Q: Who established the law of universal gravitation? A: Newton. Q: What is a spring scale used for? A: To measure weight

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "Q: Who established the law of universal gravitation? A: Newton. Q: What is a spring scale used for? A: To measure weight"

Transcription

1 Q: Who established the law of universal gravitation? A: Newton Q: What is a spring scale used for? A: To measure weight Q: What is the Law of Universal Gravitation? A: Everything in the universe has gravity. Q: What is mass? A: Mass is the amount of matter in an object Q: What is weight? A: Weight is a measurement of the force of gravity on an object. Q: Why do astronauts on the moon seem to bounce around so effortlessly? A: The moon has 1/6 th the amount of gravity that the Earth has. Q: What two factors determine the amount of gravitational attraction between two objects? A: The mass of an object and the distance between two objects. Q: What will happen on Earth if you drop a hammer and a feather at the same time and from the same height? Why? A: The hammer will land first because air resistance has a larger affect on the feather causing it to slow down as it falls. Q: What will happen on the Moon if you drop a hammer and a feather at the same time and from the same height? Why? A: They will land at the same time. The moon doesn t have an atmosphere so neither object is affected by air resistance. Q: Would your weight be the same at the base of a mountain and at the top of the same mountain? Explain. A: At the top of the mountain you would weigh a little bit less than at the base of the same mountain. This is because at the top of the mountain you are farther away from the center of the Earth.

2 Q: How can we tell if an object is moving? A: Motion is always observable as a change in an object s position compared to objects that are still, or not moving. Q: How do you calculate speed? A: Distance divided by time Q: What is velocity? A: Velocity is the speed of an object in a particular direction. Q: True or False? Two objects traveling at the same velocity stay in the same position relative to each other. A: True Q: What happens to the velocity of an object moving in a circle, like a planet orbiting around a star? A: The velocity of an object moving in a circle is constantly changing, because the direction of the movement is constantly changing. Q: What changes an objects velocity? A: A force. Q: What are two factors that affect momentum? A: how much mass an object has and its velocity (how fast it is going and in what direction) Q: How is it possible for two objects traveling the same speed to have different velocities? A: they are traveling in different directions Q: How is it possible for two objects traveling in the same direction to have different velocities? A: the have different speeds Q: What is Newton s 1 st Law of Motion? A: An object at rest will remain at rest, and an object in motion will remain in motion in a straight line unless a force acts on the object.

3 Q: Objects tend to keep on doing what they are currently doing unless what acts on them to change this condition? A: A force Q: What do you call the resistance of an object to a change in motion? A: inertia. Remember even objects at rest have inertia. Q: What is the other name for Newton s 1 st Law of Motion? A: The Law of Inertia Q: What two forces often act on objects causing them to slow down and stop? A: gravity and friction Q: A substance that decreases friction is called a. A: lubricant (example: oil) Q: What property of objects makes them tend to resist a change in motion? A: Inertia Q: What is an unbalanced force? A: An unbalanced force is a force without an equal force in the opposite direction. Q: What changes when an unbalance force acts on an object? A: when an unbalanced force acts on an object, it changes the velocity of the object (its speed, its direction, or both). Q: What is acceleration? A: Acceleration is the rate of change in velocity of an object. Q: What two properties affect acceleration of an object? A: the size of the force and the mass of the object

4 Q: Fill in the blank. The greater the force, the is the acceleration, or change in velocity. A: The greater the force, the greater is the acceleration, or change in velocity. Q: Fill in the blank. The greater the mass, the is the acceleration, or change in velocity. A: The greater the mass, the smaller is the acceleration, or change in velocity. Q: Do heavier objects require more or less force to move the same distance as lighter objects? A: They require more force. Q: If I push an object north, what direction will it go? A: North Q: If I push two objects with the same amount of force and in the same direction which will move the fastest? A: The lighter object will move the fastest. Q: why are heavier objects harder to stop and start than lighter objects? A: Because they have more mass. Q: What is the equation for force that we use when we discuss Newton s 2 nd Law of Motion? A: Force = mass x acceleration Q: What unit do we use for force? A: N (Newton) Q: What is Newton s 3 rd Law of Motion? A: For every action force there is an equal and opposite reaction force. Q: True or False? Forces never come in pairs. A: False! Forces always come in pairs!

5 Q: What is true about action and reaction forces? A: Action and reaction forces are always equal in size and opposite in direction. Q: Why does an object accelerate as it falls? A: The acceleration of a falling object is due to the force of gravity. Q: What happens when forces are balanced? A: Nothing moves Q: What happens to the balance between gravitational potential energy and mechanical kinetic energy as you start a pendulum moving? Q: The pendulum will have the most gravitational potential energy and the least mechanical kinetic energy just before it is released. It will have the most mechanical kinetic energy and the least amount of gravitational potential energy at the bottom on its swing. This is a gradual change between these two forms of energy. Q: What is the measure of the total distance an object has moved divided by the total elapsed time called? A: Average speed Q: Why is the velocity of an object moving in a circle constantly changing? A: Velocity is speed in any given direction. The velocity of an object moving in a circle is constantly changing because the direction of movement is constantly changing. Q: If you slide an object to the east, in what direction does the force of friction act to resist the motion? A: the force of friction is to the west (opposite the original force). Q: What is a hypothesis? A: It is an educated prediction scientists make before doing an experiment.

