Let s calculate the carbon

Save this PDF as:
 WORD  PNG  TXT  JPG

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "Let s calculate the carbon"

Transcription

1 UNIT 2 / ACTIvITy 4 Let s calculate the carbon in a tree LEarning outcomes Learners will have/be able to: Explain/draw in simple terms the carbon cycle, using key terms explaining the processes Explain why trees are part of the solution to the harmful effects of climate change Show how to measure the circumference of a tree trunk. Ask the children to do this three times and then take an average. Explain why more than one measurement was taken use the numbers and tables to work out further information, making use of multiplication and division, as well as explaining 50% as a fraction Contribute to a small group task, and draw conclusions about group dynamics. Forestry scientists agree that trees are very important in providing a solution to the harmful effects of climate change. Trees are environmentally friendly, efficient, reliable and cheap. They offer an easy way to remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and they store carbon away for long periods. using this simple conversion chart can help develop various numeracy and measuring skills. outdoor space With lots of trees to measure the larger the better, at least 1 tree per group 30 metre tape measure or pieces of string and a metre stick/metre wheel per group Calculator and laminated copy of chart 2.4A Carbon Calculator 1 of each per group 2.4B How trees photosynthesize 1kg packet of sugar Clipboard, paper & pencil 1 per group Flipchart sheets and marker pens 1 2 per group you WiLL need SourCES & FurTHEr inspiration Forestry Commission Scotland Forests and climate change: a convenient truth (15 minute film) preparatory activity Ask everyone if they are familiar with the idea of recycling what kinds of things do they recycle at home/school. Why do we do this? Recycling is in fact it is a fundamental process of life. We are going to investigate the carbon cycle and find out how it works, and what part people play. Set up an area of wall in the classroom with a banner titled the building materials of life must be used over and over again and carbon cycle. Give each group the task of doing an internet search to find a simple diagram of the carbon cycle. Google carbon cycle diagram. Collect the results which is the clearest diagram for them why? If they are too difficult to understand can we design our own? End result a large diagram of the carbon cycle on the wall. Now we are going to see how much carbon trees can store! preparatory activity 52

2 TEaCHEr resource FoRESTS FoR THE FuTuRE VIDEo 002 MiSSion possible CARBoN SToRAGE Activity 4 2 unit Everyone outdoors sitting by some trees. Some children love facts try the class with some key carbon cycle facts: Carbon exists in the earth s atmosphere mainly as carbon dioxide, but as a very small proportion (less than 0.05%). other gases containing carbon in the atmosphere are methane (CH natural)) and chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs all manmade) Carbon is an essential building block of life about half/50% of the dry weight of most living organisms is carbon. Forests store 86% of the planet s above-ground (as opposed to in the oceans) carbon, and 73% of the planet s soil carbon Trees can store carbon in their trunk, roots and leaves, and use it to manufacture their food as carbohydrates (a.k.a. sugars), in this way they can help us to reduce the greenhouse effect, and climate change. Scientists over the years have found ways to provide us with this information the percentages how do they do it? Most of it requires a lot of international co-operation and expensive equipment. Explain that today they can become scientists too, because we have developed a quick, cheap carbon calculator, which allows us to get a rough measure of the amount of carbon stored in these trees here it is! Wave a copy of the conversion table. Give a laminated copy to each group. Trees take in carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and store it as carbon in their trunks, roots and leaves. Approximately half of the dry weight of a tree is carbon. This means that trees are a carbon store, and can help us to reduce climate change. Follow the steps below to calculate the amount of carbon stored in a tree in your school grounds/local woodland Ask the children to read the carbon calculator conversion chart. What are the headings? Do they understand them? If not, explain. How are they going to measure the dry weight of the tree? They need to find out the circumference but where are they going to measure the circumference? Does it matter? use the diagram to explain chest height circumference give the tree a big hug! Demonstrate how to measure on a tree. Is once enough? How many times? Exactly the same way/place each time? What do they do with the measurement record it on a table. Each group collects a tape/piece of string and a metre stick, organizes who is doing what, selects a tree/s and gets measuring. Ask them to calculate the average circumference they measured for their tree/s. Then they should follow the instructions on their conversion table. use the nearest value in the table to the one they have calculated. Calculate the dry weight and carbon stored in the tree. How will this carbon finally be released from the tree? By respiration, chopping down and burning, rotting or decomposing. Trees can live for over a thousand years! The circumference of a tree is 150cm. Looking at the table this means its dry weight is about 1964kg. Dividing this by 2 tells us that the tree is storing 982kg of carbon. Multiplying this figure by the constant 3.67 tells us that the tree has absorbed 3604kg of carbon dioxide throughout its lifetime. Get each group to add up how many kilograms of carbon in their tree/s how many 1 kg packets of sugar would you need to pile up to represent this? Talk about the best way to represent their findings on the display wall, and do it back in the classroom. Collect all the equipment. Before leaving, join together in a sharing circle and ask the children what they have learned from this activity. What surprised them and what did they enjoy? What do they know now about trees and the carbon cycle, and what do they think about working in a group? ExaMpLE

3 UNIT 2 / ACTIvITy 4 2.4A Carbon calculator SupporT MaTEriaL Instructions for measuring the tree and carbon stored 1 Measure the circumference of the tree at the standard chest height (1.3m) with a tape measure. Record the result in centimetres. Repeat at least 3 times, at the same height, and calculate the average measure. 2 When you ve got your average circumference, look at the table to convert this to dry weight. use the nearest value in the table to your value. 3 Because half the dry weight of the tree is carbon, you then need to divide your answer by 2. This tells you how much carbon is stored in the tree. 4 You can also calculate how much carbon dioxide was absorbed to create this carbon store, by multiplying your figure for carbon by m Circumference (cm) Tree dry weight (kg) , , , , , , , , ,674 These values, provided by Forest Research, are for an individual hardwood tree in Westonbirt Arboretum. They can be used as an example. Trees will grow at different rates across the uk depending on, for example, the species, soil, drainage, slope aspect and climate conditions. 54

