1 st Grade Introduction to Energy Resources Renewable and Nonrenewable Energy Sources

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1 1 st Grade Introduction to Energy Resources Renewable and Nonrenewable Energy Sources Purpose: Students will be introduced to the basic concepts of energy sources and the difference between renewable and nonrenewable sources. Students will also become familiar with common energy uses. Time: (5) 1-hour classroom sessions Grade: 1 st Goals: Students will be able to: Recognize renewable and nonrenewable energy sources. Comprehend key vocabulary terms: solar, wind, water, biodiesel, fossil fuels and classify these under renewable or nonrenewable energy sources Comprehend that the sun s rays can be used as a source of energy Understand what wind is and that it is an energy source. Comprehend the order of events of the production of biodiesel. Recognize the need of alternate renewable energy sources. Objectives: Students will: Create an illustrated booklet in order to identify the key vocabulary terms explained in class. Observe how the sun s rays can be used as a source of energy by drying fruit. Observe a simulation of how wind is created using a sealed aquarium tank. Match up the order of the chain of events that leads to the production of biodiesel. Recognize key vocabulary terms and key concepts by playing a trivia game. 18

2 Renewable and Nonrenewable Energy Sources: INTRO Program Outline: In-class discussion: What are renewable and non renewable energy sources? Students are introduced to the basic concepts of energy sources. Two new terms are to be introduced: renewable and nonrenewable. Analysis of the differences between the two, examples of each and pros and cons are to be detailed. Classroom Curriculum: Introduction to energy sources: Students are introduced to the basic concept of energy. Ask the students, what makes a light bulb turn on, what runs vehicles? Where does all the power to run these come from? (See page 6 of Instructor s Handbook.) Introduction to nonrenewable energy sources: Students are introduced to the concept of a nonrenewable energy source. Nonrenewable energy sources are those that are bound to run out with no potential of being recreated. State that common nonrenewable energy sources are known as fossil fuels. Inform the students that what runs their cars and buses usually comes from fossil fuels. (See page 11 of Instructor s Handbook.) Introduction to renewable energy sources: Students are to be introduced to the concept of a renewable energy source. Different sources are to be stated: wind, water, sun and biofuels. Common modern uses of renewable energy sources should be detailed. (See page 24 of Instructor s Handbook) Recommended vocabulary terms: Renewable resource, nonrenewable resource, energy, energy source, solar energy, wind power, water power, biodiesel, fossil fuel. (See page 44 of Instructor s Handbook for definitions.) 19

3 Activity: Picture Booklet Students are to describe the different energy sources previously explained to them. Method: Students will create an illustrated booklet in order to identify the key vocabulary terms explained in class. Materials: magazines and newspapers, scissors, glue, available and desired art supplies. Procedure: 1. Ask student to bring in magazines and newspapers from home. 2. As a class, identify and classify the different energy sources as renewable or nonrenewable. 3. Take a white paper and fold it in half vertically. On one side write Renewable and on the other, write Nonrenewable. 4. Allow them to use different artistic skills as desired to illustrate the following according to their specific classification as nonrenewable or renewable: a. solar b. wind c. water d. biodiesel e. fossil fuel If desired, they can focus their drawings on pictures of the source itself or how it is used by man. Assessments: Did each student successfully complete the picture booklet? On the picture booklet, did the students successfully differentiate between renewable and nonrenewable energy sources? As a class and individually, were students able to recognize renewable and nonrenewable energy sources? Do students comprehend key vocabulary terms and can they classify them under renewable and nonrenewable energy sources? 20

4 Solar Program Outline: In-class discussion: Solar Energy: Students are introduced to the additional concepts of solar energy. Classroom Curriculum: Further introduction to solar energy and energy uses: In a quick overview the students will be asked to participate in a small class discussion about solar energy as a renewable energy source. What is solar energy? How do humans grab energy from the sun in order to use it as an energy source? Introduce the concept of heat and absorption. Compare how the sun can act like an oven. Explain how the sun s rays can be used to heat and dry fruit just like an oven or a microwave at home, but without using electricity. (See page 31 of Instructor s Handbook.) Recommended vocabulary terms: Energy, energy source, solar energy, heat, absorption, electricity. (See page 44 of Instructor s Handbook for definitions.) Activity: Drying Fruit Through observation, students will further comprehend how the sun s energy can be used. Method: By drying fruit, students will observe how the sun s rays can be used as a source of energy. Materials: a window screen; a clean, dry bed sheet; a dozen apples cut into pieces. Recommendations: The point of this experiment is to observe how the fruit becomes dry using the power of the sun. Because this activity involves several days of observation, other types of fruit could be used to accelerate the drying process. For example, waterbased fruits such as watermelon, or orange peels. If orange peels are to be used, make sure to wash your hands before sun exposure. Procedure: 1. Wash and peel about one dozen apples. 2. Remove the seeds and slice thinly. 3. Sprinkle powdered vitamin C on both sides of the fruit so it won t turn brown. 21