Section Review Answers. Chapter 12

Section Review Answers. Chapter 12 Section Review Answers Chapter 12 Section 1 1. Answers may vary. Students should say in their own words that an object at rest remains at rest and an object in motion maintains its velocity unless it experiences

More information

Warm up. Forces. Sir Issac Newton. Questions to think about

Warm up. Forces. Sir Issac Newton. Questions to think about Warm up Have you ever tried to pull something that just wouldn t budge? Describe a situation in which you pulled or tried to pull something. What made the job easier? Forces Sir Issac Newton Newton said

More information

Describe the relationship between gravitational force and distance as shown in the diagram.

Describe the relationship between gravitational force and distance as shown in the diagram. Name Period Chapter 2 The Laws of Motion Review Describe the relationship between gravitational force and distance as shown in the diagram. Assess the information about gravity, mass, and weight. Read

More information

Understanding the motion of the Universe. Motion, Force, and Gravity

Understanding the motion of the Universe. Motion, Force, and Gravity Understanding the motion of the Universe Motion, Force, and Gravity Laws of Motion Stationary objects do not begin moving on their own. In the same way, moving objects don t change their movement spontaneously.

More information

April 07, 2015. Force motion examples.notebook MOTION AND FORCES. GRAVITY: a force that makes any object pull toward another object.

April 07, 2015. Force motion examples.notebook MOTION AND FORCES. GRAVITY: a force that makes any object pull toward another object. Force motion examples.notebook April 07, 2015 MOTION AND FORCES GRAVITY: a force that makes any object pull toward another object Feb 15 12:00 PM 1 FRICTION: a force that acts to slow down moving objects

More information

Forces and Motion. Force

Forces and Motion. Force Forces and Motion Forces and motion are very important. You may not know but forces are used in everyday life for example: walking, pushing and pulling. Forces cause things to move. Motion is simply a

More information

4 Gravity: A Force of Attraction

4 Gravity: A Force of Attraction CHAPTER 1 SECTION Matter in Motion 4 Gravity: A Force of Attraction BEFORE YOU READ After you read this section, you should be able to answer these questions: What is gravity? How are weight and mass different?

More information

Student Exploration: Gravitational Force

Student Exploration: Gravitational Force 5. Drag STUDENT PACKET # 7 Name: Date: Student Exploration: Gravitational Force Big Idea 13: Forces and Changes in Motion Benchmark: SC.6.P.13.1 Investigate and describe types of forces including contact

More information

TO GO TO ANY OF THE PAGES LISTED BELOW, CLICK ON ITS TITLE

TO GO TO ANY OF THE PAGES LISTED BELOW, CLICK ON ITS TITLE TO GO TO ANY OF THE PAGES LISTED BELOW, CLICK ON ITS TITLE CHAPTER 12 Force 1 12-1 What is a force? 2 Forces and Force Diagrams Enrichment Activity for Lesson 12-1 3 12-2 What is gravity? 4 Gravitational

More information

Lecture 07: Work and Kinetic Energy. Physics 2210 Fall Semester 2014

Lecture 07: Work and Kinetic Energy. Physics 2210 Fall Semester 2014 Lecture 07: Work and Kinetic Energy Physics 2210 Fall Semester 2014 Announcements Schedule next few weeks: 9/08 Unit 3 9/10 Unit 4 9/15 Unit 5 (guest lecturer) 9/17 Unit 6 (guest lecturer) 9/22 Unit 7,

More information

Forces. Isaac Newton was the first to discover that the laws that govern motions on the Earth also applied to celestial bodies.

Forces. Isaac Newton was the first to discover that the laws that govern motions on the Earth also applied to celestial bodies. Forces Now we will discuss the part of mechanics known as dynamics. We will introduce Newton s three laws of motion which are at the heart of classical mechanics. We must note that Newton s laws describe

More information

Newton s Laws of Motion

Newton s Laws of Motion Kari Eloranta 2015 Jyväskylän Lyseon lukio November 30, 2015 Kari Eloranta 2015 2.2.4 Newton s First Law of Motion Definition of Newton s First Law of Motion (Law of Inertia) An object at rest remains

More information

Force. A force is a push or a pull. Pushing on a stalled car is an example. The force of friction between your feet and the ground is yet another.

