Need Fish? A Leader In Fisheries Since 1952!

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1 J.M. Malone and Son, Inc. Need Fish? A Leader In Fisheries Since 1952! F-W-Thomas A owner s Guide to stocking By: Robert P Glennon, Biologist Illustrations By: Duane Raver Fish Order Form Included Save up to 10% by pre ordering by the 100! Save up to 25% by pre ordering a pond package! See Display in Store For Delivery Dates and Ordering Deadlines! Copyright 2011 by J.M. Malone and Son, Inc.

2 Grass Carp Best Time of Year to Handle: Grass Carp handle best between October and April during cool weather. It is best to stock grass carp before aquatic vegetation takes over your pond. Survival is lowest for grass carp stocked between June and September. Grass Carp, also called white amur, are a biological control for aquatic vegetation. They will eat weeds and algae from your pond so that there is no need to use chemicals in the water you fish in, swim in or water livestock with. Unlike common carp, Grass carp will not spawn in ponds or muddy the water. Native to the Amur river in China, grass carp are strict herbivores using specialized teeth in the back of their throat to graze submerged plants from the top down. Grass carp also grow to large sizes, are fun to catch and good to eat. Management of aquatic vegetation can be achieved by stocking 5 to 6 grass carp per surface acre. Complete eradication of aquatic vegetation can be rapidly achieved by stocking 10 to 12 grass carp per surface acre. So what is the difference between a Triploid Grass carp and a Diploid Grass carp? Diploid (normal) Grass carp require flowing water of large rivers to spawn and cannot reproduce in ponds. However, many States are concerned grass carp will escape private ponds into public rivers and reproduce. Therefore, most States require the stocking of Triploid (sterile) Grass Carp. As of January 1, 2011 only Arkansas, Missouri, Iowa, Mississippi, Alabama and Nebraska allow diploids. What makes a Triploid sterile? Like humans, diploid grass carp have two chromosomes in every cell allowing them to produce viable eggs or sperm with 1 chromosome each. Triploid Grass carp have three chromosomes in each cell preventing them from producing viable eggs or sperm because each egg or sperm would have more than 1 chromosome each. If Triploid Grass carp are sterile, how do you breed them? Triploid grass carp are produced by combining the eggs and sperm from diploid grass carp and then shocking the fertilized eggs with temperature, pressure or chemicals early in development. This occurs in a specialized fish hatchery. The shock causes the egg to retain a naturally occurring third set of chromosomes called the third polar body which is normally discarded in the early stages of development. Why do Triploid Grass carp cost so much more? Before triploid (sterile) grass carp can be sold to private pond owners, each fish is individually blood tested by the fish farmer to prove they are sterile. Then the United States Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) must inspect and certify the fish and notify the State before they are sold across State lines. As of January 1, 2011, Arizona, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Illinois, Indiana, Louisiana, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Texas, Virginia, West Virginia and Wyoming require permits to purchase Triploid Grass Carp. Additional States may require permits in the near future and it is a federal offense to transport grass carp across state lines in violation of state law. Please be informed of your local laws. J.M. Malone and Son, Inc. will not sell Triploid Grass Carp to pond owners who do not have permits if required by their State. If your State requires a permit to stock Triploid Grass Carp you must submit a copy of your permit prior to delivery. Permits may be faxed to or sent to If you cannot provide your permit you will not receive your fish. Be advised; grass carp can be difficult to handle during the summer months of June, July and August and you may lose a few fish during warm weather.

3 Bass Packages Species 1/4 Acre 1/2 Acre 3/4 Acre 1 Acre Bluegill Sunfish 200 head 400 head 600 head 800 head Redear Sunfish 50 head 100 head 150 head 200 head Fathead Minnows 2.5pounds 5 pounds 7.5 pounds 10 pounds Largemouth Bass 12 head 25 head 37 head 50 head The bass pond package utilizes the predator/prey relationship found in lakes and rivers to produce a self-sustaining quality bass and bream fishery in your pond. Bluegill (coppernose or northern) and redear sunfish (shellcracker) form the base of the food chain by spawning several times throughout the spring and summer providing adequate forage to grow big bass. Largemouth Bass control the bluegill and redear population by feeding on small and intermediate sized bream allowing larger bluegill to reach catchable size. Redear sunfish also eat snails eliminating grubs from your pond. A successful bass pond must be stocked in the proper sequence to ensure the development of the predator/prey relationship. Small (1-3 inch) minnows, bluegill and redear can be stocked into new ponds during fall or spring (September April). The minnows will start to spawn in April. The bluegill and redear will begin to spawn in May and June. Once bream spawning has occurred, small (1-3 inch) largemouth bass may be stocked during that summer (May-June). Some pond owners prefer to stock the bass at the same time as the bluegill, redear and minnows. This is ok for smaller (less than one acre) ponds, but should be avoided with larger ponds. Indicate your preference on the order form. As the bass feed on the young bluegill they will grow rapidly reaching 1/4 to 1/2 pound by the following April. Then they will begin to spawn producing the next generation of bass for your pond. It is important not to harvest any bass from your pond until they have spawned at least once. This ensures that there will be enough bass in your pond to control the bream population. Fathead minnows stocked with the bluegill and redear will serve as forage for the growing bream. Once bass are stocked minnows will disappear quickly. This is ok because the bass will feed on the young bream. Minnows can be stocked periodically in the spring and fall to supplement your forage population. Grass carp should also be stocked to control aquatic vegetation before it becomes a big problem. If you would like your Bass to contain catfish or crappie see the Traditional Fishing option on page 5. Mature Largemouth Bass can be expected to grow 1/2 to 1 pound a year with younger bass staying in the 1/4 to 1/2 pound range to control bream populations. Mature bluegill and redear should grow 1/4 pound per year with many younger bream staying in the 2-4 inch size range to feed the bass. Bass s require fertile soils to be productive. If your soil is not very fertile you may want to consider the Catfish on page 6 or the Bream on page 3. See page 22 for Bass Package Prices. Save up to $150 per acre by buying a Bass Package rather than by buying ala-carte fish by the hundred.

