Guidelines for Participation in West Virginia State Assessments

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1 Guidelines for Participation in West Virginia State Assessments

2 West Virginia Board of Education Gayle C. Manchin, President Michael I. Green, Vice President Tina H. Combs, Secretary Thomas W. Campbell, Member Lloyd G. Jackson II, Member L. Wade Linger Jr., Member William M. White, Member Paul L. Hill, Ex Officio Chancellor West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission James L. Skidmore, Ex Officio Chancellor West Virginia Council for Community and Technical College Education Michael J. Martirano, Ex Officio State Superintendent of Schools West Virginia Department of Education

3 Guidelines for Participation in West Virginia State Assessments, Guidance on Designated Supports and Accommodations for State and District Testing Office of Assessment and Research

4 Office of Assessment and Research Division of Teaching and Learning West Virginia Department of Education Building 6, Suite Kanawha Boulevard East Charleston, West Virginia December 2014 Michael J. Martirano, Ed.D. State Superintendent of Schools Clayton Burch Interim Associate State Superintendent of Schools Larry White Interim Executive Director Office of Assessment and Research 2014 by the West Virginia Department of Education Content Contact Melissa Gholson Coordinator Office of Assessment and Research Suggested Citation West Virginia Department of Education (2014). West Virginia guidelines for participation in state assessments, : Guidance on accommodations for students with disabilities and/or limited English proficiency in state and district-wide testing. Charleston, WV: Author, Office of Assessment and Accountability. Online Availability

5 Contents Foreword... x Preface... xi List of Abbreviations and Terms... xv Section I. Introduction to Accommodations... 1 Assessments Covered in These Guidelines... 1 Legislative and Policy Foundations... 2 Research Base... 5 Test Administration Options for West Virginia Measures of Academic Progress (WV-MAP... 6 Modifications... 6 Assuring Accommodations... 7 Provision of Accommodations... 7 Prior to assessment... 7 During the administration of the assessment... 9 After the assessment Following up on an accommodations administration error Managing the WVS.326 forms Special Assessment Circumstances Medical Emergency Exemptions Homebound students Alternative schools Instructions for Nonpublic Students and Schools Home-instructed students Nonpublic schools WV-MAP Online Resources Section II. Guidelines for Accommodating Students with Disabilities Role of IEP Teams and Section 504 Committees IEP teams Section 504 committees English Language Learners with Disabilities Accessibility Guidelines for Classroom Activities Selecting general assessment designated supports and accommodations: Three steps Step One Select appropriate designated supports and accommodations Step Two Document the reasons for designated supports and accommodations selected Step Three Verification of information to WVEIS iii West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

6 Contents Guide to Designated Supports and Accommodations for Students with Disabilities Presentation P01 Use text to Speech (TTS), excluding ELA reading passages P02 Have test read aloud P03 Use contracted braille or other tactile graphics static (fixed) P06 Have test presented through sign language, locally provided P13 Have text-talk speech (TTS), including ELA reading passages P14 Have test read aloud including passages P15 Have directions only read aloud P16 Have directions presented through sign language, locally provided P17 Use braille embedded (refreshable or embossers) P18 Have directions rephrased by trained examiner P19 Use large print edition P21 Use screen-reading software to access computer P22 Enlarge text on screen P23 Use a magnifying device to enlarge assessment material P24 Use translator to present test P25 Use translator to present directions only P27 Use approved bilingual word to word dictionary for directions only P28 Use high contrast for online assessments P29 Use sign dictionary to present, including directions P30 Provide translated test directions P31 Provide translations glossary P32 Provide translation stacked P33 Turn off any universal tools P34 Use embedded American Sign Language P35 Use non-contracted braille and tactile graphics P36 Use closed captioning P37 Use masking P38 Use color contrast P39 Use color overlays P40 Use print on demand P41 Provide translation glossary (Paper/Pencil Test*) P42 Provide Noise Buffers West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments, iv

