MULTIPLE CHOICE. Choose the one alternative that best completes the statement or answers the question.

Save this PDF as:
 WORD  PNG  TXT  JPG

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "MULTIPLE CHOICE. Choose the one alternative that best completes the statement or answers the question."

Transcription

1 Exam Name MULTIPLE CHOICE. Choose the one alternative that best completes the statement or answers the question. 1) A 660-Hz tone has an intensity level of 54 db. The velocity of sound in air is 345 m/s. The bulk modulus of air is 142 kpa. The pressure amplitude of the sound waves, in SI units, is closest to: A) B) C) D) E) ) 2) A 380-Hz tone has an intensity level of 64 db. The velocity of sound in air is 345 m/s. The bulk modulus of air is 142 kpa. The displacement amplitude of the sound waves, in SI units, is closest to: A) B) C) D) E) ) 3) A 860-Hz tone has an intensity level of 71 db. The velocity of sound in air is 345 m/s. The bulk modulus of air is 142 kpa. A 1548-Hz tone has the same displacement amplitude as does the 860-Hz tone. The difference in the intensity level of the 1548-Hz tone relative to that of the 860 Hz tone, in db, is closest to: A) -5.1 B) 5.1 C) 2.6 D) -2.6 E) zero 3) 4) A 710-Hz tone has an intensity level of 23 db. The velocity of sound in air is 345 m/s. The bulk modulus of air is 142 kpa. An 1122-Hz tone has the same pressure amplitude as does the 710-Hz tone. The difference in the intensity level, of the 1122 Hz tone relative to that of the 710-Hz tone, in db, is closest to: A) zero B) 2.0 C) 4.0 D) -2.0 E) ) 5) The howler monkey is the loudest land animal and can be heard up to a distance of 5.0 km. Assume the acoustic output of a howler to be uniform in all directions. The acoustic power emitted by the howler, in mw, is closest to: A) 11 B) 0.11 C) 0.32 D) 1.1 E) 3.2 5) 6) The howler monkey is the loudest land animal and can be heard up to a distance of 8.0 km. Assume the acoustic output of a howler to be uniform in all directions. The distance at which the intensity level of a howler's call is 28 db, in SI units, is closest to: A) 540 B) 380 C) 320 D) 480 E) 640 6) 1

2 7) The howler monkey is the loudest land animal and can be heard up to a distance of 4.5 km. Assume the acoustic output of a howler to be uniform in all directions. A chorus of five howlers call at the same time. The largest distance at which the chorus can be heard, in km, is closest to: A) 18 B) 6.7 C) 10 D) 23 E) 14 7) 8) The howler monkey is the loudest land animal and can be heard up to a distance of 8.4 km. Assume the acoustic output of a howler to be uniform in all directions. A juvenile howler monkey has an acoustic output of 50 µw. The ratio of the acoustic intensity produced by the juvenile howler to the reference intensity I o, at a distance of 460 m, is closest to: A) 19 B) 38 C) 28 D) 50 E) 13 9) An enclosed chamber with sound absorbing walls has a 2.0 m 1.0 m opening for an outside window. A loudspeaker is located outdoors, 74 m away and facing the window. The intensity level of the sound entering the window space from the loudspeaker is 24 db. Assume the acoustic output of the loudspeaker is uniform in all directions and that acoustic energy incident upon the ground is completely absorbed. The acoustic power entering through the window space, in µw, is closest to: A) B) C) D) E) ) 9) 10) An enclosed chamber with sound absorbing walls has a 2.0 m 1.0 m opening for an outside window. A loudspeaker is located outdoors, 90 m away and facing the window. The intensity level of the sound entering the window space from the loudspeaker is 27 db. Assume the acoustic output of the loudspeaker is uniform in all directions and that acoustic energy incident upon the ground is completely absorbed. The sound intensity at a point midway between the loudspeaker and the window, in SI units, is closest to: A) B) C) D) E) ) 11) An enclosed chamber with sound absorbing walls has a 2.0 m 1.0 m opening for an outside window. A loudspeaker is located outdoors, 78 m away and facing the window. The intensity level of the sound entering the window space from the loudspeaker is 41 db. Assume the acoustic output of the loudspeaker is uniform in all directions and that acoustic energy incident upon the ground is completely absorbed. The acoustic output of the loudspeaker, in SI units, is closest to: A) B) C) D) E) ) 12) A glass window is installed in the window space and the intensity level of the sound entering through the window is reduced from 84 db to 71 db. The factor, by which the acoustic power entering the chamber is reduced by the glass window, is closest to: A) B) C) D) E) ) 2

3 13) Consider the waves on a vibrating guitar string and the sound waves the guitar produces in the surrounding air. The string waves and the sound waves have the same A) amplitude. B) wavelength. C) frequency. D) velocity. E) More than one of the above is true. 13) 14) Which one of the following statements is true? A) If the intensity of sound A is twice the intensity of sound B, then the intensity level (in decibels) of A is twice the intensity level of B. B) If two different sound waves have the same displacement amplitude, then they must have the same intensity. C) If two sound waves have the same intensity level (in decibels), they must have the same intensity. D) If two different sound waves have the same displacement amplitude, then they must have the same intensity level (in decibels). E) If the intensity level (in decibels) of sound A is twice the intensity level of sound B, then the intensity of A is twice the intensity of B. 14) 15) Which of the following increases when a sound becomes louder? A) Amplitude B) Phase C) Velocity D) Wavelength E) Period 15) 16) What is the intensity level in decibels of a sound whose intensity is 10-7 W/m 2? A) 20 db B) 50 db C) 60 db D) 30 db E) 40 db 16) 17) An open pipe, 0.46 m long, vibrates in the second overtone with a frequency of 1200 Hz. In this situation, the distance from the center of the pipe to the nearest antinode, in cm, is closest to: A) 12 B) 3.8 C) 7.7 D) 15 E) zero 17) 18) An open pipe, 0.64 m long, vibrates in the second overtone with a frequency of 848 Hz. In this situation, the speed of sound in air, in SI units, is closest to: A) 350 B) 344 C) 368 D) 356 E) ) 19) An open pipe, 0.28 m long, vibrates in the second overtone with a frequency of 1900 Hz. In this situation, the fundamental frequency of the pipe, in SI units, is closest to: A) 482 B) 634 C) 1520 D) 951 E) ) 20) An open pipe, 0.62 m long, vibrates in the second overtone with a frequency of 888 Hz. In this situation, the length of the shortest stopped pipe, which has the same resonant frequency as the open pipe in the second overtone, in cm, is closest to: A) 10 B) 12 C) 21 D) 5.2 E) 31 20) 3