Force. A force is a push or a pull. Pushing on a stalled car is an example. The force of friction between your feet and the ground is yet another. Force A force is a push or a pull. Pushing on a stalled car is an example. The force of friction between your feet and the ground is yet another. Force Weight is the force of the earth's gravity exerted

More information

4.1 Describing Motion. How do we describe motion? Chapter 4 Making Sense of the Universe: Understanding Motion, Energy, and Gravity

4.1 Describing Motion. How do we describe motion? Chapter 4 Making Sense of the Universe: Understanding Motion, Energy, and Gravity Chapter 4 Making Sense of the Universe: Understanding Motion, Energy, and Gravity 4.1 Describing Motion Our goals for learning:! How do we describe motion?! How is mass different from weight? How do we

More information

8th Grade Motion, Forces and Energy

8th Grade Motion, Forces and Energy Read and answer each question carefully. 1) The amount of matter in an object is known as its A) mass. B) force. C) weight. D) size. 2) An object is in motion if it is moving relative to A) the object's

More information

Making Sense of the Universe: Understanding Motion, Energy, and Gravity

Making Sense of the Universe: Understanding Motion, Energy, and Gravity Making Sense of the Universe: Understanding Motion, Energy, and Gravity 1. Newton s Laws 2. Conservation Laws Energy Angular momentum 3. Gravity Review from last time Ancient Greeks: Ptolemy; the geocentric

More information

The Cosmic Perspective Seventh Edition. Making Sense of the Universe: Understanding Motion, Energy, and Gravity. Chapter 4 Lecture

The Cosmic Perspective Seventh Edition. Making Sense of the Universe: Understanding Motion, Energy, and Gravity. Chapter 4 Lecture Chapter 4 Lecture The Cosmic Perspective Seventh Edition Making Sense of the Universe: Understanding Motion, Energy, and Gravity Making Sense of the Universe: Understanding Motion, Energy, and Gravity

More information

PS-5.1 Explain the relationship among distance, time, direction, and the velocity of an object.

PS-5.1 Explain the relationship among distance, time, direction, and the velocity of an object. PS-5.1 Explain the relationship among distance, time, direction, and the velocity of an object. It is essential for students to Understand Distance and Displacement: Distance is a measure of how far an

More information

Newton s Wagon Newton s Laws

Newton s Wagon Newton s Laws Newton s Wagon Newton s Laws What happens when you kick a soccer ball? The kick is the external force that Newton was talking about in his first law of motion. What happens to the ball after you kick it?

More information

Name Date Class. The Nature of Force and Motion (pages ) 2. When one object pushes or pulls another object, the first object is

Name Date Class. The Nature of Force and Motion (pages ) 2. When one object pushes or pulls another object, the first object is CHAPTER 4 MOTION AND FORCES SECTION 4 1 The Nature of Force and Motion (pages 116-121) This section explains how balanced and unbalanced forces are related to the motion of an object. It also explains

More information

b. Velocity tells you both speed and direction of an object s movement. Velocity is the change in position divided by the change in time.

b. Velocity tells you both speed and direction of an object s movement. Velocity is the change in position divided by the change in time. I. What is Motion? a. Motion - is when an object changes place or position. To properly describe motion, you need to use the following: 1. Start and end position? 2. Movement relative to what? 3. How far

More information

Section 3 Newton s Laws of Motion

Section 3 Newton s Laws of Motion Section 3 Newton s Laws of Motion Key Concept Newton s laws of motion describe the relationship between forces and the motion of an object. What You Will Learn Newton s first law of motion states that

More information

A Place Where Learning is Fun! Student Manual Elementary School

A Place Where Learning is Fun! Student Manual Elementary School A Place Where Learning is Fun! Student Manual Elementary School 1 TO BE READ ON THE BUS ON YOUR WAY TO CAROWINDS! Your bus pulls up to the entrance of Carowinds and you are about to jump out of your seat

More information

Name Period Chapter 10 Study Guide

Name Period Chapter 10 Study Guide Name _ Period Chapter 10 Study Guide Modified True/False Indicate whether the statement is true or false. 1. Unbalanced forces do not change an object s motion. 2. Friction depends on the types of surfaces

More information

Newton s Laws of Motion. Chapter 4

Newton s Laws of Motion. Chapter 4 Newton s Laws of Motion Chapter 4 Changes in Motion Section 4.1 Force is simply a push or pull It is an interaction between two or more objects Force is a vector so it has magnitude and direction In the

More information

Chapter 12 - Forces and Motion

Chapter 12 - Forces and Motion Chapter 12 - Forces and Motion A. What is a force? 1. It is a push or pull. 2. Force can cause resting objects to move. 3. Force can cause acceleration by changing the object s speed or direction. 4. Newtons

More information

Unsaved Test, Version: 1 1

Unsaved Test, Version: 1 1 Name: Select the term that best completes the statement. A. force B. net force C. unbalanced force D. Newton's first law E. motion F. inertia 1. is the change of position over time. Date: 2. The overall

More information

Understanding the motion of the Universe. Motion, Force, and Gravity

Understanding the motion of the Universe. Motion, Force, and Gravity Understanding the motion of the Universe Motion, Force, and Gravity Laws of Motion Stationary objects do not begin moving on their own. In the same way, moving objects don t change their movement spontaneously.