4 Bream Packages Species 1/4 Acre 1/2 Acre 3/4 Acre 1 Acre Hybrid Bream 185 head 375 head 565 head 750 head Redear Sunfish 25 head 50 head 75 head 100 head Fathead Minnows 2.5 pounds 5 pounds 7.5 pounds 10 pounds Largemouth Bass 12 head 25 head 37 head 50 head Channel Catfish 12 head 25 head 37 head 50 head The Bream package is well suited for small ponds less than two acres in size or ponds which do not have fertile soils. Hybrid bream have a large mouth and readily take artificial feed. They are very aggressive making them easy to catch, even on a bare hook. Populations of hybrid bream are composed of 80 to 95% male fish. Therefore reproduction is limited and more of the stocked fish reach a catchable size. For every 100 hybrid bream stocked you can expect to catch 80 eating size bream. While they are capable of reaching 1 to 2 pounds, most average 1/2 to 3/4 pounds. New hybrid bream ponds should be free of other bream species to prevent reproduction. All of the fish should be of similar size and stocked at the same time to prevent predation. Small 1 to 3 inch fingerlings will grow rapidly reaching 5 to 6 inches in their first summer and can gain 1/3 pound per year every year thereafter. Although reproduction is limited, some reproduction will occur. The offspring from this reproduction are inferior fish. They resemble green sunfish, will not grow very large and will breed readily, resulting in thousands of small fish rather than eating size fish. Once hybrid bream have reproduced the only way to correct the problem is to drain the pond and start over. To eliminate reproduction altogether you must stock either channel catfish or largemouth bass with the hybrid bream to eat any offspring produced. Channel catfish will eat the inbred fish and can be grown to large sizes with feed. Largemouth bass will also eat the inbred fish but will not grow very large (1/2-1 pound) because there are simply not enough offspring produced to grow big bass. To sustain quality fishing new hybrid bream will need to be restocked periodically. Larger (5-6 ) fish will need to be stocked to prevent them from being eaten by the channel catfish or largemouth bass present in the pond. Hybrid bream should not be mixed with bluegill (coppernose or northern). Bluegill will breed with the hybrid bream producing more inferior offspring. Fathead minnows should be stocked as forage for hybrid bream in the spring and fall. Redear sunfish should also be stocked with hybrid bream to control grubs, however there is a chance that the redear sunfish will breed with the hybrid bream. Grass carp should also be stocked to control aquatic vegetation before it becomes a big problem. See page 22 for Hybrid Bream Package Prices. Save up to $129 per acre by buying a Bream Package rather than by buying ala-carte fish by the hundred.

5 Crappie Packages Species 1/4 Acre 1/2 Acre 3/4 Acre 1 Acre Bluegill Sunfish 100 head 200 head 300 head 400 head Redear Sunfish 25 head 50 head 75 head 100 head Fathead Minnow 2.5 pounds 5 pounds 7.5 pounds 10 pounds Largemouth Bass 38 head 75 head 113 head 150 head Black Crappie 38 head 75 head 113 head 150 head The Crappie package is the most complicated of pond stocking combinations. Crappie are a favorite of many fisherman and most pondowners wish to stock crappie in their ponds. However, crappie can be difficult to manage in small ponds due to their ability to reproduce rapidly and overpopulate. Successful crappie ponds are greater than 5 acres with abundant habitat (brushpiles) and numerous small (less than 1 pound ) largemouth bass. Black crappie do not produce as many eggs as white crappie and are therefore better suited to fishing ponds. Black crappie serve as both predator and prey because they feed on small fish and produce large numbers of offspring. Bluegill, redear sunfish and fathead minnows should be stocked as forage for black crappie. Largemouth bass should be stocked at increased numbers to control the crappie population. Black crappie handle best in cold temperatures and therefore should be stocked October through April. Fathead minnows will serve as forage for the growing bream and crappie. Once bass are stocked minnows may disappear quickly. This is ok because the bass will feed on the young crappie and bream. Minnows can be stocked periodically in the spring and fall to supplement your forage population. Grass carp should also be stocked to control aquatic vegetation before it becomes a big problem. Mature black crappie can be expected to grow 1/2 to 1 pound a year with bass staying in the 1/2 to 1 pound range to control crappie populations. Mature bluegill and redear should grow 1/4 pound per year with many younger bream staying in the 1-2 inch size range to feed the crappie. It is very important to restrict the harvest of bass in a black crappie pond. Enough bass can be removed in one day of fishing to upset the predator/prey balance required to control the black crappie population. Hybrid Crappie may be substituted for black crappie. Hybrid crappie will be easier to manage than black crappie but will require periodic restocking to maintain good fishing. Indicate on the order form whether you want black crappie or hybrid crappie. If substituting hybrid crappie for black crappie you will receive 63 hybrid crappie and 25 bass per 1/4 acre instead of 38 black crappie and 38 bass per 1/4 acre. The price per 1/4 acre will stay the same. Crappie s require fertile soils to be productive. If your soil is not very fertile you may want to consider the Catfish on page 6 or the Bream on page 3. See page 22 for Crappie Package Prices. Save up to $112 per acre by buying a Crappie Package rather than by buying ala-carte fish by the hundred.

