A LEADER S GUIDE TO DAISY GIRL SCOUTING Nuts & Bolts FOR THE FIRST 5 WEEKS

Save this PDF as:
 WORD  PNG  TXT  JPG

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "A LEADER S GUIDE TO DAISY GIRL SCOUTING Nuts & Bolts FOR THE FIRST 5 WEEKS"

Transcription

1 A LEADER S GUIDE TO DAISY GIRL SCOUTING Nuts & Bolts FOR THE FIRST 5 WEEKS Girl Scouts, Hornets Nest Council 7007 Idlewild Road Charlotte, NC Outside Mecklenburg Website:

2 Table of Contents Unit One: Introduction To Girl Scouts Foundation and History of Girl Scouts... 5 Girl Scout Promise and Girl Scout Law... 5 Special Girl Scout Days Unit Two: Planning and Getting Started... 6 Planning Trail... 6 Monthly Tips/Ideas... 7 Sample or Letter to Parents in Your Troop. 8 Tips For Working With Adults/Parents 8 Girl Scout Daisy Uniform... 9 Summary of Troop Committee Positions Girl-Led Planning 11 Troop Government: The Girl Scout Daisy Ring Unit Three: Meetings Meeting Logistics Kapers Meeting Components and Ideas Step By Step Guide For The First Five Meetings Meeting One: Learning the Girl Scout Promise.. 15 Daisy Name Tag Template.. 16 Meeting Two: Learning to be Honest & Fair.. 17 Meeting Three: Learning to be Friendly & Helpful. 18 Meeting Four: Getting Ready for the Investiture Ceremony.. 19 Investiture Invitation Template Girl Scout Investiture Ceremony. 21 Meeting Five: The Investiture Ceremony Making Decisions About Money Troop Trip Planning 23 Unit Four: Girl Scout Traditions Girl Scout Sign Girl Scout Motto Girl Scout Slogan Girl Scout Handshake. 24 Girl Scout Friendship Circle SWAPS Girl Scout Ceremonies Flag Ceremony.. 26 Investiture Ceremony Bridging Ceremony. 28 Ideas for a Closing Ceremony

3 Table of Contents Unit Four: Girl Scout Traditions cont A Girl Scout s Own Ceremony Games Songs Unit Five: Working With Daisy Girl Scouts.. 33 Characteristics of Girl Scout Daisies.. 33 Growing with Girl Scout Daisies.. 33 Promoting Self-Esteem 34 Leader/Daughter Syndrome. 34 Tips to Prevent Challenging Behavior Guidelines for Adult/Child Interaction 34 When and Where to Obtain Help 36 3

4 Unit One: Introduction TO GIRL SCOUTS Congratulations on becoming a member of the unique and wonderful world of Girl Scouts! Thank you for giving your time to shape today s girls into tomorrow s leaders. As an adult volunteer for a Girl Scout Daisy troop, you will help build girls of courage, confidence and character, who make the world a better place. There s a lot to learn to get started, and we re here to help. Girl Scouts Hornets Nest Council has 5 Values that drive all our efforts. Girl Scouting experiences are: Girl Centered, Inclusive, Aligned, Accountable and Innovative. Take time to review all the available resources listed below. These resources all work together to provide detailed information about different parts of the Girl Scout Daisy experience! As you become more comfortable in your leadership position, you will learn how to give the girls more responsibility. The ultimate goal in Girl Scout troop management is to implement girl/adult partnership. Give the girls an opportunity regardless of their grade level, to take an increasingly more active part in planning as the year progresses. Your ultimate satisfaction in leading will come as you see your girls grow and mature under your guidance. Lastly, Girl Scouts is about exploring and having fun. Remember: You Lead Today, She ll Lead Tomorrow. To effectively use this guide, you should be familiar with the following resources: Volunteer Essentials In-depth details on aspects of your leadership role, including registration, finance, safety tips, communication and more! Excerpts provided at your Leader 101 training; full document available online at FYI Listing of all GSHNC programs and trainings. Check at least 4-6 weeks in advance for upcoming events. Events and trainings require advanced registration and can fill up quickly. Sample listing provided at your Leader 101 training; full document available at GSHNC website: Troop forms, Adult Learning and Program registrations, Online Courses, Adult Awards, Council properties, staff contact information, and more! The Daisy Girl s Guide to Girl Scouting* This Handbook is packed with information and activities that encourage girls to learn and to have fun. It also includes 12 badge activity sheets, covering a range of exciting topics for girls to explore. It s Your World Change It! Leadership Journey - Adult Set* How To Guide for completing a 2-3 month Leadership experience in which Girl Scout Daisies learn the Girl Scout Law and the 3 keys to leadership: Discover, Connect, and Take Action. It s Your Planet Love It! Leadership Journey - Adult Set* How To Guide for completing a 2-3 month Leadership experience where Girl Scout Daisies explore the precious resources of water. It s Your Story Tell It! Leadership Journey - Adult Set* How To Guide for completing a 2-3 month Leadership experience where Girl Scout Daisies build confidence and learn about the wide world of girls. *Available for purchase at Promise Provisions store. Visit 4

5 Foundation and History of Girl Scouts 100 Years Strong Juliette Gordon Low was a strong, independent woman who looked beyond the traditional role of women. While living in England, she befriended Lord Baden Powell, the founder of the Boy Scouts. It was through her knowledge of Boy Scouts that Juliette Gordon Low brought the idea of Girl Scouts to the United States. In 1912, her vision became a reality. The first Girl Scout troop was formed on March 12, Juliette Gordon Low had a vision for the Girl Scouts that included exposing girls to knowledge, practicing useable new skills, and fostering positive attitudes about themselves and others. The Girl Scout program promotes the development of values, which girls can draw on to help them resist some of the pressures of today's society. Girl Scouting continues to evolve to meet the needs of girls. Activities may change, however, the fundamental premise and mission of the organization remains the same. Every girl and adult that joins Girl Scouts agrees to accept the Girl Scout Promise and Law. These words become the moral compass of the Girl Scout experience, so that every decision made in Girl Scouts is based on the Girl Scout Promise and Law. Girl Scout Mission Girl Scout Promise On my honor, I will try: To serve God and my country, To help people at all times, And to live by the Girl Scout Law. Girl Scout Law I will do my best to be honest and fair, friendly and helpful, considerate and caring, courageous and strong, and responsible for what I say and do, and to respect myself and others, respect authority, use resources wisely, make the world a better place, and be a sister to every Girl Scout. Special Girl Scout Days There are a few days throughout the year that are special to Girl Scouts across the nation. Here are those days and why we celebrate them. Thinking Day: February 22 Girls participate in activities and projects with global themes to honor their sister Girl Guides and Girl Scouts in other countries. World Thinking Day is part of the World Association of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts Global Action Theme (GAT), based on the United Nation's Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), which aim to improve the lives of the world's poorest people. Girl Scout Birthday: March 12 Juliette Gordon Low, Daisy to her friends and family, started Girl Scouting in Savannah, Georgia on March 12, Girl Scout Sunday: Sunday after March 12 Girl Scout Sabbath: Saturday after March 12 Girl Scout Week: The week in which March 12 falls Founder s Day: October 31 The birthday of Juliette Daisy Low, the founder of Girl Scouts. Leader Appreciation Day: April 22 5

6 Unit Two: Planning & Getting Started Planning Trail The planning trail is a useful tool for helping plan with your Girl Scout Daisies. A planning trail is a step-by-step planning process. If followed, your troop activities will be well-planned, include girl/adult partnerships, and focus on the Council Goals. There are eight steps to the planning trail. Step 1: Set a Goal Considering the girls interests and working with your other adult volunteers, set a goal for the troop. Step 2: Brainstorm Ideas Once you have set your goals for the year, brainstorm ways to meet your goals. This brainstorm list may include activities, field trips, and other program opportunities. Come up with a list that will allow the girls to choose from the options by voting. Step 4: Gather Information Now that you have a list of ideas/activities for the year, you must gather information to ensure success in implementing the activities. Ask yourself: Are there safety requirements, admission fees, transportation, health concerns, etc., for the activities planned? Step 3: Focus on the Girl Scout Leadership Experience For every program activity you have planned, you need to ask if it relates to outcomes in the 3 Keys to Leadership (Discover, Connect, Take Action), the mission and the program, and consider the program processes as you work with girls. Step 5: Focus on the Activity/ Program For each activity, there will be some planning. In this step, you will need to establish timelines and budgets. Ask yourself: Who? What? Where? Why? How? Step 6: DO IT! In this step you implement the activity! Step 8: Pass It On Tell others about the activity. Share your success at service unit meetings. Call the local press. Celebrate and share the good news! Step 7: Evaluate Evaluate the entire planning process, not just the final activity. Ask yourself and the girls: Did it work? Would you do it again? How could you improve it? How could you be more efficient in the planning? Was everyone involved? What did you learn? 6

7 Monthly Tips/Ideas Girl Scout troops can start any time of the year. No matter where you are in your troop schedule, here are a few ideas and things to think about during each month. The dates below represent only a small number of Girl Scout program opportunities available. As the year progresses, you will find many other opportunities for your troop. Service Unit events and council-sponsored programs are two sources for beyond the troop activities. These activities can help support the achievement of the goals of your troop. Keep notes as you hear of different opportunities so that you can help the girls plan a meaningful year. September New Troops: Register within 4 weeks of your first meeting. Existing Troops: Register by October 1. Existing Troops: Hold an Investiture/Rededication Ceremony. Plan an event to celebrate Juliette Low s birthday (October 31). Attend Service Unit meeting. Find out about upcoming Service Unit programs/events your troop can attend to meet. February Celebrate Thinking Day Do an activity related to Pluralism & Diversity. Present girls with their World Association Pins. See the pinning ceremony in the Ceremonies & Traditions section of this booklet. Invite parents to attend and incorporate a flag ceremony into the pinning ceremony. Cookie Booth Sales begin! Contact your sponsorship (if a religious institution) to see if your troop can participate in Girl Scout Sunday/Sabbath services in March. October Celebrate Juliette Low s birthday (October 31). Think about participating in your community s holiday parade. Research details and share with parents. November Attend Cookie Training with your troop s cookie sale manager. Plan/participate in a community service project. Complete Community Service Report form, found online at under Resources. December Plan holiday celebrations as appropriate. Plan/participate in a community service project, if not done in November. Complete the Community Service Report form. Check FYI for winter/spring council activities. Cookie Sale Begins! March If applicable, confirm with your sponsorship about participating in Girl Scout Sunday/Sabbath services. Plan a Girl Scout birthday party to celebrate the 1st Girl Scout troop meeting on March 12, Contact your Service Unit Manager or Membership Specialist about participating in a spring recruitment. Service Unit Adult Award nominations due March 15. April Leader Appreciation Day is April 22 do something special and fun with your co-leaders/assistants! Begin planning an End-of-Year ceremony. Plan ahead to order patches and other supplies from Promise Provisions Girl Scout store. Plan a way to say Thank You to your sponsorship. Prepare to bridge any 1st grade members to Girl Scout Brownies. See Bridging section of this booklet. If no girl is bridging, do an activity with another troop to meet the requirement. January Plan to participate in Thinking Day activities for February 22. Celebrate Martin Luther King's Birthday - Show the girls how this celebration can help us understanding some parts of the Girl Scout Law. Attend Service Unit meeting or optional enrichment trainings. Board Level Adult Award nominations due January 15. May Plan and participate in End-of-Year Ceremony. Bridge 1st grade girls to Girl Scout Brownies. Early Bird registration due May 31. Celebrate your success with your co-leaders/assistants for a year well done! June Annual Troop Report due June 15. 7

8 Sample or Letter to Parents in Your Troop Welcome to Girl Scout Daisy Troop #! My name is (name) and I have volunteered to be the leader for our new troop. I am excited about working with your daughter and look forward to meeting everyone soon. Out first troop meeting will be on (date). We will be meeting at (location & room #) at (time). Please plan on returning the forms I have attached in the Parent Information Packet along with the registration fee at this meeting. I will need your help throughout the year so pleaser review the Girl Scouting is a Family Affair Form and let me know where you may be able to help. Parents are asked to stay at this meeting so that we can meet each other and finalize our meeting dates. All girls are required to register and pay the registration fee to join Girl Scouts. Leaders, Co-Leader, Fall Product Sales Manager and Cookie Sale Manager are required to register and clear a criminal background check. Other adult parents are encouraged to register as Girl Scout members. Financial assistance is available; please contact me for more information. I look forward to meeting each of you and if you have any questions, please feel free to call or me. (Your Name & Phone #) Attached is the Parent Information Packet and forms you will need to complete and bring to the meeting: Registration Form Girl Registration Form Adult (if joining the troop committee) Girl & Adult Health History Record (not required, until we go on a field trip we will discuss more at the meeting) Girl Scout is a Family Affair Form Summary of Troop Committee Positions Registration Fee (financial assistance available if needed). Please make check payable to Girl Scouts, Hornets Nest Council (GSHNC). The forms listed above can be found on the council web site at: Forms & Publications Troop Forms Tips for Working with Adults/Parents As a Girl Scout adult volunteer, you will be developing meaningful relationships with the girls in your troop. Since you will need help from time to time, it is also wise to develop positive relationships with the parents and guardians in your troop. Here are some tips to start the year off right and keep things running smoothly. Share the magic of the Girl Scout program. Discuss the 3 Keys to Leadership and the Girl Scout Promise and Law. Let the parents know that while Girl Scouts is fun, it is much more than a social club. Get to know the parents. Give parents interest cards at the beginning of the year. This card, in addition to containing emergency contact information, can gather information about their professions, places of work, hobbies, talents, etc. Later in the year, you will have an idea of who to call when you need help with a project or trip. Communicate often with the parents. Send home updates and easy-to-read permission forms. Talk to parents as they pick up and drop off their girls. Be professional. Do not gossip about the girls or other parents. If you have an important issue to discuss, make sure that the girls are properly supervised and speak with the parent in private. Parents are more likely to help when you ask them directly. Also, make sure the task is specific and shortterm. People can easily get overwhelmed if you ask, 8 Would you be willing to help with the troop? Instead, state, I need a parent to assist with our Mexican craft project. Will you help us one hour a week for two weeks? Create and publish a phone tree or distribution list. Instead of calling every parent in your troop, you can make only a few calls and start a chain of information, or send one to all. Parent Meeting Daisy Points Have blank name tags for parents and girls and encourage them to make one for themselves when they arrive. If possible, contact an older Girl Scout troop and ask for volunteers to come and do activities with your Daisies while you and your assistant(s) meet with the parents. Read through FYI and provide families with any information on upcoming events designed specifically for them to attend (non-troop events).

