Final - Physics 1240 Spring, 2010 version 1. Intensity ratio 1 db db db db db db db db db 7.

Save this PDF as:
 WORD  PNG  TXT  JPG

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "Final - Physics 1240 Spring, 2010 version 1. Intensity ratio 1 db db db db db db db db db 7."

Transcription

1 Final - Physics 1240 Spring, 2010 version SIL difference (in decibels) Intensity ratio 1 db db db db db db db db db 7.9 Bubble in questions 1-40 ON YOUR BUBBLE SHEET! 1. What is the period of the note A4 (concert A)? A) About 440 seconds B) About 2.3 seconds C) About 0.78 seconds D) About 78 milliseconds E) About 2.3 milliseconds 2. A mass hanging on a spring wiggles up and down in simple harmonic motion. If you double the mass, how do you predict for the frequency of motion to change? A) It will go UP by a factor of 2 (new frequency is double the original). B) It will go UP, but not by a factor of exactly 2. C) It will go DOWN by a factor of 2 (new frequency is half the original). D) It will go DOWN, but not by a factor of exactly 2. E) It will stay the same, frequency does not depend on mass. 3. Which of these statements best describes the way a microphone works? A) The sound particles in the air travel into the microphone, where they strike a membrane and transform into electrons; the electrons create an electrical signal. B) Inside the microphone is a very small antenna which detects the electromagnetic wave in the room and amplifies it to create an electrical signal. C) The sound wave in the room causes pressure variation on a small membrane inside the microphone; the motion of the membrane is converted into an electrical signal. D) The microphone takes an electrical signal and converts it into physical motion of a small membrane, creating a sound wave. 4. I have a speaker with a diameter of 50 cm. Which sounds will head out primarily in the forward direction from the speaker, and which will spread out in all directions? A) Frequencies above about 7 Hz will go forward, and frequencies below about 7 Hz will spread out. B) Frequencies below about 7 Hz will go forward, and frequencies above about 7 Hz will spread out. C) Frequencies above about 700 Hz will go forward, and frequencies below about 700 Hz will spread. D) Frequencies below about 700 Hz will go forward, and frequencies above about 700 Hz will spread. E) None of the above is a good description of which sounds will head forward and which will spread.

2 A plane flies toward a stationary siren at ¼ the speed of sound. Then the plane stands still on the ground and the siren is driven away from it at ¼ the speed of sound. In both cases, a person sitting in the plane will hear the same frequency of sound from the siren. A) True B) False 6. The just noticeable difference (JND) of hearing is larger for softer sounds. For example, a 1 khz sound that starts at 80 db has a JND of about 0.5 db, while the same 1 khz sound that starts at 30 db has a JND of about 1 db. Which statement below best describes the interpretation of this experimental result? A) It s easier to hear small differences in frequency if the sound starts out louder. B) It s easier to hear small differences in loudness if the sound starts out softer. C) It s easier to hear small differences in loudness if the sound starts out louder. D) It s easier to hear small differences in loudness if the sound starts out higher in pitch. E) It s easier to hear small differences in loudness if the sound starts out lower in pitch. 7. Which pair of tones would have a slow very distinct beat? (Assume both are equally loud initially.) A) 50 Hz and 52 Hz B) 50 Hz and 60 Hz C) 50 Hz and 100 Hz D) 50 Hz and 500 Hz E) 50 Hz and 5 khz The next two questions both refer to a giant clothesline wiggling at the front of class, oscillating in a simple standing wave pattern, driven by a piston at some fixed frequency. (The picture is a snapshot in time.) 8. If the length of the rope is L=5 m, what is the wavelength of this wave? A) 1 m B) 2 m C) 5 m D) 10 m E) 25 m 9. Consider a spot on the string located two fifths of the way along (i.e. at 2/5 L ). (I have drawn a heavy dot in the picture there to guide your eye). What can you say about the motion of this spot as time goes by? A) The spot wiggles left and right. B) The spot travels to the right. C) The spot wiggles up and down. D) The spot remains motionless. E) The spot goes around in a circular pattern. L

3 The next two questions address the picture at right. The picture shows the air pressure in the room as a function of position, at some instant in time. It is a snapshot of air pressure. The horizontal axis is distance, in meters, away from the source of the sound. Note the distance scale at the bottom of the graph. The entire graph is 16 m, each of the tick marks on the x axis is separated by 1 m, each of the faint vertical lines is 0.5 m apart. 0 8 m 16 m 10. What sound will you perceive when you hear this in other words, what is the frequency of the fundamental vibration of this waveform? A) 344 Hz B) 86 Hz C) 43 Hz D) 16 Hz E) 4 Hz 11. In addition to the fundamental vibration, a higher harmonic is present in this graph. Which harmonic is it? A) the 3 rd harmonic B) the 4 th harmonic C) the 5 th harmonic D) the 6 th harmonic E) the 7 th harmonic 12. In the middle ear, the eardrum is connected to the oval window by the ossicles, which transmit force between the eardrum and the oval window. The eardrum is about 20 times larger in area than the oval window. What effect does this difference in area have? A) The difference in area makes the pressure on the oval window larger. B) The difference in area makes the pressure on the oval window smaller. C) The difference in area makes the force on the oval window larger. D) The difference in area makes the force on the oval window smaller. E) The difference in area doesn t much affect the force or the pressure. 13. When you strum a guitar, you produce a fundamental tone. If you now place your finger to play the 3 rd harmonic (n=3), what does the new tone sound like? A) The 3 rd harmonic sounds 1 octave above the fundamental. B) The 3 rd harmonic sounds 2 octaves above the fundamental. C) The 3 rd harmonic sounds 3 octaves above the fundamental. D) The 3 rd harmonic sounds 4 octaves above the fundamental. E) None of the above is a correct description of the sound of the 3 rd harmonic. 14. A given note has a period of 0.4 milliseconds. What is its frequency? (Choose the closest answer.) A) About 150 Hz B) About 250 Hz C) About 1.5 khz D) About 2.5 khz E) About 15 khz