6 Fishing Packages Species 1/4 Acre 1/2 Acre 3/4 Acre 1 Acre Bluegill Sunfish 100 head 200 head 300 head 400 head Redear Sunfish 25 head 50 head 75 head 100 head Fathead Minnows 2.5 pounds 5 pounds 7.5 pounds 10 pounds Largemouth Bass 25 head 50 head 75 head 100 head Channel Catfish 25 head 50 head 75 head 100 head Hybrid Crappie 25 head 50 head 75 head 100 head The fishing pond package utilizes the predator/prey relationship found in lakes and rivers to produce a self-sustaining quality bass and bream fishery in your pond. Bluegill (coppernose or native) and redear sunfish (shellcracker) form the base of the food chain by spawning several times throughout the spring and summer providing adequate forage to grow bass. Largemouth Bass control the bluegill and redear population by feeding on small and intermediate sized bream allowing larger bluegill to reach catchable size. Redear sunfish also eat snails eliminating grubs from your pond. Channel catfish and hybrid crappie are stocked to provide the pond owner with some variety in their pond without changing the predator/prey relationship which drives the pond. If you do not want catfish and crappie in your pond see the Bass Package on page 2. As the bass feed on the young bluegill they will grow rapidly reaching 1/4 to 1/2 pound by the following April. Then they will begin to spawn producing the next generation of bass for your pond. It is important not to harvest any bass from your pond until they have spawned at least twice. This ensures that there will be enough bass in your pond to control the bream population. Fathead minnows will serve as forage for the growing bream. Once bass are stocked minnows will disappear quickly. This is ok because the bass will feed on the young bream. Minnows can be stocked periodically in the spring and fall to supplement your forage population. Grass carp should also be stocked to control aquatic vegetation before it becomes a big problem. Mature Largemouth Bass can be expected to grow 1/2 to 1 pound a year with younger bass staying in the 1/4 to 1/2 pound range to control bream populations. Mature bluegill, redear and crappie should grow 1/4 pound per year with many younger bream staying in the 2-4 inch size range to feed the bass. Mature catfish can be expected to grow 1 pound per year. See page 22 for Traditional Package Prices. Save up to $105 per acre by buying a Fishing Package rather than by buying ala-carte fish by the hundred.

7 Catfish Packages Species 1/4 Acre 1/2 Acre 3/4 Acre 1 Acre Redear Sunfish 50 head 100 head 150 head 200 head Fathead Minnows 2.5 pounds 5 pounds 7.5 pounds 10 pounds Channel Catfish 125 head 250 head 375 head 500 head The catfish package is ideal for any size pond, including small ponds (less than one acre), heavily fished ponds and ponds which do not have fertile soils. Catfish require very little management, eat a wide variety of foods, are easy to catch and good to eat. They can also tolerate a wide range of water quality and will not spawn in most ponds unless nesting sites such as stumps, barrels, and tires are added. Spawning is not encouraged to prevent overcrowding. Channel catfish can be stocked at any time of the year, grow 3/4 to 1 pound per year and can reach large sizes if cared for properly. Fathead minnows will serve as forage for channel catfish. Redear sunfish should also be stocked with channel catfish to control grubs. Grass carp should also be stocked to control aquatic vegetation before it becomes a big problem. See page 22 for Catfish Package Prices. Save up to $55 per acre by buying a Catfish Package rather than by buying ala-carte fish by the hundred. Fathead Minnows Best Time of Year to Handle: Fathead Minnows handle best during cool weather, usually between September through May. Summer time temperatures make handling difficult. Fathead minnows are small forage fish, no larger than 3 inches, making them ideal forage for bluegill, hybrid bream, crappie and small largemouth bass. Their intended use in stocking new ponds is to jump start the forage base. Breeding early in the spring, baby minnows are eaten by bluegill fattening them before the summer spawning season. Baby minnows are also present in the summer months serving as forage for new largemouth bass. Once bass are stocked fathead minnows disappear quickly. This is ok as the bluegill have begun spawning and are capable of feeding the bass. Minnows can be stocked periodically to increase forage for bream in early spring and fall. Large male (bull) fathead minnows often die after the spawning season. Be advised that when purchasing fathead minnows during the months of May, June and July you may notice some dead minnows during transport or after stocking. During this time period the larger male (bull) fathead minnows are at the end of their life cycle and the stress of transport and stocking accelerates their demise. Although the larger males may die, many smaller males will survive.