7 Contents Streamlined R02 Indicate responses to a scribe (multiple-choice items) R03 Use braille or tactile to respond R04 Indicate responses to a scribe, all elements R05 Use an abacus R11 Use computer or other assistive technology device to respond R13 Provide physical support R15 Use a bilingual word to word dictionary R16 Mark responses on large-print test book R17 Use a translator to respond R18 Use sign dictionary to respond R19 Use Calculator R20 Use multiplication table R21 Use Speech to Text T03 Take more breaks (no studying) T04 Use extra time for any timed test T07 Flexible scheduling, same day (no studying) T09 Provide separate setting When to Choose Alternate Assessment Eligibility criteria for Alternate Assessment Alternate Assessment Participation Criteria Section III. Guidelines for Supporting and Accommodating English Language Learner (ELL) Students Federal Inclusion Requirements for English Language Learner Students West Virginia Inclusion Requirements for English Language Learners Students The role of the ELL committee in assigning accommodations Making Accommodations Decisions: Three Steps Step One Select appropriate accommodations Math Allowable Designated Supports for ELLs English Language Arts Allowable Designated Supports for ELLs Science Allowable Designated Supports for ELLs Social Studies Designated Supports for ELLs Step Two Document the reasons for accommodations selected Step Three Submit ELL assessment participation form v West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

8 Contents ELL Assessment Participation Form Guide to Accommodations for Various English and Native Language Proficiency Levels with strong native language literacy Beginning (Level 1) or Advanced Beginning (Level 2) English language proficiency Beginning (Level 1) or Advanced Beginning (Level 2) English language proficiency with strong native language literacy Intermediate (Level 3) English language proficiency and low levels of native language proficiency Intermediate (Level 3) English language proficiency and strong native language skills Early Fluent (Level 4), Fluent (Level 5) English language proficiency, or monitored former ELL students ELL students with IEPs and Section 504 plans Accommodations and WESTELL Section IV. Guidelines for Supporting Students with Assistance Team (SAT) Plans SAT team process: Three Steps Step One Guidance to teams to determine appropriate tools and designated supports Universal Tools Available to All Students Step Two Select and document the reasons for any designated supports Designates Supports Guide to Designated Supports and Accommodations for Students with Plans Presentation Step Three Verification of Information to WVEIS Student Assistance Team (SAT) State Assessment Form Section: V. General Summative Assessment Overview Accessibility and Accommodations for General Summative Assessment Universal Tools Available To All Students Embedded Universal Tools Available to All Students Non-Embedded Universal Tools Available To All Students Designated Supports Available to Students with Plans Embedded Designated Supports for Students with Plans Non-Embedded Designated Supports for Students with Plans Accommodations Embedded Accommodations for Students with Disabilities Non-Embedded Accommodations for Students with Disabilities Options to Standard Conditions Additional accommodation(s) requests West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments, vi

9 Contents English Language Arts (ELA) Allowable Designated Supports and Accommodations for the General Summative Assessment Designated Supports Accommodations Mathematics Allowable Designated Supports and Accommodation for the General Summative Assessment Designated Supports Accommodations Science and Social Studies Allowable Designated Supports and Accommodations for the General Summative Assessment Social Studies and Science Designated Supports and Accommodations Resources for Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium General Summative Assessment Crosswalk of Codes Section VI. Alternate Assessment APTA Dynamic Learning Maps Embedded Available Supports based on PNP Supports requiring additional materials Locally provided supports Supports NOT Available to DLM Selecting Allowable Supports Allowable Supports Supports Not Allowed Section VII. ACT COMPASS COMPASS Mathematics (Pre-Algebra and Algebra) Test COMPASS Writing Skills Test Students with Individual Education Plans (IEPs) and Section 504 Plans Standard Conditions with Accommodations for Students with an IEP or Section 504 Plan Accommodations Additional Accommodation Request English Language Learners Standard Conditions with Accommodations for ELL Students Accommodations Established Procedure for Accommodations Monitoring Transcribing Student Answers Accommodations Allowed for COMPASS vii West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