9 The Girl Scout Daisy Uniform Uniforms are not required in Girl Scouts, but we recommend that girls have a tunic or vest to display their awards, badges and patches. The Girl Scout uniform can be put together in many different ways. Some troops will decide on certain pieces or may make their own T-shirts, while others allow the individual girls to decide what type of uniform to wear. Below is a guide to the Daisy uniform. You have the option of either a vest or a tunic. You can purchase the Girl Scout uniform and other related items at the Promise Provisions Girl Scout Store. The Daisy vest and tunic are available in various sizes. Please buy it with room to grow. Items to purchase with vest or tunic. All others are earned and will be provided by troop unless otherwise noted by troop leader. Promise Provisions Girl Scout Store 7007 Idlewild Road Charlotte, NC Monday-Thursday 8:30 am-6:30 pm Friday 8:30 am-5:30 pm Open select Saturdays Online Store: hngirlscouts.org 9

10 Summary of Troop Committee Positions Leader Co-Leader/ Assistant Leader Troop Treasurer Family Campaign Coordinator Events Coordinator Outdoor Coordinator Fall Product Sale Manager Troop Cookie Sale Manager Troop Historian Field Trip Driver Set up troop meeting location and schedule Work with Service Unit Placement Coordinator to contact girls assigned to meet with your troop Hold regularly schedule troop meetings Carry out troop activities to ensure and protect the safety of all participants Take council required trainings Attend monthly Service Unit meetings Maintain girl award recognitions Assist leader with above Take council required trainings (recommended) Maintains troop bank account Completes reports on receipts and disbursements Completes Annual Troop Report Work with Service Unit to promote contributions from Girl Scout families to benefit Girl Scouts, Hornets Nest Council Works with leader to provide troop events and outdoor programs Attends Service Unit cookie/fall product training Receives & disburses information, products and incentives Files needed paperwork Provides deadline information Takes photos of events/activities Writes articles and submit to local paper Drives troop members to activities and events outside of the normal meeting place All volunteers - except Series Advisor and Event Volunteers - need to complete the online Girl Scouting 101 course (approximately 45 minutes long). Some volunteer roles require a criminal background check and additional training. For more information visit 10

11 Girl-Led Planning Girl-Led planning is a very special and unique part of Girl Scout program. It provides an invaluable and important opportunity for girls to make their own decisions and plans while benefiting from adult guidance and facilitation. It is the assuming leadership aspect of progression. Age and ability are the other two aspects of progression in all levels of Girl Scouting. These elements enable each girl to chart her individual course through the Girl Scout Daisy program, continue to the Brownie, Junior, Cadette, Senior and Ambassadors levels, and eventually to become an adult Girl Scout. This graph shows how the Girl-Led partnership progresses as Girl Scouts move through the grade levels. LEADER Daisy Brownie Junior The following suggestions may be helpful in planning with Girl Scout Daisies: Troop Government: The Girl Scout Daisy Ring In Girl Scouts, girls develop their self-confidence and self-esteem by making choices and influencing others. The girls should be in charge of governing their troop and should add to their responsibilities as they grow. For Girl Scout Daisies, troop government occurs in the Girl Scout Daisy Ring. The following are tips for implementing this type of government: The ring is used for planning, problem solving, and decision making. The girls gather together and sit in a circle on the floor. The leader or-ringleader (not the adult, necessarily) introduces the topic of discussion, any information about the topic, and the decision that needs to be made. The girls take turns expressing their ideas and opinions. Everyone should have a chance to speak, but no one should dominate the discussion. A great way to make things fair is to use a talking stick. A talking stick (or ball, rock, etc.) is passed around the ring. Only the person with the stick in her hand has permission to talk. Have an agreed upon signal to use when the group needs quiet time. Hints for keeping things fair: No putting down people or ideas. Make sure all people speak, but no one dominates. Adults can model behavior for the ring by listening without criticism to girls and parents. At first, the girls will need a lot of help from the adult in order to get the hang of using the ring to make decisions. After they become familiar with it, the girls can take turns being the discussion leader. 11 Cadette Senior Ambassador Encourage the girls to speak up about their ideas and to take turns expressing their opinions. Your guidance may be needed in working through ideas. Use pictures, charts, handouts and other concrete materials to increase involvement. Keep discussion short. Young girls cannot sit still for long periods, especially after a day at school. Remember that Girl Scouting provides a safe environment where girls try different approaches and may experience failure before discovering the best way to continue toward their goal(s). Use the Daisy Girl Scout Ring (see below) for troop management, planning, making decisions or rules, assigning jobs, discussing or solving problems, and evaluating activities. GIRL

12 Unit Three: Meetings Meeting Logistics Many new volunteers have questions about the logistics of their meetings. When you are starting out, some of the best advice will come from other volunteers in your Service Unit, since they are familiar with your community. Keep in mind that the troop belongs to you, the girls, and their parents, so together you decide what works for the entire group. Here are some tips to get you started: Meeting Frequency: You can choose to meet weekly, bi-monthly, or monthly. Many adult volunteers start with bi-monthly meetings, and make adjustments accordingly. Meeting Times: Many things, such as transportation, meeting space availability, and other obligations, will dictate the time of your troop meetings. Meetings usually last for an hour to an hour-and-a-half. Meeting Locations: Schools, religious buildings, and community centers are the most common places for meetings. Convenience, safety, and resources should be considered when selecting a location for meetings. Meeting Dues: Dues are used to instill a sense of responsibility in girls and to purchase badges or basic supplies. These dues typically range from $0.50 to $2.00 per meeting. The troop can also do money-earning activities, such as participate in the Fall Product Program and Cookie Program, to support troop trips and activities. If needed, your troop can do additional money-earning activities as described in Volunteer Essentials Chapter 5. Troop Size: The recommended size for a Girl Scout Daisy troop is 8 12 girls. Often, troop size will start very small and increase as new girls learn about the fun your girls are having. As an adult volunteer, your openness to accept these new girls into your troop sets a great example of Be a Sister to Every Girl Scout. Regardless of the number of girls in your troop, you want to make sure that you have plenty of adult support, in the form of adult co-volunteers and parents. Kapers A kaper is a job. A kaper chart shows the job and who is doing it. Using a kaper chart ensures that all girls will have an equal distribution of job responsibilities, and limits disagreements about who gets each job. Kaper charts can be created in a wide variety of styles, from the very simple to the very creative. The kaper chart below can be replicated using any theme. Kaper Group Name Girls Other Ideas: Clean-Up Dancers Katherine, Ling Snack Singers Kisha, Jenny Opening Painters Beth, Josey Closing Sculptors Tash, Lucy, Attendance Yodelers Ann, Meredith Using the kaper chart shown above, each meeting, rotate the groups in order to make sure all girls equally share all jobs. So, the dancers group would move down to snack, the singers to the opening, the painters to the closing, the sculptors to the attendance, and the yodelers to the clean up. Flowers Have flower centers with the name of the job on them. Put the names of the girls on petals and surround each center with the names of the girls who are doing the kaper that week. Tree Have a bare tree with the kapers listed on branches. Put the girls names on the leaves and surround the branches with the names of the girls who are assigned that job. Fish & Seaweed Let the girl design and cut out their own fish. Put the names of the jobs on the seaweed. Group the fish around the seaweed with the job that they are to do that week. 12

13 Meeting Components & Ideas Components of a Meeting Each Girl Scout meeting provides and opportunity to explore new worlds and learn new skills. For this reason, there is no strict meeting agenda for Girl Scout Daisies. You do not have to worry about sticking to a rigid set of activities that may not appeal to your girls. Instead, the key is flexibility based on the needs and interests of the girls. You may have a meeting that consists of one activity and then your next meeting may have three activities. You are able to consult a wide range of resources for ideas and activities, including the girls themselves, Journey books, Daisy Girl s Guide to Girl Scouting, and the program opportunities offered by Girl Scouts Hornets Nest Council. Clean-Up Closing Over the years, research, tradition, and knowledge of what works with girls has created the following suggested model for a successful troop meeting. This model is meant to create a natural flow for the meetings and provide a balanced diet of fun, learning, responsibility, and accomplishment. If you use this agenda for each meeting, the girls will feel comfortable because of the predictability of what will be included in each meeting. That predictability puts them at ease as they attempt new activities. The constantly changing nature of the activities and your response to their interests will prevent the girls from becoming bored. Start Activities Opening Business Start Up Activity: This is the wait around period before the meeting officially begins. This is a time to chat and greet all of the girls and parents. Since you will be talking and setting up, the girls should have an easy, self-directed activity to engage their attention. Ideas include: Coloring Sheets Puzzles Scavenger hunts through Girl Scout books People hunt (i.e. find a girl that speaks another language, find someone with the same number of sisters as you, etc.) Play board games Opening: A repetitive format for opening every meeting is a way of providing comfort and familiarity for the girls. The opening allows girls to know the meeting is officially starting, and focus and prepare for the rest of the meeting. Ideas include: Girl Scout Promise and Law Flag ceremonies Songs Offer up an opening question and be the first to answer (i.e. If I won a million dollars, I would ) Business Meeting: This is a time for special announcements, dues, attendance, making plans, voting, deciding on activities, and other troop business. This section of the meeting is very important for the girls because they learn how to lead, influence others, and communicate feelings and opinions. Little by little, allows the girls to take responsibility for more of the business of the troop. All of these skills are essential for the development of self-esteem and confidence. Activities: During this section of the Girl Scout meeting, girls get a chance to build skills, try new things, explore their interests, and work cooperatively with others. As the girls progress, you will begin to get insight into their interests. Make sure that you are always asking for their ideas and input. You will also pick up good ideas from other adult volunteers when you attend the monthly service unit meetings. Ideas include: Creative arts or crafts Activities from the Girl Scout Journey books Activities from the Girl s Guide to Girl Scouting Pen pal letters Learn about different cultures Clean-Up: Clean-up is important because it teaches the girls about sharing responsibility, allows them to face the consequence of making a mess, and helps emphasize good stewardship. You can reinforce the practice of Leave things better than you found them. Closing: This is a time when you can emphasize the accomplishments of the meeting, remind the girls of what is coming up, focus on personal goals, help girls feel part of a tradition, and end on a calm positive note. Ideas include: Friendship circle and squeeze Sharing personal goals for the week ahead Websites with additional ideas:

14 STEP BY STEP GUIDE FOR THE First Five Meetings This curriculum guide will provide you with everything you need to successfully facilitate the first five meetings of your Daisy troop. Each session begins with an overall description of what the girls will accomplish and a list of what you will need for the activities. Tips for a successful meeting: Make sure to read over the instructions for each session before you meet with the girls to ensure smooth delivery of the curriculum. Check to make sure you have all of your supplies ready. When putting the girls into pairs, try to pair a kindergartener with a first grader. When reading stories to the girls, pause to show them the pictures as you go along. 14