4 The next few questions are based on the Fletcher-Munson diagram, at right. This diagram helps us understand the connection between pitch, decibels, and perceived loudness (or phons). (The vertical axis in the graph is what we call in our class SIL, or decibel level.) According to the Fletcher-Munson diagram, how many decibels are required for a normal person to just barely detect a 10 khz tone? A) 0 db B) Less than 10 db C) Between 10 and 20 db D) More than 20 db E) The diagram doesn't give us the information to figure this out. 16. Suppose I want a recording of a 90 Hz note on a bassoon to have a perceived loudness of 50 Phon. Approximately what SIL do I need coming from my stereo? A) 40 db B) 50 db C) 60 db D) 70 db E) 80 db 17. Assume that you go to a very quiet classical concert: at your seat the loudness of all the frequencies in the music is about 60 phons. You record the music, take it home, and crank it on your stereo. Your stereo is set so all frequencies are increased from their original SIL by about +40 db. Which answer below best describes the change in your perception of the music? A) It seems louder to you, but the balance between bass and treble is also shifted it feels more bass dominated. B) It seems louder to you, but the balance between bass and treble is also shifted it feels more treble dominated. C) No change in balance, all pitches just seem equally louder. D) It seems the same loudness as at the concert, but the bass and treble are perceived as shifted up (equally) in pitch. E) It seems the same loudness as at the concert, but it seems like the bass and treble shift differently in pitch, making the music more dissonant. 18. Suppose I have a string vibrating in its third mode (n=3), and the string is 1.5 m long (like a long string on a grand piano). If I start at one end of the string, how far do I have to go to reach the first node on the string? A) 0.25 m B) 0.33 m C) 0.50 m D) 0.75 m E) 1.0 m 19. Suppose the string in the previous problem is vibrating at a frequency of 100 Hz. This produces a sound in the room (also at 100 Hz). If, at some instant in time, there happens to be an air pressure peak right at my ears, how far away from me in the room is the next air pressure peak? A) About 0.01 meters away B) About 0.3 meters away C) About 1 meter away D) About 3.4 meters away E) About 100 meters away.

5 You loosen a very tight guitar string, decreasing the tension by a factor of nine. What happens to the speed of the wave on the string? A) It goes down by a factor of 3. B) It goes down by a factor of 9. C) It goes up by a factor of 3. D) It goes up by a factor of 9. D) It stays the same, wave speed does not depend on tension. 21. I was singing while walking outside. When I walked into a tunnel, I noticed that my singing sounds much better inside the tunnel than it does outside. Why? (Pick the best explanation.) A) Because singing excites a resonance of the tunnel, and resonant sounds are more aesthetically pleasing. B) Because the sound waves diffract (spread out) when traveling through the opening of the tunnel, so the sound is easier to hear. C) Because the air temperature inside the tunnel is than from the temperature outside, which causes the frequency of the sound to shift to more pleasing notes. D) Because the sound waves inside the tunnel destructively interfere with each other, producing a pattern of loud and soft spots in the tunnel that sounds nice. E) Because the sound reflects (echoes) many times off the wall of the tunnel, and the time delay between when the different echoes reach my ear creates a richer sound. 22. What can you say about the allowed harmonics of an ideal wind instrument which is a simple narrow pipe that is closed on one end, but open on the other end? A) It has only odd numbered harmonics (i.e. you only hear frequencies which are an ODD number times the fundamental). B) It has only even numbered harmonics (i.e. you only hear frequencies which are an EVEN number times the fundamental). C) It has all harmonics, exactly the same pattern as a plucked string. D) It produces NO harmonics, only the fundamental will be heard. E) It produces a purely anharmonic pattern, where the higher frequencies are not related in any way to the fundamental. The next two questions refer to the picture below right, which shows a waveform of a pure tone (think of an oscilloscope trace, calibrated to measure pressure versus time of a pure tone). Notice the features of the graph labeled i and ii. 23. Which feature of the graph do you have to change (and how?) in order to make the pitch go down by an octave? A) Make feature i larger by a factor of 2. B) Make feature i smaller by a factor of 2. C) Make feature ii larger by a factor of 2. D) Make feature ii smaller by a factor of 2. E) None of the above changes will do the trick. 24. If you want to increase the sound intensity level (SIL) you hear by +6 db, what change do you have to make? A) Increase feature i by a factor of 4. B) Increase feature i by a factor of 6. C) Increase feature ii by a factor of 4. D) Increase feature ii by a factor of 6. E) None of the above changes will do the trick. pressure (above normal) i: (below normal) ii: time, t

6 Considering a string on a bass guitar with a fundamental (n=1) frequency of the note we call E2. When you are hearing this 4th harmonic (n=4) of this string, what note are you perceiving? A) E12 B) E7 C) E5 D) E4 E) None of the above corresponds to the 4th harmonic of this string. 26. Consider a giant organ pipe which plays a tone whose fundamental frequency is at the very low end of normal human hearing (which typically ranges from about 20 Hz to 20,000 Hz). Which harmonic number of this pipe is about the highest one most people could perceive? A) Somewhere around n=3. B) Somewhere around n=10. C) Somewhere around n=200. D) Somewhere around n=1,000. E) Somewhere around n=20, A native American bass flute is roughly 1 meter long, and is open at both ends. What is the lowest note can be played on this instrument? A) About 340 Hz. B) About 170 Hz. C) About 34 Hz. D) About 1 Hz. E) There is no lowest note on an open flute, a highly skilled player can go as low as they want. 28. If you cap off one end of the flute in the previous problem, what happens to the fundamental frequency? A) It goes down by an octave. B) It goes down, but by much less than an octave C) It goes up by an octave D) It goes up, but by much less than an octave E) It stays the same. 29. If the intensity of sound (measured in W/m 2 ) increases by a factor of 5, what happens to the decibel level? A) It goes up by a factor of 20 from whatever value it starts at (decibels are multiplied by 20). B) It goes up by a factor of 5 from whatever value it starts at (decibels are multiplied by 5). C) It increases by +3 db. D) It increases by +5 db. E) It increases by +7 db. 30. A violinist tunes her instrument before a concert by tightening one of the strings. As you listen to this, you hear the pitch of the note she plays increasing slightly. How does the speed of the produced sound wave (traveling through the air towards you) change as the frequency goes up? A) The higher the frequency, the faster the sound wave travels to you. B) The higher the frequency, the slower the sound wave travels to you. C) Frequency makes no difference, sound waves of all frequencies travel to you at the same speed.