More information

3.1 Force, Mass, and Acceleration

3.1 Force, Mass, and Acceleration Sir Isaac Newton discovered one of the most important relationships in physics: the link between the force on an object, its mass, and its acceleration. In this section, you will learn about force and

More information

NEWTON S LAWS OF MOTION

NEWTON S LAWS OF MOTION NEWTON S LAWS OF MOTION Background: Aristotle believed that the natural state of motion for objects on the earth was one of rest. In other words, objects needed a force to be kept in motion. Galileo studied

More information

Force and Motion Test

Force and Motion Test Force and Motion Test Multiple Choice Identify the letter of the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question. (1 point each) 1. Your best guess of how an experiment might turn out

More information

Newton s First Law (Law of Inertia) An object will remain at rest or in a constant state of motion unless acted upon by net external forces.

Newton s First Law (Law of Inertia) An object will remain at rest or in a constant state of motion unless acted upon by net external forces. Newton s Third Law Newton s First Law (Law of Inertia) F = 0 An object will remain at rest or in a constant state of motion unless acted upon by net external forces. Newton s First Law If F = 0 => No Change

More information

Unit 3. Forces Part 1

Unit 3. Forces Part 1 Unit 3 Forces Part 1 1 Vocabulary: Force Acceleration Mass Net Force Balanced Forces Unbalanced Forces Friction Air resistance Gravity Weight Inertia Action Force Reaction Force Concepts: How does a force

More information

Today s topic: Gravity

Today s topic: Gravity Today s topic: Gravity Reminder: midterm on Wed Oct 8. I will do a review session second half of today s class Midterm will cover everything through last week. Remember to bring you star wheel for the

More information

2.1 Force and Motion Kinematics looks at velocity and acceleration without reference to the cause of the acceleration.

2.1 Force and Motion Kinematics looks at velocity and acceleration without reference to the cause of the acceleration. 2.1 Force and Motion Kinematics looks at velocity and acceleration without reference to the cause of the acceleration. Dynamics looks at the cause of acceleration: an unbalanced force. Isaac Newton was

More information

Physical Science Chapter 2. Forces

Physical Science Chapter 2. Forces Physical Science Chapter 2 Forces The Nature of Force By definition, a Force is a push or a pull. A Push Or A Pull Just like Velocity & Acceleration Forces have both magnitude and direction components

More information

Forces. When an object is pushed or pulled, we say that a force is exerted on it.

Forces. When an object is pushed or pulled, we say that a force is exerted on it. Forces When an object is pushed or pulled, we say that a force is exerted on it. Forces can Cause an object to start moving Change the speed of a moving object Cause a moving object to stop moving Change

More information

The Motions of Celestial Bodies, and Newton s Laws of Motion

The Motions of Celestial Bodies, and Newton s Laws of Motion The Motions of Celestial Bodies, and Newton s Laws of Motion Announcements The results of Quiz 1 are posted in OWL Looking ahead: Homework 1 is on-going, and is due on Thu, Sept. 29 th ; Homework 2 will

More information

Name: Earth 110 Exploration of the Solar System Assignment 1: Celestial Motions and Forces Due in class Tuesday, Jan. 20, 2015

Name: Earth 110 Exploration of the Solar System Assignment 1: Celestial Motions and Forces Due in class Tuesday, Jan. 20, 2015 Name: Earth 110 Exploration of the Solar System Assignment 1: Celestial Motions and Forces Due in class Tuesday, Jan. 20, 2015 Why are celestial motions and forces important? They explain the world around

More information

356 CHAPTER 12 Bob Daemmrich

356 CHAPTER 12 Bob Daemmrich Standard 7.3.17: Investigate that an unbalanced force, acting on an object, changes its speed or path of motion or both, and know that if the force always acts toward the same center as the object moves,

More information

Newton s Laws of Motion

Newton s Laws of Motion Newton s Laws of Motion The Earth revolves around the sun in an elliptical orbit. The moon orbits the Earth in the same way. But what keeps the Earth and the moon in orbit? Why don t they just fly off

More information

Ch 4 Test Review. Why do we say a speeding object doesn t have force? (Assume this object is speeding through space) (Explain)

Ch 4 Test Review. Why do we say a speeding object doesn t have force? (Assume this object is speeding through space) (Explain) Ch 4 Test Review Why do we say a speeding object doesn t have force? (Assume this object is speeding through space) (Explain) If the forces that act on a cannonball and the recoiling cannon from which

More information

Today. Laws of Motion. Conservation Laws. Gravity

Today. Laws of Motion. Conservation Laws. Gravity Today Laws of Motion Conservation Laws Gravity Laws of Motion Motion notions: slow fast Speed: Rate at which object moves fast change in direction slow example: speed of 10 m/s Velocity: Speed and direction