15 Meeting One: Learning the Girl Scout Promise In this session, girls will: Learn the Girl Scout Promise & earn the Promise Center of the Daisy Petal Set. Learn the Girl Scout Sign. Make a friendship web. What you ll need: Pre-cut construction paper (daisy shapes) with the girls names on them see template on next page. Ball of yarn to use as a necklace for the name tags & for the friendship web activity Single hole punch and bucket of crayons or colored pencils Opening: Begin the meeting with the Pledge of Allegiance Have each girl color their daisy name tag. Use the yarn to have the name tag hang around the girls necks. Arrange the girls in a circle and have them tell the group their name and what grade they are in. Explain the traditional Quiet Sign for a Girl Scout meeting. Use the quiet sign whenever the girls get too loud. Quiet sign: Raise the right hand over the head to signal for attention and quiet at any Girl Scout gathering. When the hand goes up, mouths go quiet, and everyone joins in giving the quiet sign. Program Activity: Earn the Promise Center of the Daisy Petal Set. See requirements on page 8 in the Daisy Girl s Guide to Girl Scouting. Plan to give the Promise Center to the girls at their Investiture Ceremony. Show the girls how to make the Girl Scout sign. You make the Girl Scout sign when saying the Promise and Law. The three fingers represent the three parts of the Promise. Tell the girls you will start out each session with the Promise, and recite the Promise with them while making the Girl Scout sign. Make a friendship web using a ball of yarn. Friendship Web: sit in a circle (adults, too) and start with a ball of yarn. Ask the girls to say their name and favorite color when they catch the ball of yarn. Say your name and then throw the yarn to a girl. When the girl catches the yarn, she states her name and favorite color and then throws it to another friend. Tell the girls you are building a friendship web where you are always there to help each other. Clean Up Time & Snack Time Closing: Discuss what was learned in the meeting and remind girls and parents of upcoming meeting dates and events. Close with a friendship circle. Friendship Circle: Everyone gathers in a circle and crosses their right arm over their left in front of them and hold hands with the people on either side. The circle represents the unbroken chain of friendship among Girl Scouts and Girl Guides all over the world. Once everyone is silent, the leader starts the friendship squeeze which is passed from hand to hand. Tell the girls to make a wish after their hand has been squeezed before they pass the squeeze along. Collect name tags for next meeting. 15

16 Daisy Name Tag Template 16

17 Meeting Two: Learning to be Honest & Fair In this session, girls will: Learn the Girl Scout Law. Earn the Lupe Petal of the Daisy Petal Set. There are 10 Petals in the Daisy Petal Set. Every Flower Friend tells a story about her line of the Girl Scout Law. What you ll need: Daisy Girl s Guide to Girl Scouting Handbook Lyrics to Make New Friends (pg. 9 in the Daisy Girl s Guide to Girl Scouting Handbook) Supplies from first meeting for any girls who were absent Opening: Give each girl their Daisy name tag and open the meeting by reciting the Girl Scout Promise and the Pledge of Allegiance. Have new girls that did not attend the first meeting color their Daisy name tag and explain the Girl Scout Promise to them. Introduce the girls to the Girl Scout Law by having them repeat each line after you and explain that in this meeting they will learn how to be Honest & Fair. Program Activity: Earn the Lupe Petal of the Daisy Petal Set. Plan to give the Lupe Petal to the girls at their Investiture Ceremony (meeting five). Share with the girls Lupe s Story: A Fair Turn in the Flower Garden in the Daisy Girl s Guide to Girl Scouting Handbook. This story will teach the girls how to be honest and fair. To earn the Lupe Petal, follow the steps outlined in the handbook. Step one, discuss Lupe s Story. Step two, have the girls act out the story. Each girl can take a different part. Step three, practice being honest and fair. NOTE: Another option especially if time is short is to assign the girls homework where they have to do something that is honest and fair between now and the next meeting. They will need to share with the troop during the next meeting what they did (or write a sentence or draw a picture about it to bring) as the last step in earning the petal. Teach the girls Make New Friends to sing at their Investiture Ceremony. Clean Up Time & Snack Time Closing: Discuss what was learned in the meeting and remind girls and parents of upcoming meeting dates and Where Can I Find Songs & Lyrics? Visit gsmusic.com for MP3s, Karaoke Tracks, Sheet Music, Free Lyrics, Videos. Visit YouTube.com to listen to Girl Scout songs and videos. 17

18 Meeting Three: Learning to be Friendly & Helpful In this session, girls will: Learn the Girl Scout Law. Earn the Sunny Petal of the Daisy Petal Set. There are 10 Petals in the Daisy Petal Set. Every Flower Friend tells a story about her line of the Girl Scout Law. What you ll need: Daisy Girl s Guide to Girl Scouting Handbook Blank paper Bucket of crayons or colored pencils Opening: Give each girl their Daisy name tag and open the meeting by reciting the Girl Scout Promise and the Pledge of Allegiance. Re-introduce the girls to the Girl Scout Law by having them repeat each line after you and explain that in this meeting they will learn how to be Friendly & Helpful. Program Activity: Earn the Sunny Petal of the Daisy Petal Set. Plan to give the Sunny Petal to the girls at their Investiture Ceremony (meeting five). Share with the girls Sunny s Story: A Warm Welcome for Suzy. This story will teach the girls how to be friendly and helpful. To earn the Sunny Petal, follow the steps outlined in the Daisy Girl s Guide to Girl Scouting Handbook. Step one, discuss Sunny s Story. Step two, have the girls create a drawing based on the story. Step three, practice being friendly and helpful. NOTE: Another option especially if time is short is to assign the girls homework where they have to do something that is friendly and helpful between now and the next meeting. They will need to share with the troop during the next meeting what they did (or write a sentence or draw a picture about it to bring) as the last step in earning the petal. Practice singing Make New Friends for their Investiture Ceremony. Clean Up Time & Snack Time Make sure girls will have their Daisy uniform by meeting five for the Investiture Ceremony. Discuss with parents the uniform essentials (page 9 in this document). Uniforms can be purchased at our council store, Promise Provisions (see page 9 in this document for hours and location). Some troops collect money from the parents and a leader purchases all items from the store, other troops have the parents purchase the uniform items themselves. 18

19 Meeting Four: Getting Ready for the Investiture Ceremony In this session, girls will: Learn about and practice an Investiture Ceremony. Learn the Girl Scout Handshake. Decorate invitations for the Investiture Ceremony. What you ll need: Pre-made invitations to the Investiture Ceremony on white paper for the girls to color and decorate. See sample invitation on next page. The girls will give these invitations to their parents at the end of the meeting. Bucket of crayons or colored pencils Any craft supplies for the girls to decorate the invitations (i.e. colored paper, yarn, glitter, etc.) Opening: Give each girl their Daisy name tag and open the meeting by reciting the Girl Scout Promise and the Pledge of Allegiance. Program Activity: Explain to the girls what an Investiture Ceremony is. An investiture ceremony is held when an individual joins Girl Scouting for the first time. She makes the Girl Scout Promise, receives her membership pin and is welcomed into Girl Scouting. Membership Pins: The girls will receive their Daisy Pin during this ceremony. Practice the Investiture Ceremony. See example on page 21 in this document. Have the girls decorate the invitations to the Investiture Ceremony. Teach the girls the Girl Scout Handshake. Girl Scout Handshake: Girl Scouts can greet each other with the Girl Scout handshake, used by Girl Scouts and Girl Guides all over the world. The handshake is made by shaking hands with the left hand and making the Girl Scout sign with the right. The left hand is nearest to the heart and signifies friendship. Girl Scout Daisy Pin Practice singing Make New Friends for their Investiture Ceremony. Clean Up Time & Snack Time Closing: Discuss what was learned in the meeting and remind girls and parents of upcoming meeting dates and events. Close with a friendship circle. Make sure girls will have their Daisy uniform by meeting five for the Investiture Ceremony. If troop does not provide uniforms, discuss with parents the uniform essentials. Uniforms can be purchased at our council store, Promise Provisions. Leader Note: Make sure to purchase the Daisy Pin and the Daisy Petal Sets for each girl to give at the Investiture Ceremony. These can be purchased at our council store, Promise Provisions. If the troop has not collected enough dues to cover these items yet, collect money from the parents to cover the cost. 19

20 YOU RE INVITED! Please join the members of Troop at our Girl Scout Investiture Ceremony where they will receive their Daisy pins. Date: Time: Location: RSVP to by 20

21 Set Up: Cut out for the letters D,A,I,S,I,E,S (one letter for each girl in the troop you can use the word Daisy if you have fewer girls, or Daisy Girl Scouts if you have more girls) Girls stand in horseshoe formation or circle. Adult Volunteer: Today we officially welcome you as members of Girl Scouts. Wearing your Girl Scout Daisy Pin means you have promised to try your best to serve God and your country, to be helpful to others, and to be the best person you can be. The three finger Girl Scout sign reminds us of the three parts of our Girl Scout Promise. Lets all say the Girl Scout Promise together. Girl Scout Daisies: Repeat the Girl Scout Promise together. Adult Volunteer: Call each girl individually to receive their Girl Scout Daisy Pin. The Girl Scout tradition is for the Daisy Pin to be pinned upside down during the ceremony. Before the girl can wear the pin right side up, she has to do a good deed. Each girl shakes hands with the Adult Volunteer using the Girl Scout handshake. The Girl Scout Daisy returns to the circle as another comes forward. Continue until all the new girls are invested. Adult Volunteer: The girls want to show you what being a Daisy means to them. Each girl hold up a letter and says what it stands for. Leaders may help as needed. Girl Scout Daisies: D is for DOING. We do lots of new things. A is for ACTION. Daisies are always on the go. I is for INTEREST. We are interested in everything. S is for SUPER. Daisies are great. I is for IMPORTANT. We are important. E is for ENERGY. We never run out. S is for SHOW. Show us how we can do it. Adult Volunteer & Girl Scout Daisies: Lead the girls in singing Make New Friends. Girl Scout Investiture Ceremony Adult Volunteer: For our closing we would like to have you join us in our friendship circle. Explain to the families the meaning of the Friendship Circle: Everyone gathers in a circle and crosses their right arm over their left in front of them and hold hands with the people on either side. The circle represents the unbroken chain of friendship among Girl Scouts and Girl Guides all over the world. Once everyone is silent, the leader starts the friendship squeeze which is passed from hand to hand. Tell the girls to make a wish after their hand has been squeezed before they pass the squeeze along. Reception: If you chose to have a family reception, either have families bring something to share with everyone or provide something yourself. Make sure to plates, silverware, cups, napkins, etc. are on the list of needed items! 21

22 Meeting Five: The Investiture Ceremony In this session, girls will: Receive their Daisy Pins and earned petals during the Investiture Ceremony. What you ll need: Cut out for the letters D,A,I,S,I,E,S (one letter for each girl in the troop you can use the word Daisy if you have fewer girls, or Daisy Girl Scouts if you have more girls) Daisy Pins Daisy Petals Sets The girls will have earned the Promise Center, Lupe s Petal and Sunny s Petal at this point. If you chose to have a family reception either have families bring something to share with everyone or provide something yourself. Make sure to bring plates, silverware, cups, napkins, etc. Opening: Have girls introduce their family to their new friends and meeting place. Program Activity: Investiture Ceremony as practiced in the previous meeting Petals Awarded Family Reception Time Closing: Provide families with upcoming troop activities as well as any information on upcoming events found in the FYI designed specifically for them to attend with their girls (non troop events). Congratulations! You have just completed the first five meetings of your Daisy troop! Continue to use the Daisy Girl s Guide to Girl Scouting Handbook to keep earning the Daisy petals. 22

23 Making Decisions About Money When managing money... Make sure to thoroughly review the Finances chapter in Volunteer Essentials, which new leaders receive during Leader 101 training, and is also available at Troop funds belong to the troop as a whole. There should be no individual girl accounts within the troop bank account. Girl Scout funds do not become the property of any individual girl or adult. Troop Trip Planning Troop trips are a wonderful way of building skills, having fun, working towards goals, and seeing the world. Many adults fondly recall the trips that they took when they were Girl Scouts. The following offers information and tips that will contribute to a successful troop trip. Girls benefit from the Girl Scout program when they are the planners and decision makers. Remember, this is their time to explore interests and desires. Their experience planning troop trips will apply to later life successes. Trips should be progressive. Revisit the idea of progression: Rome wasn't built in a day and the girls will not automatically be ready for a long trip. There are steps that you can take to ensure success. Here is an example of progressive steps you can take to help the girls build up to the big trip. Take a walk during a troop meeting. Take a hike in a local park. Take a day field trip. Have an overnight at a girl s house, or meeting place. Before planning a trip, consider the following information about your troop: The age of your troop members and their skills related to handling money, budgeting, planning, and communication. Individual experiences in and outside of Girl Scouting. The ability of your girls to focus on a goal (for a week, month, year, several years). Time to prepare (economically and otherwise) for the trip. Safety is the primary concern. First, the trip goals should be age-appropriate. Second, paperwork provides a safety net for the troop adult volunteer. Make sure that all paperwork is submitted to the appropriate people and that you have multiple organized copies of all medical forms. Trip Ideas for Daisies: Visit the library Visit the Fire Station Visit a doctor or dentist office Visit a local nursing home Visit a local ice cream shop GSHNC sponsored events for Daisies Local GSHNC camp Visit a local museum Year-end trip to a nearby camp Please refer to the Troop Trip Appendix in Volunteer Essentials for more details. For GSUSA Travel Programs visit 23