4 Situation 16.1 A standing wave of the third overtone is induced in a stopped pipe, 1.2 m long. The speed of sound is 340 m/s. 21) In Situation 16.1, the number of antinodes in the standing wave pattern is: A) 3 B) 6 C) 5 D) 4 E) 7 21) 22) In Situation 16.1, the frequency of the sound produced by the pipe, in SI units, is closest to: A) 210 B) 350 C) 430 D) 280 E) ) 23) Three tuning forks are available. Fork A produces a 440 Hz tone. The other forks are marked X and Y. The frequency of fork Y is less than the frequency of fork X. When forks A and X are sounded together, a beat frequency of 4 Hz is heard. For forks A and Y, the beat frequency is 7 Hz. For forks X and Y, the beat frequency is 3 Hz. The frequencies of forks X and Y, respectively, in SI units, are closest to: A) 436 and 433 B) 444 and 447 C) 447 and 444 D) 436 and 447 E) 444 and ) Situation 16.2 A stopped wire, 0.90 m long, resonates with a tone whose wavelength is 0.72 m. 24) In Situation 16.2, the number of the harmonic for this resonant wavelength is: A) 3 B) 5 C) 6 D) 2 E) 4 24) 25) In Situation 16.2, the distance between a node and an adjacent antinode in the standing wave pattern in the pipe, in SI units, is closest to: A) 0.18 B) 0.36 C) 0.45 D) 0.27 E) ) 26) In Situation 16.2, the wavelength of the next higher overtone in this pipe, in SI units, is closest to: A) 0.51 B) 0.58 C) 0.40 D) 0.45 E) ) 27) In Situation 16.2, the overtone number of this normal mode is: A) 4 B) 5 C) 2 D) 3 E) 6 27) 28) In Situation 16.2, the frequency of this normal mode, in SI units, is closest to: A) 220 B) 330 C) 380 D) 270 E) ) 29) Two loudspeakers placed 6.0 m apart are driven in phase by an audio oscillator, whose frequency range is 1399 Hz to 1812 Hz. A point P is located 5.1 m from one loudspeaker and 3.6 m from the other. The speed of sound is 344 m/s. The frequency produced by the oscillator, for which constructive interference of sound occurs at point P, in SI units, is closest to: A) 1663 B) 1605 C) 1777 D) 1720 E) ) 4

5 30) Two loudspeakers placed 6.0 m apart are driven in phase by an audio oscillator, whose frequency range is 1350 Hz to 1826 Hz. A point P is located 4.9 m from one loudspeaker and 3.6 m from the other. The speed of sound is 344 m/s. The frequency produced by the oscillator, for which destructive interference occurs at point P, in SI units, is closest to: A) 1799 B) 1694 C) 1720 D) 1746 E) ) 31) Which of the following is an accurate statement? A) Standing waves can be set up in a pipe closed on both ends, but not in one with one end open and one end closed. B) The fundamental frequency of an organ pipe is determined primarily by the pipe diameter. C) The open end of a pipe is a pressure antinode for standing waves. D) Displacement nodes and pressure antinodes occur at the same place in an organ pipe. E) Standing sound waves can be set up in a pipe open on one end, but not on one open on both ends. 31) 32) An organ pipe open at both ends has two successive harmonics with frequencies of 210 Hz and 240 Hz. What is the length of the pipe? The speed of sound is 345 m/s in air. A) 5.25 m B) 2.76 m C) 4.90 m D) 5.75 m E) 3.62 m 32) Situation 16.3 Two loudspeakers S1 and S2, placed 5.0 m apart, are driven in phase by an audio oscillator. A boy stands at point P, which is 12.0 m from S1 and 13.0 m from S2. A right triangle is formed by S1, S2, and P. The wave from S2 arrives at point P 2.00 periods later than the wave from S1. The speed of sound is 350 m/s. 33) In Situation 16.3, the frequency of the oscillator, in SI units, is closest to: A) 500 B) 700 C) 1400 D) 1000 E) ) 34) In Situation 16.3, the boy walks directly away from S1, along the line through P, until destructive interference occurs. At that point, the wave from S2 arrives 1.50 periods later than the wave from S1. The distance of this point from S1, in SI units, is closest to: A) 14.3 B) 16.3 C) 15.3 D) 15.8 E) ) Situation 16.4 A car on a road parallel to and right next to a railroad track is approaching a train. The car is traveling eastward at 30.0 m/s while the train is going westward at 50.0 m/s. There is no wind, and the speed of sound is 344 m/s. The car honks its horn at a frequency of 1.00 khz as the train toots its whistle at a frequency of 1.50 khz. 35) In Situation 16.4, the frequency that the car's driver hears from the train's whistle is closest to: A) 1.18 khz B) 1.15 khz C) 1.95 khz D) 1.20 khz E) 1.91 khz 35) 36) In Situation 16.4, the wavelength of the sound from the train's whistle, as measured by the driver of the car, is closest to: A) m B) m C) m D) m E) m 36) 5

6 37) In Situation 16.4, the frequency that a person riding on the train measures for the sound from the car's horn is closest to: A) khz B) 1.05 khz C) khz D) 1.25 khz E) 3.79 khz 37) 38) In Situation 16.4, the wavelength of the sound from the car's horn, as measured by a person riding in the train, is closest to: A) m B) m C) m D) m E) m 38) 39) In Situation 16.4, the driver of the car hears the sound of her horn reflected back toward her from the front of the moving train. The frequency she measures for this reflected sound is closest to: A) 1.19 khz B) 1.19 khz C) 1.19 khz D) 1.19 khz E) 1.19 khz 39) 40) In Situation 16.4, the car and train eventually pass each other and continue traveling away from each other. In this case, the frequency of the sound that the driver of the car hears from the train s whistle is closest to: A) 1.42 khz B) 1.91 khz C) 1.22kHz D) 1.60 khz E) 1.20 khz 40) Situation 16.5 A carousel, 5.0 m in radius, has a pair of 600-Hz sirens, mounted on posts at opposite ends of a diameter. The carousel rotates with an angular velocity of 0.80 rad/s. A stationary listener is located at a distance from the carousel. The speed of sound is 350 m/s. 41) In Situation 16.5, the longest wavelength reaching the listener from the sirens, in cm, is closest to: A) 59.0 B) 58.3 C) 57.0 D) 57.7 E) ) 42) In Situation 16.5, the highest siren frequency heard by the listener, in SI units, is closest to: A) 609 B) 605 C) 611 D) 603 E) ) 43) In Situation 16.5, the maximum beat frequency of the sirens at the position of the listener, in SI units, is closest to: A) 12 B) 14 C) 8 D) 10 E) 6 43) 44) In Situation 16.5, the listener mounts a bicycle and rides directly away from the carousel with a speed of 4.5 m/s. The highest siren frequency heard by the listener, in SI units, is given by: A) 345.5/ B) 354.5/ C) 354.0/ D) 354.5/ E) 345.5/ ) 45) A jet aircraft, in level flight at constant speed, is observed directly overhead. A sonic boom is heard 12.0 s later, at which time the line of sight to the aircraft forms a 54 angle with respect to the horizontal. The speed of sound is 325 m/s. The Mach number for the aircraft is closest to: A) 1.7 B) 1.8 C) 2.0 D) 2.1 E) ) 6

7 46) A jet aircraft, in level flight at constant speed, is observed directly over head. A sonic boom is heard 9.0 s later, at which time the line of sight to the aircraft forms a 53 angle with respect to the horizontal. The speed of sound is 325 m/s. The altitude of the aircraft, in SI units, is closest to: A) 6000 B) 4900 C) 3700 D) 1800 E) ) 47) The reason a decibel scale is used to measure sound intensity level is that A) decibels are dimensionless. B) the intensity levels usually encountered are too small to be expressed in the usual exponential notation. C) the ear is sensitive over such a broad range of intensities. D) the intensity levels usually encountered are too large to be expressed in the usual exponential notation. E) the energy in a sound wave varies exponentially with the amplitude of the wave. 47) Figure ) In Fig are some wavefronts emitted by a source of sound S. This picture can help us to understand A) the phenomenon of beats. B) why a sound grows quieter as we move away from the source. C) how sonar works. D) why the siren on a police car changes its pitch as it races past us. E) why it is that our hearing is best near 3000 Hz. 48) 49) A person is hearing two sound waves simultaneously. One has a period of 1.50 ms and the other one a period of 1.54 ms. The beat due to these two waves has a period closest to: A) ms B) 57.8 ms C) 3.04 ms D) 329 ms E) 1.52 ms 49) 50) The speed of sound in steel is 5000 m/s. What is the wavelength of a sound wave of frequency 270 Hz in steel? A) 2.95 m B) m C) m D) 5.89 m E) 18.5 m 50) 7