More information

13 Universal Gravitation. Everything pulls on everything else.

13 Universal Gravitation. Everything pulls on everything else. Everything pulls on everything else. Gravity was not discovered by Isaac Newton. What Newton discovered, prompted by a falling apple, was that gravity is a universal force that it is not unique to Earth,

More information

Units DEMO spring scales masses

Units DEMO spring scales masses Dynamics the study of the causes and changes of motion Force Force Categories ContactField 4 fundamental Force Types 1 Gravity 2 Weak Nuclear Force 3 Electromagnetic 4 Strong Nuclear Force Units DEMO spring

More information

AST 101 Lecture 7. Newton s Laws and the Nature of Matter

AST 101 Lecture 7. Newton s Laws and the Nature of Matter AST 101 Lecture 7 Newton s Laws and the Nature of Matter The Nature of Matter Democritus (c. 470-380 BCE) posited that matter was composed of atoms Atoms: particles that can not be further subdivided 4

More information

A Place Where Learning is Fun! Student Manual Middle School

A Place Where Learning is Fun! Student Manual Middle School A Place Where Learning is Fun! Student Manual Middle School 1 TO BE READ ON THE BUS ON YOUR WAY TO CAROWINDS! Your bus pulls up to the entrance of Carowinds and you are about to jump out of your seat with

More information

Newton s Laws of Motion

Newton s Laws of Motion Physics Newton s Laws of Motion Newton s Laws of Motion 4.1 Objectives Explain Newton s first law of motion. Explain Newton s second law of motion. Explain Newton s third law of motion. Solve problems

More information

There are many different types of contact forces. In fact there is four. Book resting on table

There are many different types of contact forces. In fact there is four. Book resting on table You may not know but forces are everyday life movements, by reading a book, talking, running and writing on a page you are applying a force. They cause objects to move or stay stationary. There are two

More information

At the skate park on the ramp

At the skate park on the ramp At the skate park on the ramp 1 On the ramp When a cart rolls down a ramp, it begins at rest, but starts moving downward upon release covers more distance each second When a cart rolls up a ramp, it rises

More information

Use the following information to deduce that the gravitational field strength at the surface of the Earth is approximately 10 N kg 1.

Use the following information to deduce that the gravitational field strength at the surface of the Earth is approximately 10 N kg 1. IB PHYSICS: Gravitational Forces Review 1. This question is about gravitation and ocean tides. (b) State Newton s law of universal gravitation. Use the following information to deduce that the gravitational

More information

Chapter 3: Force and Motion

Chapter 3: Force and Motion Force and Motion Cause and Effect Chapter 3 Chapter 3: Force and Motion Homework: All questions on the Multiple- Choice and the odd-numbered questions on Exercises sections at the end of the chapter. In

More information

Dynamics- Why do objects move as they do? What makes an object at rest, begin to move? What makes a body accelerate or decelerate?

Dynamics- Why do objects move as they do? What makes an object at rest, begin to move? What makes a body accelerate or decelerate? Dynamics- Why do objects move as they do? What makes an object at rest, begin to move? What makes a body accelerate or decelerate? What makes an object move in a circle? Force A Force is simply a push

More information

Chapter 4 Making Sense of the Universe: Understanding Motion, Energy, and Gravity

Chapter 4 Making Sense of the Universe: Understanding Motion, Energy, and Gravity Chapter 4 Making Sense of the Universe: Understanding Motion, Energy, and Gravity How do we describe motion? Precise definitions to describe motion: Speed: Rate at which object moves sp e e d = d ista

More information

STAAR Science Tutorial 25 TEK 8.6C: Newton s Laws

STAAR Science Tutorial 25 TEK 8.6C: Newton s Laws Name: Teacher: Pd. Date: STAAR Science Tutorial 25 TEK 8.6C: Newton s Laws TEK 8.6C: Investigate and describe applications of Newton's law of inertia, law of force and acceleration, and law of action-reaction

More information

Gravitation. Gravitation

Gravitation. Gravitation 1 Gravitation Newton s observations A constant center seeking force is required to keep an object moving along a circular path. You know that the moon orbits the earth and hence there should be a force

More information

Chapter 6: Energy and Oscillations. 1. Which of the following is not an energy unit? A. N m B. Joule C. calorie D. watt E.