24 Unit FOUR: Girl Scout Traditions Sharing traditions with millions of Girl Scouts and the huge network of Girl Scout alumnae who came before them helps remind girls they belong to a big, powerful sisterhood. Girl Scout Sign Girl Scouts make the Girl Scout sign when they say the Girl Scout Promise. The three fingers represent the three parts of the Promise. Girl Scout Motto The Girl Scout motto is Be prepared. In the 1947 Girl Scout Handbook, the motto was explained this way: A Girl Scout is ready to help out wherever she is needed. Willingness to serve is not enough; you must know how to do the job well, even in an emergency. The same ideas are true today. Girl Scout Slogan The Girl Scout slogan, which has been used since 1912, is Do a good turn daily. The slogan is a reminder of the many ways girls can contribute positively to the lives of others. Girl Scout Handshake Girl Scouts can greet each other with the Girl Scout handshake, used by Girl Scouts and Girl Guides all over the world. The handshake is made by shaking hands with the left hand and making the Girl Scout sign with the right. The left hand is nearest to the heart and signifies friendship. Friendship Circle The friendship circle stands for an unbroken chain of friendship with Girl Scouts and Girl Guides around the world. Everyone stands in a circle, crosses their right arms over their left, and clasps hands with their friends on both sides. Everyone makes a silent wish as a friendship squeeze is passed from hand to hand. SWAPS Girl Scouts often make small tokens of friendship to exchange with the Girl Scouts they meet when they travel. These little gifts are called SWAPS, which stands for Special Whatchamacallits Affectionately Pinned Somewhere or Shared With A Pal. Why SWAP? For Girl Scouts, swapping can be an expression of friendship and camaraderie. This can also follow along with the traditions, in that swapping is often done during a camporee or other gathering. It teaches the girls about sharing with others, while learning new skills and ways of communication. Another benefit is learning about other cultures, countries and Girl Scout/Girl Guide Ways. What to do with all those SWAPS? There are numerous ways to collect and display SWAPS. Attach them to your troop cap or bandanna, a t-shirt, tote bag, or vest. Stick them to your refrigerator, a cork board, or poster board. Make a SWAP Box out of a coffee can or shoe box and collect them there. And of course, share them with old and new friends. SWAPS Etiquette Always remember to say thank you when someone gives you a SWAP. Not only is this good manners, but it is encouraging for others to share. Be courteous. If a person gives you a SWAP you don't really like, remember that it may have come with the purest of intentions and the simplest of skills. One good thing to do when you go to a camporee or other event where there is a lot of swapping is to wear a hat and put the swaps on it. Bring extra SWAPS if you are going to an event where swapping is part of the event. It is always a Girl Scout good turn to give those who have few or none. SWAPS should be handmade. Store bought things take away from the concept of the gift. It is not how fancy your SWAP is, it s the smile that accompanies it when given. Once you have swapped, you do not SWAP it again. Lastly, but not least, have fun swapping! This is supposed to be a fun experience for you and your girls. The girls can learn a lot about sharing and how other troops in other states/countries do things. 24

25 Girl Scout Ceremonies Ceremonies help Girl Scouts mark special events throughout the year, such as bridging to another level, earning a National Leadership Journey award, or getting a Girl Scout pin. Ceremonies can commemorate accomplishments or simply make the beginning or end of a group's meeting special. Girls can plan a ceremony around a theme, such as friendship or nature, and express themselves in thought, words, or song. Whatever its purpose, every Girl Scout ceremony enables girls to share Girl Scout history and traditions and create their own special memories. Important Ceremonies in Girl Scouting Investiture: welcomes new members, girls or adults, into the Girl Scout family for the first time. Girls receive their Girl Scout, Girl Scout Brownie, or Girl Scout Daisy pin at this time. See page 27 of this document for more details. Rededication ceremonies: are an opportunity for girls and adults to renew their commitment to the Girl Scout Promise and Law. Bridging ceremonies: mark a girl's move from one level of Girl Scouting to another. See page 28 of this document for more details. Fly-Up ceremony: a bridging ceremony for Girl Scout Brownies bridging to Girl Scout Juniors. Girls receive the Girl Scout pin along with their Brownie wings. Flag ceremonies: can be part of any activity that honors the American flag. See page 26 of this document for more details. Closing ceremonies: Indicate the meeting is over. See page 28 of this document for more details. Journey ceremonies: honor Girl Scouts who have earned the final award along a Journey. The ceremonies are usually held at the troop/group level and invite the girls to develop a themed celebration of their Journey, often including friends and family. Girl Scout Bronze Award ceremony: honors Girl Scout Juniors who have earned the Girl Scout Bronze Award and is usually held at the troop/group level. Girl Scout Silver Award ceremony: honors Girl Scout Cadettes who have earned the Girl Scout Silver Award and is often combined with the Girl Scout Gold Award ceremony at the council level. Girl Scout Gold Award ceremony: honors Girl Scout Seniors and Ambassadors who have earned the highest award in Girl Scouting and takes place at council level. Girl Scouts' Own: is a girl-planned program that allows girls to explore their feelings around a topic, such as friendship or the Girl Scout Promise and Law, using spoken word, favorite songs, poetry, or other expressions. It is not a religious ceremony. See page 29 of this document for more details. Tips for Holding Ceremonies Devote sufficient time to planning the ceremony. Good ceremonies have a clear purpose and enrich the meaning and mood of the ceremony. Use Journey adult guides and The Girl s Guide to Girl Scouting to help girls plan their ceremonies. Take safety precautions when using candles or fires, or when the girls construct bridges or platforms. Add personal elements to traditional ceremonies. Use favorite poems, songs, stories, and sayings, or have the girls write something new. Consider the role of colors and symbols that the girls might use in their ceremony. Observe flag etiquette when the girls hold flag ceremonies. 25

26 Flag Ceremony A flag ceremony honors the American flag as the symbol of our country and all the hopes, dreams, and people it consists of. If your group includes girls from other countries, girls can honor their flags, too, and conduct an international flag ceremony. Flag ceremonies may be used for: Opening or closing meetings Opening or closing special events Beginning or closing a day Honoring a special occasion or special person Retiring a worn flag Flag ceremonies may take place in meeting rooms, outdoor settings, large auditoriums, on stage, even on horseback. All flag ceremonies share one thing respect for the flag. instructions for an Indoor Flag Ceremony Supplies Needed: An American flag and, if possible, a Girl Scout flag. The troop forms a horseshoe. The color guard is in position. All stand at attention. The Girl Scout-in-charge says: Color guard, advance. This signals the color guard to advance to the flags, salute the American flag and pick the flags up. Then they turn together and get into position facing the troop. Everyone stands at attention. The color guard walks forward carrying the flags to the formation. They stop in front of the standards. The Girl Scout-in-charge says: Color guard, post the colors. This signals the color bearers to place the flags in their stands. They remain at attention next to the flags. The Girl Scout-in-charge says: Girl Scouts honor the flag of your country. The group salutes the American flag. The Girl Scout-in-charge says: Girls Scouts recite the Pledge of Allegiance. Songs, poems, or verses may follow the pledge. Note: If the flag ceremony is a part of a larger ceremony such as an investiture, the Girl Scout-in-charge dismisses the color guard and then the main ceremony takes place. Following the ceremony, the Girl Scout-in-charge commands the color guard to retire the colors by taking the flags to their place of storage. The following commands can be used: Girl Scouts, attention Color guard, advance Color guard, honor your flag Color guard, retire the colors Color guard, dismissed Girl Scouts, dismissed At the end of the flag ceremony, take the opportunity to give further instruction on what the girls will be doing in their meeting. Terms Used in a Flag Ceremony: The color bearer (or flag bearer) is the person who carries the flag. There is one color bearer for each flag used in the ceremony. The color guard is a team that guards the flags. Any even number of guards may be used, but usually four or six girls are sufficient. The Girl Scout in charge (or caller) is a designated Girl Scout who announces or calls each part of the ceremony. 26

27 Investiture Ceremony An investiture ceremony is held when an individual joins Girl Scouting for the first time. She makes the Girl Scout Promise, receives her membership pin and is welcomed into Girl Scouting. When? An investiture ceremony is done any time new girls join the troop. Girls are invested after they have learned the meaning of the Girl Scout Promise and Law. The investiture ceremony can be combined with a rededication ceremony for returning girls, a time for them to renew the Girl Scout Promise and Law. Girls Help Plan: Although younger girls may need guidance in planning, conducting and participating in a ceremony to make it significant and satisfying, a ceremony which girls plan themselves is an opportunity for creative self-expression. Experienced girls in the troop should be involved in helping plan and carry out the ceremony. They might tell or act out the Girl Scout Daisy story, give the Girl Scout handshake, or say words of welcome. All girls should be involved in planning for the investiture meetings (songs to sing, refreshments, serving on committees, etc.). Membership Pins: The appropriate membership pin is given for the age level (Girl Scout Daisy Pin, Girl Scout Brownie Pin or Girl Scout Pin). The World Association Pin is usually presented after the girls have learned about the international aspects of Girl Scouting/Girl Guiding. However, it can be presented at the investiture ceremony if other girls have this pin already. Sample Girl Scout Investiture Ceremony Set Up: Cut out for the letters D,A,I,S,I,E,S (one letter for each girl in the troop you can use the word Daisy if you have fewer girls, or Daisy Girl Scouts if you have more girls) Girls stand in horseshoe formation or circle. Adult Volunteer: Today we officially welcome you as members of Girl Scouts. Wearing your Girl Scout Daisy Pin means you have promised to try your best to serve God and your country, to be helpful to others, and to be the best person you can be. The three finger Girl Scout sign reminds us of the three parts of our Girl Scout Promise. Lets all say the Girl Scout Promise together. Girl Scout Daisies: Repeat the Girl Scout Promise together. Adult Volunteer: Call each girl individually to receive their Girl Scout Daisy Pin. The Girl Scout tradition is for the Daisy Pin to be pinned upside down during the ceremony. Before the girl can wear the pin right side up, she has to do a good deed. Each girl shakes hands with the Adult Volunteer using the Girl Scout handshake. The Girl Scout Daisy returns to the circle as another comes forward. Continue until all the new girls are invested. Adult Volunteer: The girls want to show you what being a Daisy means to them. Each girl hold up a letter and says what it stands for. Leaders may help as needed. Girl Scout Daisies: D is for DOING. We do lots of new things. A is for ACTION. Daisies are always on the go. I is for INTEREST. We are interested in everything. S is for SUPER. Daisies are great. I is for IMPORTANT. We are important. E is for ENERGY. We never run out. S is for SHOW. Show us how we can do it. Adult Volunteer & Girl Scout Daisies: Lead the girls in singing Make New Friends. Adult Volunteer: For our closing we would like to have you join us in our friendship circle. Explain to the families the meaning of the Friendship Circle: Everyone gathers in a circle and crosses their right arm over their left in front of them and hold hands with the people on either side. The circle represents the unbroken chain of friendship among Girl Scouts and Girl Guides all over the world. Once everyone is silent, the leader starts the friendship squeeze which is passed from hand to hand. Tell the girls to make a wish after their hand has been squeezed before they pass the squeeze along. Reception: If you chose to have a family reception, either have families bring something to share with everyone or provide something yourself. Make sure to bring plates, silverware, cups, napkins, etc. 27