10 Contents Section VIII. Accommodations Guidelines for the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) Procedures for Monitoring NAEP Exclusions and Accommodations NAEP Accommodations for Students with IEPs and Section 504 Plans NAEP Accommodations for English Language Learners References Appendices Appendix A. Ethical Testing Practices Appendix B. District Test Coordinator s Secure Materials and Test Agreement Appendix C. District Technology Coordinator or Technology Vendor Secure Materials and Test Procedures Agreement Appendix D. Principals Secure Materials and Test Procedures Agreement Appendix E Building Level Coordinator's Secure Materials and Test Procedures Agreement (Other than Principal) Appendix F County/School Personnel Secure Materials Agreement Appendix G RESA/District/School Personnel Secure Materials Agreement Appendix H Appendix I WVDE/RESA/District/School Technology Personnel Secure Materials and Test Procedures Agreement Verification of Training for Principals, Building Level Coordinators, District/School, RESA Personnel (Examiners/Scribes/Other School Personnel)154 Appendix J District Supplemental Assessments Notification Form Appendix K WVS.326 Accommodations Monitoring Form Appendix L Labels for Returning the WVS.326 Forms Appendix M Guidelines for Reading Aloud, Test Reader Appendix N Guidelines for Scribing and Transcribing Student Responses Appendix O ELL Assessment Participation Form West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments, viii

11 List of Exhibits Exhibit 1. Characteristics of Options and Accommodations versus Modifications... 6 West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments, ix

12 FOREWORD West Virginia uses multiple state assessments to measure student achievement and inform program decision making. The Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act of 2004 (IDEA 2004) requires participation of students with disabilities in statewide assessments to be consistent with the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 2001 (ESEA). States are directed by ESEA to issue guidelines for appropriate participation of students with disabilities and students with limited English proficiency in those assessments. ESEA requires that states do the following: Adopt challenging academic content and student achievement standards that apply to all schools and all children in the state. Align assessments to the state standards. Assess all students. Provide designated supports for all students with plans and/or accommodations for students with disabilities or English Language Learners (ELLs) with disabilities. Measure the progress of all students, including students with disabilities, relative to the state standards for the grade in which the student is enrolled. Develop one or more alternate assessments to measure performance relative to gradelevel expectations, for those students with disabilities who, based on the findings of their individualized education program (IEP) teams, cannot participate in the state s general assessments, even with accommodations. The West Virginia Department of Education has crafted this document, West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments, to (a) provide policy guidance to Student Assistance Teams (SAT), Individualized Education Program (IEP) teams, Section 504 committees and English Language Learners (ELL) committees to provide appropriate access for students in statewide assessments; and (b) assist teachers and schools to work within the framework of federal law and state policies. The guidelines are referenced by addendum to Policies 2340, West Virginia Measures of Academic Progress; 2419, Education of Exceptional Students; and 2417, Programs of Study for Limited English Proficiency. Therefore, this document is an addendum to the above-mentioned state policies. Additional copies of this document may be accessed on the Office of Assessment and Research website or may be obtained by calling (304) Michael J. Martirano, Ed.D. State Superintendent of Schools

13 Preface The West Virginia Department of Education (WVDE) has an ongoing review and evaluation process for examining designated supports and/or accommodations available during statewide testing to a n y s t u d e n t w i t h a p l a n : Student Assistance Teams plans (SAT), Individualized Education Program (IEP) plans, Section 504 plans and English Language Learner (ELL) plans. The process has three major components: Technical aspects of West Virginia s assessment and accountability system as a whole are reviewed by national experts who serve on the West Virginia Technical Assistance Committee (WVTAC). The information in this document is reviewed annually for comprehensiveness and clarity by the Stakeholder Group for Participation Guidelines. The WVDE Office of Research performs an annual evaluation of the implementation of assessment accommodations. West Virginia Technical Assistance Committee The WVTAC was established to provide guidance and recommendations to the WVDE in meeting federal requirements for state accountability assessment programs. Members of the WVTAC were selected based on their expertise in assessments, standards, systems alignment, and inclusion of students with disabilities and/or limited English proficiency. The WVTAC has provided crucial input on reporting, sampling, standard setting, accommodations, universal design, ESEA peer review, and designs for assessment research studies. Members of the WVTAC include the following national and state experts: Larry White, interim executive director, WVDE Office of Assessment and Research Dr. William Auty, consultant, Education Measurement Dr. Damian Betebenner, The National Center for the Improvement of Educational Assessment, Inc. Dr. Gary Phillips, chief scientist, American Institutes for Research Dr. Doris Redfield, educational consultant Dr. Grace Ross, educational consultant Dr. Alan Sheinker, educational consultant Dr. Jan Sheinker, owner, Sheinker Educational Services, Inc. Dr. Norman Webb, senior research scientist, Wisconsin Center for Education Research, University of Wisconsin Stakeholders Group for Participation Guidelines Review The purpose of the Stakeholders Group is to review annually the West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments for comprehensiveness and clarity and to recommend revisions as needed. This review and revision cycle is coordinated by the Office of Assessment and Research. xi