8 51) The speed of sound in an alcohol, at a temperature of 20 C, is 1240 m/s. The density of the alcohol at that temperature is 830 kg/m 3. The bulk modulus of the alcohol, at a temperature of 20 C, in MPa, is closest to: A) 1470 B) 1530 C) 1340 D) 1280 E) ) A pipe, 20 m long and 10.0 cm in diameter contains olive oil. The density of the olive oil is 890 kg/m 3 and the bulk modulus is Pa. A 53.4-Hz longitudinal wave is transmitted in the oil. The time for the wave to travel the length of the pipe in the oil, in ms, is closest to: A) 17 B) 13 C) 15 D) 14 E) 12 53) A pipe, 40 m long and 10.0 cm in diameter contains olive oil. The density of the olive oil is 865 kg/m 3 and the bulk modulus is Pa. A 980-Hz longitudinal wave is transmitted in the oil. The wavelength of the longitudinal wave in the oil, in SI units, is closest to: A) 1.5 B) 1.4 C) 1.7 D) 1.2 E) ) A pipe, 60 m long and 10.0 cm in diameter contains olive oil. The density of the olive oil is 933 kg/m 3 and the bulk modulus is Pa. A 980-Hz longitudinal wave of amplitude 4.0 mm is transmitted in the oil. The intensity of the wave, is closest to: A) B) C) D) E) ) 52) 53) 54) 55) A metal bar 14.0 m long has a density of 5800 kg/m 3 and a diameter of 6 cm. Longitudinal sound waves take s to travel the length of the bar. What is Young's modulus for this material? A) Pa B) Pa C) Pa D) Pa E) Pa 55) Situation 16.6 A uniform bar of metal, 0.40 m long, with a diameter of 2.0 cm, has a mass of 1.1 kg. A 1.5-MHz longitudinal wave is propagated along the length of the bar. A wave compression traverses the length of the bar in 0.12 ms. 56) In Situation 16.6, the wavelength of the longitudinal wave in the metal, in mm, is closest to: A) 2.6 B) 2.2 C) 3.8 D) 3.0 E) ) 57) In Situation 16.6, the value of Young's modulus for the metal, in GPa (G = giga = 10 9 ), is closest to: A) 97 B) 73 C) 79 D) 85 E) 91 57) 58) The molecular mass of helium is kg/mol and the adiabatic constant is The speed of sound in helium gas, taken as an ideal gas, at a temperature of 290 K and a pressure of 80 kpa, in SI units, is closest to: A) 1100 B) 1200 C) 900 D) 1000 E) ) 8

9 59) A star is moving toward earth at one-third the speed of light and is emitting light of frequency Hz. The frequency of light measured by an observer on earth is closest to: A) Hz B) Hz C) Hz D) Hz E) Hz 59) 60) Two identical loudspeakers that are 5.00 m apart and face toward each other are driven in phase by the same oscillator at a frequency of 875 Hz. You are standing midway between the speakers, and the speed of sound in the room is 344 m/s. The minimum distance you can walk toward either speaker in order to hear a minimum of sound is closest to: A) m B) m C) m D) m E) m 60) 61) At a distance of 2.00 m from a point source of sound, the intensity level is 80.0 db. At a distance of 4.00 m from this source, the intensity level will be closest to: A) 74.0 db B) 40.0 db C) 60.0 db D) 77.0 db E) 20.0 db 61) 62) Which one of the following statements is true? A) Both the intensity level (in db) and the sound intensity can never be negative. B) Both the intensity level (in db) and the sound intensity can be negative. C) Both intensity level (in db) and sound intensity obey inverse-square distance laws. D) The sound intensity can never be negative, but the intensity level (in db) can be negative. E) The intensity level (in db) obeys an inverse-square distance law, but the sound intensity does not. 62) 63) Sound takes 10.0 ms to travel across a certain experimental enclosure. If the absolute temperature in this enclosure is doubled, the time for sound to travel across it will be closest to: A) 2.50 ms B) 14.1 ms C) 7.07 ms D) 20.0 ms E) 5.00 ms 63) 64) Under certain conditions the speed of sound in air is 340 m/s. If the temperature were to rise by 1.00%, what would the speed of sound then be? A) 339 m/s B) 342 m/s C) 338 m/s D) 341 m/s E) 340 m/s 64) SHORT ANSWER. Write the word or phrase that best completes each statement or answers the question. 65) A certain source of sound waves radiates uniformly in all directions. At a distance of 20 m from the source the intensity level is 51 db. What is the total acoustic power output of the source, in watts? (Note: The reference intensity I o is W/m 2.) 65) 9

10 Figure ) In Fig. 16.2, a man is traveling on a bicycle at 18 m/s along a straight road that runs parallel to some railroad tracks. He hears the whistle of a train that is behind him, as shown in the sketch. The frequency emitted by the train is 840 Hz, but the frequency the man hears is 778 Hz. Take the velocity of sound to be 340 Hz. a) What frequency is heard by a stationary observer located between the train and the bicycle? b) What is the speed of the train, and is the train traveling away from or toward the bicycle? 66) 67) Two violists are tuning their A-strings, for which the fundamental frequency is 440 Hz when properly tuned. When both play the A-note, 6.9 beats per second are heard. By what fractional amount must the player of the viola with the lower frequency increase the tension in his string to make its frequency identical to that of the other viola? Assume that the other viola is already properly tuned. Express your answer in percent (%). 67) 68) What must be the length of an organ pipe that is open at one end and closed at the other if its fundamental frequency is to be 5 times that of a pipe that is 2.10 meters long and open at both ends? 68) Figure ) In Fig. 16.3, two identical loudspeakers, A and B, driven by the same amplifier, are separated by 2.00 m and produce sound waves of the same frequency. A small microphone is placed at point C, 3.00 m from speaker A along the line perpendicular to the line connecting the two speakers. At this point destructive interference occurs. If the microphone is now moved along this line to point D, 4.50 m from speaker A, constructive interference occurs. Find the frequency of the sound waves. The speed of sound is 344 m/s. Assume that there are no other points between C and D where interference occurs. 69) 10