4 2.4B How trees photosynthesize UNIT 2 / ACTIvITy 4 SupporT MaTEriaL photosynthesis photo = light synthesis = combining elements Plants (including trees) make their own food through photosynthesis. This takes place in the leaves. Leaves capture energy from the sun and use it to combine carbon dioxide from the air and water from the soil to make sugars and oxygen. This oxygen is released into the atmosphere and is what makes the Earth habitable for humans and other animals. It is thanks to photosynthesis that we are able to breathe. The carbon dioxide remains stored in the tree or plant as carbon (in the form of sugars) throughout the lifetime of the tree. It has effectively been removed from the atmosphere. 55

5 UNIT 2 / ACTIvITy 4 additional information The tree solution additional information Trees are useful to us and to the planet as a carbon store, but they are also good for the environment in other ways. They help us to adapt to changes in the climate. Flood management system Trees help to slow down rainwater and prevent flooding in towns and cities. They also help to slow down floodwaters when they are planted on a floodplain as floodplain woodland. Trees also take up water through their roots, reducing runoff into rivers and streams. Self anchoring dynamic foundations Trees have their own root systems which they use to anchor themselves in place. The roots are another part of the tree where carbon is stored. The roots also help to stabilise soil, protecting it from erosion, as well as helping to slow down rainwater through the soil. rainwater decelerator This means that trees help to slow down rainwater the water gets caught in their branches and leaves rather than hitting soil or tarmac immediately this reduces flooding. Have you ever walked through a woodland on a wet day? You are much less likely to get soaked through than if you were standing out in the open. air freshening unit During photosynthesis trees take in carbon dioxide and release oxygen. This means that we are able to breathe. They can also help to remove pollutants from the air in towns and cities. Carbon store Trees absorb carbon dioxide from the atmosphere during photosynthesis. This is stored in their leaves, branches, trunks and roots as carbon, making them a carbon store. Wind deflector and buffering unit As well as helping to slow down floodwater, trees also slow down wind and help to protect us, providing shelter. 56

6 TEaCHEr resource FoRESTS FoR THE FuTuRE Wildlife habitat They also offer shelter for animals, helping animals move around green areas in cities to places where the climate might be more suitable. Soil stabilisation Tree roots help to stabilise soil, meaning that it is not washed away by rainwater. This can help to prevent rivers becoming silted up with lots of soil another way in which trees help to prevent flooding. additional information 2 unit Timber manufacturing plant Food production and self regeneration system Trees can be used to produce wood or timber to make things with, like houses or furniture. Again, as long as the woodlands which the timber comes from are managed sustainably, and more trees are planted to replace those cut down, this can be a climate friendly alternative to using materials like concrete or steel. The wooden building or piece of furniture will go on storing carbon throughout its lifetime, and new trees that grow in place of those cut down will absorb yet more carbon dioxide from the atmosphere especially deciduous trees in the spring growth spurt. Wooden products also take much less energy to produce than things made of concrete or steel. Different types of tree provide different types of food and other useful products that we can eat or use for example, various types of fruit and nut come from trees, chewing gum, cork, latex and rubber used in balloons and shoes all come from trees. Some types of woodland management such as coppicing, take advantage of the ability of trees to regenerate. When hazel is coppiced for example, shoots are cut close to the ground and used to make things with. These shoots quickly regenerate, and produce more wood which can be cut in a continual cycle. At Westonbirt Arboretum the oldest tree is in fact a 2000-year-old coppiced lime. Fuel production units Trees can be used to produce wood fuel. As long as the woodlands that the trees come from are managed sustainably, and more trees are planted to replace those cut down, using more of this type of fuel can be good for our climate. Any carbon dioxide that is released through burning the wood, is absorbed by the new trees. Cooling zone Trees release water into the atmosphere through transpiration. The water is evaporated from the leaves into the air, helping to cool the air down. Trees planted in towns and cities can help to cool down the air, which is often warmer than the surrounding countryside. Trees also provide shade for people, plants and animals. 57

How is carbon stored in trees and wood products?

How is carbon stored in trees and wood products? How is carbon stored in trees and wood products? Science S Theory Lesson Lesson information Level: Junior secondary school Year 10 Duration: Summary: Approximately 3 lessons Sustainably managed forests

More information

Rainforest Concern Module 2 Why do we need rainforests?

Rainforest Concern Module 2 Why do we need rainforests? Rainforest Concern Module 2 Why do we need rainforests? Rainforest Concern Module 2: Why do we need Rainforest? Before we go any further, there are some words you may not understand, and these words and

More information

Cycles of Matter. Chapter 13- Lesson 3

Cycles of Matter. Chapter 13- Lesson 3 Cycles of Matter Chapter 13- Lesson 3 What processes are involved in the water cycle? Matter in an ecosystem includes water, carbon, oxygen, nitrogen, and many other substances. The water cycle is the

More information

National 5. Unit 3. Life on earth. Ink exercise 1. Biodiversity and the distribution of life.

National 5. Unit 3. Life on earth. Ink exercise 1. Biodiversity and the distribution of life. National 5 Unit 3 Life on earth Ink exercise 1 Biodiversity and the distribution of life. Once completed and marked- Think about and list below the areas I need to work on: Multiple choice Tick one answer

More information

Language Arts Standard 8: Use listening and speaking strategies for different purposes.