14 Preface Members of the Stakeholders Group include representatives from the WVDE s Office of Assessment and Research, Office of Legal Services and Accountability, Office of Special Programs, and Office of Federal Programs and System Improvement; regional and county special education directors; county Title III directors; county test coordinators; school administrators; and teachers. Members individually review the current document and identify any areas that need clarification, updates, or corrections, and make suggestions for improvement of the document. They submit their individual recommendations for revision to the topical revision leaders. Listed below are WVDE staff revision leaders for the edition and each leader s area of responsibility: Vickie Baker National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) Timothy Butcher General assessment science and investigations Annette Carey Interpreting and transcribing for the hearing impaired and special education issues for vision impairment, blindness, and deafness/blindness Dr. Beth Cipoletti ACT COMPASS, Policy 2340, federal assessment system requirements and reporting, and college and career readiness Allegra Kazemzadeh General assessment social studies Melissa Gholson (editor of the Participation Guidelines) designated supports, accommodations, accommodations monitoring and reporting, state and federal policies and alternate assessment Patricia Homberg District-required monitoring, special education issues and policies Robert Crawford and Mami Itamochi English Language Learner (ELL) accommodations, policy and monitoring; English language development assessment (ELDA)/ West Virginia Test of English Language Learning (WESTELL); and Title III issues Dr. Vaughn Rhudy General Assessment English language arts and scribe accommodations Terri Sappington General Assessment mathematics Annual Evaluation of Statewide Implementation of Accommodations For the better part of a decade, the West Virginia Department of Education (WVDE) Office of Assessment and Research (OAR) 1 has led an ambitious and comprehensive research agenda to address the appropriateness and impact of accommodations identified for students with disabilities and English language learners (ELLs). Beyond the appropriateness and impact of accommodations, the research agenda also sets a goal of empirically determining the comparability of test scores for students from both accommodated and non-accommodated conditions and the impact of the assessment accommodations upon student performance. 1 Previously the Office of Assessment and Accountability and the Office of Research West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments, xii