11 70) A police siren produces a sound level of 81.0 db with a pressure amplitude of 0.75 Pa. Find the new intensity level if the pressure amplitude changes to 2.48 Pa. 70) 71) Two police cars have identical sirens that produce a frequency of 570 Hz. A stationary listener is standing between two cars. One car is parked and the other is approaching the listener and both have their sirens on. The listener notices 9.7 beats per second. Find the speed of the approaching police car. (The speed of sound is 340 m/s.) 71) 72) Find the ratio of the speed of sound in nitrogen gas to that of air at room temperature, t = 20.0 C. The molecular mass of nitrogen is g/mol and! is The molecular mass of air is 28.8 g/mol and! is ) 73) A string 40.0 cm long of mass 8.50 g is fixed at both ends and is under a tension of 425 N. When this string is vibrating in its third overtone, you observe that it causes a nearby pipe, open at both ends, to resonate in its third harmonic. The speed of sound in the room is 344 m/s. (a) How long is the pipe? (b) What is the fundamental frequency of the pipe? 73) 74) A sound wave of wavelength 26.0 cm in air has an intensity level of 45.0 db. By how many pascals does the pressure of this wave vary above and below the ambient air pressure? The reference intensity is W/m 2, the speed of sound in the room is 344 m/s, and the density of the air is 1.20 kg/m 2. 74) 11

12 Answer Key Testname: UNTITLED3 1) B 2) C 3) B 4) A 5) C 6) C 7) C 8) A 9) C 10) C 11) E 12) D 13) C 14) C 15) A 16) B 17) C 18) E 19) A 20) A 21) D 22) E 23) C 24) B 25) A 26) A 27) C 28) D 29) B 30) C 31) D 32) D 33) B 34) B 35) E 36) D 37) D 38) E 39) D 40) E 41) A 42) E 43) B 44) A 45) E 46) B 47) C 48) D 49) B 12

13 Answer Key Testname: UNTITLED3 50) E 51) D 52) A 53) A 54) B 55) D 56) B 57) A 58) D 59) A 60) A 61) A 62) E 63) C 64) B 65) watts 66) a) 821 Hz b) 7.8 m/s, away from the bicycle 67) 3.1 % 68) meters 69) 950 Hz 70) 91.4 db 71) 5.7 m/s 72) 1.01 times as fast 73) (a) m (b) 236 Hz 74) Pa 13

Sound Waves. PHYS102 Previous Exam Problems CHAPTER. Sound waves Interference of sound waves Intensity & level Resonance in tubes Doppler effect

Sound Waves. PHYS102 Previous Exam Problems CHAPTER. Sound waves Interference of sound waves Intensity & level Resonance in tubes Doppler effect PHYS102 Previous Exam Problems CHAPTER 17 Sound Waves Sound waves Interference of sound waves Intensity & level Resonance in tubes Doppler effect If the speed of sound in air is not given in the problem,

More information

Chapter 3: Sound waves. Sound waves

Chapter 3: Sound waves. Sound waves Sound waves 1. Sound travels at 340 m/s in air and 1500 m/s in water. A sound of 256 Hz is made under water. In the air, A) the frequency remains the same but the wavelength is shorter. B) the frequency

More information

MULTIPLE CHOICE. Choose the one alternative that best completes the statement or answers the question.

MULTIPLE CHOICE. Choose the one alternative that best completes the statement or answers the question. Exam Name MULTIPLE CHOICE. Choose the one alternative that best completes the statement or answers the question. 1) A transverse wave is propagated in a string stretched along the x-axis. The equation

More information

1) The time for one cycle of a periodic process is called the A) wavelength. B) period. C) frequency. D) amplitude.

1) The time for one cycle of a periodic process is called the A) wavelength. B) period. C) frequency. D) amplitude. practice wave test.. Name Use the text to make use of any equations you might need (e.g., to determine the velocity of waves in a given material) MULTIPLE CHOICE. Choose the one alternative that best completes

More information

2. A series of ocean waves, 5.0 m between crests, move past at 2.0 waves/s. Find their speed. a. 2.5 m/s c. 8.0 m/s b. 5.0 m/s d.

2. A series of ocean waves, 5.0 m between crests, move past at 2.0 waves/s. Find their speed. a. 2.5 m/s c. 8.0 m/s b. 5.0 m/s d. Sound 1. A sound wave coming from a tuba has a wavelength of 1.50 m and travels to your ears at a speed of 345 m/s. What is the frequency of the sound you hear? a. 517 Hz c. 230 Hz b. 1/517 Hz d. 1/230

More information

Unit 6 Practice Test: Sound

Unit 6 Practice Test: Sound Unit 6 Practice Test: Sound Name: Multiple Guess Identify the letter of the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question. 1. A mass attached to a spring vibrates back and forth. At

More information

β = 10 log(i/i 0 ) I = P/4πr 2 v = λ /T = λf

β = 10 log(i/i 0 ) I = P/4πr 2 v = λ /T = λf Chapter 12 Lecture Notes Physics 2414 - Strauss Formulas: v (331 + 0.60T ) m/s I P/A 2 I x 0 β = 10 log(i/i 0 ) I = P/4πr 2 v = λ /T = λf v = FT ml for a stretched string λ n = 2L/n, for a stretched string

More information

SPH 3U0: Exam Review: Sound Waves and Projectile Motion

SPH 3U0: Exam Review: Sound Waves and Projectile Motion SPH 3U0: Exam Review: Sound Waves and Projectile Motion True/False Indicate whether the sentence or statement is true or false. 1. A trough is a negative pulse which occurs in a longitudinal wave. 2. When

More information

Constructive and Destructive Interference Conceptual Question

Constructive and Destructive Interference Conceptual Question Chapter 16 - solutions Constructive and Destructive Interference Conceptual Question Description: Conceptual question on whether constructive or destructive interference occurs at various points between

More information

y(cm) 4.0 t(s) 4.0 Fig Problem 5.

y(cm) 4.0 t(s) 4.0 Fig Problem 5. PROBLEMS 11-3 Simple Harmonic Wave 1. A wave has an angular frequency of 110 rad/s and a wavelength of 1.8 m. Calculate (a) the angular wave number and (b) the speed of the wave. 2. A sinusoidal wave of

More information

Chapter 15: Making Waves

Chapter 15: Making Waves Chapter 15: Making Waves 1. Electromagnetic waves are generally A. transverse waves. B. longitudinal waves. C. a 50/50 combination of transverse and longitudinal waves. D. standing waves. 2. The period

More information

第 1 頁, 共 8 頁 Chap16&Chap17 1. Test Bank, Question 6 Three traveling sinusoidal waves are on identical strings, with the same tension. The mathematical forms of the waves are (x,t) = y m sin(3x 6t), y 2

More information

State Newton's second law of motion for a particle, defining carefully each term used.

State Newton's second law of motion for a particle, defining carefully each term used. 5 Question 1. [Marks 28] An unmarked police car P is, travelling at the legal speed limit, v P, on a straight section of highway. At time t = 0, the police car is overtaken by a car C, which is speeding

More information

CHAPTER 9 SOUND WAVES. - As a tuning fork vibrates a series of condensations and rarefactions moves

CHAPTER 9 SOUND WAVES. - As a tuning fork vibrates a series of condensations and rarefactions moves CHAPTER 9 SOUND WAVES 9.1 Producing a sound waes - As a tuning fork ibrates a series of condensations and rarefactions moes away outward, away from the fork. - Sound is a wae that propagate in solids,

More information

Cutnell/Johnson Physics

Cutnell/Johnson Physics Cutnell/Johnson Physics Classroom Response System Questions Chapter 17 The Principle of Linear Superposition and Interference Phenomena Interactive Lecture Questions 17.1.1. The graph shows two waves at

More information

Physics 1120: Waves Solutions

Physics 1120: Waves Solutions Questions: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 Physics 1120: Waves Solutions 1. A wire of length 4.35 m and mass 137 g is under a tension of 125 N. What is the speed of a wave in this wire? If the tension

More information

State Newton's second law of motion for a particle, defining carefully each term used.