28 Bridging Ceremony Bridging is an important transition in a Girl Scout's life. It's a defining moment when a girl becomes aware of her achievements and is ready for new adventures and responsibilities. Celebrating this change should be fun, personalized, and memorable for everyone involved. And most of all, it should be designed by the girls in true partnership with adults. Bridging ceremonies usually take place at the beginning or end of the Girl Scout year and can have three parts: Opening: guests are welcomed. Main Section: the ceremony is explained and the girls celebrate moving from one level to the next. Closing: girls can participate in friendship circles and thank their guests. Each of the ceremony's parts offers plenty of room for the girls' creativity and individuality. And whether the ceremony includes an actual bridge or a symbolic one, or if it includes props like candles, flowers, or flags, it should always focus on paying tribute to the girls as they move forward. In addition to the ceremony itself, there are other ways you can help your Girl Scouts move to the next level. Volunteers can help girls work through bridging activities to earn their bridging award patch. Bridging awards mark a girl's transition from one leadership level to the next. An exciting time in a Girl Scout's life, the earning of the award and completion of the activities are designed to emphasize the continuity of one Girl Scout program and to welcome girls to an anticipated "next level." Guidelines for bridging to each level be found in the Girl s Guide to Girl Scouting book. When bridging, a volunteer can make a decision about moving up with her troop/group to the next level, or whether her bridging girls will move into another group. Bridging Award Patches Bridge to Brownie Bridge to Junior Bridge to Cadette Bridge to Senior Bridge to Ambassador Ideas for a Closing Ceremony A closing indicates the meeting is over and it is time to go home. Sample One Ask the girls for themes in which they have an interest, for example trees. With their adult volunteer s help, they find a short poem or write simple lyrics to a familiar song. Sample Two Get in the friendship circle. Read a poem or sing a song. A variation on taps (Day is Done) Night is come, owls are out, beetles hum round about, tip toe so out they creep, Girl Scout Daisies go home to sleep. Sample Three Use the golden friendship circle. Each girl gets a 12 piece of gold cord or yarn. The first girl makes a circle and makes a square knot in it. The girl on her left threads her cord through the first girl s circle and knots her piece. The third girl threads her cord through the second s, and so on. Eventually you will end up with a linked golden chain. As each girl makes her link, she says, I am a link in the golden chain of friendship and I must keep the link strong and bright. Sample Four Use the Vanish closing. Two adult volunteers make an arch with their arms. The girls go by twos and under the arch as quietly as they can (as if they have cotton under their shoes) as the adult volunteers say, Vanish. It makes for a quiet closing. Sample Five Use this to clean up before leaving. The girls move about arranging everything neatly. As the adult volunteer asks, Is everything finished? Girls answer, Everything. Adult volunteer asks, Is nothing left? Girls answer Nothing. Adult volunteer says, Then be gone. Girls get their coats and leave with their parent/guardians, but not until the above has been spoken. 28

29 A Girl Scout s Own Ceremony For some adult volunteers, a Girl Scout s Own is somewhat mysterious and sometimes confusing to introduce to girls, so they avoid it. However, it can be a very meaningful, thought provoking and beautiful ceremony, and should not be neglected because it is not familiar. Guidelines for a Girl Scout s Own It should be inspirational. It should be planned by the girls to express their deepest feelings about something (any ideals or values that have meaning for them). It is not a religious ceremony. It can take place anytime and in any form. It is not a performance for an audience. It involves choosing a theme and a place and deciding what to do. Example One The adult volunteer decided to suggest a Girl Scout s Own at a weekend camp out because the girls were not getting along. The girls decided that their theme would be friendship. The adult volunteer and the girls sat down and openly discussed how they felt about how the weekend was going. This led to importance of working together and then in turn led to what they valued (or devalued) in each other. It wasn't long before the word friend came into the discussion. The adult volunteer suggested that a Girl Scout s Own might help and explained what it was. In a short time, friendship was suggested as the theme. The adult volunteer had books of poetry and famous sayings about friendship, which she gave the girls. After explaining what a Girl Scout s Own was and how it worked, she gave them a half hour where they scattered around the campsite to decide what they thought about the theme and what they would do or say. When the adult volunteer rang a bell, everyone silently walked to a pine grove and sat down on the needle-covered ground. When a girl felt moved to speak or read or whatever she decided to do, she stood, did it, and sat back down. The setting grew quieter as the girls expressed their feelings about friendship. The adult volunteer finally said, Let s close with a friendship circle but instead of passing around the squeeze, each girl in turn stepped in front of the girl on her left, say something positive about her so all can hear and give her a hug. Some commented on appearance, some on skills she admired and some on positive personality traits. They all walked out of the pine grove and the Girl Scout s Own was over. The adult volunteer said for the remainder of the camp out, everyone was very cooperative. Later that year, some of the troop members commented that doing that Girl Scout s Own was one of the best-remembered activities of the year. Example Two The adult volunteer explained what a Girl Scout s Own was and that at the next meeting they would have one. The girls decided that they would like their theme to be Thanksgiving because this holiday was two days later. The girls were told to think about Thanksgiving before they returned for their next meeting. Before the girls arrived the next week, the adult volunteer put a paper foldout turkey on the floor in a corner of the gymnasium. After troop business, the adult volunteer said, We will all have our Girl Scout s Own in the gym. Remember, it is a serious ceremony and our theme is Thanksgiving. The girls slowly and quietly walked down the hall to the gymnasium and sat crossed legged in a circle around the paper turkey. The adult volunteer said, What can we say about the first Thanksgiving? The girls expressed hardships and what it must have been like. No one was called on. If a girl has something to say, she quietly said it. Then the adult volunteer put a little wax turkey candle in front of each girl and told each girl to think of what she felt most thankful for. When a girl was ready to speak, she picked up her candle and held it in her hand. When she was through speaking, she sat it down in front of her again. After everyone was done speaking, the adult volunteer quietly said, As you eat dinner on Thanksgiving Day, light your candle and think about what you said here today. The troop then quietly filed back to the meeting room. After they got inside the meeting room the Girl Scout s Own was over. The adult volunteer commented that the girls shared some very personal heartfelt thoughts. This Girl Scout s Own could serve as a springboard for hunger issues and lead to long term planning to help combat hunger in their own community. 29

30 Games The reason games are used in Girl Scouting is to: Help girls and leaders get acquainted easily and enjoy being together. Meet some of the needs of the whole troop and of individuals. For example, games can give girls a chance to be active and noisy after long hours in school, learn teamwork and fair play, learn to win or lose goodnaturedly, and to be both leaders and followers. To present new information or skills in an attractive way. To review or practice skills in a fun way. To help girls understand and appreciate both similar and different games of Girl Scouts and Girl Guides in other countries. Tips for Teaching Games Choose games according to the ages, interests, and abilities of the group you are working with. Make sure you choose a game appropriate to the site you will be using. Know the game well so you don't have to refer to notes while you are teaching. Make sure you collect all the supplies and equipment you will need for the game. Game Ideas Color Tag All girls stand in an open area. The game leader asks them to touch or point to something that is that specific color. Everyone would quickly do so, one girl per item. Girls unable to do so are out. The game leader continues to call out colors until one girl remains. Daisy to Daisy One person is the caller. The girls are paired. The caller says different body parts that must be matched with their partner by touching. Example: toes to toes, elbows to elbows, knees to knees, chin to chin, etc. When the caller says Daisy to Daisy, girls must find another partner. With an odd number of girls, the one without a partner is the caller. Popcorn Ball The game leader tells the girls they are popcorn kernels. They start out by popping or jumping about slowly. As the heat is turned up (game leader can call out hotter) they hop faster. When girls bump into each other, they stick together and must hop together. They continue to hop and grow until the entire group is into a giant popcorn ball. Explain the game briefly and get them playing it as soon as possible. Ask for questions before you begin. If the game is complicated, teach a portion at a time letting the girls play each portion as you teach it. Let the girls have fun with the game but stop when necessary to clear up any rules or to answer questions regarding the action of the game. Stop the game after a reasonable amount of time even if some girls are begging to continue. Make sure you make adaptations in the action or the rules of the game to accommodate girls with special needs in the group. Make sure you check the playing area for any safety hazards as well as evaluate the game for potential safety problems before you play the game with the girls. What Animal am I? Wrap as many different animal crackers as there are players and place in a bowl. Have players form a circle. Each player selects one wrapped animal cracker and unwraps it without showing anyone else. Players take turns standing inside the circle, acting like the animals on their cracker. The other players try to guess which animal is being imitated. Alphabet Scavenger Hunt Have the girls go out and hunt for an item that begins with the letter that the leader calls out. For example, call out A and have the girls go in search for something that begins with A. You can add a twist to the game and give each girl a different letter and let each girl go in search for her item. 30

31 Game Ideas Continued Giggling Gertie The girls form a circle and one girl stands in the center. The girl in the center laughs and tosses a rag in the air. The group starts to laugh and all players continue to laugh as long as the handkerchief is in the air. The instant the handkerchief touched the floor all faces become expressionless. The first person caught smiling or laughing is it and replaces the girl in the center. Magic Clean Up As the girls clean up the meeting place, they can sing a song to make the work go faster. This song is sung to the tune of London Bridge. Weave the magic in and out, in and out, in and out, Weave the magic in and out, for we are Daisies. We have tidied everything, everything, everything, We have tidied everything, for we are Daisies. Yarn Toss Take a ball of yarn and say the name of the girl that you are throwing it to (or rolling it to), holding on to the end. Then have that girl say the name of another girl and throw it to her, having her hold on to the yarn as well. Do this over and over until there is no more yarn. Talk about how in Girl Scouts we are all connected, how important each girl in the troop is, and how we have to work together to have fun. Me-You-Lisa Supplies: a soft ball such as a foam ball Have everyone sit in a circle, including the adult volunteers. Explain that the game is designed to help everyone learn names. When the ball is rolled to a girl, the girl should say her name and then roll the ball back to the adult volunteer. The volunteer rolls the ball to the other girls until all girls have introduced themselves. Barnyard Scramble Give each girl the name of an animal on a slip of paper (or a picture, especially for young girls who cannot yet read). Make sure there is at least two of each animal. On the signal, girls must make the sound that their animals make and try to find other girls with the same animal. This is a great way to break the ice. Charade Box Have a box prepared with simple ideas to act out written on a slip of paper. These may be done alone or with a buddy. Add to these or change them often if you find that the girls like this activity. Charades can be as simple or complex as the girls are ready. For example, setting the table, bowling, drinking something you like, eating corn on the cob, etc. We re Going on a Picnic Have each girl say, for example Hello, my name is Abby. I m going on a picnic and I m bringing Apples. the next girl in the circle will say, for example Hello, my name is Elizabeth and I m bringing Eggs. This is my friend, Abby and she is bringing apples. The pattern continues with each girl stating their own name and an item that begins with the same letter as her first name. Each continues to add the ones before her. You do not have to worry that a girl will not remember, the other girls in the circle will help her. Alphabet Line-Up The girls either line themselves up using the first letter of their names or they take turns lining each other up. Fantasy Island Have each girl say her name, then answer the following questions: If I were on a desert island, I would bring I would eat My hobbies would be...etc. 31 Affirmation Supplies: paper and crayon, pen or marker for each girl Have each girl on a piece of paper either write or draw responses to the following statements: My name is...my favorite thing to do is...my favorite TV show is...i like myself because...i like Saturdays because After the girls have finished, have them share it with the rest of the troop. You may wish to display them on a wall throughout the troop meeting. Movement Mambo Each girl introduces herself and must make up a movement. The movement must have a name that starts with the first letter of the girl s first name. the next girl must do that move and add her own, until the last girl is doing the whole troop s dance. For example, My name is Jenny and I do the Jemimmy My name is Emily and I do the Emmamooba and Jenny does the Jemimmy. My name is Rian and I do the Rimambo, Emily does the Emmamooba and Jenny does the Jemimmy. Mirror Mirror Girls need to first pair up, preferably randomly so buddies are not always together. One girl will be the mirror and will reflect whatever her partner does. The pairs face each others. The girl who is not the mirror should start making slow movements, lifting an arm or a leg or blowing our their cheeks. The mirrors must try to imitate them as quickly as possible. After a few minutes, switch. Animal Moves Goal: move from one line to the other like an animal. Use the movement that is called out and pretend to be that animal. This is not a race. Examples: walk like a turtle, run like a cheetah, gallop like a horse, hop like a kangaroo, jump like a rabbit, etc.