Language Arts Standard 8: Use listening and speaking strategies for different purposes. Page1 Title: The Great Kapok Tree Time 60 70 Minutes Subjects: Science, Social Studies, Language Arts Objectives Listen to gain knowledge and share information and perform a task (relating to problems

More information

Students will describe the carbon cycle and the journey a carbon atom might take on its way through this cycle after participating in a simulation.

Students will describe the carbon cycle and the journey a carbon atom might take on its way through this cycle after participating in a simulation. Pre-Visit Activity #3 The Carbon Cycle Overview Objectives Subjects Earth has a fixed number of carbon atoms which circulate among air, plants, animals, soil, and minerals by way of the carbon cycle. This

More information

Unit 2 Lesson 3 Energy and Matter in Ecosystems. Copyright Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company

Unit 2 Lesson 3 Energy and Matter in Ecosystems. Copyright Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company Soak Up the Sun How do organisms get energy and matter? Energy is the ability to do work. Matter is anything that has mass and takes up space. All organisms need energy and matter to live, grow, and reproduce.

More information

Introduction to the Carbon Cycle

Introduction to the Carbon Cycle Introduction to the Carbon Cycle Levels V-VI Overview: Students will learn about the carbon cycle and how carbon dioxide enters the atmosphere. (Note: In this lesson students are introduced to the carbon

More information

A Guide to Woodland Carbon for Business

A Guide to Woodland Carbon for Business A Guide to Woodland Carbon for Business Contents: 1. Investing in Woodland Carbon: an overview 2. Why Woodland Carbon? 3. How much does it cost? 4. Woodland Carbon Code 5. Woodland Carbon compliance 6.

More information

Commensalism is a symbiotic relationship in which one organism benefits and the other organism is not affected.. What they might ask:

Commensalism is a symbiotic relationship in which one organism benefits and the other organism is not affected.. What they might ask: B-6.1 Explain how the interrelationships among organisms (including predation, competition, parasitism, mutualism, and commensalism) generate stability within ecosystems. ecosystem - biotic community (all

More information

Forests and forestry in New South Wales

Forests and forestry in New South Wales APRIL 2008 Primefact 687 Forests and forestry in New South Wales Forests NSW Community Programs Here are answers to questions often asked about forestry and forest management. Why do we need forests? Forests

More information

FACTS ABOUT CLIMATE CHANGE

FACTS ABOUT CLIMATE CHANGE FACTS ABOUT CLIMATE CHANGE 1. What is climate change? Climate change is a long-term shift in the climate of a specific location, region or planet. The shift is measured by changes in features associated

More information

The Greenhouse Effect

The Greenhouse Effect The Greenhouse Effect The Sun, which is the Earth's only external form of heat, emits solar radiation mainly in the form of visible and ultraviolet (UV) radiation. As this radiation travels toward the

More information

The weather effects everyday life. On a daily basis it can affect choices we make about whether to walk or take the car, what clothes we wear and

The weather effects everyday life. On a daily basis it can affect choices we make about whether to walk or take the car, what clothes we wear and Weather can have a big impact on our day-to-day lives. On longer timescales, climate influences where and how people live and the lifecycles of plants and animals. Evidence shows us that our climate is

More information

Worksheet A Environmental Problems

Worksheet A Environmental Problems Worksheet A Environmental Problems Vocabulary Can you talk about Environmental issues in English? With a partner, try to explain the terms in the diagram below. Why are the words divided into two groups

More information

Journey through the rainforest

Journey through the rainforest Journey through the rainforest by Etruscan Primary School Contents What is a rainforest? Rainforests of the world Why are rainforests important? Rainforest wildlife This book was made by the pupils in

More information

Greenhouse Gas Tag. background: Objectives: vocabulary: TEACHING CLIMATE CHANGE THROUGH NATIONAL PARKS

Greenhouse Gas Tag. background: Objectives: vocabulary: TEACHING CLIMATE CHANGE THROUGH NATIONAL PARKS Grade Level: 4th grade and up Activity Time: 30 60 min. Subject Area: Science-Climate Change Objectives: Students will: Understand the greenhouse effect. Understand the role greenhouse gases play within

More information

Grade 7. Objective. Students will be able to:

Grade 7. Objective. Students will be able to: Grade 7 Objective Students will be able to: Describe the carbon cycle in more detail: o Learn about the importance of carbon and the role it plays in photosynthesis and cellular respiration, Identify elements

More information

Which of the following can be determined based on this model? The atmosphere is the only reservoir on Earth that can store carbon in any form. A.

Which of the following can be determined based on this model? The atmosphere is the only reservoir on Earth that can store carbon in any form. A. Earth s Cycles 1. Models are often used to explain scientific knowledge or experimental results. A model of the carbon cycle is shown below. Which of the following can be determined based on this model?

More information

Rain Forests. To Do. The Greenhouse Effect. Q Name one country in each of these continents where rain forests occur.

Rain Forests. To Do. The Greenhouse Effect. Q Name one country in each of these continents where rain forests occur. Rain Forests Trees are not just important as homes for wildlife. Forests are also very important to this whole planet. The most important area of forest in the world is the tropical rain forest. Rain Forests

More information

Summary A variety of objects provide students with metaphors for why climate change is occurring and the impacts resulting from it.