7 The next 2 questions refer to a half-closed 3 m long pipe (one end is sealed, the other end is open to the atmosphere). This pipe has a standing pressure wave in it (that's just one of the ordinary modes we've talked about in class, the wave shown happens to have n=3). The overpressure in the tube at one instant in time is shown as a solid line. The overpressure at a later time is shown dashed. Over- Pressure m 2 m 3 m L=3 m 31. Which end of this pipe is the open end? Choose the correct answer and the correct reason. A) The right end is open, because you should have a pressure antinode at the open end B) The right end is open, because you should have a pressure node at the open end C) The left end is open, because you should have a pressure antinode at the open end D) The left end is open, because you should have a pressure node at the open end E) The graph shown cannot possibly correspond to any real standing wave in a tube. 32. A dust particle is located 2/3 of the way along the tube, i.e. at the 2 m spot (shown as a black dot in the figure above). How will the dust speck move as time goes by due to the standing pressure wave? A) The speck wiggles left and right. B) The speck travels steadily in one direction until it leaves the tube. C) The speck wiggles up and down (i.e. towards the top and bottom of the tube, not towards the ends). D) The speck remains essentially motionless. E) The speck moves around in a circular pattern. 33. The speed of a wave on a 1 meter long bass string is. A) 2 m/s B) 1 m/s C) 344 m/s D) 172 m/s E) There is not enough information given to determine. 34. You are listening to two speakers. The distance from you to one of the speakers is precisely half a wavelength longer than the distance to the other one. Assume the speakers are wired to produce sound in synch (in phase) with one another. What do you hear when the speakers play the same pure tone? A) A very soft or no sound (that is, it s much softer than the loudness of either speaker alone). B) A sound that beats (that is, it gets louder and softer, louder and softer, with time). C) A sound louder than either speaker alone would produce. D) A sound of distinctly different frequency than either speaker alone would produce. E) A sound the same loudness as either speaker alone. 35. In a concert, a solo violinist begins the piece, playing at a steady 40 db. Then more violins join in. They all play at the same intensity, and the sound intensity level (SIL) in the room is now 50 db. How many violins (total) are now playing? A) 5 B) 10 C) 13 D) 15 E) 20

8 Our perception of sound comes from the inner ear. There is a basilar membrane which runs down the cochlea, with hair cells located along this membrane. What mechanism associated with the inner ear best helps us perceive how high or low the pitch of a given sound is? A) The vibration rate of the individual hair cells carries much of the frequency information. B) The amplitude of the vibration of individual hair cells carries much of the frequency information. C) The spectrum of the electric signal produced by the individual hair cells carries much of the frequency information. D) The location of vibrating hair cells along the membrane carries much of the frequency information. E) Brain signal processing (nothing physical, it's pure software) determines much of the frequency information. 37. An car is driving very fast toward a group of stationary people, while blaring music from its speakers. The sound hear by the stationary listeners sounds lower in pitch than the sound heard by listeners in the car. A) True B) False 38. I play a pure tone of frequency 10 khz, which reflects off the cliff I am facing. The bumps and irregularities on the cliff are about 1 m wide. What will happen and why? A) The sound will largely reflect specularly because the surface is rough. B) The sound will largely reflect specularly because the surface is smooth. C) The sound will largely reflect specularly, it doesn t matter whether the surface is smooth or rough. D) The sound will largely reflect diffusely because the surface is rough. E) The sound will largely reflect diffusely because the surface is smooth. 39. I measure the just noticeable difference (JND) of a particular sound and find that it is 2 db. What intensity ratio is detectable for this sound? A) An intensity ratio of 1.3 or larger is a noticeable difference. B) An intensity ratio of 1.3 or smaller is a noticeable difference. C) An intensity ratio of 1.6 or larger is a noticeable difference. D) An intensity ratio of 1.6 or smaller is a noticeable difference. E) An intensity ratio of 2.0 or larger is a noticeable difference.

9 Consider a sound wave which decomposes into the following three pure tones (the relative amplitudes in these three pictures are drawn to scale). overpressure overpressure overpressure f 1 3f 1 5f 1 time time time The frequency spectrum for this wave looks like (choose the closest one): Spectrum Spectrum A B Spectrum f1 frequency C 5f 1 Spectrum f 1 frequency D 5f 1 f 1 frequency 5f 1 f 1 frequency 5f 1

Waves. Wave: A traveling disturbance consisting of coordinated vibrations that transmit energy with no net movement of the matter.

Waves. Wave: A traveling disturbance consisting of coordinated vibrations that transmit energy with no net movement of the matter. Waves Wave: A traveling disturbance consisting of coordinated vibrations that transmit energy with no net movement of the matter. Source: some kind of disturbance from the state of equilibrium. Propagation:

More information

Chapter 3: Sound waves. Sound waves

Chapter 3: Sound waves. Sound waves Sound waves 1. Sound travels at 340 m/s in air and 1500 m/s in water. A sound of 256 Hz is made under water. In the air, A) the frequency remains the same but the wavelength is shorter. B) the frequency

More information

Cutnell/Johnson Physics

Cutnell/Johnson Physics Cutnell/Johnson Physics Classroom Response System Questions Chapter 17 The Principle of Linear Superposition and Interference Phenomena Interactive Lecture Questions 17.1.1. The graph shows two waves at

More information

Lecture 13: More on Perception of Loudness

Lecture 13: More on Perception of Loudness Lecture 13: More on Perception of Loudness We have now seen that perception of loudness is not linear in how loud a sound is, but scales roughly as a factor of 2 in perception for a factor of 10 in intensity.

More information

1) The time for one cycle of a periodic process is called the A) wavelength. B) period. C) frequency. D) amplitude.

1) The time for one cycle of a periodic process is called the A) wavelength. B) period. C) frequency. D) amplitude. practice wave test.. Name Use the text to make use of any equations you might need (e.g., to determine the velocity of waves in a given material) MULTIPLE CHOICE. Choose the one alternative that best completes

More information

Constructive and Destructive Interference Conceptual Question

Constructive and Destructive Interference Conceptual Question Chapter 16 - solutions Constructive and Destructive Interference Conceptual Question Description: Conceptual question on whether constructive or destructive interference occurs at various points between

More information

Chapter 15: Making Waves

Chapter 15: Making Waves Chapter 15: Making Waves 1. Electromagnetic waves are generally A. transverse waves. B. longitudinal waves. C. a 50/50 combination of transverse and longitudinal waves. D. standing waves. 2. The period

More information

Lecture PowerPoints. Chapter 12 Physics: Principles with Applications, 6 th edition Giancoli

Lecture PowerPoints. Chapter 12 Physics: Principles with Applications, 6 th edition Giancoli Lecture PowerPoints Chapter 12 Physics: Principles with Applications, 6 th edition Giancoli 2005 Pearson Prentice Hall This work is protected by United States copyright laws and is provided solely for

More information

Wave Interference and Resonance

Wave Interference and Resonance Wave Interference and Resonance 1. An audio frequency oscillator produces a single frequency sound wave but sends it through two speakers 1 m apart from each other. An observer standing 10.0 m away from

More information

β = 10 log(i/i 0 ) I = P/4πr 2 v = λ /T = λf

β = 10 log(i/i 0 ) I = P/4πr 2 v = λ /T = λf Chapter 12 Lecture Notes Physics 2414 - Strauss Formulas: v (331 + 0.60T ) m/s I P/A 2 I x 0 β = 10 log(i/i 0 ) I = P/4πr 2 v = λ /T = λf v = FT ml for a stretched string λ n = 2L/n, for a stretched string

More information

MULTIPLE CHOICE. Choose the one alternative that best completes the statement or answers the question.