8 2-3 Largemouth Bass Best Time of Year to Handle: May and June are the best times to stock small bass fingerlings when stocking Bass s. Bass are available year round and can be stocked in Fishing s, Crappie s, and Bream s anytime between September and May. Largemouth bass are the most popular fish for pond stocking. Not only are bass fun to catch but bass are required to maintain balanced fish populations in ponds. Small fingerlings grow quickly throughout the summer reaching 1/2 to 3/4 pound by fall. By spring the bass are mature and can begin spawning. Most largemouth bass will grow one pound a year after their first year. Maximum size and rate of growth is a function of food availability, competition and age. Genetics are a small part of the equation and are linked geographically to climate. There are two recognized strains of largemouth bass. Florida strain largemouth bass are native to peninsular Florida. Northern strain largemouth bass are native to everywhere north of Florida. An intergrade zone exists in northern Florida, southern Georgia and Alabama in which naturally occurring largemouth bass populations contain genes from both northern and Florida strains. Recently an F1 hybrid (the first cross between a northern strain and Florida strain bass) has been marketed for pond stocking in the southeast. Northern strain largemouth bass are capable of reaching 16+ pounds in size with most averaging 6 to 8 pounds. Northern strain largemouth bass in their native climate have a well defined growing season and must tolerate stressful cold winters. Therefore they do not live as long as Florida strain largemouth bass and generally do not get as large as Florida strain bass. Northern strain largemouth bass provide quality bass fishing. Florida strain largemouth bass are the largest strain with some fish reaching 20 +pounds in size with most averaging 8 + pounds. Florida strain largemouth bass in their native climate have a year round growing season and do not have to cope with stressful cold winters, and therefore they live longer and grow larger in their native climate. However, Florida strain largemouth bass are difficult to catch prompting many pond owners to restock with northern strain bass to produce quality fishing. Florida bass are not very cold tolerant and ponds north of I-20 stocked with Florida strain largemouth bass can experience 50% mortality in the winter and up to 75% mortality under ice cover. F1 hybrid largemouth bass are gaining in popularity in the southern region as easier to catch then Florida strain largemouth bass and larger than northern strain largemouth bass. The jury is still out on the F1 hybrid largemouth bass. Once the F1 bass reach maturity and spawn the, hybrid genes will be mixed up and those passed on to offspring will be selected by the local climate. Follow the recommendations on page 2 for stocking Bass ponds.

9 1-3 Bluegill Sunfish Best Time of Year to Handle: Bluegill handle best during cool weather, usually between October and May. Temperature dictates handling success. Survival is lowest for Bluegill stocked between June and September. Bluegill are the multi-purpose fish for pond stocking. They are abundant, fun to catch, great to eat and excellent forage for largemouth bass and crappie. Bluegill have a long spawning season resulting in a reliable supply of small and intermediate sized forage. Bluegill are capable of growing 1/4 pound per year after the first year, reaching average sizes of 1/2 to 3/4 pound with some reaching 1 to 2 pounds if they are well fed and live long enough. Maximum size and rate of growth is a function of food availability, competition and age. Genetics are a small part of the equation and are linked geographically to climate. There are three recognized strains of bluegill. Coppernose bluegill are native to Florida and the Atlantic coast north to North Carolina. Northern bluegill (also called native or straight bluegill) are native to the Mississippi River Basin in the central US from Louisiana to Canada. A lesser known, smaller sized strain of bluegill also exists in the dry land river drainages of Oklahoma, Texas and Mexico but is not recommended for pond stocking. Coppernose bluegill are the largest strain of bluegill reaching large sizes with the year round growing season and mild winters of their native climate. Coppernose bluegill farther north along the Atlantic coast may not grow as fast or as big due to the shorter growing season and colder winters. Northern bluegill may not have the warm climate of coppernose country, but they still provide quality fishing throughout the central United States. Northern bluegill are capable of reaching trophy sizes. A well managed bass/bluegill pond will routinely produce 3/4 to 1 pound bluegill. Many pond owners request coppernose bluegill because they can grow to large sizes in southern climates and are thought to grow faster than native bluegill. While both coppernose and northern bluegill can reach sizes in excess of 1 pound, research has shown that coppernose only grow faster than northern bluegill during the first few months of life. This short lived growth advantage allows more coppernose to survive their first summer and reach intermediate sizes (3 to 4 inches) which are preferred by large bass. However, coppernose are less cold tolerant than northern bluegill and experience has shown mortality under ice cover in northern climates. Follow the recommendations on page 5 for stocking Bluegill ponds.

10 1-3 Redear Sunfish Best Time of Year to Handle: Redear handle best in cool weather, usually between October and May. Temperature dictates handling success. Survival is lowest for Redear stocked between June and September. Redear sunfish are a positive addition to any fishing pond. Redear generally reach larger sizes than bluegill, do not overpopulate and will prevent grubs by eating the snails that are a host to the grubs. Redear spawn after bass but before bluegill. The spawning season is short lasting only a few weeks, unlike bluegill which spawn all summer. Redear are susceptible to nest failures due to fluctuating water temperatures in the early spring. Therefore redear are less abundant than bluegill and should be stocked in combination with bluegill to provide adequate forage for bass. Redear are generally stocked as 20% of the total bream population. Redear are capable of growing 1/3 pound per year after the first year, reaching average sizes of 1/2 to 3/4 pound with some reaching 1 to 2 pounds if they are well fed and live long enough. Redear can be stocked in any pond at a rate of 100 to 200 per acre. 1-3 Hybrid Bream Best Time of Year to Handle: Hybrid Bream handle best in cool weather, usually between September and June. Temperature dictates handling success. Survival is lowest for Hybrid Bream stocked between July and September. Hybrid bream are touted by many as improved bream or super bream, capable of reaching five pounds. While hybrid bream can reach large sizes, do not expect many to reach 5 pounds. The most common hybrid bream results from a cross between bluegill and green sunfish. This cross creates a population of bream which is 80-95% male resulting in limited reproduction. Hybrid bream have a large mouth and readily take artificial feed. They are very aggressive making them easy to catch even on a bare hook. Because of their limited reproduction the majority of hybrid bream in a pond will grow to large sizes. While they are capable of reaching 1 to 2 pounds, most average 1/2 to 3/4 pounds. Hybrid bream may take 6 years to grow to 2 pounds. Only one 5 pound hybrid bream has ever been found, and it was reportedly 20 years old. Follow the recommendations on page 3 for stocking Hybrid Bream s.