Summary A variety of objects provide students with metaphors for why climate change is occurring and the impacts resulting from it. * What do a car, a rock and a thermometer have in common? Put your hand into the mystery bag to unravel the clues to some unexpected connections. Activity Time: 30 minutes Setting: Any Materials: Grab

More information

Creating Futures. For more resources visit Lesson 2. Carbon, fossil fuels and the greenhouse effect

Creating Futures. For more resources visit  Lesson 2. Carbon, fossil fuels and the greenhouse effect Creating Futures For more resources visit www.trocaire.org/creating-futures Lesson 2 Carbon, fossil fuels and the greenhouse effect Creating Futures / Lesson 2 Carbon, fossil fuels and the greenhouse effect

More information

CARBON THROUGH THE SEASONS

CARBON THROUGH THE SEASONS DESCRIPTION In this lesson plan, students learn about the carbon cycle and understand how concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) in the Earth s atmosphere vary as the seasons change. Students also learn

More information

ATMOSPHERE COMPOSITION AND STRUCTURE

ATMOSPHERE COMPOSITION AND STRUCTURE MODULE - 4 Atmosphere Composition and Structure 9 ATMOSPHERE COMPOSITION AND STRUCTURE Earth is a unique planet because the life is found only on this planet. The air has a special place among the conditions

More information

Our American Trees by Robert C. Birkby

Our American Trees by Robert C. Birkby North arolina Testing Program Our merican Trees by Robert. irkby The largest and oldest living things on earth are trees. Over a thousand kinds grow in the United States, and thousands more flourish in

More information

NZ WOOD Our Endlessly Renewable Environmentally Friendly Resource

NZ WOOD Our Endlessly Renewable Environmentally Friendly Resource NZ WOOD Our Endlessly Renewable Environmentally Friendly Resource Cross curricular activities and investigations brought to you by www.woodcareers.co.nz www.nzwood.co.nz Session Index Curriculum Areas...1

More information

water cycle (hydrologic cycle) precipitation infiltrate runoff evapotranspiration Infiltration

water cycle (hydrologic cycle) precipitation infiltrate runoff evapotranspiration Infiltration Regents Earth Science Unit 8 Climate Water Cycle Most of Earth s water was created by volcanic out-gassing when the Earth formed and by impacts by comets early in Earth s history this water has remained

More information

Measuring Carbon Sequestration in Schoolyard Trees and Global Sustainability of Carbon Stores

Measuring Carbon Sequestration in Schoolyard Trees and Global Sustainability of Carbon Stores Measuring Carbon Sequestration in Schoolyard Trees and Global Sustainability of Carbon Stores Five Day Lesson Plans for Future Fuels from Forests Teacher Institute 2009 Denise Payment Tahquamenon Area

More information

Plant Parts. Background Information

Plant Parts. Background Information Purpose The purpose of this lesson is for students to learn the six basic plant parts and their functions. Time Teacher Preparation: 30 minutes Student Activity: 60 minutes Materials For the teacher demonstration:

More information

Overview. Suggested Lesson Please see the Greenlinks Module description.

Overview. Suggested Lesson Please see the Greenlinks Module description. Overview Plants interact with their environment in many ways that we cannot see. Children often enjoy learning about these hidden secrets of plant life. In this lesson, children will learn about role of

More information

of relationships that exist are parasitic relationships and mutualistic relationships.

of relationships that exist are parasitic relationships and mutualistic relationships. Ecology Escapade: Pre-/Post-Visit Activities Teacher Guide Thank you for registering for the Ecology Escapade Workshop at the Everett Children s Adventure Garden. During this workshop, your students will

More information

Sustaining Ecosystems: Deforestation, Biodiversity, & Forest Management

Sustaining Ecosystems: Deforestation, Biodiversity, & Forest Management Sustaining Ecosystems: Deforestation, Biodiversity, & Forest Management tutorial by Paul Rich 1. Forests Types & Importance Outline 2. Temperate Deforestation old growth forest, U.S. & Canada 3. Tropical

More information

4th GRADE MINIMUM CONTENTS-NATURAL SCIENCE UNIT 11: PLANTS

4th GRADE MINIMUM CONTENTS-NATURAL SCIENCE UNIT 11: PLANTS PLANT BITS 4th GRADE MINIMUM CONTENTS-NATURAL SCIENCE UNIT 11: PLANTS There are four main parts to a plant. They are the root, stem, leaf and flower. Each part has an important task to do in the life of

More information

2. What kind of energy is stored in food? A. chemical energy B. heat energy C. kinetic energy D. light energy

2. What kind of energy is stored in food? A. chemical energy B. heat energy C. kinetic energy D. light energy Assessment Bank Matter and Energy in Living Things SC.8.L.18.4 1. What is energy? A. anything that takes up space B. anything that has mass C. the ability to conduct current D. the ability to do work 2.

More information

Climate Change and Biomes

Climate Change and Biomes Climate Change and Biomes Key Concepts: Greenhouse Gas WHAT YOU WILL LEARN Biome Climate zone Greenhouse gases 1. You will learn the difference between weather and climate. 2. You will analyze the effect

More information

Name: Verbal Reasoning. Science. Revision Guide. Sue Hunter AN HACHETTE UK COMPANY

Name: Verbal Reasoning. Science. Revision Guide. Sue Hunter AN HACHETTE UK COMPANY Name: Verbal Reasoning Science Revision Guide Sue Hunter AN HACHETTE UK COMPANY Contents and progress record Use this page to plot your revision. Colour in the boxes when you feel confident with the skill

More information

NUTRIENT CYCLES (How are nutrients recycled through ecosystems?)