MULTIPLE CHOICE. Choose the one alternative that best completes the statement or answers the question. Exam Name MULTIPLE CHOICE. Choose the one alternative that best completes the statement or answers the question. 1) A 660-Hz tone has an intensity level of 54 db. The velocity of sound in air is 345 m/s.

More information

Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley.

Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley. Chapter 20. Traveling Waves You may not realize it, but you are surrounded by waves. The waviness of a water wave is readily apparent, from the ripples on a pond to ocean waves large enough to surf. It

More information

2. A series of ocean waves, 5.0 m between crests, move past at 2.0 waves/s. Find their speed. a. 2.5 m/s c. 8.0 m/s b. 5.0 m/s d.

2. A series of ocean waves, 5.0 m between crests, move past at 2.0 waves/s. Find their speed. a. 2.5 m/s c. 8.0 m/s b. 5.0 m/s d. Sound 1. A sound wave coming from a tuba has a wavelength of 1.50 m and travels to your ears at a speed of 345 m/s. What is the frequency of the sound you hear? a. 517 Hz c. 230 Hz b. 1/517 Hz d. 1/230

More information

transverse wave on a string Slinky waves

transverse wave on a string Slinky waves L 23 Vibrations and Waves [3] updated 10/23/07 resonance clocks pendulum springs harmonic motion mechanical waves sound waves golden rule for waves musical instruments The Doppler effect Doppler radar

More information

Sound Waves. PHYS102 Previous Exam Problems CHAPTER. Sound waves Interference of sound waves Intensity & level Resonance in tubes Doppler effect

Sound Waves. PHYS102 Previous Exam Problems CHAPTER. Sound waves Interference of sound waves Intensity & level Resonance in tubes Doppler effect PHYS102 Previous Exam Problems CHAPTER 17 Sound Waves Sound waves Interference of sound waves Intensity & level Resonance in tubes Doppler effect If the speed of sound in air is not given in the problem,

More information

v = λ f this is the Golden Rule for waves transverse & longitudinal waves Harmonic waves The golden rule for waves Example: wave on a string Review

v = λ f this is the Golden Rule for waves transverse & longitudinal waves Harmonic waves The golden rule for waves Example: wave on a string Review L 23 Vibrations and Waves [3] resonance clocks pendulum springs harmonic motion mechanical waves sound waves golden rule for waves musical instruments The Doppler effect Doppler radar radar guns Review

More information

physics 1/12/2016 Chapter 20 Lecture Chapter 20 Traveling Waves

physics 1/12/2016 Chapter 20 Lecture Chapter 20 Traveling Waves Chapter 20 Lecture physics FOR SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS a strategic approach THIRD EDITION randall d. knight Chapter 20 Traveling Waves Chapter Goal: To learn the basic properties of traveling waves. Slide

More information

Unit 4: Science and Materials in Construction and the Built Environment. Sound

Unit 4: Science and Materials in Construction and the Built Environment. Sound 8.1 Origin of Sound Sound Sound is a variation in the pressure of the air of a type which has an effect on our ears and brain. These pressure variations transfer energy from a source of vibration that

More information

Unit 6 Practice Test: Sound

Unit 6 Practice Test: Sound Unit 6 Practice Test: Sound Name: Multiple Guess Identify the letter of the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question. 1. A mass attached to a spring vibrates back and forth. At

More information

1 of 8 1/23/2010 6:15 PM

1 of 8 1/23/2010 6:15 PM 1 of 8 1/23/2010 6:15 PM Chapter 21 Homework Due: 8:00am on Tuesday, January 26, 2010 Note: To understand how points are awarded, read your instructor's Grading Policy [Return to Standard Assignment View]

More information

MAKE SURE TA & TI STAMPS EVERY PAGE BEFORE YOU START

MAKE SURE TA & TI STAMPS EVERY PAGE BEFORE YOU START Laboratory Section: Last Revised on September 21, 2016 Partners Names: Grade: EXPERIMENT 11 Velocity of Waves 0. Pre-Laboratory Work [2 pts] 1.) What is the longest wavelength at which a sound wave will

More information

Mathematical Harmonies Mark Petersen

Mathematical Harmonies Mark Petersen 1 Mathematical Harmonies Mark Petersen What is music? When you hear a flutist, a signal is sent from her fingers to your ears. As the flute is played, it vibrates. The vibrations travel through the air

More information

The Sonometer The Resonant String and Timbre Change after plucking

The Sonometer The Resonant String and Timbre Change after plucking The Sonometer The Resonant String and Timbre Change after plucking EQUIPMENT Pasco sonometers (pick up 5 from teaching lab) and 5 kits to go with them BK Precision function generators and Tenma oscilloscopes

More information

Chapter4: Superposition and Interference

Chapter4: Superposition and Interference Chapter4: Superposition and Interference Sections Superposition Principle Superposition of Sinusoidal Waves Interference of Sound Waves Standing Waves Beats: Interference in Time Nonsinusoidal Wave Patterns

More information

S15--AP Phys Q3 SHO-Sound PRACTICE

S15--AP Phys Q3 SHO-Sound PRACTICE Name: Class: Date: ID: A S5--AP Phys Q3 SHO-Sound PRACTICE Multiple Choice Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question.. If you are on a train, how will the pitch of the

More information

Eighth Grade Sound Waves Assessment

Eighth Grade Sound Waves Assessment Eighth Grade Sound Waves Assessment 1a. Waves carry or transfer, but they do not carry matter. a. mass b. energy 1b. Waves of all kinds only carry or transfer from one place to another. 1c. Waves transfer,

More information

Chapter 21 Study Questions Name: Class:

Chapter 21 Study Questions Name: Class: Chapter 21 Study Questions Name: Class: Multiple Choice Identify the letter of the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question. 1. If a fire engine is traveling toward you, the Doppler

More information

The Big Idea. Key Concepts

The Big Idea. Key Concepts The Big Idea Objects in motion that return to the same position after a fixed period of time are said to be in harmonic motion. Objects in harmonic motion have the ability to transfer some of their energy

More information

Waves. In short: 1. A disturbance or variation which travels through a medium 2. Must transfer energy from one location to another.