15 Preface To date, efforts to achieve the goals set in the research agenda has included multiple reports beginning with the 2006 publication, Special Education Testing Accommodations in West Virginia: An Overview of Practices in (Hughes et al., 2006). This study, conducted by an external research organization, provided a comprehensive overview of accommodations provision during the school year and examined student performance on the state s summative assessment disaggregated by each available accommodation. Three years later, The Office of Research replicated this study internally to re-examine the distribution of accommodations and the academic performance of those students who were identified to receive accommodations during the first administration of the state s newly developed summative assessment The West Virginia Educational Standards Test 2 (WESTEST 2). This report, Examining Accommodations in West Virginia ( ) (White, Hixson, D Brot, & Perdue, 2009), provided a first look at accommodations use with the new assessment. In 2011, the Office of Research completed a third research report titled, Examining Accommodations in West Virginia: A Descriptive Analysis of Accommodations Specified for Students in Individualized Education Plans, 504 Plans, and Limited English Proficient Plans in (Hixson & Hammer, 2011). Beyond examining accommodations for students with disabilities, this report is noteworthy in that it represents the first systematic examination of the distribution of assessment accommodations provided to ELLs in West Virginia, a historically small population of students in our state, which at the time of publication included approximately 1,700 students across all grades. Reporting efforts in were two pronged. First, West Virginia worked closely with the George Washington University Center for Equity and Excellence in Education (GWU-CEEE) to examine the appropriateness of accommodations for English Language Learners (ELLs) via a special technical assistance project. The project has informed West Virginia about the extent to which instructors accommodation recommendations for ELLs are in line with recommendations from the research literature given students English language proficiency levels. Second, the Office of Research conducted an examination of the WVS.326 accommodations data (described below) for WESTEST 2 and produced data tables for each school district in the state. These reports supplied districts with detailed information on accommodation assignments, provision, refusal, and over accommodation for each available accommodation type for all WESTEST 2 content areas (mathematics, reading language arts, social studies, and science). For the first time, districts and County Test Coordinators (CTCs) had access to their accommodation data, allowing them to: 1. Systematically review their data by individual accommodation type along with comparing their results to state averages; 2. Use accommodation data to inform and drive changes to Individualized Education Plans (e.g. investigating the appropriateness of a refused accommodation on a student s IEP); xiii West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

16 Preface 3. Investigate occurrences of over accommodation and under accommodation to assess validity of WESTEST 2 results; 4. Provide targeted assistance to schools that experienced technical issues related to accommodations, and; 5. Actively self-monitor accommodations provision as they relate to instructional utility. Traditionally accommodations data were collected and maintained by Local Education Agencies (LEAs) in West Virginia; however in the WVDE piloted a fillable accommodations form, WVS.326, and began collecting statewide data. The development of the WVS.326 form was a crucial step in creating a statewide process to monitor, collect, and warehouse identifier-linked accommodations provision data from all schools. Since piloting the WVS.326 form, the WVDE has worked closely with the Stakeholder Group for Participation Guidelines to improve the functionality of the WVS.326 form, resulting with notable improvements in the quality of accommodations data collected each school year. Improved data quality will ensure accurate accommodations reporting at the state and local levels, as well as allow the OAR to further its research agenda which includes Differential Item Functioning (DIF) analysis. Originally, the OAR planned to work with the WESTEST 2 testing vendor to examine DIF statistics to address comparability of accommodated and non-accommodated conditions. However, a combination of data quality concerns, the transition from a paper-pencil based WESTEST 2 to an online WESTEST 2, and now a new online general assessment to be deployed for the first time during , has postponed this analysis. Currently, the OAR is engaged in various accommodations reporting efforts. First, a report examining accommodations assignments and provision spanning multiple school years ( ) is being written. While descriptive in nature, this study will expand upon previous reports in that all results are yielded from WVS.326 data. Further, it will be impactful in that it is the first report describing multi-year trends concerning accommodations data for students with IEPs, 504 plans, and ELL students. Second, district level WVS.326 Accommodations Reports for WESTEST 2 testing year will be produced and disseminated to school districts. It is anticipated these reports will continue to drive the decision making process among district level staff and CTCs concerning accommodations. Looking forward, the OAR plans to complete a number of future accommodations studies. The first shall be an examination of the online WESTEST 2 (school year ) accommodations data and results. This study may inform accommodation considerations necessary for other online assessments. Later, once multiple years of accommodations data has been collected for the new online general assessment, the OAR hopes to collaborate with the testing vendor to conduct Differential Item Functioning (DIF) analysis to determine comparability among accommodated and non-accommodated conditions. West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments, xiv