5 4. Lay one piece of the bed sheet on the screen. 5. Lay the apple slices in a single layer on the bed sheet, making sure the pieces don t touch. 6. Cover with the other piece of bed sheet. Weights Sheet Apples Sheet Screen 7. Put this in a safe place to avoid tampering. 8. Use some source of weight to hold the cloth down. 9. Create an exact replica of the above steps 1-8, and place it away from the sunlight. This new variable is recommended to allow students to compare the final results and further comprehend what the sun does. 10. Ask the students what they think will happen to each set of apples and why. 11. Check the apples every day. 12. When the fruit exposed to the sunlight are dehydrated and light brown, put them in an airtight container. 13. Compare the sun-dried apples with the other apples and allow students to observe the difference. 14. Restate how the sun has been used to replace a microwave or an oven. Ask the students how they think that using the sun s rays as power can help the environment. Assessments: Did the fruit successfully dry? Could the student observe the difference between the fruit being dried in the sun, and the other fruit? Could the student relate the fact that the fruit got dry through heat and energy from the sun? Did the student comprehend that the sun s rays can be used as a source of energy? Did the students respond to how using the sun for energy can help the environment? Reference: Renewable Energy: The Infinite Power of Texas. Studying the Sun [Online] Available <http://www.infinitepower.org/lessonplans> (December 20, 2004) 22

6 Wind Program Outline: In-class discussion: What is wind?: Students are introduced to the concept of what wind is, how it is formed and how it can be used as a source of energy. Classroom Curriculum: What is wind? Ask your students to use all of their senses to describe wind. Can they see wind, feel it, smell it, hear it or taste it? How do we know it's there? Explain how the atmosphere is composed of air. Explain that the sun shines on the atmosphere constantly but heats the surface of the Earth unevenly, causing some places to be warm while other places to be cold. As air gets warmer, its particles spread out. This makes the air lighter, so it rises. In the same manner as air is cooled it becomes heavier and sinks. Wind is caused when warm air rises and air from cooler areas flows in to take the place of the heated air. (See page 25 of Instructor s Handbook.) Wind and energy Explain to the students that winds movement caused by wind is used to produce energy. (See page of Instructor s Handbook.) Recommended vocabulary terms: Wind, senses, atmosphere, air, sun, heat, energy, wind power. (See page 44 of Instructor s Handbook for definitions.) Activity: What is wind? Students will be introduced to what wind is by means of observation. Method: Using a sealed aquarium tank, a demonstration of how wind is produced on Earth will be prepared. Materials: (for the class) Aquarium, Clamp lamp, 100-watt light bulb, ice, punk, matches, plastic wrap, candle, paper serpent, small feathers. Recommendations: This experiment is intended to be a teacher demonstration. Make sure to take all necessary precautions to prevent students from getting burned. 23

7 Procedure: 1. Set up the lamp with the light bulb so that it shines down on one end of the aquarium. 2. Place the bowl of ice at the other end of the aquarium and cover aquarium with plastic wrap. 3. Light the end of a punk. Allow some smoke to be produced by letting it burn for a few moments and then blowing it out. 4. Puncture a hole in the plastic wrap with the lit punk near the bowl of ice. 5. Describe what happens to the smoke. 6. Allow the students to observe that this process imitates how wind is formed in our atmosphere. Restate that as air gets warmer, its particles spread out. This makes the air lighter, so it rises. In the same manner as air is cooled it becomes heavier and sinks. Wind is caused when warm air rises and air from cooler areas flows in to take the place of the heated air. 7. Make a wind serpent by tying a piece of string to the eye of the serpent. A wind serpent can be made by cutting a piece of paper as shown in the drawing. 8. Hold the serpent by one end above a lit candle. 9. Observe what happens when air is heated under a lightweight object. 10. Explain to the students that hot air rises which is why the object lifts itself. 11. Using small feathers, find places where these will rise and explain why this occurs. 12. Allow students to comprehend that wind can move objects. Explain that wind is used to create energy, and that places where there is stronger wind is better. Assessments: Could the students see the swirls created in the tank to illustrate wind? Do students understand what wind is and that it is a source of energy? Can the students explain in their own words what wind is and how it is formed? Can the students acknowledge that as air gets warmer it rises, which is why the wind serpent is lifted? Did the students grasp the concept that wind causes movement, and movement helps create energy? Reference: Unknown Author. What is wind? [Online] Available < (January 3, 2005) 24