32 Songs Since the days of Daisy Low, Girl Scouts and their leaders have been writing, singing, and playing songs that celebrate sisterhood and the fundamental ideals of Girl Scouting. Songs can be used to open or close meetings, to enhance ceremonies, or just to share a special moment with other Girl Scouts. Fun Fact: The first Girl Scout Song Book, which was a collection of songs put together by girl members, was published in How to Choose Songs: Begin with some songs your troop is familiar with. You can enjoy singing them at once, with no practice. If your troop is not familiar with Girl Scout songs, select a song to begin with that is easy to learn. Short rounds or songs that include repetition are good to start with. If you notice your troop learns quickly, teach them a second verse of a song or proceed to songs that are longer and a little more advanced. Choose songs that suit the occasion. For example, if you are having a Fourth of July celebration, you would want to sing a song about our country. Introduce songs to make a mundane task more fun. For example, a clean up song can help keep girls focused and liven up clean up time during a meeting. Tips for Teaching Songs: Be familiar with the song so you don't need to use a song sheet or book as a crutch. Sing the song through first. Say the words phrase by phrase and have the group repeat. Sing the song together three times or until known but don t wear it out. If a song has several verses, teach one verse at a time. Begin with simple songs and move on to more difficult ones later on. You give the starting note. Avoid pitching the song too high or low. Songs may be taught using tapes or CD s; just follow the procedure above. Where Can I Find Songs & Lyrics? Visit gsmusic.com for MP3s, Karaoke Tracks, Sheet Music, Free Lyrics, Videos. Visit YouTube.com to listen to Girl Scout songs and videos. 32

33 Unit FIVE: Working with Girl Scout Daisies General Characteristics of Girl Scout Daises Emotional Needs the approval and support of adults and peers. Learning the power of words. Curious about people and the world around her. Understands rules and tries to conform. Sometimes blames others for her own mistakes. Starts to comprehend how conflicts can be solved by talking. Shows pride in accomplishments Social Physical Intellectual Plays with peers and likes to work in small groups of two or three. Has strong link to parents and likes to please adults. Needs support in completing tasks. Engages in group discussions and enjoys finding solutions to problems in imaginative ways. Interested in making up rules for the group, but prone to forget rules unless reinforced often. Is interested in difference among people. Can make behavior choices and follow simple two to three-step instructions. Has better control of large muscles than smaller muscles, and developing good eye-hand coordination. Works in cyclic bursts of energy and cannot sit still for long periods of time. Learns by first-hand exploration of the world. Moves fast; has lots of energy! Enjoys a sense of competence, socially and intellectually. Does not have an accurate sense of the passage of time. Learns by doing, experiencing and playing. Likes to be read to. Learning to read and write in school. Growing with Girl Scout Daisies As the troop volunteer, you are planting the seeds for growing girls to be adult volunteers with courage, confidence, and character. However, every gardener knows that you cannot simply plant seeds. You must also tend to and cultivate growing flowers, making sure to keep the environment safe and nurturing. Do not forget to provide plenty of room for the growing girls. Tips for the troop gardener Start with a closely supervised environment and by the time the girls are in third grade, allow them to manage themselves more independently. Remember, this takes practice, patience, and a few growing pains. Support troop rules and guidelines by modeling them yourself. As the girls get older, allow them to set limits and rules for the troop meetings. Use a questioning process to get a group consensus on ideas such as fairness and decency. Lead the girls through the learning process, instead of just dictating rules. This will allow them to grow into women that set their own values, instead of waiting for someone to impose limits on them. Teach more games and allow for small group interaction. This creates a social greenhouse where the girls are able to spread their roots. Plan activities that allow the girls to practice fairness, cooperation, and problem solving. Do more in-depth activities. Allow the girls to take on more and more bite-size chunks of planning and decisionmaking. As the girls get older, repot them! don't just do the same exact thing for every Girl Scout activity. Visit new places and stretch their minds and imaginations. Listen to them! Contrary to popular belief, flowers can talk, and when they talk, they want people to treat them with respect, take them seriously, and not make fun of their dreams. 33

A LEADER S GUIDE TO BROWNIE GIRL SCOUTING Nuts & Bolts FOR THE FIRST 5 WEEKS

A LEADER S GUIDE TO BROWNIE GIRL SCOUTING Nuts & Bolts FOR THE FIRST 5 WEEKS A LEADER S GUIDE TO BROWNIE GIRL SCOUTING Nuts & Bolts FOR THE FIRST 5 WEEKS Girl Scouts, Hornets Nest Council 7007 Idlewild Road Charlotte, NC 28212 704-731-6500 Outside Mecklenburg 800-868-0528 Website:

More information

A LEADER S GUIDE TO JUNIOR GIRL SCOUTS Nuts & Bolts FOR THE FIRST 5 WEEKS

A LEADER S GUIDE TO JUNIOR GIRL SCOUTS Nuts & Bolts FOR THE FIRST 5 WEEKS A LEADER S GUIDE TO JUNIOR GIRL SCOUTS Nuts & Bolts FOR THE FIRST 5 WEEKS Girl Scouts, Hornets Nest Council 7007 Idlewild Road Charlotte, NC 28212 704-731-6500 Outside Mecklenburg 800-868-0528 Website:

More information

Steps Have the Trefoil name tag supplies ready so girls can start making them as they wait for others to arrive.

Steps Have the Trefoil name tag supplies ready so girls can start making them as they wait for others to arrive. HELLO my name is Activity 1 : Trefoil Name Tag 15 minutes Girl Scout Trefoil Name Tag template Girl Scout Promise template Yarn pre-cut in 2-4 foot sections Scissors, hole-punch, glue-stick, markers/crayons/colored

More information

SAMPLE: FIRST FOUR BROWNIE GIRL SCOUT MEETINGS

SAMPLE: FIRST FOUR BROWNIE GIRL SCOUT MEETINGS SAMPLE: FIRST FOUR BROWNIE GIRL SCOUT MEETINGS Objective The goal of your first four meetings is to familiarize the girls with what makes the Girl Scout experience special. Girls will also prepare for

More information

Daisy Troop Start-up Kit

Daisy Troop Start-up Kit Daisy Troop Start-up Kit This booklet is a resource designed for a new leader to help make it through those first couple of troop meetings before a Basic Leadership and a Daisy Program Age Level Training

More information

Pines of Carolina Girl Scout Council, Inc.

Pines of Carolina Girl Scout Council, Inc. Pines of Carolina Girl Scout Council, Inc. Girl Scouts North Carolina Coastal Pines PO Box 91649, Raleigh, NC 27675-1649 919-782-3021 or 800-284-4475 T420/1-08 Dear Brownie Girl Scout Leader: This packet

More information

HELLO. Activity 1 : As Girls Arrive: Daisy Name Tag. my name is. Time Allotment 10 minutes

HELLO. Activity 1 : As Girls Arrive: Daisy Name Tag. my name is. Time Allotment 10 minutes HELLO my name is Activity 1 : As Girls Arrive: Daisy Name Tag Time Allotment 10 minutes Materials Daisy Name Tag Template Girl Scout Promise Template Yarn pre-cut in 2- to 4-foot sections Scissors Glue

More information

Girl Scout Brownie Sample Meetings (Created by Girl Scouts of Northern Illinois)

Girl Scout Brownie Sample Meetings (Created by Girl Scouts of Northern Illinois) Girl Scout Brownie Sample Meetings (Created by Girl Scouts of Northern Illinois) OBJECTIVE The goal of your first four meetings is to encourage the girls and adults to get to know each other and to learn

More information

( Stars indicate Must Reads )

( Stars indicate Must Reads ) Frequently Asked Questions Junior Program Levels ( Stars indicate Must Reads ) Awards/Program 1. How do I plan for my first meetings? Girl Scout meetings usually contain the following: opening, business,

More information

Multi-Level Bridging Activity Guide

Multi-Level Bridging Activity Guide Multi-Level Bridging Activity Guide Girl Scout Promise On my honor, I will try: To serve God and my country, To help people at all times, And to live by the Girl Scout Law. Girl Scout Law I will do my

More information

A GIRL SCOUT YEAR. If the answer is YES, we want to do all the activities an earn the A Girl Scout Year patch, put the date you decided here:

A GIRL SCOUT YEAR. If the answer is YES, we want to do all the activities an earn the A Girl Scout Year patch, put the date you decided here: A GIRL SCOUT YEAR Dear Girl Scouts, Are you ready for a year of fun, friendship and adventure? Do you want to learn how to do new things and be a leader in your community? Then let s get started! Every

More information

Junior Cookie CEO Badge Activity Plan 1

Junior Cookie CEO Badge Activity Plan 1 Junior Cookie CEO Badge Activity Plan 1 Badge Purpose: When girls have earned this badge, they ll know more about how to run all parts of their cookie business. Program Essentials Link: Financial Literacy

More information

In this packet are directions for your first eight Brownie meetings of the year. The meetings break down as follows:

In this packet are directions for your first eight Brownie meetings of the year. The meetings break down as follows: In this packet are directions for your first eight Brownie meetings of the year. The meetings break down as follows: 1. Introduction to Girl Scouting The Girl Scout Promise 2. Introduction to Girl Scouting

More information

Planning the Troop Year With Your Brownie Girl Scouts

Planning the Troop Year With Your Brownie Girl Scouts Planning the Troop Year With Your Brownie Girl Scouts This guide provides information, ideas, and tips for planning a year of engaging, interactive, and fun activities for your Girl Scout Brownies. To

More information

Girl Scout Juniors First Four Meeting Examples

Girl Scout Juniors First Four Meeting Examples Girl Scout Juniors First Four Meeting Examples To help you get started with your Girl Scout Junior troop, you ll find examples of how you and the girls can structure your first four meetings. Each example

More information

Appendix: For Troop Volunteers

Appendix: For Troop Volunteers Appendix: For Troop Volunteers Girls and adults participating in troops can meet once a week, once a month, or twice a month for several months how often is up to you and the girls. Troops can meet just

More information

DAISY MEETING PLAN. Sample. Clover Petal Use Resources Wisely. Activity Plan 1

DAISY MEETING PLAN. Sample. Clover Petal Use Resources Wisely. Activity Plan 1 Sample DAISY MEETING PLAN Clover Petal Use Resources Wisely Activity Plan 1 Purpose When girls have earned this petal, they ll know to use resources wisely. Focus Area Science, Technology, Engineering

More information

Table of Contents. The Girl s Guide to Girl Scouting It's Your World - Change It! Welcome to the Daisy Flower Garden... 5

Table of Contents. The Girl s Guide to Girl Scouting It's Your World - Change It! Welcome to the Daisy Flower Garden... 5 1 Table of Contents The Girl s Guide to Girl Scouting... 4 How do Daisy Girl Scouts earn their Daisy Petals?... 4 It's Your World - Change It! Welcome to the Daisy Flower Garden... 5 Sample Session 1...

More information

Planning the Troop Year With Your Junior Girl Scouts

Planning the Troop Year With Your Junior Girl Scouts Planning the Troop Year With Your Junior Girl Scouts This guide provides information, ideas, and tips for planning a year of engaging, interactive, and fun activities for your Girl Scout Juniors. To learn

More information

Table of Contents. The Girl s Guide to Girl Scouting It's Your World - Change It! Agent of Change... 5

Table of Contents. The Girl s Guide to Girl Scouting It's Your World - Change It! Agent of Change... 5 1 Table of Contents The Girl s Guide to Girl Scouting... 4 It's Your World - Change It! Agent of Change... 5 Sample Session 1... 6 Sample Session 2... 8 Sample Session 3... 10 It's Your Planet - Love

More information

A World of Girls uses stories to help girls find clues about how they can create positive change in the world change that affects girls.

A World of Girls uses stories to help girls find clues about how they can create positive change in the world change that affects girls. The First 8 Meetings A World of Girls uses stories to help girls find clues about how they can create positive change in the world change that affects girls. What You Need: Amuse girl book: Each girl needs

More information

Junior Social Butterfly Badge Activity Plan 1

Junior Social Butterfly Badge Activity Plan 1 Junior Social Butterfly Badge Activity Plan 1 Badge Purpose: When girls have earned this badge, they ll know how to act at many types of events, from picnics to weddings and parties. Program Essentials

More information

SAMPLE: FIRST FOUR CADETTE/SENIOR/AMBASSADOR GIRL SCOUTMEETINGS

SAMPLE: FIRST FOUR CADETTE/SENIOR/AMBASSADOR GIRL SCOUTMEETINGS Resource shared from Girl Scouts in the Heart of Pennsylvania SAMPLE: FIRST FOUR CADETTE/SENIOR/AMBASSADOR GIRL SCOUTMEETINGS Objective The goal of your first four Cadette/Senior/Ambassador meetings is

More information

Junior Agent of Change Journey-Power of One Award Activity Plan 1

Junior Agent of Change Journey-Power of One Award Activity Plan 1 Junior Agent of Change Journey-Power of One Award Activity Plan 1 Purpose: When girls have earned this award, they'll see how their personal qualities and those of other women and girls give them the power

More information

Brownie Pets Badge Activity Plan 1

Brownie Pets Badge Activity Plan 1 Brownie Pets Badge Activity Plan 1 Badge Purpose: When girls have earned this badge, they ll know how to take care of a pet. Program Essentials Link: Outdoor Awareness and Environmental Stewardship Fun

More information

Junior Business Owner Badge Activity Plan 1

Junior Business Owner Badge Activity Plan 1 Junior Business Owner Badge Activity Plan 1 Badge Purpose: When girls have earned this badge, they ll know the basic steps to plan and create a new business. Program Essentials Link: Financial Literacy

More information

Girl Scout Trivia. 1) What do we celebrate on February 22 each year? A) Thinking Day

Girl Scout Trivia. 1) What do we celebrate on February 22 each year? A) Thinking Day Girl Scout Trivia 1) What do we celebrate on February 22 each year? A) Thinking Day 2) Where are the four World Centers? A) England, Switzerland, India & Mexico 3) Where is the Girl Scouts birthplace?