17 List of Abbreviations and Terms AAAS Alternate Academic Achievement Standards, including Policies , , and , which define the alternate academic achievement standards in reading/language arts (Policy ), mathematics (Policy ), and science (Policy ) for students with the most significant cognitive disabilities ACT COMPASS A computer-adaptive test developed by ACT to measure academic readiness for college-level courses ADA Americans with Disabilities Act AMO Annual Measurable Objectives (AMO s) Unique yearly targets in reading and mathematics for each subgroup, school and district, as described in West Virginia s ESEA Flexibility Request APTA Alternative Performance Task Assessment Alternate assessment designed for students with significant cognitive disabilities whose performance cannot be adequately assessed through the general assessment instrument, even with accommodations ASL CAT American Sign Language Computer-adaptive test CCSSO Council of Chief State School Officers CEC Council for Exceptional Children CIFM Continuous improvement and focused monitoring process COMPASS ACT COMPASS (see above) CRESST National Center for Research on Evaluation, Standards, and Student Testing CSOs Content Standards and Objectives, defined in the 26 sections of Policy 2520 CSR Confidential Summary Report A part of assessment reporting to schools CTC County test coordinator District assessments Any assessment given to students of an entire grade without exclusion (e.g., students who take APTA or are on an IEP, ELL plan, or Section 504 plan) DLM Dynamic Learning Maps Alternate assessment designed for students with significant intellectual disabilities whose performance cannot be assessed through the general assessment instrument. This is a computer based assessment of English Language Arts and mathematics. ELDA English Language Development Assessment In West Virginia, the West Virginia Test of English Language Learning (WESTELL) ELL English language learner a student identified as acquiring English for their education. ELPA 21 English Language Proficiency Assessment which will be a field test in spring 2015 and replace ELDA in ESEA Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) xv

18 List of Abbreviations and Terms ESL IASA ICT English as a second language Improving America's Schools Act Reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) in 1994 (predecessor to the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001) Interactive computer tasks IDEA 2004 Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act of 2004 IEP LFS Individualized education plan Limited formal studies NAEP National Assessment of Educational Progress Sometimes known as the Nation's Report Card, conducted by the National Center for Education Statistics at the U.S. Department of Education NAGB National Assessment Governing Board NCEO National Center on Educational Outcomes NCES National Center for Education Statistics NCLB No Child Left Behind Act the Elementary and Secondary Education Act ( E S E A ) reauthorization for 2001 OEPA Office of Education Performance Audits at the West Virginia Department of Education OIS OSP Office of International Schools at the West Virginia Department of Education Office of Special Programs at the West Virginia Department of Education Policy 2340 West Virginia Measures of Academic Progress West Virginia Board of Education policy that establishes rules governing the administration and operation of the West Virginia Measures of Academic Progress (WV-MAP) Policy 2417 Programs of Study for Limited English Proficient Students West Virginia Board of Education legislative rule that defines the expectations for programs of study for improving the English language proficiency of students with limited English proficiency Policy 2419 Regulations for the Education of Students with Exceptionalities West Virginia policies that apply to preschool, early childhood, middle childhood, adolescent, and adult students whose educational programs require special education and related services Policy 2510 Assuring the Quality of Education: Regulations for Education Programs West Virginia Board of Education policy that establishes the regulations for all education programs that are designed to prepare students for the 21 st century Public Law The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB) The reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) RESA Regional education service agency Agencies proving technology, training, and other services to schools, districts, and communities in eight geographic regions across West Virginia West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments, xvi

19 SAT Student assistance team A trained school based team which provides a formalized process for the review of student needs and complements the work of instruction and intervention teams. The student assistance team may select designated supports for any student with an active plan. The designated supports are provided if the student also receives these supports instructionally. See Policy 2510, section 8.2 and Section 504 An amendment to the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 that prohibits exclusion from participation in, denial of benefits to, or discrimination against individuals with disabilities on the basis of their disability, in federally assisted programs or activities Standard conditions Regular testing conditions, described in test administration materials, which are followed for all students. An IEP team, Section 504 committee, or ELL committee may require specific assessment accommodation(s) for individual students, which augment the standard conditions. SwD Students with disabilities WESTELL West Virginia Test of English Language Learning An annual statewide assessment designed to measure progress in learning the English language, administered to students who are not native English speakers or have a home language other than English WVBE West Virginia Board of Education WVDE West Virginia Department of Education WVEIS West Virginia Education Information System WV-MAP West Virginia Measures of Academic Progress multiple assessments conducted by the WVDE, including General Summative Assessment; alternate assessment; ACT COMPASS and NAEP WVS.326 Monitoring Process A monitoring process provided during state and district assessments that documents the provision of accommodations to students with disabilities and/or limited English proficiency WVTAC West Virginia Technical Assistance Committee xvii West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