8 Biodiesel Program Outline: In-class discussion: Biodiesel: Students are introduced to the concept of Biodiesel. Classroom Curriculum: Further introduction to biodiesel: In a quick overview the students will be asked to lead a small class discussion about Biodiesel as a renewable fuel. State that Biodiesel works like diesel and gasoline: it is a fuel to run transportation methods. Explain that Biodiesel is a fuel derived from vegetable oil, which comes from plants. Explain in simple terms how biodiesel is made. Then Biodiesel can be pumped into cars. (See page of Instructor s Handbook.) Benefits of biodiesel: Explain that it is a fuel, like gasoline, but Biodiesel is very environmental friendly. Explain how it is easier to keep getting Biodiesel from plants than it is to get gasoline and diesel out from the Earth. (See page 41 of Instructor s Handbook.) Recommended vocabulary terms Renewable resource, fuel, energy, biodiesel, vegetable oil, transportation, plants. (See page 44 of Instructor s Handbook for definitions.) Activity: Chain of Events Students will organize a set of pictures to represent the chain of events that leads to the production of biodiesel. Method: Students are presented with a disorganized version of the chain of events that leads to the production of biodiesel. They will cut out the pictures, organize them and later create a bookmark. Materials: Chain of events handout, desired art supplies for coloring, scissors, glue, and construction paper. Procedure: 1. Before class cut out the construction paper into individual slips that will later be made into the bookmarks. 25

9 2. Make sure the students have understood what was explained in class by asking them questions. Where does biodiesel come from? Write the key terms on the board. 3. Hand out individual disorganized chain of events slips to the students. 4. Ask them to look at the different pictures to see if they understand what that picture represents. 5. Ask them to quickly color them in. 6. Ask them to find the order of events by first finding the initial one and work progressively to the next. 7. Ask the students to cut out the pictures and paste them, in order of events, on the construction paper. 8. Promote a small class discussion about the chain of events that leads to the production on biodiesel. Assessments: Did the students color in and cut out the drawings given to them? Did the students comprehend the order of events that lead to being able to use fuel from plants, in the form of biodiesel? Could the students relate the drawings given to the chain of events being explained? Could the students formulate the chain of events on their own? 26

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11 Renewable and Nonrenewable Energy Sources: Review Program Outline: In-class discussion: Renewable and non renewable energy source review: Students are to review the concepts learned in the previous four weeks. Classroom Curriculum: Renewable and nonrenewable energy sources: Ask the students to open their picture booklets and review their drawings for the different energy sources. Review the main concepts: nonrenewable sources will some day cease to exist; renewable sources are always given to us by nature. Review the main vocabulary terms: Solar energy, wind power, water power, biodiesel, fossil fuels. (See page 6,11,24 of Instructor s Handbook.) Solar energy: Ask the students questions about the Drying Fruit activity. Can the sun be used instead of a household oven? How? What happened to the fruit exposed to the sun versus the fruit that was kept in the dark? How is the sun a source of energy? (See page 31 of Instructor s Handbook.) Wind: Ask the students about wind. What is wind? How do we know it's there? Refer to the fact that the sun shines on the atmosphere constantly but heats the surface of the Earth unevenly, causing some places to be warm while other places to be cold: refer to the aquarium with the lamp and ice. Ask them to recall that this makes the air lighter, so it rises. In the same manner as air is cooled it becomes heavier and sinks. Ask them to recall that wind is caused when warm air rises and air from cooler areas flows in to take the place of the heated air. (See page 25 of Instructor s Handbook.) Biodiesel: Review with the students that Biodiesel is a renewable source of fuel. Ask the students about the chain of events that leads to the production of Biodiesel. Restate that Biodiesel is a fuel derived from vegetable oil, which comes from plants. (See page 34 of Instructor s Handbook.) 28

12 Activity: Trivia Game Students will play a trivia game about the basic concepts learned throughout the previous classes. Method: An overall review will be conducted by asking the students multiple choice and true or false questions about renewable and nonrenewable energy sources, as well as about the basic concepts learned in class. Materials: Question-Answer cut outs (for the instructor only). Procedure: 1. Before the class, take the sheet of questions and answers presented and cut out each individual set. If desired more questions could be added, according to the level of understanding or complexity desired. 2. Start the activity by subdividing the class in two groups. 3. Mix up the question papers so they are not in chronological order. 4. Ask a one student from each group to participate in a coin toss, to determine which group starts. 5. Ask the first group a question, then the second group, and so on. Promote the participation of all members of the group. Do not allow two students to be the ones answering all the questions. Work with a point based system: one point for a correct answer, no points for wrong answers. Assessments: Review the individual assessment questions from each of the specific lessons of this unit. Can the students recall the information previously learned? Did the students respond positively to the questions asked in the review trivia game? Are the students familiar with the key vocabulary terms from this unit? Can the students recognize why renewable energy resources are important? 29

13 Which resources are eventually going to run out? Natural Gas is a resource. Which energy resources are constantly provided to us by nature? The sun is a resource. What could you use to replace a microwave? A. Wind B. The Sun Wind is caused because cold air sinks and warm air rises: A. True B. False The wind is a resource. Biodiesel comes from: A. Water B. Vegetable oil Water is a resource. Gasoline is better for the environment than biodiesel A. True B. False Biodiesel is a resource. Fossil fuels are resources. Petroleum is a resource. Coal is a resource. Biodiesel can be used primarily for: A. Cooking food B. Driving cars Using renewable energy sources is better for our lives and for the environment. A. True B. False Alcohol and Lye are also important in the production of Biodiesel. A. True B. False It takes millions of years for the earth to produce fossil fuels. A. True B. False 30

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