NUTRIENT CYCLES (How are nutrients recycled through ecosystems?) NUTRIENT CYCLES (How are nutrients recycled through ecosystems?) Why? We have learned the importance of recycling our trash. It allows us to use something again for another purpose and prevents the loss

More information

4th Grade. Human Energy Use. Slide 1 / 73 Slide 2 / 73. Slide 3 / 73. Slide 4 / 73. Slide 6 / 73. Slide 5 / 73. Energy and Natural Resources

4th Grade. Human Energy Use. Slide 1 / 73 Slide 2 / 73. Slide 3 / 73. Slide 4 / 73. Slide 6 / 73. Slide 5 / 73. Energy and Natural Resources Slide 1 / 73 Slide 2 / 73 4th Grade Energy and Natural Resources 2015-11-18 www.njctl.org Slide 3 / 73 Slide 4 / 73 Energy and Natural Resources Human Energy Use Renewable Energy Non-Renewable Energy Environmental

More information

Materials Needed: Choose one of the following methods depending on how familiar your students are with the internet and how to use it.

Materials Needed: Choose one of the following methods depending on how familiar your students are with the internet and how to use it. Teacher Information Lesson Title: Global Warming, Green House Effect and Climate Changes Lesson Description: This lesson helps students to understand or review their understanding of global warming, the

More information

Grow your own Tomatoes

Grow your own Tomatoes Key Stage 2 Worksheet 1a Growing plants Curriculum coverage: QCA Science: Unit 1B Which parts of the plant are the leaves, stem, fruit, flower and root? Name their parts by writing your answers in the

More information

Supported by. A seven part series exploring the fantastic world of science.

Supported by. A seven part series exploring the fantastic world of science. Supported by A seven part series exploring the fantastic world of science. Find out about different climates in different parts of the World. The only animal capable of surviving the harsh conditions in

More information

Ecosystem Ecology. Community interacts with abiotic factors. Objectives

Ecosystem Ecology. Community interacts with abiotic factors. Objectives Ecosystem Ecology Community interacts with abiotic factors Objectives Compare the processes of energy flow and chemical cycling as they relate to ecosystem dynamics. Define and list examples of producers,

More information

GCSE Geography. Living World - Past Papers

GCSE Geography. Living World - Past Papers GCSE Geography Living World - Past Papers Short / Data: estions & wers Linked Ideas: estions & wers Paragraph / Extended: estions & wers Short / Data Response estions GCSE Geography Living World Old (a

More information

Sustainable Living Student Worksheets

Sustainable Living Student Worksheets Sustainable Living Student Worksheets Stage 4 Design & Technology FW4DT1 Name: Introduction Renewable Versus Non-renewable Energy The Sun is a Primary Source of Energy Almost all the energy needed to keep

More information

Climate Change: A Theme to Teach Across the Science Disciplines

Climate Change: A Theme to Teach Across the Science Disciplines Climate Change: A Theme to Teach Across the Science Disciplines Sunshine State Stards & Benchmarks that Help Students Underst Climate Change K-2 Compare describe changing patterns in nature that repeat

More information

Objectives. Key Terms

Objectives. Key Terms Objectives Summarize the basic pattern of chemical cycling. Describe how carbon and oxygen are cycled through an ecosystem. Describe the movement of nitrogen through an ecosystem. Describe the processes

More information

Taking the Classroom Outside By Ashley Schopieray

Taking the Classroom Outside By Ashley Schopieray Taking the Classroom Outside By Ashley Schopieray Background Introduction If you had the choice to spend the day outside or go to school and sit inside all day, which would you choose? Spending time outdoors

More information

Greenhouse Effect Laboratory Teacher Guide

Greenhouse Effect Laboratory Teacher Guide Greenhouse Effect Laboratory Teacher Guide Greenhouse Effect Laboratory Teacher Guide Driving Question: What impact does the greenhouse effect have on atmospheric temperature? In this activity your students

More information

Ecology Pre-Test (High School)

Ecology Pre-Test (High School) Ecology Pre-Test (High School) Science is easier to understand if you can make connections between what you know now and the new ideas that you are studying. This is a test that will help us to understand

More information

Lungs of the Planet. 1. Based on the equations above, describe how the processes of photosynthesis and cellular respiration relate to each other.

Lungs of the Planet. 1. Based on the equations above, describe how the processes of photosynthesis and cellular respiration relate to each other. Lungs of the Planet Name: Date: Why do people call rain forests the lungs of the planet? Usually it is because people think that the rain forests produce most of the oxygen we breathe. But do they? To

More information

Beech. Oak. Ash. Sycamore. Copper Beech. Birch THE TREE TRAIL. Willow

Beech. Oak. Ash. Sycamore. Copper Beech. Birch THE TREE TRAIL. Willow 12 Beech Ash Oak Sycamore Copper Beech Birch Poplar Willow Alder THE TREE TRAIL 2 11 The start of the trail PLEASE REMEMBER TO WATCH OUT FOR TRAFFIC WHEN WALKING ON ALL ROADS Stand outside the Palace gift

More information

Science of Life Explorations

Science of Life Explorations Science of Life Explorations Erosion and Soil Quality: Prevent Erosion We know that soil is important to us. Healthy soil provides us with healthy plants. Soil is part of the ECOSYSTEM because so much

More information

Biome= A large ecosystem (plant and animal community) covering a large amount of the earth s surface.

Biome= A large ecosystem (plant and animal community) covering a large amount of the earth s surface. Topic 3: Battle for the Biosphere What is the value of the biosphere? Define the terms eco-system and biome, and map the distribution of major biomes across the planet. See map above for biome distribution.

More information

Green From The Start

Green From The Start PACKING EXPOSURE 75 sq. ft. (7.0 m 2) R Our Blue Label... 1963,1998, 2002 007 CERTI-SPLIT Handsplit Red Cedar Shakes CEDAR SHAKE & SHINGLE BUREAU THE RECOGNIZED AUTHORITY SINCE 1915 SUMAS, WASHINGTON (604)

More information

Consider How can you collect solar energy for use in your school? What are other alternatives?