11 1-3 Hybrid Crappie Best Time of Year to Handle: F1 Hybrid Crappie handle best in cool weather, usually between October and April. Temperature dictates handling success. Crappie are not very well suited to small ponds because of their tendency to overpopulate. To solve this problem fish farmers have developed the F1 HYBRID CRAPPIE. F1 Hybrid crappie are the first generation cross between a black crappie and a white crappie. The resulting hybrid displays limited reproductive success and increased growth. Early research indicates that F1 hybrid crappie populations are 50% male and 50% female and are capable of producing large numbers of offspring. However, the offspring of hybrid crappie are inferior in terms of growth and are readily controlled (eaten) by bass and bluegill. Therefore, when stocking F1 hybrid crappie in ponds with bass and bluegill very few baby crappie will survive, preventing overpopulation. Any offspring that may survive to adulthood display reduced reproductive rates. Research indicates that F1 Hybrid Crappie grow faster and weigh more than both black crappie and white crappie of the same age. Due to their limited reproductive success Hybrid Crappie will need to be restocked periodically. The Hybrid Crappie produced by J.M. Malone and Son, Inc. is the original cross between an Arkansas Black Nosed Black Crappie male and a white crappie female resulting in a hybrid crappie with a black stripe running down its nose. This black stripe is not an indication that a crappie is a hybrid crappie. Therefore, be advised when purchasing crappie, just because it has a black stripe on its nose does not make it a hybrid crappie.

12 3-5 Channel Catfish Best Time of Year to Handle: Channel Catfish handle best in cool weather, usually between September and June. Temperature dictates handling success. Channel catfish are suited to almost any pond, big or small. Catfish require very little management, eat a wide variety of foods, are easy to catch and good to eat. They can also tolerate a wide range of water quality and can grow to large sizes even in small ponds. Often characterized as bottom feeders, catfish are omnivores eating whatever they can find and readily take to artificial feed, growing to large sizes if properly cared for. Channel catfish will not spawn in most ponds unless nesting sites such as stumps, barrels, and tires are added. Spawning is generally not encouraged to prevent overcrowding. Many pond owners prefer a put/grow/take approach to catfish ponds. That is to stock fingerlings, grow them to large sizes on feed, catch most of them out and restock periodically when fish numbers decline. This approach allows pond owners to regulate the number of fish in the pond and increase growth rates. Follow the recommendations on page 6 for stocking Channel Catfish ponds. 1-3 Black Crappie Best Time of Year to Handle: Black Crappie handle best in cool weather, usually between October and April. Temperature dictates handling success. Black crappie are a popular wide bodied panfish. Reaching an average size of 1 to 2 pounds crappie are fun to catch and great to eat. Black crappie are better suited to ponds then the white crappie because black crappie produce less eggs reducing the chances of overcrowding. Crappie are susceptible to nest failure if water temperatures drop suddenly. This causes the boom or bust reproductive cycle associated with crappie populations. Crappie populations are difficult to manage and are only recommended for large ponds with plenty of habitat and many small largemouth bass to control crappie populations. There are always exceptions to the rule, but in general crappie do best in large ponds. With suitable habitat black crappie are capable of growing 1/4 to 1/2 pound per year after their first year. The Arkansas Black Nosed Black Crappie* is a strain of black crappie first described in the white river basin of Arkansas. The black nosed crappie have a black stripe running from the top of their dorsal fin, down their nose and over their bottom lip. The Arkansas Black Nosed Black Crappie are not hybrid crappie, they reproduce at the same rate, grow at the same rate and fight just as hard as regular black crappie. Follow the recommendations on page 4 for stocking Crappie s.

13 The 10 Rules of stocking 1. Do not under harvest bass from your pond Catch and Release is important on public waters where fishing pressure is high. However in private ponds Catch and Release can destroy the balance between predator and prey that regulates a pond s food chain. Under harvest of bass will result in numerous small bass and few big bluegill. Bass harvest recommendations vary depending on the type of pond you have and the current state of its predator/ prey balance. See page 16 for proper bass harvest guidelines. 2. Do not overharvest bass from your pond Bass harvest is very important to maintaining the predator/prey balance in private ponds. However, overharvest of bass will result in numerous small bluegill and few big bass. The predator/prey balance in a private pond can be upset in one day of fishing because bass are very susceptible to fishing. Bass harvest recommendations vary depending on the type of pond you have and the current state of its predator/ prey balance. See page 16 for proper bass harvest guidelines. 3. Do not stock bass in your pond before stocking forage fish It takes 5 pounds of bluegill and minnows to make 1 pound of bass. Stocking bass into a pond before stocking bluegill, redear and minnows is a recipe for disaster. Bass fishing ponds should be stocked with bluegill, redear and minnows in the fall and bass in the early summer after the bream have begun to spawn. All other types of ponds can be stocked with bass at the same time the other fish are stocked. 4. Do not stock adult fish in your pond unless doing so is part of a corrective stocking Adult fish bought from a farm or caught in the wild can destroy the predator/prey balance in a pond. Stocking big fish is not necessarily a shortcut to good fishing. 5.Do not stock Florida Bass and Coppernose Bluegill north of Interstate 20 Florida Bass and Coppernose Bluegill are not very cold tolerant and have high mortality rates under ice cover. 6. Do not mix hybrid bream and bluegill in the same pond Hybrid bream populations are 80 to 95% male. This prevents over crowding. Hybrid bream males will spawn with bluegill females resulting in over crowding and inferior fish. 7. Do not stock Hybrid Bream without stocking predators such as bass and catfish Although hybrid bream have reduced reproductive rates, they are not sterile. Without predators such as bass or catfish to eat hybrid bream offspring, a hybrid bream pond can be ruined in one summer of uncontrolled spawning. 8. Do not expect to feed your pond minnows and grow big bass Minnows do not provide enough food to make up for the energy exerted by a bass to catch them. Feed your bream daily with fish food and watch your bass grow. 9. Do not wait to stock Redear Sunfish in your pond Redear sunfish prevent grubs. Stock them in all ponds from day one. 10. Do not wait to stock Triploid Grass Carp in your pond Excessive aquatic vegetation can destroy a fishing pond through poor water quality and unbalanced predator/prey relationships. Once vegetation is well established it may take two summers for Grass Carp to clean it up. By stocking Triploid Grass Carp on day one, you allow them to manage the vegetation before it gets out of control and takes over your pond.