State Newton's second law of motion for a particle, defining carefully each term used. 5 Question 1. [Marks 20] An unmarked police car P is, travelling at the legal speed limit, v P, on a straight section of highway. At time t = 0, the police car is overtaken by a car C, which is speeding

More information

PHYS-2020: General Physics II Course Lecture Notes Section VIII

PHYS-2020: General Physics II Course Lecture Notes Section VIII PHYS-2020: General Physics II Course Lecture Notes Section VIII Dr. Donald G. Luttermoser East Tennessee State University Edition 4.0 Abstract These class notes are designed for use of the instructor and

More information

v = λ f this is the Golden Rule for waves transverse & longitudinal waves Harmonic waves The golden rule for waves Example: wave on a string Review

v = λ f this is the Golden Rule for waves transverse & longitudinal waves Harmonic waves The golden rule for waves Example: wave on a string Review L 23 Vibrations and Waves [3] resonance clocks pendulum springs harmonic motion mechanical waves sound waves golden rule for waves musical instruments The Doppler effect Doppler radar radar guns Review

More information

Tennessee State University

Tennessee State University Tennessee State University Dept. of Physics & Mathematics PHYS 2010 CF SU 2009 Name 30% Time is 2 hours. Cheating will give you an F-grade. Other instructions will be given in the Hall. MULTIPLE CHOICE.

More information

S15--AP Phys Q3 SHO-Sound PRACTICE

S15--AP Phys Q3 SHO-Sound PRACTICE Name: Class: Date: ID: A S5--AP Phys Q3 SHO-Sound PRACTICE Multiple Choice Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question.. If you are on a train, how will the pitch of the

More information

PHYSICS 202 Practice Exam Waves, Sound, Reflection and Refraction. Name. Constants and Conversion Factors

PHYSICS 202 Practice Exam Waves, Sound, Reflection and Refraction. Name. Constants and Conversion Factors PHYSICS 202 Practice Exam Waves, Sound, Reflection and Refraction Name Constants and Conversion Factors Speed of sound in Air œ $%!7Î= "'!*7/>/

More information

1/28/2009. Motion that repeats itself over and over. Rotation and revolution of Earth Back and forth motion of a swing Turning bicycle wheel

1/28/2009. Motion that repeats itself over and over. Rotation and revolution of Earth Back and forth motion of a swing Turning bicycle wheel Physics: Waves and Sound Dr. Ed Brothers Chemistry and Physics for High School Students Texas A&M (Qatar) January 27, 2009 Harmonic Motion Motion that repeats itself over and over Examples of harmonic

More information

Waves. Wave: A traveling disturbance consisting of coordinated vibrations that transmit energy with no net movement of the matter.

Waves. Wave: A traveling disturbance consisting of coordinated vibrations that transmit energy with no net movement of the matter. Waves Wave: A traveling disturbance consisting of coordinated vibrations that transmit energy with no net movement of the matter. Source: some kind of disturbance from the state of equilibrium. Propagation:

More information

Nicholas J. Giordano. Chapter 12 Waves

Nicholas J. Giordano.  Chapter 12 Waves Nicholas J. Giordano www.cengage.com/physics/giordano Chapter 12 Waves Wave Motion A wave is a moving disturbance that transports energy from one place to another without transporting matter Questions

More information

Superposition and Standing Waves. Solutions of Selected Problems

Superposition and Standing Waves. Solutions of Selected Problems Chapter 18 Superposition and Standing Waves. s of Selected Problems 18.1 Problem 18.8 (In the text book) Two loudspeakers are placed on a wall 2.00 m apart. A listener stands 3.00 m from the wall directly

More information

Superposition and Interference

Superposition and Interference Superposition and Interference Bởi: OpenStaxCollege These waves result from the superposition of several waves from different sources, producing a complex pattern. (credit: waterborough, Wikimedia Commons)

More information

Physics 131: tutorial week 6 Waves (1)

Physics 131: tutorial week 6 Waves (1) Physics 131: tutorial week 6 Waves (1) Take the speed of sound in air at 0 C as 331ms 1 and the speed of electromagnetic radiation c 3, 00 10 8 ms 1. 1. A person standing in the ocean notices that after

More information

18 Q0 a speed of 45.0 m/s away from a moving car. If the car is 8 Q0 moving towards the ambulance with a speed of 15.0 m/s, what Q0 frequency does a

18 Q0 a speed of 45.0 m/s away from a moving car. If the car is 8 Q0 moving towards the ambulance with a speed of 15.0 m/s, what Q0 frequency does a First Major T-042 1 A transverse sinusoidal wave is traveling on a string with a 17 speed of 300 m/s. If the wave has a frequency of 100 Hz, what 9 is the phase difference between two particles on the

More information

1 of 8 1/23/2010 6:15 PM

1 of 8 1/23/2010 6:15 PM 1 of 8 1/23/2010 6:15 PM Chapter 21 Homework Due: 8:00am on Tuesday, January 26, 2010 Note: To understand how points are awarded, read your instructor's Grading Policy [Return to Standard Assignment View]

More information

General Physics (PHY 2130)

General Physics (PHY 2130) General Physics (PHY 2130) Lecture 28 Waves standing waves Sound definitions standing sound waves and instruments Doppler s effect http://www.physics.wayne.edu/~apetrov/phy2130/ Lightning Review Last lecture:

More information

UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE CHATTANOOGA PHYSICS 1030L LAB 2/06/2013. PHYSICS 1030L Laboratory Measuring the Speed of Sound in Air Using a Resonance Tube

UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE CHATTANOOGA PHYSICS 1030L LAB 2/06/2013. PHYSICS 1030L Laboratory Measuring the Speed of Sound in Air Using a Resonance Tube PHYSICS 1030L Laboratory Measuring the Speed of Sound in Air Using a Resonance Tube Objective: The purpose of this experiment is to measure the speed of sound in air by exploiting standing wave and resonance

More information

Chapter 21 Mechanical Waves. A PowerPoint Presentation by Paul E. Tippens, Professor of Physics Southern Polytechnic State University

Chapter 21 Mechanical Waves. A PowerPoint Presentation by Paul E. Tippens, Professor of Physics Southern Polytechnic State University Chapter 21 Mechanical Waves A PowerPoint Presentation by Paul E. Tippens, Professor of Physics Southern Polytechnic State University 2007 Objectives: After completion of this module, you should be able

More information

explain your reasoning

explain your reasoning I. A mechanical device shakes a ball-spring system vertically at its natural frequency. The ball is attached to a string, sending a harmonic wave in the positive x-direction. +x a) The ball, of mass M,

More information

MAKE SURE TA & TI STAMPS EVERY PAGE BEFORE YOU START

MAKE SURE TA & TI STAMPS EVERY PAGE BEFORE YOU START Laboratory Section: Last Revised on September 21, 2016 Partners Names: Grade: EXPERIMENT 11 Velocity of Waves 0. Pre-Laboratory Work [2 pts] 1.) What is the longest wavelength at which a sound wave will

More information

Waves. Overview (Text p382>)

Waves. Overview (Text p382>) Waves Overview (Text p382>) Waves What are they? Imagine dropping a stone into a still pond and watching the result. A wave is a disturbance that transfers energy from one point to another in wave fronts.