Consider How can you collect solar energy for use in your school? What are other alternatives? 5 a 5 Energy Sources a - Energy from the sun Purpose To explore sourcing our energy from the sun Key concepts Solar energy is a natural and renewable resource Heat energy from the sun can be used to heat

More information

THE PLANT KINGDOM: THE WATER CYCLE

THE PLANT KINGDOM: THE WATER CYCLE THE PLANT KINGDOM: THE WATER CYCLE Material: The Water Cycle Nomenclature The Water cycle Model Water Ice Heat Source (lamp with a clamp) Tables Presentation 1: Key Experience 1. Say, Today we are going

More information

Today, we re going to tackle your GUM U7, L2 & L3 Cause and Effect Essay! Chat me your best sentence using the word conscientious.

Today, we re going to tackle your GUM U7, L2 & L3 Cause and Effect Essay! Chat me your best sentence using the word conscientious. Good Morning Conscientious 7 th Graders! Today, we re going to tackle your GUM U7, L2 & L3 Cause and Effect Essay! Chat me your best sentence using the word conscientious. Rainforest Destruction: Causes

More information

Global Warming Is it manmade or natural?

Global Warming Is it manmade or natural? Global Warming Is it manmade or natural? By Kirsty Carruthers 1B3 1X3 Contents Introduction to Global Warming 2 What is Global Warming? 3 The background to Global Warming 3 Global Warming It is natural

More information

GETTING TO THE CORE: THE LINK BETWEEN TEMPERATURE AND CARBON DIOXIDE

GETTING TO THE CORE: THE LINK BETWEEN TEMPERATURE AND CARBON DIOXIDE DESCRIPTION This lesson plan gives students first-hand experience in analyzing the link between atmospheric temperatures and carbon dioxide ( ) s by looking at ice core data spanning hundreds of thousands

More information

Chapter 5 The Roles of Organisms in an Ecosystem 5.1: The Roles of Organisms in an Ecosystems

Chapter 5 The Roles of Organisms in an Ecosystem 5.1: The Roles of Organisms in an Ecosystems Chapter 5 The Roles of Organisms in an Ecosystem 5.1: The Roles of Organisms in an Ecosystems photosynthesis a process by which plants use water, carbon dioxide, and sunlight to produce sugars (food) Types

More information

Lesson 6. BioMara gratefully acknowledges the following funders: Content Section - How Algae can be used to produce Biofuel.

Lesson 6. BioMara gratefully acknowledges the following funders: Content Section - How Algae can be used to produce Biofuel. Lesson 6 Content Section - How Algae can be used to produce Biofuel. From lesson 5 you have discovered that there are many uses for algae. You also have discovered that algae can be used to produce biofuels.

More information

FIELD ENHANCEMENT 3. Forest Energy Scavenger Hunt NUTSHELL OBJECTIVES BACKGROUND INFORMATION SUBJECT AREAS LESSON/ACTIVITY TIME TEACHING SITE

FIELD ENHANCEMENT 3. Forest Energy Scavenger Hunt NUTSHELL OBJECTIVES BACKGROUND INFORMATION SUBJECT AREAS LESSON/ACTIVITY TIME TEACHING SITE FIELD ENHANCEMENT 3 Forest Energy Scavenger Hunt OBJECTIVES Upon completion of this lesson, students will be able to: Classify organisms as producers, consumers, and decomposers. Explain that energy flows

More information

The Polar Climate Zones

The Polar Climate Zones The Polar Climate Zones How cold is it in the polar climate? Polar areas are the coldest of all the major climate zones The Sun is hardly ever high enough in the sky to cause the plentiful ice to melt,

More information

2.5: Energy Flow in Ecosystems pg. 38. Radiant Energy: energy that travels through empty space.

2.5: Energy Flow in Ecosystems pg. 38. Radiant Energy: energy that travels through empty space. 2.5: Energy Flow in Ecosystems pg. 38 Radiant Energy: energy that travels through empty space. Producer: an organism that makes its own energy-rich food using the Sun s energy. Photosynthesis: the process

More information

Carbon/Oxygen Cycle. Zain Aamer, Christine Pak, Lorrin Stone, Vivian Xu

Carbon/Oxygen Cycle. Zain Aamer, Christine Pak, Lorrin Stone, Vivian Xu Carbon/Oxygen Cycle Zain Aamer, Christine Pak, Lorrin Stone, Vivian Xu Step One - Carbon Dioxide Carbon is released into the atmosphere through the form of carbon dioxide due to combustion and respiration

More information

Watershed Connections

Watershed Connections Watershed Connections Learning about watersheds in the Portland Metro area What is a Watershed? A watershed is an area of land where all the rain and snow drains into a Watershed Boundary Headwaters common

More information

Weather and climate. reflect. what do you think? look out!

Weather and climate. reflect. what do you think? look out! reflect You re going on vacation in a week and you have to start thinking about what clothes you re going to pack for your trip. You ve read the weather reports for your vacation spot, but you know that

More information

Chapter 3 How Ecosystems Work. You could cover the whole world with asphalt, but sooner or later green grass would break through.

Chapter 3 How Ecosystems Work. You could cover the whole world with asphalt, but sooner or later green grass would break through. Chapter 3 How Ecosystems Work You could cover the whole world with asphalt, but sooner or later green grass would break through. Ilya Ehrenburg Energy Flow in Ecosystems For most living organisms the sun

More information

MERTON COUNCIL PUTTING YOU FIRST.