14 Corrective Stocking 5-6 Coppernose Bluegill 5-6 Hybrid Bream 7-9 Largemouth Bass Under harvest of bass can lead to bass crowded ponds; all of the bass in your pond are under 12 inches and all of the bluegill are over 6 inches. To correct the predator/prey balance you need to harvest 50 pounds of bass per acre and then stock to 6 inch bluegill per 1/4 acre. Home delivery only. Due to the limited reproduction of Hybrid bream it is necessary to restock hybrid bream ponds every few years to maintain good fishing. If your fishing has declined and your pond does not contain inferior offspring, stock to 6 inch hybrid bream per 1/4 acre. Home delivery only. 12 Grass Carp Overharvest of bass can lead to bluegill crowded ponds; all of the bass in your pond are over 15 inches and all of the bluegill are less than 6 inches. To correct the situation you need to harvest 200 pounds of 5 to 6 inch bluegill per acre and stock 6 7 to 9 inch bass per 1/4 acre. Home delivery only. 12 Grass carp stocked at 10 fish per acre will control established aquatic vegetation in older ponds which tend to have larger bass that may eat the smaller 8 to 10 inch grass carp. Small 8 to 10 inch grass carp are preferred for new ponds and for ponds with filamentous algae or pithophora.

15 Supplemental Stocking 5-6 Redear Sunfish If your pond has developed a grub problem your redear sunfish may need to be re stocked. To re-establish redear in an existing pond with big bass or catfish you will need to stock 100 to to 6 inch fish per acre. Be advised; there is often a limited availability of 5 to 6 inch redear sunfish. Home delivery only. Not available in Louisiana. 5-6 Black & Hybrid Crappie Fathead Minnows Although crappie ponds usually do not need to be re stocked, fishing ponds containing hybrid crappie will need to be restocked periodically. To re-establish black crappie or hybrid crappie in an existing pond with big bass or catfish you will need to stock 100 to to 6 inch fish per acre. Home delivery only. Not available in Louisiana. Fathead minnows can be stocked periodically in the spring or fall to supplement the forage base in your pond. Stock 10 to 50 pounds per acre. Channel Catfish Because reproduction is not encouraged in small ponds channel catfish will need to be restocked periodically. Stock up to inch fish per acre in catfish ponds and up to 100 per acre in all other ponds. Home delivery only.

16 Management Carrying Capacity s that are not fed or fertilized can support 300 pounds of fish per acre. Well managed ponds that are fed, fertilized or aerated can support 600 to 1000 pounds of fish per acre. Feeding s that are fed daily will grow more and bigger fish than ponds that are not fed. Unfertile ponds with poor soils will need to be fed in order to grow big fish. Fish feeding should begin when water temperatures warm in the spring and should continue through the fall until water temperatures cool and fish stop feeding. Fish should be fed daily all they will eat in 10 to 15 minutes. s without aeration should be fed no more than 10 pounds of feed per acre per day at maturity. Aerated ponds can be fed 20 pounds per acre per day at maturity. Excessive feeding can lead to oxygen depletion and should be avoided. Bass/Bluegill and Bream ponds should be fed with a feed that has at least 38-40% protein and 8-16% fat. Catfish ponds should be fed a feed that has at least 28-32% protein and 4 to 8% fat. One year old fish will eat a 1/8 inch floating pellet. Small fish need a smaller pellet size. Newly stocked fish may not feed immediately and may need to be trained to feed by feeding in the same area of a pond at the same time each day. As the fish grow they will feed more aggressively. Automatic fish feeders make fish feeding simple and easy. Fertilization Fertilization increases productivity of a pond and can help control aquatic vegetation. Water chemistry determines how effective a fertilization program will be. s must have a total alkalinity of 20 ppm in order to benefit from fertilizer. If alkalinity is less than 20 ppm agricultural limestone can be added periodically to increase alkalinity. Contact your local Natural Resource Conservation Service Agent for assistance when measuring alkalinity and determining how much limestone to add. Fertilization should begin when weather warms in spring and can continue until water temperatures cool in the fall. Fertilizer should be added every 2 weeks until visibility is less than 2 feet, then only as needed when visibility increases beyond 2 feet. Excessive fertilization can cause oxygen depletion and fish kills and should be avoided. s with muddy water or aquatic vegetation should not be fertilized. Fed ponds will require less fertilizer. Muddy water can be cleared by adding gypsum or agricultural lime. Aeration Aeration improves the carrying capacity of ponds and helps mix pond water to prevent turnovers and fish kills. A variety of aerators are available ranging from ornamental fountains and windmills to air compressors and paddlewheels. The most important aspect of aeration for fishing ponds is mixing of pond water to prevent turnovers. This can be accomplished with fountains or air compressors. owners wanting serious fish production may consider paddlewheels. Solar and wind powered systems are available for remote locations without electricity. Fish Habitat Improvement Stake beds, brush piles, and Christmas trees can be sunk throughout the pond to provide submerged habitat. To avoid overpopulation of channel catfish, old tires, milk cans and buckets should not be added to encourage spawning. Artificial fish habitat can also be purchased and placed strategically around your pond to improve fish populations and fishing success.