Chapter 6: Energy and Oscillations. 1. Which of the following is not an energy unit? A. N m B. Joule C. calorie D. watt E. Chapter 6: Energy and Oscillations 1. Which of the following is not an energy unit? A. N m B. Joule C. calorie D. watt E. kwh 2. Work is not being done on an object unless the A. net force on the object

More information

Physics 101 Exam 1 NAME 2/7

Physics 101 Exam 1 NAME 2/7 Physics 101 Exam 1 NAME 2/7 1 In the situation below, a person pulls a string attached to block A, which is in turn attached to another, heavier block B via a second string (a) Which block has the larger

More information

Astro 110-01 Lecture 10 Newton s laws

Astro 110-01 Lecture 10 Newton s laws Astro 110-01 Lecture 10 Newton s laws Twin Sungrazing comets 9/02/09 Habbal Astro110-01 Lecture 10 1 http://umbra.nascom.nasa.gov/comets/movies/soho_lasco_c2.mpg What have we learned? How do we describe

More information

Experimenting With Forces

Experimenting With Forces Have you heard the story about Isaac Newton and the apple? Newton was a scientist who lived about 300 years ago. He made many important discoveries about how and why things move. The apple story goes like

More information

Educational Innovations

Educational Innovations Educational Innovations NA-100/95S Newton s Apple grav i ty (gravitē) noun 1. The force that attracts a body toward the center of the earth, or toward any other physical body having mass. For most purposes

More information

Isaac Newton was a British scientist whose accomplishments included

Isaac Newton was a British scientist whose accomplishments included 80 Newton s Laws of Motion R EA D I N G Isaac Newton was a British scientist whose accomplishments included important discoveries about light, motion, and gravity. You may have heard the legend about how

More information

Speed, acceleration, friction, inertia, force, gravity 11/13/15

Speed, acceleration, friction, inertia, force, gravity 11/13/15 Speed, acceleration, friction, inertia, force, gravity 11/13/15 Sarah starts at a positive position along the x- axis. She then undergoes a negative displacement. Her final position A. is positive. B.

More information

Unification of the laws of the Earth and the Universe Why do planets appear to wander slowly across the sky?

Unification of the laws of the Earth and the Universe Why do planets appear to wander slowly across the sky? October 19, 2015 Unification of the laws of the Earth and the Universe Why do planets appear to wander slowly across the sky? Key Words Newton s Laws of motion, and Newton s law of universal gravitation:

More information

Introduction to Gravity and Orbits. Isaac Newton. Newton s Laws of Motion

Introduction to Gravity and Orbits. Isaac Newton. Newton s Laws of Motion Introduction to Gravity and Orbits Isaac Newton Born in England in 1642 Invented calculus in early twenties Finally published work in gravity in 1687 The Principia Newton s Laws of Motion 1: An object

More information

October 01, Thinking Questions on Newton's laws. Thinking Questions on Newton's Laws

October 01, Thinking Questions on Newton's laws. Thinking Questions on Newton's Laws Thinking Questions on Newton's Laws http://www.physicsclassroom.com/reviews/newtlaws/newtlawsprint.cfm 1. Which of the following statements are true of inertia? List all that apply. Inertia is a force.

More information

ACTIVITY 1: Gravitational Force and Acceleration

ACTIVITY 1: Gravitational Force and Acceleration CHAPTER 3 ACTIVITY 1: Gravitational Force and Acceleration LEARNING TARGET: You will determine the relationship between mass, acceleration, and gravitational force. PURPOSE: So far in the course, you ve

More information

Newton s Laws of Motion

Newton s Laws of Motion Newton s Laws of Motion Isaac Newton is famous for three laws. They are about the way things move. He didn t write the laws. Other people called them Newton s Laws of Motion. Newton s First Law The first

More information

January 27 th 2016 page 133

January 27 th 2016 page 133 January 27 th 2016 page 133 DO: I will be able to explain the impact of forces on the world and the impact of forces on each other. EQ s: 1. What is force? 2. How is force described? 3. What forces do

More information

PHYSICS MIDTERM REVIEW

PHYSICS MIDTERM REVIEW 1. The acceleration due to gravity on the surface of planet X is 19.6 m/s 2. If an object on the surface of this planet weighs 980. newtons, the mass of the object is 50.0 kg 490. N 100. kg 908 N 2. If

More information

THE NATURE OF FORCES Forces can be divided into two categories: contact forces and non-contact forces.

THE NATURE OF FORCES Forces can be divided into two categories: contact forces and non-contact forces. SESSION 2: NEWTON S LAWS Key Concepts In this session we Examine different types of forces Review and apply Newton's Laws of motion Use Newton's Law of Universal Gravitation to solve problems X-planation

More information

GRADE 8 SCIENCE INSTRUCTIONAL TASKS. Gravity

GRADE 8 SCIENCE INSTRUCTIONAL TASKS. Gravity GRADE 8 SCIENCE INSTRUCTIONAL TASKS Gravity Grade-Level Expectations The exercises in these instructional tasks address content related to the following science grade-level expectation(s): ESS-M-C3 Relate

More information

Note: Thrust from the rocket s engines acts downward producing an upward reaction on the rocket

Note: Thrust from the rocket s engines acts downward producing an upward reaction on the rocket Water Rocket Physics Principles Forces and Motion Newton s First Law An object at rest remains at rest, and an object in motion remains in motion at constant speed and in a straight line unless acted on