Waves. In short: 1. A disturbance or variation which travels through a medium 2. Must transfer energy from one location to another. Waves What is a wave? A disturbance or variation that transfers energy progressively from point to point in a medium and that may take the form of an elastic deformation or of a variation of pressure,

More information

Hearing Sound. The Human Auditory System. The Outer Ear. Music 170: The Ear

Hearing Sound. The Human Auditory System. The Outer Ear. Music 170: The Ear Hearing Sound Music 170: The Ear Tamara Smyth, trsmyth@ucsd.edu Department of Music, University of California, San Diego (UCSD) December 1, 2015 Sound interpretation in the auditory system is done by 1.

More information

Waves are created by disturbances which cause vibrations.

Waves are created by disturbances which cause vibrations. Wave Motion Waves are created by disturbances which cause vibrations. Vibrations produce a back-and-forth type motion called an oscillation. http://3d wave simulation The number of vibrations (or waves)

More information

Introduction to acoustic phonetics

Introduction to acoustic phonetics Introduction to acoustic phonetics Dr. Christian DiCanio cdicanio@buffalo.edu University at Buffalo 10/8/15 DiCanio (UB) Acoustics 10/8/15 1 / 28 Pressure & Waves Waves Sound waves are fluctuations in

More information

11/17/10. Transverse and Longitudinal Waves. Transverse and Longitudinal Waves. Wave Speed. EXAMPLE 20.1 The speed of a wave pulse

11/17/10. Transverse and Longitudinal Waves. Transverse and Longitudinal Waves. Wave Speed. EXAMPLE 20.1 The speed of a wave pulse You may not realize it, but you are surrounded by waves. The waviness of a water wave is readily apparent, from the ripples on a pond to ocean waves large enough to surf. It s less apparent that sound

More information

Beats: Interference of Sound Waves

Beats: Interference of Sound Waves Beats: Interference of Sound Waves Have you ever heard a piano, band, or orchestra play more than one note at a time? (These are called chords.) Chances are that the music you heard was a series of pleasant-sounding

More information

Sound W.S. 1. Two major classes of waves are longitudinal and transverse. Sound waves are.

Sound W.S. 1. Two major classes of waves are longitudinal and transverse. Sound waves are. Sound W.S. 1. Two major classes of waves are longitudinal and transverse. Sound waves are. longitudinal transverse 2. The frequency of a sound signal refers to how frequently the vibrations occur. A high-frequency

More information

Physics 116. Oct 13, Lecture 9 Standing waves. R. J. Wilkes 10/13/11 phys 116.

Physics 116. Oct 13, Lecture 9 Standing waves. R. J. Wilkes   10/13/11 phys 116. Physics 116 Lecture 9 Standing waves Oct 13, 2011 http://okamusic.com/ R. J. Wilkes Email: ph116@u.washington.edu 1 HW2 (ch. 14) due today 5 pm HW3 open at 5pm (Ch.25, due 10/24) -- But focus on studying

More information

1/26/2016. Chapter 21 Superposition. Chapter 21 Preview. Chapter 21 Preview

1/26/2016. Chapter 21 Superposition. Chapter 21 Preview. Chapter 21 Preview Chapter 21 Superposition Chapter Goal: To understand and use the idea of superposition. Slide 21-2 Chapter 21 Preview Slide 21-3 Chapter 21 Preview Slide 21-4 1 Chapter 21 Preview Slide 21-5 Chapter 21

More information

A: zero everywhere. B: positive everywhere. C: negative everywhere. D: depends on position.

A: zero everywhere. B: positive everywhere. C: negative everywhere. D: depends on position. A string is clamped at both ends and then plucked so that it vibrates in a standing wave between two extreme positions a and c. (Let upward motion correspond to positive velocities.) When the

More information

3.14 understand that light waves are transverse waves which can be reflected, refracted and diffracted

3.14 understand that light waves are transverse waves which can be reflected, refracted and diffracted Light and Sound 3.14 understand that light waves are transverse waves which can be reflected, refracted and diffracted 3.15 use the law of reflection (the angle of incidence equals the angle of reflection)

More information

PHYSICS 202 Practice Exam Waves, Sound, Reflection and Refraction. Name. Constants and Conversion Factors

PHYSICS 202 Practice Exam Waves, Sound, Reflection and Refraction. Name. Constants and Conversion Factors PHYSICS 202 Practice Exam Waves, Sound, Reflection and Refraction Name Constants and Conversion Factors Speed of sound in Air œ $%!7Î= "'!*7/>/

More information

SPH 3U0: Exam Review: Sound Waves and Projectile Motion

SPH 3U0: Exam Review: Sound Waves and Projectile Motion SPH 3U0: Exam Review: Sound Waves and Projectile Motion True/False Indicate whether the sentence or statement is true or false. 1. A trough is a negative pulse which occurs in a longitudinal wave. 2. When

More information

Lecture 1-3: Periodic Sounds & Pitch

Lecture 1-3: Periodic Sounds & Pitch Lecture 1-3: Periodic Sounds & Pitch Overview 1. Periodic waveforms: Of the three subjective dimensions of sound: loudness, pitch and timbre, pitch is associated with the 'musical' aspect of the sound.