More information

Final - Physics 1240 Spring, 2010 version 1. Intensity ratio 1 db db db db db db db db db 7.

Final - Physics 1240 Spring, 2010 version 1. Intensity ratio 1 db db db db db db db db db 7. Final - Physics 1240 Spring, 2010 version 1 0001-1 SIL difference (in decibels) Intensity ratio 1 db 1.3 2 db 1.6 3 db 2.0 4 db 2.5 5 db 3.2 6 db 4.0 7 db 5.0 8 db 6.3 9 db 7.9 Bubble in questions 1-40

More information

transverse wave on a string Slinky waves

transverse wave on a string Slinky waves L 23 Vibrations and Waves [3] updated 10/23/07 resonance clocks pendulum springs harmonic motion mechanical waves sound waves golden rule for waves musical instruments The Doppler effect Doppler radar

More information

Waves Review Checklist Pulses 5.1.1A Explain the relationship between the period of a pendulum and the factors involved in building one

Waves Review Checklist Pulses 5.1.1A Explain the relationship between the period of a pendulum and the factors involved in building one 5.1.1 Oscillating Systems Waves Review Checklist 5.1.2 Pulses 5.1.1A Explain the relationship between the period of a pendulum and the factors involved in building one Four pendulums are built as shown

More information

Waves. In short: 1. A disturbance or variation which travels through a medium 2. Must transfer energy from one location to another.

Waves. In short: 1. A disturbance or variation which travels through a medium 2. Must transfer energy from one location to another. Waves What is a wave? A disturbance or variation that transfers energy progressively from point to point in a medium and that may take the form of an elastic deformation or of a variation of pressure,

More information

Name Class Date. A wave is produced that moves out from the center in an expanding circle. The wave

Name Class Date. A wave is produced that moves out from the center in an expanding circle. The wave Exercises 25.1 Vibration of a Pendulum (page 491) 1. The time it takes for one back-and-forth motion of a pendulum is called the period. 2. List the two things that determine the period of a pendulum.

More information

Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley.

Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley. Chapter 20. Traveling Waves You may not realize it, but you are surrounded by waves. The waviness of a water wave is readily apparent, from the ripples on a pond to ocean waves large enough to surf. It

More information

Wave Interference and Resonance

Wave Interference and Resonance Wave Interference and Resonance 1. An audio frequency oscillator produces a single frequency sound wave but sends it through two speakers 1 m apart from each other. An observer standing 10.0 m away from

More information

physics 1/12/2016 Chapter 20 Lecture Chapter 20 Traveling Waves

physics 1/12/2016 Chapter 20 Lecture Chapter 20 Traveling Waves Chapter 20 Lecture physics FOR SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS a strategic approach THIRD EDITION randall d. knight Chapter 20 Traveling Waves Chapter Goal: To learn the basic properties of traveling waves. Slide

More information

Sound W.S. 1. Two major classes of waves are longitudinal and transverse. Sound waves are.

Sound W.S. 1. Two major classes of waves are longitudinal and transverse. Sound waves are. Sound W.S. 1. Two major classes of waves are longitudinal and transverse. Sound waves are. longitudinal transverse 2. The frequency of a sound signal refers to how frequently the vibrations occur. A high-frequency

More information

PHYS 101-4M, Fall 2005 Exam #3. MULTIPLE CHOICE. Choose the one alternative that best completes the statement or answers the question.

PHYS 101-4M, Fall 2005 Exam #3. MULTIPLE CHOICE. Choose the one alternative that best completes the statement or answers the question. PHYS 101-4M, Fall 2005 Exam #3 Name MULTIPLE CHOICE. Choose the one alternative that best completes the statement or answers the question. 1) A bicycle wheel rotates uniformly through 2.0 revolutions in

More information

Lecture PowerPoints. Chapter 12 Physics: Principles with Applications, 6 th edition Giancoli

Lecture PowerPoints. Chapter 12 Physics: Principles with Applications, 6 th edition Giancoli Lecture PowerPoints Chapter 12 Physics: Principles with Applications, 6 th edition Giancoli 2005 Pearson Prentice Hall This work is protected by United States copyright laws and is provided solely for

More information

Chapter4: Superposition and Interference

Chapter4: Superposition and Interference Chapter4: Superposition and Interference Sections Superposition Principle Superposition of Sinusoidal Waves Interference of Sound Waves Standing Waves Beats: Interference in Time Nonsinusoidal Wave Patterns

More information

Chapter 16 Waves and Sound

Chapter 16 Waves and Sound Chapter 16 WAVES AND SOUND PREVIEW A wave is a disturbance which causes a transfer of energy. Mechanical waves need a medium in which to travel, but electromagnetic waves do not. Waves can be transverse

More information

Angle of an incident (arriving) ray or particle to a surface; measured from a line perpendicular to the surface (the normal) Angle of incidence

Angle of an incident (arriving) ray or particle to a surface; measured from a line perpendicular to the surface (the normal) Angle of incidence The maximum displacement of particles of the medium from their mean positions during the propagation of a wave Angle of an incident (arriving) ray or particle to a surface; measured from a line perpendicular

More information

8.4 Resonance in Air Columns

8.4 Resonance in Air Columns 8.4 8.4 Resonance in Air Columns Sound waves from one source can cause an identical source to vibrate in resonance. Just as with mechanical resonance (section 6.7), a small force produces a large vibration.

More information

11/17/10. Transverse and Longitudinal Waves. Transverse and Longitudinal Waves. Wave Speed. EXAMPLE 20.1 The speed of a wave pulse

11/17/10. Transverse and Longitudinal Waves. Transverse and Longitudinal Waves. Wave Speed. EXAMPLE 20.1 The speed of a wave pulse You may not realize it, but you are surrounded by waves. The waviness of a water wave is readily apparent, from the ripples on a pond to ocean waves large enough to surf. It s less apparent that sound

More information

Chapter 11. Waves & Sound

Chapter 11. Waves & Sound Chapter 11 Waves & Sound 11.2 Periodic Waves In the drawing, one cycle is shaded in color. The amplitude A is the maximum excursion of a particle of the medium from the particles undisturbed position.

More information

Sound Waves Practice Problems PSI AP Physics B

Sound Waves Practice Problems PSI AP Physics B Sound Waves Practice Problems PSI AP Physics B Name Multiple Choice 1. Two sound sources S 1 and S 2 produce waves with frequencies 500 Hz and 250 Hz. When we compare the speed of wave 1 to the speed of

More information

Unit 4 Sound and Waves

Unit 4 Sound and Waves Name: Class: Date: Unit 4 Sound and Waves Multiple Choice Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question. 1. The speed of any mechanical wave as it propagates through a medium

More information

waves and sound 1. Within a vacuum, the property common to all electromagnetic waves is their A. amplitude B. frequency C. wavelength D.

waves and sound 1. Within a vacuum, the property common to all electromagnetic waves is their A. amplitude B. frequency C. wavelength D. Name: ate: 1. Within a vacuum, the property common to all electromagnetic waves is their 1.. amplitude. frequency. wavelength. velocity 2. The diagram shown represents four waves traveling to the right

More information

Chapter 21. Superposition

Chapter 21. Superposition Chapter 21. Superposition The combination of two or more waves is called a superposition of waves. Applications of superposition range from musical instruments to the colors of an oil film to lasers. Chapter

More information

The Sonometer The Resonant String and Timbre Change after plucking

The Sonometer The Resonant String and Timbre Change after plucking The Sonometer The Resonant String and Timbre Change after plucking EQUIPMENT Pasco sonometers (pick up 5 from teaching lab) and 5 kits to go with them BK Precision function generators and Tenma oscilloscopes

More information

Chapter 18 4/14/11. Superposition Principle. Superposition and Interference. Superposition Example. Superposition and Standing Waves

Chapter 18 4/14/11. Superposition Principle. Superposition and Interference. Superposition Example. Superposition and Standing Waves Superposition Principle Chapter 18 Superposition and Standing Waves If two or more traveling waves are moving through a medium, the resultant value of the wave function at any point is the algebraic sum

More information

Chapter 15 Wave Motion. Copyright 2009 Pearson Education, Inc.