20 Section I. Introduction The purposes of the West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments (Participation Guidelines) include the following: Providing policy guidance to individualized education program (IEP) teams, Section 504 committees, 2 S tudent Ass ist ance Teams and English Language Learner (ELL) committees for appropriately accommodating students in statewide and district-wide assessments; Helping teachers and schools work within the framework of federal law and state policies; and Providing tools for documentation of implementation and assurances for federal requirements under both the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act of 2004 (IDEA 2004). Assessments Covered in These Guidelines These Participation Guidelines focus on the West Virginia Board of Education (WVBE) Policy 2340, West Virginia Measures of Academic Progress (WV-MAP) as follows: The West Virginia General Summative Assessment is a customized test used to measure students levels of achievement of the Next Generation Content Standards and Objectives (CSOs) for West Virginia. The General Summative Assessment assesses English language arts, mathematics, science, and social studies 3 in Grades The General Summative Assessment is an assessment aligned to the Common Core State Standards in English language arts/literacy and mathematics that are designed to help prepare all students to graduate high school college- and career-ready and these standards have been adopted as the Next Generation Content Standards (Policies A and B). ELA and mathematics are computer adaptive tests. Science and social studies are fixed forms. T h e G e n e r a l S u m m a t i v e A s s e s s m e n t is used for accountability as required by ESEA. West Virginia is in a transition year for alternate assessment. The West Virginia Alternate Performance Task Assessment (APTA) is a n alternat e assessment specifically designed for students with significant intellectual disabilities, who are instructed using the Alternate Academic Achievement Standards and are pursuing a modified diploma. Students are assessed in reading/language arts and mathematics in Grades 3 8 and 11, and in science, Grades 4, 6, and 10. The Dynamic Learning Maps is an online alternate assessment system that assesses students in grades 3-11 in the areas of English language arts and mathematics that is used to measure the Next Generation Alternate Achievement Standards. 2 Section 504 (of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973) committees develop educational programs for students with disabilities who do not have IEPs, but receive accommodations to help them overcome barriers to the curriculum posed by physical or emotional disabilities that restrict one or more major life activity. The Section 504 plan is designed to level the playing field so that those students can safely pursue the same opportunities as everyone else in a regular education setting. 3 Social studies are aligned to the Next Generation social studies standards

21 Section I. Introduction to Accommodations ACT COMPASS i s a national assessment that is part of WV-MAP but the results are not used for accountability. ACT COMPASS is a computer-adaptive test developed by ACT to measure academic readiness for college-credit courses. o Students enrolled in the Transition Mathematics for Seniors course take the COMPASS Mathematics Test and students enrolled in the Transition English Arts for Seniors course take the COMPASS Writing Skills Test. o All students in Grade 11 take both the COMPASS Mathematics Test and the COMPASS Writing Skills Test except those participating in the alternate assessment. The National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) is a national assessment of a representative sampling of America's students in Grades 4, 8, and 12. NAEP measures what America's students know and can do in various subject areas. NAEP assessments are conducted periodically in reading, mathematics, science, writing, U.S. history, civics, geography, and the arts. Although NAEP is not used for the purpose of accountability it is part of WV-MAP as defined by Policy 2340 and required by West Virginia Code 18-2e-2. Sections II through V of this document present guidelines for Gener al Summativ e; Alternate Assessment (APTA & DLM), ACT COMPASS; and other field or district-wide assessments. At the beginning of each school year districts must notify the Office of Assessment and Research of any district-required assessments. Guidance on selecting appropriate designated supports and or ac commodations follow these sections. District-required assessments must follow the same procedures for the provision of accommodations as outlined within this document. Section IV provides NAEP participation guidelines. Accommodations allowable for NAEP are determined by the National Center for Educational Statistics (NCES), not the West Virginia Department of Education (WVDE). 4 Legislative and Policy Foundations These Participation Guidelines integrate and explain what is legally required by various authorities governing education in West Virginia, with regard to providing testing accommodations to several classifications of students, as outlined below: Policy 2340 requires participation in statewide assessments for all students, including g e n e r a l education students, students with IEPs, students with Section 504 plans, E n g l i s h L a n g u a g e L e a r n e r s and students with School Assistance Team (SAT) plans. The Participation Guidelines are subject to change based on revisions to the statewide assessment system. The U.S. Department of Education (USED), Office for Civil Rights has emphasized that exclusion from assessment undermines the value of assessment and also violates Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, which prohibits exclusion from participation in, denial of benefits to, or discrimination against, individuals with disabilities on the basis of their disability in federally assisted programs or activities (Heumann & Cantu, 1997). 4 Visit the NCES website (http://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/about/incusion.asp) for the most current information about NAEP accommodations for special needs students. West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