More information

constructive interference results when destructive interference results when two special interference patterns are the and the

constructive interference results when destructive interference results when two special interference patterns are the and the Interference and Sound Last class we looked at interference and found that constructive interference results when destructive interference results when two special interference patterns are the and the

More information

1/28/2009. Motion that repeats itself over and over. Rotation and revolution of Earth Back and forth motion of a swing Turning bicycle wheel

1/28/2009. Motion that repeats itself over and over. Rotation and revolution of Earth Back and forth motion of a swing Turning bicycle wheel Physics: Waves and Sound Dr. Ed Brothers Chemistry and Physics for High School Students Texas A&M (Qatar) January 27, 2009 Harmonic Motion Motion that repeats itself over and over Examples of harmonic

More information

NOTES Unit 13: Waves and Optics Wave Motion and Sound

NOTES Unit 13: Waves and Optics Wave Motion and Sound Unit 13: Waves and Optics Wave Motion and Sound OBJECTIVES: Big Idea 6: Waves can transfer energy and momentum from one location to another without the permanent transfer of mass and serve as a mathematical

More information

Unit 4 Sound and Waves

Unit 4 Sound and Waves Name: Class: Date: Unit 4 Sound and Waves Multiple Choice Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question. 1. The speed of any mechanical wave as it propagates through a medium

More information

CHAPTER 9 SOUND WAVES. - As a tuning fork vibrates a series of condensations and rarefactions moves

CHAPTER 9 SOUND WAVES. - As a tuning fork vibrates a series of condensations and rarefactions moves CHAPTER 9 SOUND WAVES 9.1 Producing a sound waes - As a tuning fork ibrates a series of condensations and rarefactions moes away outward, away from the fork. - Sound is a wae that propagate in solids,

More information

Name Class Date. c. column of air at the mouthpiece 4. flute. longitudinal

Name Class Date. c. column of air at the mouthpiece 4. flute. longitudinal Exercises 26.1 The Origin of (page 515) Match each sound source with the part that vibrates. Source Vibrating Part a b d c 1. violin a. strings 2. your voice b. reed 3. saxophone c. column of air at the

More information

Chapter 11. Waves & Sound

Chapter 11. Waves & Sound Chapter 11 Waves & Sound 11.2 Periodic Waves In the drawing, one cycle is shaded in color. The amplitude A is the maximum excursion of a particle of the medium from the particles undisturbed position.

More information

Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley.

Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley. You may not realize it, but you are surrounded by waves. The waviness of a water wave is readily apparent, from the ripples on a pond to ocean waves large enough to surf. It s less apparent that sound

More information

Contents 1 PENDULUM EXPERIMENT 3 2 SIMPLE HARMONIC MOTION 9 3 STANDING WAVES ON STRINGS 15 4 STANDING WAVES IN AIR COLUMNS 21

Contents 1 PENDULUM EXPERIMENT 3 2 SIMPLE HARMONIC MOTION 9 3 STANDING WAVES ON STRINGS 15 4 STANDING WAVES IN AIR COLUMNS 21 Contents 1 PENDULUM EXPERIMENT 3 2 SIMPLE HARMONIC MOTION 9 3 STANDING WAVES ON STRINGS 15 4 STANDING WAVES IN AIR COLUMNS 21 5 SOUND INTENSITY - THE DECIBEL SCALE 27 6 REVERBERATION TIME 31 1 2 CONTENTS

More information

Standing Waves in Strings

Standing Waves in Strings Standing Waves in Strings APPARATUS 1. Buzzer (vibrating at a given frequency) mounted on a board with a pulley 2. Electronic balance 3. 2 Strings, one light and one heavy 4. Set of known masses (slotted

More information

STANDING WAVES IN AN AIR COLUMN

STANDING WAVES IN AN AIR COLUMN 01/02 Tube - 1 STANDING WAVES IN AN AIR COLUMN The objective of the experiment is: To study the harmonic structure of standing waves in an air column. APPARATUS: Function generator, oscilloscope, speaker,

More information

MULTIPLE CHOICE. Choose the one alternative that best completes the statement or answers the question.

MULTIPLE CHOICE. Choose the one alternative that best completes the statement or answers the question. Exam Name MULTIPLE CHOICE. Choose the one alternative that best completes the statement or answers the question. 1) A transverse wave is propagated in a string stretched along the x-axis. The equation

More information

Superposition and Interference

Superposition and Interference Superposition and Interference Bởi: OpenStaxCollege These waves result from the superposition of several waves from different sources, producing a complex pattern. (credit: waterborough, Wikimedia Commons)

More information

waves and sound 1. Within a vacuum, the property common to all electromagnetic waves is their A. amplitude B. frequency C. wavelength D.

waves and sound 1. Within a vacuum, the property common to all electromagnetic waves is their A. amplitude B. frequency C. wavelength D. Name: ate: 1. Within a vacuum, the property common to all electromagnetic waves is their 1.. amplitude. frequency. wavelength. velocity 2. The diagram shown represents four waves traveling to the right

More information

light and sound, our bodies are not capable of sensing radio waves directly.

light and sound, our bodies are not capable of sensing radio waves directly. Background A wave is a disturbance that carries energy, a disturbance that transports energy from one place to another without the transfer of matter. After a wave passes through a medium, there are no

More information

Waves Review Checklist Pulses 5.1.1A Explain the relationship between the period of a pendulum and the factors involved in building one

Waves Review Checklist Pulses 5.1.1A Explain the relationship between the period of a pendulum and the factors involved in building one 5.1.1 Oscillating Systems Waves Review Checklist 5.1.2 Pulses 5.1.1A Explain the relationship between the period of a pendulum and the factors involved in building one Four pendulums are built as shown

More information

Lab 17.1 Standing Waves in an Air Column

Lab 17.1 Standing Waves in an Air Column Name School Date Lab 17.1 Standing Waves in an Air Column Purpose To observe resonance of sound waves in an air column To determine the speed of sound in air To determine the effect of temperature on the

More information

The Nature of Sound Waves

The Nature of Sound Waves Name: The Nature of Sound Waves Read from Lesson 1 of the Sound and Music chapter at The Physics Classroom: http://www.physicsclassroom.com/class/sound/u11l1a.html http://www.physicsclassroom.com/class/sound/u11l1b.html

More information

Sound Waves. Intermediate 1 Physics. Intermediate 1 Physics. Sound and Music. Frequency. Frequency. Sound Waves. Int 1 Physics - Telecommunication 1

Sound Waves. Intermediate 1 Physics. Intermediate 1 Physics. Sound and Music. Frequency. Frequency. Sound Waves. Int 1 Physics - Telecommunication 1 Sound Waves Speed of Sound Using Sound Sound Waves 1 2 Sound Waves Vibrations Musical instruments produce sound when part of the instrument vibrates. A guitar string vibrates when it is plucked. Vibrations

More information

5-Minute Refresher: SOUND AND HEARING

5-Minute Refresher: SOUND AND HEARING 5-Minute Refresher: SOUND AND HEARING Sound Key Ideas Sound is a type of energy that involves the vibration of molecules in a medium, such as air or water. Sound is transmitted through a medium as a pressure

More information

第 1 頁, 共 8 頁 Chap16&Chap17 1. Test Bank, Question 6 Three traveling sinusoidal waves are on identical strings, with the same tension. The mathematical forms of the waves are (x,t) = y m sin(3x 6t), y 2

More information

Sound and Music. Skin vibrating. Air vibrating

Sound and Music. Skin vibrating. Air vibrating Sound and Music Sound Waves Sound is all around us. All sounds have one thing in common; they are all produced by a vibrating object. Examining musical instruments is a useful way to show what is vibrating.