17 Fish Harvest Proper fish harvest can extend the life of your fishing pond. Each type of pond requires a different harvest strategy. Catfish ponds and bream ponds are generally put/grow/take ponds allowing a pond owner to grow big fish, catch them out and start over without concern for proper harvest. Crappie ponds, bass ponds and fishing ponds however require careful management of the predator/prey balance in order to maintain good fishing. Unfertile ponds with poor soils cannot be harvested as aggressively as fertile ponds. Beginning one year after stocking, fertile ponds need to be harvested according to the following chart: 15 + Bass Bass 8-11 Bass 6-8 Bluegill/ Redear 12 + Catfish 10 + Crappie Bass Crappie Fishing Bream Catfish Release all fish* Harvest 15 pounds per acre per year Harvest 15 pounds per acre per year after first spawn. Harvest up to 100 pounds per acre per year Harvest 10 pounds per acre per year Harvest 10 pounds per acre per year Harvest 10 pounds per acre per year Release all fish Release all fish Release all fish Release all fish Harvest up to 50 pounds per acre per year Harvest 50 pounds per acre per year Harvest 10 pounds per acre per year Harvest up to 100 pounds per acre per year Harvest 20 pounds per acre per year Harvest 25 pounds per acre per year Release all fish Harvest 100 pounds per acre per year Harvest 20 pounds per acre per year Harvest up to 10 pounds per acre per year Harvest 100 pounds per acre per year Monitoring Fish Populations Fish populations and predator/prey relationships are always in a state of flux requiring constant monitoring to maintain quality fishing. Two common methods are shoreline seining and angler catch records. Angler catch records should be maintained year round keeping track of how many, what size and what kind of fish are being caught. Anglers should record every fish they catch even if they release them. Based on the results of this sampling you should be able to determine the health of your fish population and if any corrective management is necessary. -If you are managing a bass pond and all of the bass you catch are less than 12 inches and the bluegill you catch are all over 6 inches, you should harvest 50 pounds of bass per acre and then stock to 6 bluegill per acre. *If the bass in your bass pond stop growing at 15 inches, harvest 30 pounds of 15 to 20 inch bass for one year.* -If managing a fishing pond and all of the bass you catch are over 15 inches and the bluegill you catch are all less than 6 inches; you should stop harvesting bass for one year, harvest 200 pounds of 5 to 6 inch bluegill for one year and stock 25 eight inch bass per acre. If all of the bass you catch are less than 12 inches and the bluegill you catch are all over 6 inches; you should harvest 50 pounds of bass per acre and then stock to 6 bluegill per acre. -If managing a crappie pond and the bass you catch are all over 15 inches and the crappie you catch are all under 8 inches; you should stop harvesting bass for one year and harvest 100 pounds of 6 to 8 inch crappie for one year. -If managing a bream pond and the bass you catch are all over 15 inches and the bream you catch are all less than 6 inches; you should drain the pond and start over. -If managing a catfish pond and are not catching very many catfish; you should stock more catfish.

18 What Else Do I Need? Here is a checklist of additional items you may need for your pond. Check with you local store for pricing and availability. Fish Feed Fish Feeders Fertilizer Agricultural Lime Dye/Colorant Aerators and Fountains Fish Habitat Structures Floating Docks Paddle Boats Bug Lights How Fast Will My Fish Grow? Fish growth rate and maximum size are dependant on food availability and space. Fish will grow fastest in a fertilized pond that is well fed and aerated. Fish will grow slower in ponds which have become overpopulated or contain aquatic vegetation or clear or muddy water. Channel Catfish should grow 1 pound per year and average 5 to 10 pounds in size. Largemouth Bass should grow 1 pound per year and average 4 to 6 pounds in size. Hybrid bream should grow 1/3 pound per year and average 3/4 to 1 pound in size. Bluegill sunfish should grow 1/4 pound per year and average 1/2 to 3/4 pound in size. Redear sunfish should grow 1/3 pound per year and average 3/4 to 1 pounds in size. Crappie should grow 1/4 pound per year and average 1 to 2 pounds in size. Triploid Grass Carp can grow 1 inch per month during the summer if food is available and can reach sizes of 20 to 40 pounds. How Often Should I Restock? The average pond requires 2 years to mature and provides good fishing for 3 to 5 more years. Once fishing begins to decline, it is sometimes best to drain a pond and start over if possible. Adding more small fish to an old pond does not necessarily maintain good fishing. See page 16 for information on proper harvest and corrective stocking to maintain good fishing in old ponds. The average catfish pond or bream pond needs to be drained and re stocked every 5 to 6 years. The life of a fishing pond, a bass pond or crappie pond can be extended beyond 6 years through intensive management, proper harvest and corrective stocking. Professional Management Consultants are available for population monitoring and corrective stocking recommendations to extend the life of your pond.