Chapter 15 Wave Motion. Copyright 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Chapter 15 Wave Motion Characteristics of Wave Motion Types of Waves: Transverse and Longitudinal Energy Transported by Waves Mathematical Representation of a Traveling Wave The Wave Equation Units of

More information

Sound and Waves worksheet

Sound and Waves worksheet Sound and Waves worksheet Short Answer 1. For each of the following, calculate the frequency, in hertz, and the period, in seconds: (a) a bee beating its wings 3000 times in 30 s (b) a tuning fork completing

More information

AP1 Waves. (A) frequency (B) wavelength (C) speed (D) intensity. Answer: (A) and (D) frequency and intensity.

AP1 Waves. (A) frequency (B) wavelength (C) speed (D) intensity. Answer: (A) and (D) frequency and intensity. 1. A fire truck is moving at a fairly high speed, with its siren emitting sound at a specific pitch. As the fire truck recedes from you which of the following characteristics of the sound wave from the

More information

Contents 1 PENDULUM EXPERIMENT 3 2 SIMPLE HARMONIC MOTION 9 3 STANDING WAVES ON STRINGS 15 4 STANDING WAVES IN AIR COLUMNS 21

Contents 1 PENDULUM EXPERIMENT 3 2 SIMPLE HARMONIC MOTION 9 3 STANDING WAVES ON STRINGS 15 4 STANDING WAVES IN AIR COLUMNS 21 Contents 1 PENDULUM EXPERIMENT 3 2 SIMPLE HARMONIC MOTION 9 3 STANDING WAVES ON STRINGS 15 4 STANDING WAVES IN AIR COLUMNS 21 5 SOUND INTENSITY - THE DECIBEL SCALE 27 6 REVERBERATION TIME 31 1 2 CONTENTS

More information

Assignment 6. Problem 1: Creating a Standing Wave

Assignment 6. Problem 1: Creating a Standing Wave Assignment 6 Problem 1: Creating a Standing Wave The wave is traveling in the +x direction Asin(kx + wt) = Asin(k(x + vt)) since vt is added to position, the wave is traveling in the negative direction.

More information

Unit 4: Science and Materials in Construction and the Built Environment. Sound

Unit 4: Science and Materials in Construction and the Built Environment. Sound 8.1 Origin of Sound Sound Sound is a variation in the pressure of the air of a type which has an effect on our ears and brain. These pressure variations transfer energy from a source of vibration that

More information

a) A hanging spring supporting a weight. b) The balance of a wheel. c) The wheel of an automobile. d) The spring of a violin.

a) A hanging spring supporting a weight. b) The balance of a wheel. c) The wheel of an automobile. d) The spring of a violin. 114. If mass of a body suspended from a spring is doubled, the period of vibration of the body becomes: (6a ii 07) a) Double. b) Half. c) Times. d) Iyr times. 115. The frequency of a simple pendulum in

More information

Superposition and Interference

Superposition and Interference OpenStax-CNX module: m42249 1 Superposition and Interference OpenStax College This work is produced by OpenStax-CNX and licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution License 3.0 Abstract Explain standing

More information

Ch 26 Chapter Review Q & A s

Ch 26 Chapter Review Q & A s Ch 26 Chapter Review Q & A s Q: What is the source of all sounds? A: vibrating objects Q: How does pitch relate to frequency? A: Pitch is subjective, but it increases as frequency increases Q: What is

More information

NOTES Unit 13: Waves and Optics Wave Motion and Sound

NOTES Unit 13: Waves and Optics Wave Motion and Sound Unit 13: Waves and Optics Wave Motion and Sound OBJECTIVES: Big Idea 6: Waves can transfer energy and momentum from one location to another without the permanent transfer of mass and serve as a mathematical

More information

constructive interference results when destructive interference results when two special interference patterns are the and the

constructive interference results when destructive interference results when two special interference patterns are the and the Interference and Sound Last class we looked at interference and found that constructive interference results when destructive interference results when two special interference patterns are the and the

More information

Chapter 13. Mechanical Waves

Chapter 13. Mechanical Waves Chapter 13 Mechanical Waves A harmonic oscillator is a wiggle in time. The oscillating object will move back and forth between +A and A forever. If a harmonic oscillator now moves through space, we create

More information

Waves and Sound. An Introduction to Waves and Wave Properties Wednesday, November 19, 2008

Waves and Sound. An Introduction to Waves and Wave Properties Wednesday, November 19, 2008 Waves and Sound An Introduction to Waves and Wave Properties Wednesday, November 19, 2008 Mechanical Wave A mechanical wave is a disturbance which propagates through a medium with little or no net displacement

More information

Waves and Sound. AP Physics B

Waves and Sound. AP Physics B Waves and Sound AP Physics B What is a wave A WAVE is a vibration or disturbance in space. A MEDIUM is the substance that all SOUND WAVES travel through and need to have in order to move. Two types of

More information

Waves Review Checklist Pulses 5.1.1A Explain the relationship between the period of a pendulum and the factors involved in building one

Waves Review Checklist Pulses 5.1.1A Explain the relationship between the period of a pendulum and the factors involved in building one 5.1.1 Oscillating Systems Waves Review hecklist 5.1.2 Pulses 5.1.1A Explain the relationship between the period of a pendulum and the factors involved in building one Four pendulums are built as shown

More information

Waves in Water Waves and Sound

Waves in Water Waves and Sound Waves in Water Waves and Sound What is a wave? What are the main properties of waves? What two things do all waves transport? Vibration Waves are a type of disturbance that can propagate or travel. Waves

More information

PES 2130 Fall 2014, Spendier Lecture 14/Page 1

PES 2130 Fall 2014, Spendier Lecture 14/Page 1 PE 2130 Fall 2014, pendier Lecture 14/Page 1 Lecture today: Chapter 17 Waves-2 1) Doppler Effect 2) hock Waves Announcements: - HW 5 due, HW 6 given out Last time: - tanding sound waves open pipe (two

More information

Honors Physics Burns. Multiple Choice: Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question. / ~.