More information

Transverse and Longitudinal waves (6.2)

Transverse and Longitudinal waves (6.2) Waves Homework from the book: Exercises: 1, 2, 3, 5-10, 12-16, 20, 25, 33, 34, 36. Questions:3, 9, 14 Problems 2, 11, 17 In the study guide: All the Multiple choice & True False a starting on page 69.

More information

Lecture Presentation Chapter 16 Superposition and Standing Waves

Lecture Presentation Chapter 16 Superposition and Standing Waves Lecture Presentation Chapter 16 Superposition and Standing Waves Suggested Videos for Chapter 16 Prelecture Videos Constructive and Destructive Interference Standing Waves Physics of Your Vocal System

More information

Principles of Technology CH 12 Wave and Sound 3

Principles of Technology CH 12 Wave and Sound 3 Principles of Technology CH 12 Wave and Sound 3 Name KEY OBJECTIVES At the conclusion of this chapter you will be able to: Define the terms constructive interference, destructive interference, resonance,

More information

y(cm) 4.0 t(s) 4.0 Fig Problem 5.

y(cm) 4.0 t(s) 4.0 Fig Problem 5. PROBLEMS 11-3 Simple Harmonic Wave 1. A wave has an angular frequency of 110 rad/s and a wavelength of 1.8 m. Calculate (a) the angular wave number and (b) the speed of the wave. 2. A sinusoidal wave of

More information

General Physics (PHY 2130)

General Physics (PHY 2130) General Physics (PHY 2130) Lecture 28 Waves standing waves Sound definitions standing sound waves and instruments Doppler s effect http://www.physics.wayne.edu/~apetrov/phy2130/ Lightning Review Last lecture:

More information

Physical Science Study Guide Unit 7 Wave properties and behaviors, electromagnetic spectrum, Doppler Effect

Physical Science Study Guide Unit 7 Wave properties and behaviors, electromagnetic spectrum, Doppler Effect Objectives: PS-7.1 Physical Science Study Guide Unit 7 Wave properties and behaviors, electromagnetic spectrum, Doppler Effect Illustrate ways that the energy of waves is transferred by interaction with

More information

Waves-Wave Characteristics

Waves-Wave Characteristics 1. What is the wavelength of a 256-hertz sound wave in air at STP? 1. 1.17 10 6 m 2. 1.29 m 3. 0.773 m 4. 8.53 10-7 m 2. The graph below represents the relationship between wavelength and frequency of

More information

Wave Vocabulary- 25 words 1. WAVE 2. MEDIUM 3. MECHANICAL WAVE 4. ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVES 5. ENERGY 6. TRANSVERSE WAVES 7. LONGITUDINAL WAVES 8.

Wave Vocabulary- 25 words 1. WAVE 2. MEDIUM 3. MECHANICAL WAVE 4. ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVES 5. ENERGY 6. TRANSVERSE WAVES 7. LONGITUDINAL WAVES 8. WAVES Chapter 11 Wave Vocabulary- 25 words 1. WAVE 2. MEDIUM 3. MECHANICAL WAVE 4. ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVES 5. ENERGY 6. TRANSVERSE WAVES 7. LONGITUDINAL WAVES 8. CREST 9. TROUGH 10. INTERFERENCE 11. CONSTRUCTIVE

More information

STANDING WAVES & ACOUSTIC RESONANCE

STANDING WAVES & ACOUSTIC RESONANCE REFERENCES & ACOUSTIC RESONANCE R.H. Randall, An Introduction to Acoustics, (Addison-Wesley, 1951), Sect. 7-1, 7-. A.B. Wood, A Textbook of Sound, (Bell & Sons, 1944), pp.179 et seq. Berkeley Physics Course,

More information

Physics 1120: Waves Solutions

Physics 1120: Waves Solutions Questions: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 Physics 1120: Waves Solutions 1. A wire of length 4.35 m and mass 137 g is under a tension of 125 N. What is the speed of a wave in this wire? If the tension

More information

Unit 8. Oscillations: Simple Harmonic Motion and Waves Big Idea 3: The interactions of an object with other objects can be described by forces.

Unit 8. Oscillations: Simple Harmonic Motion and Waves Big Idea 3: The interactions of an object with other objects can be described by forces. Unit 8. Oscillations: Simple Harmonic Motion and Waves Name: Big Idea 3: The interactions of an object with other objects can be described by forces. Essential Knowledge 3.B.3: Restoring forces can Learning

More information

2011 Intensity - 1 INTENSITY OF SOUND. To understand the concept of sound intensity and how it is measured.

2011 Intensity - 1 INTENSITY OF SOUND. To understand the concept of sound intensity and how it is measured. 2011 Intensity - 1 INTENSITY OF SOUND The objectives of this experiment are: To understand the concept of sound intensity and how it is measured. To learn how to operate a Sound Level Meter APPARATUS:

More information

Physics 2A (Fall 2012) Chapters 15: Traveling Waves and Sound and 16: Superposition and Standing Waves

Physics 2A (Fall 2012) Chapters 15: Traveling Waves and Sound and 16: Superposition and Standing Waves Physics 2A (Fall 2012) Chapters 15: Traeling Waes and Sound and 16: Superposition and Standing Waes There is only one corner of the unierse that you can be certain of improing, and that s your own. Aldous

More information

Sound Level Sensor DATA HARVEST. Product No Range: 40 to 110 dba Resolution: 0.1 dba Response time: 125 ms

Sound Level Sensor DATA HARVEST. Product No Range: 40 to 110 dba Resolution: 0.1 dba Response time: 125 ms Sound Level Sensor Product No. 3175 Range: 40 to 110 dba Resolution: 0.1 dba Response time: 125 ms Range: ±2000 mv Resolution: 1 mv Frequency response: 100 Hz - 7 khz DATA HARVEST Data Harvest Group Ltd

More information

Objectives 354 CHAPTER 8 WAVES AND VIBRATION

Objectives 354 CHAPTER 8 WAVES AND VIBRATION Objectives Describe how a mechanical wave transfers energy through a medium. Explain the difference between a transverse wave and a longitudinal wave. Define amplitude and wavelength. Define frequency

More information

Sound and stringed instruments

Sound and stringed instruments Sound and stringed instruments Lecture 14: Sound and strings Reminders/Updates: HW 6 due Monday, 10pm. Exam 2, a week today! 1 Sound so far: Sound is a pressure or density fluctuation carried (usually)

More information

Physiology of Hearing Dr. Hesham Kozou Is hearing important? Communica i ti ttion Language Localization sound sources

Physiology of Hearing Dr. Hesham Kozou Is hearing important? Communica i ti ttion Language Localization sound sources Physiology of Hearing Dr. Hesham Kozou Undergraduate Round Courses 2008-2009 2009 Is hearing important? Communication Hearing is essential to Language Localization Determining the location of unseen sound

More information

Honors Physics Burns. Multiple Choice: Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question. / ~.