MERTON COUNCIL PUTTING YOU FIRST. MERTON COUNCIL PUTTING YOU FIRST www.merton.gov.uk Your impact on climate change The change in our climate is happening as a result of the way we all live. To beat it we must all work together. Making

More information

Understanding weather and climate

Understanding weather and climate Understanding weather and climate Weather can have a big impact on our day-to-day lives. On longer timescales, climate influences where and how people live and the lifecycles of plants and animals. Evidence

More information

5.1 Ecosystems, Energy, and Nutrients

5.1 Ecosystems, Energy, and Nutrients CHAPTER 5 ECOSYSTEMS 5.1 Ecosystems, Energy, and Nutrients Did anyone ever ask you the question: Where do you get your energy? Energy enters our world from the Sun but how does the Sun s energy become

More information

Land Plants and Algae

Land Plants and Algae Science Unit: Lesson 9: Plants Land Plants and Algae School year: 2008/2009 Developed for: Developed by: Grade level: Duration of lesson: David Lloyd George Elementary School, Vancouver School District

More information

CAVOC 6 th Grade Fall Curriculum- Poet-Tree (Cedric A. Vig Outdoor Classroom)

CAVOC 6 th Grade Fall Curriculum- Poet-Tree (Cedric A. Vig Outdoor Classroom) CAVOC 6 th Grade Fall Curriculum- Poet-Tree (Cedric A. Vig Outdoor Classroom) Suggested Schedule- 7:50 Homerooms 7:55 Report to Commons, check in, board bus 8:10 Arrive at CAVOC 8:15 Orientation & Large

More information

What is ecology? Ecology basic concepts. Energy flow in ecosystems. We use the energy that plants capture from the sun

What is ecology? Ecology basic concepts. Energy flow in ecosystems. We use the energy that plants capture from the sun What is ecology? The study of how organisms adapt to The environment Other organisms Ecology basic concepts Energy flow Trophic (feeding) relationships Global climate change Energy flow in ecosystems We

More information

Unit 3 Seasonal Cycles

Unit 3 Seasonal Cycles Unit 3 Seasonal Cycles Before discussing seasons, it is necessary to understand how the Earth spins and moves, because the Earth s movement is what determines seasons around the world. The movement of

More information

BASIC BOTANY ACTIVITIES:

BASIC BOTANY ACTIVITIES: BASIC BOTANY This lesson reviews basic concepts about plants (importance of plants, parts of plants, functions of plants). Students explore the concepts of photosynthesis and the oxygen/carbon dioxide

More information

Weather and Climate. What is weather? What are some characteristics of weather? When we talk about weather, we mean the daily conditions in the

Weather and Climate. What is weather? What are some characteristics of weather? When we talk about weather, we mean the daily conditions in the Weather and Climate You re going on vacation in a week and you have to start thinking about what clothes you re going to pack for your trip. You ve read the weather reports for your vacation spot, but

More information

Do-Now. 1.) Get out notebook.

Do-Now. 1.) Get out notebook. Do-Now 1.) Get out notebook. 2.) Answer the following questions on the first clean sheet in your notebook. 1.) What are renewable resources? 2.) What are nonrenewable resources? Alternative Sources of

More information

Understanding Basic Concepts demonstrate an awareness of air as a substance that surrounds us and takes up space, and whose movement we feel as wind

Understanding Basic Concepts demonstrate an awareness of air as a substance that surrounds us and takes up space, and whose movement we feel as wind Designation: Ontario Curriculum: Science and Technology Earth and Space Systems: Grade 2 Air and Water in the Environment Written by: Andrea Schultz-Allison, Department of Earth Sciences, The University

More information

i-tree LEARNING LAB Using i-tree in the Classroom Curriculum for High School Classrooms Spring 2009

i-tree LEARNING LAB Using i-tree in the Classroom Curriculum for High School Classrooms Spring 2009 i-tree LEARNING LAB Using i-tree in the Classroom beta ver.2.0 NSTA Web Seminar April 23, 2009 Carbon, Oxygen, Water and Sh ade: Putting a Price on the Benefits of Your Sc hool Yard Trees" Curriculum for

More information

mulching Action Sheet 34 So what is mulching?

mulching Action Sheet 34 So what is mulching? mulching Action Sheet 34 So what is mulching? nutrients release as leaves decompose leaf litter shallow roots take up Have you ever looked closely at a forest floor? It s covered in leaf litter - a nutrient-rich,

More information

Activity Title: The Carbon Cycle Game

Activity Title: The Carbon Cycle Game BEST OF COSEE HANDS-ON ACTIVITIES Activity Title: The Carbon Cycle Game Learning Objectives Students will take on the role of a carbon atom and record which reservoirs in the carbon cycle they visit. They

More information

Dinosaur Extinction Theories. Student Packet

Dinosaur Extinction Theories. Student Packet Dinosaur Extinction Theories Student Packet 1 Dinosaur Extinction Theories Introduction Why did the dinosaurs become extinct? What happened over 65 million years ago to kill a species that had survived

More information

Sustainable Energy Sources By: Sue Peterson

Sustainable Energy Sources By: Sue Peterson www.k5learning.com Objective sight words (consumption, terrain, integral, orbit, originated, contemporary, remote); concepts (sustainable, renewable, photovoltaics, gasification) Vocabulary consumption

More information

Ecosystems One or more communities in an area and the abiotic factors, including water, sunlight, oxygen, temperature, and soil.