Honors Physics Burns. Multiple Choice: Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question. / ~. Name: ~ Test Chapter 12 (Sound) Period Date: Honors Physics Burns /2010 Multiple Choice: Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question. / ~./~ t~ ~ ~ 1. Sound waves a. are

More information

A Simple Introduction to Interference

A Simple Introduction to Interference Course PHYSICS260 Assignment 4 Due at 11:00pm on Wednesday, February 27, 2008 A Simple Introduction to Interference Description: Interference is discussed for pulses on strings and then for sinusoidal

More information

IMPORTANT NOTE ABOUT WEBASSIGN:

IMPORTANT NOTE ABOUT WEBASSIGN: Week 13 homework IMPORTANT NOTE ABOUT WEBASSIGN: In the WebAssign versions o these problems, various details have been changed, so that the answers will come out dierently. The method to ind the solution

More information

Sensemaking TIPERs Instructors Manual Part E & F Copyright 2015 Pearson Education, Inc. 69

Sensemaking TIPERs Instructors Manual Part E & F Copyright 2015 Pearson Education, Inc. 69 E3 SOUD E3-RT01: POLICE CR D MOTORCYCLE SIRE FREQUECY police car with a 600 Hz siren is traveling along the same street as a motorcycle. The velocities of the two vehicles and the distance between them

More information

Lesson 11. Luis Anchordoqui. Physics 168. Tuesday, December 8, 15

Lesson 11. Luis Anchordoqui. Physics 168. Tuesday, December 8, 15 Lesson 11 Physics 168 1 Oscillations and Waves 2 Simple harmonic motion If an object vibrates or oscillates back and forth over same path each cycle taking same amount of time motion is called periodic

More information

2) In terms of wave motion, define medium. The type of matter a wave moves through is the medium.

2) In terms of wave motion, define medium. The type of matter a wave moves through is the medium. Waves Classwork #1 What is a wave? 1) What causes a wave? A disturbance that travels through space or matter. 2) In terms of wave motion, define medium. The type of matter a wave moves through is the medium.

More information

Center of Mass/Momentum

Center of Mass/Momentum Center of Mass/Momentum 1. 2. An L-shaped piece, represented by the shaded area on the figure, is cut from a metal plate of uniform thickness. The point that corresponds to the center of mass of the L-shaped

More information

Physical Science Study Guide Unit 7 Wave properties and behaviors, electromagnetic spectrum, Doppler Effect

Physical Science Study Guide Unit 7 Wave properties and behaviors, electromagnetic spectrum, Doppler Effect Objectives: PS-7.1 Physical Science Study Guide Unit 7 Wave properties and behaviors, electromagnetic spectrum, Doppler Effect Illustrate ways that the energy of waves is transferred by interaction with

More information

2. The graph shows how the displacement varies with time for an object undergoing simple harmonic motion.

2. The graph shows how the displacement varies with time for an object undergoing simple harmonic motion. Practice Test: 29 marks (37 minutes) Additional Problem: 31 marks (45 minutes) 1. A transverse wave travels from left to right. The diagram on the right shows how, at a particular instant of time, the

More information

Chapter 17: Change of Phase

Chapter 17: Change of Phase Chapter 17: Change of Phase Conceptual Physics, 10e (Hewitt) 3) Evaporation is a cooling process and condensation is A) a warming process. B) a cooling process also. C) neither a warming nor cooling process.

More information

Physics 117.3 Tutorial #1 January 14 to 25, 2013

Physics 117.3 Tutorial #1 January 14 to 25, 2013 Physics 117.3 Tutorial #1 January 14 to 25, 2013 Rm 130 Physics 8.79. The location of a person s centre of gravity can be determined using the arrangement shown in the figure. A light plank rests on two

More information

Waves I: Generalities, Superposition & Standing Waves

Waves I: Generalities, Superposition & Standing Waves Chapter 5 Waves I: Generalities, Superposition & Standing Waves 5.1 The Important Stuff 5.1.1 Wave Motion Wave motion occurs when the mass elements of a medium such as a taut string or the surface of a

More information

Principles of Technology CH 12 Wave and Sound 3

Principles of Technology CH 12 Wave and Sound 3 Principles of Technology CH 12 Wave and Sound 3 Name KEY OBJECTIVES At the conclusion of this chapter you will be able to: Define the terms constructive interference, destructive interference, resonance,

More information

Wave and Sound. The waves we are working with in this unit are mechanical waves.

Wave and Sound. The waves we are working with in this unit are mechanical waves. Wave and Sound Properties of waves A wave is a disturbance that carries energy through matter or space. We have worked with electromagnetic waves that do not require a medium through which to travel. Sound

More information

What is the wavelength of a sound wave with a frequency of 784 Hz, corresponding to the note G5 on a piano? ANSWER:

What is the wavelength of a sound wave with a frequency of 784 Hz, corresponding to the note G5 on a piano? ANSWER: Ch 15 HW Due: 4:20pm on Monday, August 31, 2015 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Exercise 15.1 Description: The speed of sound in air at 20

More information

Solution Derivations for Capa #13

Solution Derivations for Capa #13 Solution Derivations for Capa #13 1 Identify the following waves as T-Transverse, or L-Longitudinal. If the first is T and the rets L, enter TLLL. QUESTION: A The WAVE made by fans at sports events. B

More information

Waves are created by disturbances which cause vibrations.

Waves are created by disturbances which cause vibrations. Wave Motion Waves are created by disturbances which cause vibrations. Vibrations produce a back-and-forth type motion called an oscillation. http://3d wave simulation The number of vibrations (or waves)

More information

Waves-Wave Characteristics

Waves-Wave Characteristics 1. What is the wavelength of a 256-hertz sound wave in air at STP? 1. 1.17 10 6 m 2. 1.29 m 3. 0.773 m 4. 8.53 10-7 m 2. The graph below represents the relationship between wavelength and frequency of

More information

The Physics of Guitar Strings

The Physics of Guitar Strings The Physics of Guitar Strings R. R. McNeil 1. Introduction The guitar makes a wonderful device to demonstrate the physics of waves on a stretched string. This is because almost every student has seen a

More information

Physics 116. Oct 14, Lecture 10 Review: oscillations and waves. R. J. Wilkes

Physics 116. Oct 14, Lecture 10 Review: oscillations and waves. R. J. Wilkes Physics 116 Lecture 10 Review: oscillations and waves Oct 14, 2011 If we have time to spare: connection to this year s UW Common Book Richard Feynman - Nobel laureate in physics R. J. Wilkes Email: ph116@u.washington.edu

More information

Chapter 21 Study Questions Name: Class:

Chapter 21 Study Questions Name: Class: Chapter 21 Study Questions Name: Class: Multiple Choice Identify the letter of the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question. 1. If a fire engine is traveling toward you, the Doppler

More information

Wave Motion (Chapter 15)

Wave Motion (Chapter 15) Wave Motion (Chapter 15) Waves are moving oscillations. They transport energy and momentum through space without transporting matter. In mechanical waves this happens via a disturbance in a medium. Transverse

More information

Lab 14: Standing Waves

Lab 14: Standing Waves Lab 14: Standing Waves Objectives: To understand superposition of waves To understand how a standing wave is created To understand relationships between physical parameters such as tension and length of

More information

Waves. Types of Waves. Waves and Wave Properties Serway Ch. 13: Section 8 thru 13 Physics B Lesson 42: Wave Basics.

Waves. Types of Waves. Waves and Wave Properties Serway Ch. 13: Section 8 thru 13  Physics B Lesson 42: Wave Basics. Waves Waves and Wave Properties Serway Ch. 13: Section 8 thru 13 www.archive.org Physics B Lesson 42: Wave Basics Mechanical Caused by vibrations in a medium Examples: Sound Waves in a string Water waves

More information