19 How Do I Get My Fish Home? Your fish will be delivered to the store in a specialized live haul fish truck. The fish are pre counted and separated by order. Every order contains a few extra fish to account for any losses during transport. On the scheduled day at the scheduled time the fish truck will come to the store and package your order for you to take home. Your fish will be placed into sealed plastic bags with water and oxygen. The bags measure 2 foot square. Your fish can live for several hours in these bags if you keep them cool and out of the sunlight. You may want to bring an ice chest or blanket to cover the bags so that they do not heat up in the sunlight. Once you receive your fish you need to go directly to your pond. Before releasing your fish you need to temper them to prevent temperature shock. To do this place the bags in the shallow water along the edge of your pond and let them float unopened for 30 minutes. (Try to keep the bag shaded from direct sunlight.) After 30 minutes open the bags, remove one quart of water and add one quart of water from your pond. Do this once every 5 minutes until the water temperature in the bag is the same as your pond. You can use a thermometer to measure the water temperature or compare the water temperatures with your hand. Once the water temperature inside the bag is the same as the water temperature in your pond, pour the fish and water from the bag into your pond. The fish should swim away within a few minutes. If the fish come to the surface and gasp for air or lay on their side at the bottom of the pond they are in shock and may not live. If the fish are beginning to stress in the bags or are piping on the surface of the water in the bags when you arrive at the pond, do not wait 30 minutes to open the bags; open the bags immediately and begin tempering them. Do I Need To Feed My Fish? Fish that are fed daily will grow bigger and faster than fish that are not fed. s which are not fertilized or do not have fertile soils will need to be fed in order to grow big fish. The following feed schedule can be used for new ponds stocked in the fall or spring with one of our fish packages. Begin feeding in the spring once water temperatures have begun to warm. It is best to start feeding a small fish food, approximately 2.5 mm in size, and increase the feed size as the fish grow. By the end of the first year bream can be fed a 1/8 inch pellet and catfish can be fed a 1/4 inch pellet. By the end of the second year aerated ponds can be fed 20 pounds per acre per day and un-aerated ponds can be fed 10 pounds per acre per day. Week Pounds of Feed Per Acre Per Day Week Pounds of Feed Per Acre Per Day Week Pounds of Feed Per Acre Per Day Week Pounds of Feed Per Acre Per Day Week Pounds of Feed Per Acre Per Day

20 Creel Survey Record Day Month Year Name/Location Record Every Fish Caught Even If Released Angler Species Weight Length Released (yes or no)

21 How Big Is My? s are measured by surface area in units of acres. An acre is 43,560 square feet. To calculate the size of your pond in acres measure your pond in feet and use one of the following equations. X To calculate the size of a square pond, measure the length of any 2 sides in feet. To measure the size of a rectangular pond measure the length of one short side and one long side in feet: Multiply X by Y = square feet square feet divided by 43,560= acres Y Z To calculate the size of a round pond, measure the distance around the pond in feet: Multiply Z by itself Z = Divide by 547,390 = acres A B To calculate the size of a triangular pond, measure the length the two perpendicular sides in feet: Multiply A by B and divide by 2= square feet square feet divided by 43,560= acres E C D To calculate the size of a trapezoid pond, measure the length of the two uneven sides and the width in feet: Add C plus D and divide by 2 then multiply by E= square feet square feet divided by 43,560 = acres

22 How Do I Order Fish? Step 1: Decide which fish you would like to order. Step 2. Before the ordering deadline, order online at and Save up to 10% or call: Step 3. The Monday prior to the advertised delivery date you will receive a phone call from J.M. Malone and Son, Inc. to confirm your order and time, date and location of your delivery. The delivery date and time is subject to change due to weather or poor demand. If the delivery date and time changes you will be notified at least four days prior to original advertised delivery date. Step 4. Come to the store at the confirmed pickup day and time. The delivery driver will confirm your order and take your payment. Cash and Check are accepted. If paying with a credit card do so online or notify Malone s when we call to confirm your order. Step 5. The driver will then package your fish for you to take home. Your fish will be packaged in plastic bags with water and oxygen. Home Deliveries will be scheduled as time is available. You will receive a phone call on the Monday prior to the scheduled delivery date to confirm you order and arrange a delivery time. Why do we take fish orders? Most feed store fish day trucks do not take fish orders. Rather they travel the countryside with a load of fish speculating that they will sell them to walk up customers at any given feed store. Many of the fish may spend one to two weeks on the fish truck before being sold. This is very stressful on the fish and can cause mortality once the fish are stocked into your pond. By taking fish orders in advance we can guarantee that your fish will spend no more than two days on the fish truck before you stock them into your pond. This ensures that the fish are not stressed and will survive once stocked into your pond. What happens if my fish die? The fish you purchase are guaranteed alive at delivery and packaged in a manner to survive the trip to your pond. If you are not satisfied with the fish or packaging at delivery please make the delivery driver aware of your concerns and we will work with you to resolve the issue. Please bear in mind that live fish are a perishable item and a few fish may die in transport. It is for this reason that we always add a few extra fish to every order. You do assume a great responsibility in tempering your fish prior to releasing them into your pond. It is for that reason that all fish losses after stocking are handled on a case by case basis. If you have followed the instructions and properly tempered your fish prior to release you should not experience fish losses. If you do experience fish losses please contact us at or and we will work to resolve the issue. You may send photos of any dead fish to

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