Honors Physics Burns. Multiple Choice: Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question. / ~. Name: ~ Test Chapter 12 (Sound) Period Date: Honors Physics Burns /2010 Multiple Choice: Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question. / ~./~ t~ ~ ~ 1. Sound waves a. are

More information

Multiple Choice Identify the letter of the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question.

Multiple Choice Identify the letter of the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question. Excercises Multiple Choice Identify the letter of the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question. 1. The source of all wave motion is a a. region of variable high and low pressure.

More information

AP1 Waves. (A) frequency (B) wavelength (C) speed (D) intensity. Answer: (A) and (D) frequency and intensity.

AP1 Waves. (A) frequency (B) wavelength (C) speed (D) intensity. Answer: (A) and (D) frequency and intensity. 1. A fire truck is moving at a fairly high speed, with its siren emitting sound at a specific pitch. As the fire truck recedes from you which of the following characteristics of the sound wave from the

More information

Superposition and Interference

Superposition and Interference OpenStax-CNX module: m42249 1 Superposition and Interference OpenStax College This work is produced by OpenStax-CNX and licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution License 3.0 Abstract Explain standing

More information

Hearing. 1 Introduction. 1.1 Auditory system. 1.2 Psychoacoustics

Hearing. 1 Introduction. 1.1 Auditory system. 1.2 Psychoacoustics Hearing Sources: Rossing. (1990). The science of sound. Chapters 5 7. Karjalainen. (1999). Kommunikaatioakustiikka. Moore. (1997). An introduction to the psychology of hearing. Contents: 1. Introduction

More information

Using Everyday Examples in Engineering (E3) Physics Waves and Sound: The Guitar

Using Everyday Examples in Engineering (E3) Physics Waves and Sound: The Guitar www.engageengineering.org Using Everyday Examples in Engineering (E3) Physics Waves and Sound: The Guitar Samuel Hokin, IMS LLC The guitar is the most common stringed instrument, and shares many characteristics

More information

Nicholas J. Giordano. Chapter 12 Waves

Nicholas J. Giordano.  Chapter 12 Waves Nicholas J. Giordano www.cengage.com/physics/giordano Chapter 12 Waves Wave Motion A wave is a moving disturbance that transports energy from one place to another without transporting matter Questions

More information

Chapter 16 Waves and Sound

Chapter 16 Waves and Sound Chapter 16 WAVES AND SOUND PREVIEW A wave is a disturbance which causes a transfer of energy. Mechanical waves need a medium in which to travel, but electromagnetic waves do not. Waves can be transverse

More information

Waves. Overview (Text p382>)

Waves. Overview (Text p382>) Waves Overview (Text p382>) Waves What are they? Imagine dropping a stone into a still pond and watching the result. A wave is a disturbance that transfers energy from one point to another in wave fronts.

More information

Physics 131: tutorial week 6 Waves (1)

Physics 131: tutorial week 6 Waves (1) Physics 131: tutorial week 6 Waves (1) Take the speed of sound in air at 0 C as 331ms 1 and the speed of electromagnetic radiation c 3, 00 10 8 ms 1. 1. A person standing in the ocean notices that after

More information

Waves review practice questions

Waves review practice questions Name: ate: 1. The diagram shown represents four waves traveling to the right in the same transmitting medium. 4. Which wave has the greatest amplitude?.... Which type of wave is represented? 5. Which characteristic

More information

SOUND: Nature of sound

SOUND: Nature of sound SOUND: Nature of sound: Sound is a mechanical wave. Mechanical waves need a material medium to propagate. The medium can be a gas, liquid or solid. They can not propagate in vacuum because vacuum is not

More information

MTC191 / E.Walker Sound & Waveforms

MTC191 / E.Walker Sound & Waveforms MTC191 / E.Walker Sound & Waveforms Understanding how sound works will help us learn to manipulate it in the form of audio signals, such as an analog voltage or a digital signal that is stored and played

More information

Chapter 10: Waves. Waves. Waves (2) Examples of waves. Compression Waves. Shear (transverse) Waves

Chapter 10: Waves. Waves. Waves (2) Examples of waves. Compression Waves. Shear (transverse) Waves Chapter 10: Waves Chapter 13 Waves Demo: Shive wave machine 1. disturbances that travel from one place to another (pulse, but is often periodic) -pressure -displacement -light 2. initiated by a source

More information

IB PHYSICS HL REVIEW PACKET: WAVES & VIBRATIONS

IB PHYSICS HL REVIEW PACKET: WAVES & VIBRATIONS NAME IB PHYSICS HL REVIEW PACKET: WAVES & VIBRATIONS 1. This question is about waves and wave properties. (a) By making reference to waves, distinguish between a ray and a wavefront.......... (3) The diagram

More information

2) In terms of wave motion, define medium. The type of matter a wave moves through is the medium.

2) In terms of wave motion, define medium. The type of matter a wave moves through is the medium. Waves Classwork #1 What is a wave? 1) What causes a wave? A disturbance that travels through space or matter. 2) In terms of wave motion, define medium. The type of matter a wave moves through is the medium.

More information

The Physics of Guitar Strings

The Physics of Guitar Strings The Physics of Guitar Strings R. R. McNeil 1. Introduction The guitar makes a wonderful device to demonstrate the physics of waves on a stretched string. This is because almost every student has seen a

More information

Third Grade Sound Assessment

Third Grade Sound Assessment Third Grade Sound Assessment 1a. The form of energy you HEAR is called. a. light b. heat c. sound 1b. The form of energy you HEAR is called. 1c. Define sound. 2a. Sound is caused by an object vibrating.

More information

Center of Mass/Momentum

Center of Mass/Momentum Center of Mass/Momentum 1. 2. An L-shaped piece, represented by the shaded area on the figure, is cut from a metal plate of uniform thickness. The point that corresponds to the center of mass of the L-shaped

More information