Ecosystems One or more communities in an area and the abiotic factors, including water, sunlight, oxygen, temperature, and soil. 7-4.1 Summarize the characteristics of the levels of organization within ecosystems (including populations, communities, habitats, niches, and biomes). Taxonomy level: 2.4-B Understand Conceptual Knowledge

More information

The big picture of Carbon in a forest community By Dale Moore, Engadine Consolidated Schools

The big picture of Carbon in a forest community By Dale Moore, Engadine Consolidated Schools The big picture of Carbon in a forest community By Dale Moore, Engadine Consolidated Schools Target Grade: 11 th grade Environmental Science Class Subject: Forestry Unit Overview: The carbon cycle is a

More information

Waste timeline activity

Waste timeline activity Waste timeline activity Background information In New Zealand, all of the rubbish we create is buried in landfills. This is a problem because we don t have enough existing landfills to cope with the increasing

More information

Ecology Review Questions

Ecology Review Questions 1. The food chain above shows (A) one autotroph and two heterotrophs (B) one producer, one autotroph, and one decomposer (C) one producer and two omnivores (D) one heterotroph and two autotrophs 2. Assume

More information

EARTH SCIENCE CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK GRADES K 12 WCCUSD/UCMP EARTH AS A SYSTEM

EARTH SCIENCE CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK GRADES K 12 WCCUSD/UCMP EARTH AS A SYSTEM EARTH AS A SYSTEM K-2 3-5 6-8 How is the Earth part of a larger system? The Earth is part of a bigger system called the Solar System. The Earth is part of the Solar System. The Earth is part of the Solar

More information

ATM S 111: Global Warming Greenhouse Gases. Jennifer Fletcher Day 4: June

ATM S 111: Global Warming Greenhouse Gases. Jennifer Fletcher Day 4: June ATM S 111: Global Warming Greenhouse Gases Jennifer Fletcher Day 4: June 24 2010 What are the Major Greenhouse Gases? Our atmosphere is mostly nitrogen (N 2, 78%), oxygen (O 2, 21%), and argon (Ar, 0.9%)

More information

Activity 1: 2 butter cartons, scissors, cling film, thermometer, water, a sunny spot and a shady spot.

Activity 1: 2 butter cartons, scissors, cling film, thermometer, water, a sunny spot and a shady spot. Equipment: Activity 1: 2 butter cartons, scissors, cling film, thermometer, water, a sunny spot and a shady spot. Activity 2: 3 thermometers, black paper, white paper Suggested Class Level: 3rd 6th Preparation:

More information

Forest Ecology Class Overview 4.A.2b 4.A.2c 4.A.3a 4.A.3c 4.A.3d 10.A.2a 10.A.2c, 10.A.3c 11.A.2b 11.A.2d 11.A.3f 12.A.2a 12.B.2a 12.B.2b 12.B.

Forest Ecology Class Overview 4.A.2b 4.A.2c 4.A.3a 4.A.3c 4.A.3d 10.A.2a 10.A.2c, 10.A.3c 11.A.2b 11.A.2d 11.A.3f 12.A.2a 12.B.2a 12.B.2b 12.B. Forest Ecology Class Overview 1. Introduction a. Ask the students to go around the circle and give their name and one thing they can find in the forest. b. What are some examples of living things in the

More information

This fact sheet provides an overview of options for managing solid

This fact sheet provides an overview of options for managing solid What Is Integrated Solid Waste Management? This fact sheet provides an overview of options for managing solid waste, identifies the important issues you should consider when planning for solid waste management,

More information

Kindergarten Science Units Life Science Plants and Animals

Kindergarten Science Units Life Science Plants and Animals Kindergarten Science Units Life Science Plants and Animals How do certain characteristics of plants and animals help them to survive? How do plants and animals change during their life cycles? How are

More information

Ecology - Exchange of energy and matter

Ecology - Exchange of energy and matter - Exchange of energy and matter You should be able to: (a) briefly describe the non-cyclical nature of energy flow (b) establish the relationship of the following in food webs: producer, consumer, herbivore,

More information

Life Science Plant Growth and Changes: Plant Life Cycle Science and Mathematics Education Research Group

Life Science Plant Growth and Changes: Plant Life Cycle Science and Mathematics Education Research Group a place of mind F A C U L T Y O F E D U C A T I O N Department of Curriculum and Pedagogy Life Science Plant Growth and Changes: Plant Life Cycle Science and Mathematics Education Research Group Supported

More information

What will happen when we completely run out? What are some alternatives to using these sources of energy?

What will happen when we completely run out? What are some alternatives to using these sources of energy? reflect Millions of years ago, certain plants and animals living on Earth died. Over time their bodies decayed and became part of the soil. The energy held in their bodies did not disappear, however. Over

More information

Manufacturing Energy A look at how people create and use energy. EDUCATIONAL IN NATURE page 1 of 7

Manufacturing Energy A look at how people create and use energy. EDUCATIONAL IN NATURE  page 1 of 7 Manufacturing Energy A look at how people create and use energy EDUCATIONAL IN NATURE page 1 of 7 Energy Energy is everywhere in nature in the light of the sun, in the wind, in the forest, in falling water

More information

Sustainable Design Student Worksheets Stage 4/5 Design & Technology FW45DT2. Name: FutureWorld 2015 FW45DT2

Sustainable Design Student Worksheets Stage 4/5 Design & Technology FW45DT2. Name: FutureWorld 2015 FW45DT2 Sustainable Design Student Worksheets Stage 4/5 Design & Technology FW45DT2 Name: Introduction Renewable Versus Non-renewable Energy The Sun is a Primary Source of Energy Almost all the energy needed to

More information

Energy Quiz. Questions:

Energy Quiz. Questions: Energy Quiz Want to have some fun and learn at the same time. This is not a test. You don t have to pass it and it won t give you a grade. It will just help you learn or find out how much you remember

More information