More information

PLAN FOR THE FIRST FOUR DAISY GIRL SCOUT MEETINGS

PLAN FOR THE FIRST FOUR DAISY GIRL SCOUT MEETINGS PLAN FOR THE FIRST FOUR DAISY GIRL SCOUT MEETINGS Please keep the following points in mind as you make plans to begin meeting with your new Daisy Girl Scouts: The goals of the first four to six meetings

More information

Girl Scout Daisy Sample Meetings (Created by Girl Scouts of Northern Illinois)

Girl Scout Daisy Sample Meetings (Created by Girl Scouts of Northern Illinois) OBJECTIVE Girl Scout Daisy Sample Meetings (Created by Girl Scouts of Northern Illinois) The goal of your first four meetings is to encourage the girls and adults to get to know each other and learn to

More information

MB:fs:vl/05-126-01. Troop Start Up. A quick-reference guide for becoming a troop leader

MB:fs:vl/05-126-01. Troop Start Up. A quick-reference guide for becoming a troop leader MB:fs:vl/05-126-01 Troop Start Up A quick-reference guide for becoming a troop leader WELCOME! We re excited you ve decided to become a Girl Scout Troop Leader. This guide is intended to help you get started

More information

Family Participation. All Grade Level Patch

Family Participation. All Grade Level Patch Family Participation All Grade Level Patch Girl Scouting is the largest voluntary organization for girls in the world. Nationwide, Girl Scouts number over two million. Over the years the lives of millions

More information

Working together: Co-Op Troop Leadership. A guide for adult volunteers working together toward troop leadership. GirlScoutsRV.org

Working together: Co-Op Troop Leadership. A guide for adult volunteers working together toward troop leadership. GirlScoutsRV.org Working together: Co-Op Troop Leadership A guide for adult volunteers working together toward troop leadership GirlScoutsRV.org Table of Contents Girl Scout Program Fundamentals 3 Definition of Leadership

More information

Table of Contents. The Girl s Guide to Girl Scouting... 4. It's Your World - Change It! Brownie Quest... 5

Table of Contents. The Girl s Guide to Girl Scouting... 4. It's Your World - Change It! Brownie Quest... 5 1 Table of Contents The Girl s Guide to Girl Scouting... 4 What is a Badge Activity Set?... 4 It's Your World - Change It! Brownie Quest... 5 Basic Description:... 5 Sample Session 1... 6 Sample Session

More information

Getting Started With. Your First Two* Girl Scout Brownie. Troop Meetings. *PLUS tips on What Happens Next?

Getting Started With. Your First Two* Girl Scout Brownie. Troop Meetings. *PLUS tips on What Happens Next? Getting Started With Your First Two* Girl Scout Brownie Troop Meetings *PLUS tips on What Happens Next? Girl Scouts of Greater Atlanta 5601 North Allen Road Mableton, GA 30126 770-702-9100 www.gsgatl.org

More information

Adult Volunteer Guide

Adult Volunteer Guide Adult Volunteer Guide As a Girl Scout troop/group volunteer, you will work with and inspire a team of Girl Scout Juniors to make a difference in the Girl Scout or local community and help each girl achieve

More information

Junior Agent of Change Journey Power of One Award Activity Plan 1

Junior Agent of Change Journey Power of One Award Activity Plan 1 Junior Agent of Change Journey Power of One Award Activity Plan 1 Purpose: When girls have earned this award, they ll see how their personal qualities and those of other women and girls give them the power

More information

Girl Scouts of Central Maryland Service Unit Workshop. Ceremonies (Adapted from Girl Scouts of Western Washington)

Girl Scouts of Central Maryland Service Unit Workshop. Ceremonies (Adapted from Girl Scouts of Western Washington) Girl Scouts of Central Maryland Service Unit Workshop Ceremonies (Adapted from Girl Scouts of Western Washington) Total Time: Suggest large group be divided into smaller work groups for activities. By

More information

Getting into Girl Scouts: 5 Flowers, 4 Stories, 3 Cheers for Animals: Use this with your Adult Guide

Getting into Girl Scouts: 5 Flowers, 4 Stories, 3 Cheers for Animals: Use this with your Adult Guide The First 7 Meetings The 5 Flowers, 4 Stories, 3 Cheers for Animals Journey gives girls an opportunity to learn about the importance or caring for animals and themselves. What You Need: 5 Flowers, 4 Stories,

More information

What is a Multi-level Troop Page 3. Girl Scouts Page 4. Overview of Leadership Positions Page 5. Girl Scout Ratios Page 6

What is a Multi-level Troop Page 3. Girl Scouts Page 4. Overview of Leadership Positions Page 5. Girl Scout Ratios Page 6 1 P a g e What is a Multi-level Troop Page 3 Girl Scouts Page 4 Overview of Leadership Positions Page 5 Girl Scout Ratios Page 6 Guidelines for starting a Multi-level Troop Page 7 Leadership Development

More information

Cookie University for Daisies: Learning Has Never Been So Tasty

Cookie University for Daisies: Learning Has Never Been So Tasty Cookie University for Daisies: Learning Has Never Been So Tasty Dear Girl Scout Volunteers, As you may know, the Girl Scout Cookie Sale is the largest girl-led Business & Entrepreneurship program in the

More information

Girl Scouts of Western Ohio

Girl Scouts of Western Ohio Girl Scout New Leader Mentor Guide and Resources This packet is a resource for volunteers who are excited about welcoming, informing and supporting new leaders by being a new leader mentor. The information

More information

I can t wait to Be a Girl Scout Recruiter!

I can t wait to Be a Girl Scout Recruiter! I can t wait to Be a Girl Scout Recruiter! Recruitment Resources Booklet Inspiring to Lead Recruiting Adults to Lead a Girl Scout Troop... pp. 2-3 Open House/Community Fair & Registration Night Checklists...

More information

Junior Practice with Purpose Badge Activity Plan 1

Junior Practice with Purpose Badge Activity Plan 1 Junior Practice with Purpose Badge Activity Plan 1 Badge Purpose: When girls have earned this badge, they ll know how to set a sports goal and practice to achieve it. Program Essentials Link: Healthy Living

More information

The National Girl Scout Program Portfolio Answers to Frequently Asked Questions

The National Girl Scout Program Portfolio Answers to Frequently Asked Questions The National Girl Scout Program Portfolio Answers to Frequently Asked Questions Q: What is the National Girl Scout Program Portfolio? A: In Fall 2011, the national program portfolio will consist of two

More information

Brownie Snacks Badge Activity Plan 1

Brownie Snacks Badge Activity Plan 1 Brownie Snacks Badge Activity Plan 1 Badge Purpose: When girls have earned this badge, they ll know how to make yummy snacks for their families and friends. Program Essentials Link: Healthy Living and

More information

A Family Guide to Girl Scouting Page 1

A Family Guide to Girl Scouting Page 1 www.gshpa.org A Family Guide to Girl Scouting Page 1 Dear Parents, Girl Scouts in the Heart of Pennsylvania (GSHPA) is committed to helping today s girls become tomorrow s leaders. Our goal is to help

More information

Welcome to Girl Scout Brownies: A Guide for Girl Scout Brownie Leaders

Welcome to Girl Scout Brownies: A Guide for Girl Scout Brownie Leaders Welcome to Girl Scout Brownies: A Guide for Girl Scout Brownie Leaders 1 Welcome to Girl Scout Brownies! Thank you for volunteering with Girl Scouts of the Northwestern Great Lakes! You are about to meet

More information

Your First Den Meeting The First Rank for all boys - Bobcat

Your First Den Meeting The First Rank for all boys - Bobcat Your First Den Meeting The First Rank for all boys - Bobcat The Bobcat rank is the first badge awarded a new Cub Scout. As a new member, he may work on his Bobcat rank requirements while simultaneously

More information

Pack Meeting Planning Sheet

Pack Meeting Planning Sheet Pack Meeting Planning Sheet Meeting Date Theme Activity Badges PERSON IN CHARGE BEFORE THE MEETING Room Arrangement Materials and Equipment GATHERING Greeters Den Exhibits Preopening Activity OPENING Opening

More information

Welcome to Girl Scout Daisies: A Guide for Girl Scout Daisy Troop Leaders

Welcome to Girl Scout Daisies: A Guide for Girl Scout Daisy Troop Leaders Welcome to Girl Scout Daisies: A Guide for Girl Scout Daisy Troop Leaders Welcome to Girl Scout Daisies! Thank you for volunteering with Girl Scouts of the Northwestern Great Lakes! You are about to meet

More information

FIRST FEW CUB SCOUT DEN MEETINGS

FIRST FEW CUB SCOUT DEN MEETINGS 1 FIRST FEW CUB SCOUT DEN MEETINGS The object of the first few den meetings are to: 1) Give every Cub Scout an opportunity to earn his first award: the Bobcat Badge 2) Complete den organization, get acquainted,

More information

Girl Scouts of Sycamore Council. Brownie Meeting Lesson Plans. Week 1

Girl Scouts of Sycamore Council. Brownie Meeting Lesson Plans. Week 1 Girl Scouts of Sycamore Council Brownie Meeting Lesson Plans Materials needed Week 1 Crayons or markers, enough for girls to share Scissors Colored paper Stickers for decoration Poster Board Sit-upon materials

More information

Cookie University for Brownies: Learning Has Never Been So Tasty

Cookie University for Brownies: Learning Has Never Been So Tasty Cookie University for Brownies: Learning Has Never Been So Tasty Dear Girl Scout Volunteers, As you may know, the Girl Scout Cookie Sale is the largest girl-led Business & Entrepreneurship program in the

More information

Girl Scout Daisy Sample Meeting 1 (60 minutes)

Girl Scout Daisy Sample Meeting 1 (60 minutes) Girl Scout Daisy Sample Meeting 1 (60 minutes) Goal: Daisies identify ways they can care for animals. Supplies needed: 5 Flowers, 4 Stories, 3 Cheers for Animals! Journey adult guide and girl books Garden

More information

Most Girl Scout Meetings have the same general format and are usually one to two hours in length. The basic parts of a meeting are:

Most Girl Scout Meetings have the same general format and are usually one to two hours in length. The basic parts of a meeting are: WHAT DO YOU DO AT A GIRL SCOUT MEETING? Most Girl Scout Meetings have the same general format and are usually one to two hours in length. The basic parts of a meeting are: Start-Up Activity Opening Business

More information

Girl Scout Journey FAQs Frequently Asked Questions

Girl Scout Journey FAQs Frequently Asked Questions Girl Scout Journey FAQs Frequently Asked Questions 1. How do we pick which Girl Scout Journey to do? 2. How long does it take to complete a Girl Scout Journey? How long is a typical Girl Scout Journey

More information

Girl Scout Seniors - GIRLtopia

Girl Scout Seniors - GIRLtopia Girl Scout Seniors - GIRLtopia Note to Leaders and Mentors: By this time in the Girl Scout experience almost everything should be girlled. We recognize that girls in high school are very busy and have

More information

A SAMPLER OF. Daisy and Brownie Bridging Ceremonies

A SAMPLER OF. Daisy and Brownie Bridging Ceremonies A SAMPLER OF Daisy and Brownie Bridging Ceremonies A Basic Daisy-to-Brownie Bridging Ceremony Upside Down Pin/Magic Pond Daisy Bridging A New Batch of Brownies Brownie Stepping Stones (Bridge to Juniors)

More information

I d like to invite Troop 2240 up on the stage. They will tell us the Girl Scout Law.

I d like to invite Troop 2240 up on the stage. They will tell us the Girl Scout Law. ANNE Welcome to the Burton Valley Brownie to Junior Bridging Ceremony. We have three 3 rd grade Brownie Troops that are very excited to become Junior Girl Scouts tonight. My name is Anne Mitchell and I

More information

Chapter 2: Girl Scouting as a National Experience

Chapter 2: Girl Scouting as a National Experience Chapter 2: Girl Scouting as a National Experience Now that you re a Girl Scout volunteer, you belong to a network of more than 1 million adults who share an important commitment: preparing girls to lead

More information

Welcoming New Parishioners

Welcoming New Parishioners be invited to share in the joy that stewardship can bring. Welcoming New Parishioners The Importance of Welcoming How a parish welcomes new parishioners can have a tremendous impact on the success of stewardship

More information

I can t wait to Be a dancing machine Be the best picture taker ever Be a spy on a mission Be a hula-hooping queen Be a Girl Scout.

