT OVERVIEW Content Area: Energy, Machines, and Motion Unit Title: Lesson 2: Making a Battery Target Course/Grade Level: 7 th Grade Science Unit Summary: In this module, students investigate energy and the different forms it can take, how forces do work to change energy from one form to another, how machines reduce the effort force needed to do work, and how forces change the motion of objects. By engaging in inquiries that provide opportunities to explore these relationships and concepts, students begin constructing a knowledge base of their own. Part one of the module focuses on energy, the nature of various forces, and the work done when forces act on an object. Approximate Length of Unit: 2 class periods Primary interdisciplinary connections: Mathematics A, Language Arts: Writing 8.1, 8.2, 8.4, 8.5, 8.6, Speaking and Listening 8.1, 8.4, 8.5, Language st Century Life and Career Skills: Standard st Century Life and Career Skills: All students will demonstrate the creative, critical thinking, collaboration, and problem-solving skills needed to function successfully as both global citizens and workers in diverse ethnic and organizational cultures. Standard Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation: All students will apply knowledge about and engage in the process of career awareness, exploration, and preparation in order to navigate the globally competitive work environment of the information age. LEARNING TARGETS Content Area Standard Content Area Strand CPI 5.1 Science Practices A. Understand Scientific Explanations A A Science Practices B. Generate Scientific Evidence Through Active Investigations A B B B Science Practices C. Reflect on Scientific Knowledge C C C Science Practices D. Participating Productively in Science D D D.3

37 5.2 Physical Science D. Energy Transfer and Conservation D D.1 Unit Understandings Students will understand that A battery consists of two separated metal electrodes immersed in an ionic solution. Batteries supply energy to operate devices. The electrical energy that a battery supplies is the results of chemical reactions between the electrodes and the electrolyte in the battery. A battery contains a limited amount of energy. Unit Essential Questions What are the essential components of a battery? What occurs as a battery operates? What happens to a battery when it is removed from the electrolyte? Knowledge and Skills Students will know Batteries are made up of two electrodes of different metals, and an electrolyte. As a battery operates, there is a chemical reaction between the electrolyte and the electrodes, which generates electrical energy. When the electrodes are removed from the electrolyte, the electricity will stop flowing. Students will be able to Build a battery. Observe what happens as a battery operates. Describe what makes up a battery. EVIDENCE OF LEARNING Assessment Teacher Observation Student Sheet Lab Journal Reflection Questions Homework Learning Activities Create a TWL Chart. Build a battery. Observe what happens when a battery operates.

38 RESOURCES Teacher Resources: Science and Technology Concepts for Middle Schools (STC) Energy Machines and Motion: Teachers Edition Student Energy, Machines, and Motion Book Student Energy, Machines, and Motion Lab Sheets Equipment Needed: Overhead Projector/ Computer and Internet connection as needed Laboratory equipment as specified for unit

39 RAHWAY PUBLIC SCHOOLS CURRICULUM UNIT OVERVIEW Content Area: Energy, Machines, and Motion Unit Title: Lesson 3 Rechargeable Batteries Target Course/Grade Level: 7 th Grade Unit Summary: In this module, students investigate energy and the different forms it can take, how forces do work to change energy from one form to another, how machines reduce the effort force needed to do work, and how forces change the motion of objects. By engaging in inquiries that provide opportunities to explore these relationships and concepts, students begin constructing a knowledge base of their own. Part one of the module focuses on energy, the nature of various forces, and the work done when forces act on an object. Approximate Length of Unit: 2 class periods Primary interdisciplinary connections: Mathematics A, Language Arts: Writing 8.1, 8.2, 8.4, 8.5, 8.6, Speaking and Listening 8.1, 8.4, 8.5, Language st Century Life and Career Skills: Standard st Century Life and Career Skills: All students will demonstrate the creative, critical thinking, collaboration, and problem-solving skills needed to function successfully as both global citizens and workers in diverse ethnic and organizational cultures. Standard Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation: All students will apply knowledge about and engage in the process of career awareness, exploration, and preparation in order to navigate the globally competitive work environment of the information age. LEARNING TARGETS Content Area Standard Content Area Strand CPI 5.1 Science Practices A. Understand Scientific Explanations A A Science Practices B. Generate Scientific Evidence Through Active Investigations A B B B Science Practices C. Reflect on Scientific Knowledge C C C Science Practices D. Participating Productively in Science 5.3 Physical Science D. Energy Transfer and Conservation D D D D D.1

40 Unit Understandings Students will understand that Energy can be stored in a battery. Energy can be transformed from one form to another. Different devices use energy at different rates. Unit Essential Questions What happens when a battery is charged? What energy transformations take place as a battery is used to light a light bulb? Why do batteries charged for the same periods of time, cause different lengths of potential usage, in different devices. Knowledge and Skills Students will know As a battery is charged, a device will work for longer periods of time. As energy flows through a battery, chemical energy becomes electrical, and then electrical energy becomes light and heat. Different devices have different energy needs. Students will be able to Identify that a device will work for different periods of time depending on how long a battery is charged. Identify the energy changes that take place when a battery is connected to different devices. EVIDENCE OF LEARNING Assessment Teacher Observations Student Journal Reflection Questions Data Tables Homework Learning Activities Read and discuss Different Batteries for Different Needs. Describe how they built batteries. Test how long a device will work after charging batteries for different lengths of time.

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