More information

Newton s Laws of Motion (Ch 5)

Newton s Laws of Motion (Ch 5) Newton s Laws of Motion (Ch 5) Force Isaac Newton 1642-1727 English physicist & mathematician By the age of 31, discovered: laws of motion universal gravitation calculus Eccentric read Coming of Age in

More information

CHAPTER 3: INERTIA. 1. Purpose of Experiments with Inertia. 2. Inertia. 3. Experiments with Inertia. 4. Other Activities. 5. The Importance of Inertia

CHAPTER 3: INERTIA. 1. Purpose of Experiments with Inertia. 2. Inertia. 3. Experiments with Inertia. 4. Other Activities. 5. The Importance of Inertia CHAPTER 3: INERTIA 1. Purpose of Experiments with Inertia 2. Inertia 3. Experiments with Inertia 4. Other Activities 5. The Importance of Inertia 6. Bibliography 7. Research Topics Montessori Research

More information

Practice TEST 2. Explain your reasoning

Practice TEST 2. Explain your reasoning Practice TEST 2 1. Imagine taking an elevator ride from the1 st floor to the 10 th floor of a building. While moving between the 1 st and 2 nd floors the elevator speeds up, but then moves at a constant

More information

Galileo and the physics of motion

Galileo and the physics of motion Galileo and the physics of motion Studies of motion important : planetary orbits, cannonball accuracy, basic physics. Galileo among first to make careful observations Looked at velocity, acceleration,

More information

Physics: Principles and Applications, 6e Giancoli Chapter 4 Dynamics: Newton's Laws of Motion

Physics: Principles and Applications, 6e Giancoli Chapter 4 Dynamics: Newton's Laws of Motion Physics: Principles and Applications, 6e Giancoli Chapter 4 Dynamics: Newton's Laws of Motion Conceptual Questions 1) Which of Newton's laws best explains why motorists should buckle-up? A) the first law

More information

Summary Notes. to avoid confusion it is better to write this formula in words. time

Summary Notes. to avoid confusion it is better to write this formula in words. time National 4/5 Physics Dynamics and Space Summary Notes The coloured boxes contain National 5 material. Section 1 Mechanics Average Speed Average speed is the distance travelled per unit time. distance (m)

More information

Physics 211 Lecture 4

Physics 211 Lecture 4 Physics 211 Lecture 4 Today's Concepts: Newton s Laws a) Acceleration is caused by forces b) Force changes momentum c) Forces always come in pairs d) Good reference frames Mechanics Lecture 4, Slide 1

More information

Described by Isaac Newton

Described by Isaac Newton Described by Isaac Newton States observed relationships between motion and forces 3 statements cover aspects of motion for single objects and for objects interacting with another object An object at rest

More information

Rocket Principles. Rockets: A Teacher's Guide with Activities in Science, Mathematics, and Technology EG-108 February Outside Air Pressure

Rocket Principles. Rockets: A Teacher's Guide with Activities in Science, Mathematics, and Technology EG-108 February Outside Air Pressure Rocket Principles Outside ir Pressure Inside ir Pressure ir Moves Balloon Moves rocket in its simplest form is a chamber enclosing a gas under pressure. small opening at one end of the chamber allows the

More information

College Physics 140 Chapter 4: Force and Newton s Laws of Motion

College Physics 140 Chapter 4: Force and Newton s Laws of Motion College Physics 140 Chapter 4: Force and Newton s Laws of Motion We will be investigating what makes you move (forces) and how that accelerates objects. Chapter 4: Forces and Newton s Laws of Motion Forces

More information

Astronomy Test 2 Concept Review and Practice

Astronomy Test 2 Concept Review and Practice Name: Date: Class Period: Astronomy Test 2 Concept Review and Practice Gravity and Motion Skill: Describe how mass and weight would change (or not) going from one place in the universe to another. Practice:

More information

Reading Comprehension Skills Preview the Book How to Read Charts Cause and Effect

Reading Comprehension Skills Preview the Book How to Read Charts Cause and Effect TM Red Edition Grade 3 4 reading level Purple Edition Grade 4 5 reading level Objectives Describe how forces can change the motion of objects. Explain what happens when many forces act on one object at

More information

UNIT 2D. Laws of Motion

UNIT 2D. Laws of Motion Name: Regents Physics Date: Mr. Morgante UNIT 2D Laws of Motion Laws of Motion Science of Describing Motion is Kinematics. Dynamics- the study of forces that act on bodies in motion. First Law of Motion

More information

FREE FALL AND PROJECTILE MOTION

FREE FALL AND PROJECTILE MOTION FREE FALL AND PROJECTILE MOTION 1 Let s review equations and then split them into X (horizontal) and Y (vertical). GENERAL HORIZONTAL VERTICAL V f = V i + aδt V fx = V ix + a x t V fy = V iy + a y t x