I can t wait to Be a dancing machine Be the best picture taker ever Be a spy on a mission Be a hula-hooping queen Be a Girl Scout. I can t wait to Be a dancing machine Be the best picture taker ever Be a spy on a mission Be a hula-hooping queen Be a Girl Scout. Family Guide to Girl Scouting It s Your Girl s Experience Share It! As

More information

Editorial Style Guide

Editorial Style Guide Editorial Style Guide Updated 1/26/2014 A style guide provides all employees and volunteers of Girl Scouts of NE Kansas & NW Missouri guidelines for creating consistent, professional communications to

More information

GOLD GOING. Tips for Updated with. Including. Journey

GOLD GOING. Tips for Updated with. Including. Journey GOING FOR THE GOLD GIRL SCOUT GOLD AWARD GUIDELINES Adult Volunteer Guide Including Tips for the Project Advisor Updated with Journey Requirements as of August 1, 2009 Dear Arizona Cactus-Pine Troop Volunteer

More information

GIRL SCOUT GOLD AWARD PROJECT GUIDE

GIRL SCOUT GOLD AWARD PROJECT GUIDE GIRL SCOUT GOLD AWARD PROJECT GUIDE Girl Scout Promise On my honor, I will try: To serve God and my country, To help people at all times, And to live by the Girl Scout Law. Girl Scout law I will do my

More information

Volunteer s Guide to Girl Scouting 2014-2015

Volunteer s Guide to Girl Scouting 2014-2015 Volunteer s Guide to Girl Scouting 2014-2015 Volunteer s Guide to Girl Scouting 1 Copyright 2013 Table of Contents How Do I Get Started? 3 How Will My Troop Volunteers and I Share Leadership? 5 How Do

More information

How to Run an Effective Bring-a-Friend Event

How to Run an Effective Bring-a-Friend Event How to Run an Effective Bring-a-Friend Event www.scouts.ca/js2g It starts with Scouts. How to Run an Effective Bring-a-Friend Event Introduction A good way to have more youth and adults explore the benefits

More information

Dear Leader, Thank you for participating in this Cub Scout recruiting campaign! We have designed some new materials and approaches to help your pack

Dear Leader, Thank you for participating in this Cub Scout recruiting campaign! We have designed some new materials and approaches to help your pack The basis of this program is for current Cub Scouting youth members to recruit their friends into the pack. Studies show that members will remain active in the program if they are participating with their

More information

HOOKED ON SCOUTING - 2015

HOOKED ON SCOUTING - 2015 HOOKED ON SCOUTING - 2015 One lucky Scout from each FSC will win a meet and greet with professional Bass Angler Kevin VanDam! 2015 Pack Hooked on Scouting Recruitment Manual For Fall Roundup Each brand

More information

SCOUTMASTER/ ASSISTANT SCOUTMASTER LEADER SPECIFIC TRAINING

SCOUTMASTER/ ASSISTANT SCOUTMASTER LEADER SPECIFIC TRAINING SCOUTMASTER/ ASSISTANT SCOUTMASTER LEADER SPECIFIC TRAINING Training Continuum for Adult Leaders Fast Start Youth Protection Training (Required) Basic Leader Training This Is Scouting Position Specific

More information

Webelos Handbook, page 306 ADVENTURE REQUIREMENTS

Webelos Handbook, page 306 ADVENTURE REQUIREMENTS BUILD MY OWN HERO RATIONALE FOR ADVENTURE Through this adventure, Webelos Scouts will discover what being a hero means to them as well as the community they live in. Boys will meet local heroes and learn

More information

Girl Scout Journey: It's Your Planet Love It!

Girl Scout Journey: It's Your Planet Love It! Girl Scout Journey: It's Your Planet Love It! WOW! Wonders of Water WOW! Wonders of Water Six-Session Session Girl Scout Journey Program WOW! calls on Girl Scout Brownies across the country and around

More information

Junior amuse Journey Activity Plan 1

Junior amuse Journey Activity Plan 1 Junior amuse Journey Activity Plan 1 Purpose: When girls have earned this award, they ll understand the many roles women and girls play in the world around them and the leadership skills they use. Program

More information

Pack 349. New Parent s Guide To Cub Scouting. Cub Scout Pack Edmond, OK. Last Frontier Council. Boy Scouts of America

Pack 349. New Parent s Guide To Cub Scouting. Cub Scout Pack Edmond, OK. Last Frontier Council. Boy Scouts of America Pack 349 New Parent s Guide To Cub Scouting Cub Scout Pack 349 - Edmond, OK Quail Springs United Methodist Church Last Frontier Council Boy Scouts of America What is Cub Scouting? The purpose of the Boy

More information

Girl Scout Brownies It s Your Journey Choose It! First Four Meetings

Girl Scout Brownies It s Your Journey Choose It! First Four Meetings Girl Scout Brownies It s Your Journey Choose It! First Four Meetings Congratulations on deciding to become a Girl Scout Troop Leader! As you ve probably heard in your training already, the Girl Scout National

More information

A World of Girls uses stories to help girls find clues about how they can create positive change in the world change that affects girls.

A World of Girls uses stories to help girls find clues about how they can create positive change in the world change that affects girls. The First 7 Meetings A World of Girls uses stories to help girls find clues about how they can create positive change in the world change that affects girls. What You Need: A World of Girls girl book:

More information

Meeting 1 Plan. Rationale for Adventure. Takeaways for Cub Scouts. Tiger Handbook, page 66

Meeting 1 Plan. Rationale for Adventure. Takeaways for Cub Scouts. Tiger Handbook, page 66 Team Tiger Rationale for Adventure This adventure will introduce Tigers to the concept of teamwork and also to the idea that even at a young age they can make a difference in the world. Some of the activities

More information

Family Guide., TM, Kellogg NA Co. Girl Scout Cookie Program

Family Guide., TM, Kellogg NA Co. Girl Scout Cookie Program Family Guide Girl Scout Cookie Program Girl Scout Cookies build skills You know that Girl Scouting provides your girl with precious lifelong experiences and values that are important to your family. As

More information

Kindergarten Math Lesson Plans Week 3, Day 1 Topic of the Week: Subtraction

Kindergarten Math Lesson Plans Week 3, Day 1 Topic of the Week: Subtraction Kindergarten Math Lesson Plans Week 3, Day 1 of the Week: Subtraction of Classroom Culture Birthday Bar Graph 10 None The teacher will have the campers create a classroom bar graph by having them line

More information

Guidelines for Girl Scout Cadettes

Guidelines for Girl Scout Cadettes Guidelines for Girl Scout Cadettes Have you ever looked around your neighborhood or school and wondered how you could make a change for the better? Going for the Girl Scout Silver Award the highest award

More information

OPTIONS Program Guide for Brownie Girl Scout Leaders

OPTIONS Program Guide for Brownie Girl Scout Leaders Girl Scout Leaders today are usually juggling some combination of family, career, volunteer commitments and leisure activities. Finding the time for all of these could, at best, be described as difficult.

More information

Need more help? Contact the Emerson Resource Center. This mini library has all your Journey resource needs.

Need more help? Contact the Emerson Resource Center. This mini library has all your Journey resource needs. KISS Notes for 5 Flowers, 4 Stories, 3 Cheers for Animals! Planning to guide your troop on a Daisy Journey? KISS (Keep It Short and Sweet) Notes for the Girl Scout Daisies 5 Flowers, 4 Stories, 3 Cheers

More information

Daisy Jam Series. Grades K-1

Daisy Jam Series. Grades K-1 Daisy Jam Series Grades K-1 1 Introduction to Leaders The focus of the leader guides is to help adults guide new Daisy Girl Scouts as they learn about Girl Scouting and how the various parts of the Girl

More information

Need more help? Contact the Emerson Resource Center. This mini library has all your Journey resource needs.

Need more help? Contact the Emerson Resource Center. This mini library has all your Journey resource needs. KISS Notes for A World of Girls! Planning to guide your troop on a Brownie Journey? KISS (Keep It Short and Sweet) Notes for the Girl Scout Brownies A World of Girls! Journey are a helpful resource. Through

More information

Program Guide for Daisy Girl Scout Leaders

Program Guide for Daisy Girl Scout Leaders Program Guide for Daisy Girl Scout Leaders Girl Scout Council of Greater St. Louis Daisy Girl Scout Troop Finances In 1995, to find out what financial resources are needed to operate a Daisy troop, Daisy

More information

RATIONALE FOR ADVENTURE TAKEAWAYS FOR CUB SCOUTS. Wolf Handbook, page 220 ADVENTURE REQUIREMENTS

RATIONALE FOR ADVENTURE TAKEAWAYS FOR CUB SCOUTS. Wolf Handbook, page 220 ADVENTURE REQUIREMENTS FINDING YOUR WAY RATIONALE FOR ADVENTURE Learning to read and use a map and a compass is a valuable skill. In this adventure, Scouts will receive an introduction to maps, symbols, and the cardinal directions

More information

Girl Scout DAISY Investiture Ceremony Sampler

Girl Scout DAISY Investiture Ceremony Sampler Girl Scout DAISY Investiture Ceremony Sampler Girl Scouts of Greater Atlanta 5601 North Allen Road Mableton, GA 30126 770-702-9100 www.gsgatl.org JUNE 2013 Sample Daisy Investiture Ceremonies. in ves ti

More information

Re-Energize your Service Unit

Re-Energize your Service Unit Re-Energize your Service Unit Well begun is half done. Aristotle 1 What s the VALUE of a Service Unit? There s function, and there s value. Function: A Service Unit does a lot. It holds recruitments. It

More information

Den Meeting/Activity Plan and Cub Scout Advancement Using the Pack s Popcorn Sale

Den Meeting/Activity Plan and Cub Scout Advancement Using the Pack s Popcorn Sale Den Meeting/Activity Plan and Cub Scout Advancement Using the Pack s Popcorn Sale Central New Jersey Council Boy Scouts of America 2245 US HWY 130 Suite 106 Dayton, NJ 08810 www.cnjcscouting.org Popcorn

More information

Cub Scout Round-Up Program Guide

Cub Scout Round-Up Program Guide Cub Scout Round-Up Program Guide This program guide is intended as a recruiting aid for all Cub Scout packs. Pack leaders might use this guide, along with other available materials to help in constructing

More information

Team Building Ideas to Motivate, Engage, encourage

Team Building Ideas to Motivate, Engage, encourage MOTIVATE ENGAGE encourage Team Building Ideas to Motivate, Engage, and Encourage How to Use this ebook Baudville 52 Ways to a Positive Culture ebook PAGE 1 Keep your team feeling motivated, engaged, and

More information

The ABC s of Kindergarten/ First Grade

The ABC s of Kindergarten/ First Grade The ABC s of Kindergarten/ First Grade Attention Signal Teacher will say Class! and the class responds, Yes! (Whole Brain Teaching Technique.) Or we may sound the chimes to get attention or to show there

More information

Working With Girl Scout Brownies

Working With Girl Scout Brownies Working With Girl Scout Brownies Table of Contents Section 1: Working with Girl Scout Brownies Welcome Who Are Girl Scout Brownies Achieving Girl Scout Goals and Girl Scout Outcomes Girl Scout Leadership

More information

Books in a Bag. Ways. Pursuing this badge will give girls the opportunity to learn the history of

Books in a Bag. Ways. Pursuing this badge will give girls the opportunity to learn the history of Books in a Bag The Books in a Bag Program consists of two documents. One presents a series of questions to challenge girls and adults to find the answers as they have fun looking through the handbooks

More information

Jennifer Moriarty Sunburst Daisy Consultant

Jennifer Moriarty Sunburst Daisy Consultant Daisy Leaders, In the following pages you will find letters that I used in the formation of Sunburst Daisy Troop# 927. Adapt the letters to meet your needs and update the pricing information as necessary.

More information

Welcome to Tiger Cubs!

Welcome to Tiger Cubs! Welcome to Tiger Cubs! Tiger Cubs introduces boys and their adult partners to the excitement of Cub Scouting. A shared leadership component, where a den leader works with boy-adult partner teams, gives

More information

Girl Scout Juliette Guidebook

Girl Scout Juliette Guidebook Girl Scout Juliette Guidebook Girl Scouts of Minnesota and Wisconsin Lakes and Pines What are Girl Scout Juliettes? Girl Scouting is a unique girl-only place where a girl finds: 1. Courage by exploring

More information

Parent s Guide to Girl Scouting

Parent s Guide to Girl Scouting The Girl Scout Promise and Law are shared by every member of Girl Scouting. The Girl Scout Promise is the way Girl Scouts agree to act every day toward one another and other people, and the Law outlines

More information

Objective: To show how selling Girl Scout cookies helps girls develop marketing strategies and business skills all while having fun!

Objective: To show how selling Girl Scout cookies helps girls develop marketing strategies and business skills all while having fun! Open for Business December 1, 2013 January 31, 2014 at any shopping mall or outlet center Mall Scavenger Hunt The Girl Scout Cookie Program is a girl-run program that turns girls into young entrepreneurs.

More information

Brownie Making Games Badge Activity Plan 2

Brownie Making Games Badge Activity Plan 2 Brownie Making Games Badge Activity Plan 2 Badge Purpose: When girls have earned this badge, they ll know how to create new games and share them with others. Program Essentials Link: Science, Technology,

More information