More information

1. The unit of force, a Newton, is equal to a. The amount of mass in an object c. kg m/s b. Mass X Velocity d. kg m/s 2

1. The unit of force, a Newton, is equal to a. The amount of mass in an object c. kg m/s b. Mass X Velocity d. kg m/s 2 Forces in Motion Test- FORM B Multiple Choice Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question. 1. The unit of force, a Newton, is equal to a. The amount of mass in an object

More information

Momentum, Work and Energy

Momentum, Work and Energy previous index next Momentum, Work and Energy Michael Fowler, U. Va. Physics, 11/29/07 Momentum At this point, we introduce some further concepts that will prove useful in describing motion. The first

More information

Lesson 3 - Understanding Energy (with a Pendulum)

Lesson 3 - Understanding Energy (with a Pendulum) Lesson 3 - Understanding Energy (with a Pendulum) Introduction This lesson is meant to introduce energy and conservation of energy and is a continuation of the fundamentals of roller coaster engineering.

More information

Physics Exam Q1 Exam, Part A Samples

Physics Exam Q1 Exam, Part A Samples Physics Exam Q1 Exam, Part A Samples 1. An object starts from rest and accelerates uniformly down an incline. If the object reaches a speed of 40 meters per second in 5 seconds, its average speed is (A)

More information

Ch.4 Forces. Conceptual questions #1, 2, 12 Problem 1, 2, 5, 6, 7, 10, 12, 15, 16, 19, 20, 21, 23, 24, 26, 27, 30, 38, 39, 41, 42, 47, 50, 56, 66

Ch.4 Forces. Conceptual questions #1, 2, 12 Problem 1, 2, 5, 6, 7, 10, 12, 15, 16, 19, 20, 21, 23, 24, 26, 27, 30, 38, 39, 41, 42, 47, 50, 56, 66 Ch.4 Forces Conceptual questions #1, 2, 12 Problem 1, 2, 5, 6, 7, 10, 12, 15, 16, 19, 20, 21, 23, 24, 26, 27, 30, 38, 39, 41, 42, 47, 50, 56, 66 Forces Forces - vector quantity that changes the velocity

More information

Astro 101 F15 Test 2. Name: Multiple Choice Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question.

Astro 101 F15 Test 2. Name: Multiple Choice Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question. Name: Astro 101 Test 2 Multiple Choice Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question. 1. The Moon undergoes synchronous rotation, and as a consequence the: a. Moon does

More information

Rocketry for Kids. Science Level 4. Newton s Laws

Rocketry for Kids. Science Level 4. Newton s Laws Rocketry for Kids Science Level 4 Newton s Laws Victorian Space Science Education Centre 400 Pascoe Vale Road Strathmore, Vic 3041 www.vssec.vic.edu.au Some material for this program has been derived from

More information

The University of Texas at Austin. Forces and Motion

The University of Texas at Austin. Forces and Motion UTeach Outreach The University of Texas at Austin Forces and Motion Time of Lesson: 50-60 minutes Content Standards Addressed in Lesson: 6.8B identify and describe the changes in position, direction and

More information

Name: Date: 7. A child is riding a bike and skids to a stop. What happens to their kinetic energy? Page 1

Name: Date: 7. A child is riding a bike and skids to a stop. What happens to their kinetic energy? Page 1 Name: Date: 1. Driving down the road, you hit an insect. How does the force your car exerts on the insect compare to the force the insect exerts on the car? A) The insect exerts no force on the car B)

More information

Newton's First Law. Driving Questions. Background. Materials and Equipment. Safety. For each student or group: Name Period Date

Newton's First Law. Driving Questions. Background. Materials and Equipment. Safety. For each student or group: Name Period Date Name Period Date Newton's First Law Driving Questions What factors affect the motion of objects? Aristotle (384 BC to 322 BC) believed that the natural state of an object was to be at rest and therefore

More information

Educator Guide to S LAR SYSTEM. 1875 El Prado, San Diego CA 92101 (619) 238-1233 www.rhfleet.org

Educator Guide to S LAR SYSTEM. 1875 El Prado, San Diego CA 92101 (619) 238-1233 www.rhfleet.org Educator Guide to S LAR SYSTEM 1875 El Prado, San Diego CA 92101 (619) 238-1233 www.rhfleet.org Pre-Visit Activity: Orbital Paths Materials: Plastic Plate Marble Scissors To Do: 1. Put the plate on a flat

More information

Rotation of the Earth

Rotation of the Earth Earth rotates from West to East Axis of Rotation Why does the Sun appear to rise in the east and set in the west? link to animation by Barth Van Bossuyt 2011 Rotation of the Earth Rotation is the spin

More information

Friction and Gravity. Friction. Section 2. The Causes of Friction

Friction and Gravity. Friction. Section 2. The Causes of Friction Section 2 Friction and Gravity What happens when you jump on a sled on the side of a snow-covered hill? Without actually doing this, you can predict that the sled will slide down the hill. Now think about

More information