22 Section I. Introduction to Accommodations IDEA 2004 addresses nondiscrimination in assessment for students with disabilities and assures that standards are measured and not the student s disability. To comply with the requirements of IDEA 2004 and Section 504, IEP teams and Section 504 committees must determine assessment participation and allowable accommodations for individual students as specified in this document. The USED, Office of Elementary and Secondary Education administers the ESEA reauthorized in 2001 as No Child Left Behind (NCLB) and requires assessment and accountability for all students. To better focus on improving student learning and increasing the quality of instruction, the USED in 2013 granted West Virginia a flexibility waiver that allows local leaders to determine targets for attaining reading and mathematics proficiency by ESEA requires accommodations as appropriate for students with disabilities. Policy 2340 includes students who English Language Learners (formerly limited English proficiency ELL). West Virginia requires that migrant and gender subgroup performance be reported in the assessment Confidential Summary Report (CSR) for schools, counties, and the state. Policy 2340 established the rules governing the administration and operation of WV- MAP, requiring the WVDE to (a) provide an operational framework to administer an effective and efficient statewide assessment program, (b) protect the integrity of the test data, and (c) support the use of assessment data to improve instruction. The policy addresses special concerns regarding appropriate professional practices within WV-MAP, as well as appropriate professional conduct. Accordingly special forms (reprinted from Policy 2340 in Appendices A through I are available in test administration manuals) are required to be signed and dated by all personnel involved in state assessments and maintained in files at the appropriate office (see Appendix A). As described in the previous section, the purposes of the assessments vary and the participation of students varies by grade levels. The administration/examiners manuals for WV-MAP assessments describe the required testing conditions for students participating in each particular assessment. These standard conditions described in the administration materials must be followed unless a student has a documented need on a plan that identifies designated supports or accommodation(s) for assessment. The Participation Guidelines document also addresses other special circumstances for student participation in the WV-MAP. Procedures are included for homebound students, home-instructed students, students in alternative schools, and nonpublic students. Unless these students are identified as having disabilities under IDEA 2004 or Section 504, or qualify as English Language Learners, the guidelines for accommodations do not apply. IDEA 2004 and WVBE Policy 2419, Regulations for the Education of Students with Exceptionalities, set high expectations for students with disabilities by requiring that they have access to and the opportunity to make progress in the general education curriculum and that they be included in state and district assessment programs with appropriate accommodations when necessary. Both ESEA and IDEA 2004 require assessment on gradelevel content standards for all students, including students with the most significant cognitive disabilities who are unable to participate in the general assessment, even when accommodations are provided. These students are assessed using the alternate assessment, APTA. Assessment accommodations for students with disabilities are explained in depth later in this section. Policy 2340 requires that all students who are English Language Learners participate 3 West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

23 Section I. Introduction to Accommodations annually in state assessments. West Virginia does not offer an exemption for students attending less than 12 months. Because West Virginia s ELL population is approximately one percent of the total student population and includes a wide variety of native/home languages, the state does not offer its assessment in any language other than English. One exception is NAEP, which allows the use of a Spanish version for some assessments. Districts should carefully consider the potential for distraction before this accommodation is used. The WVDE is required by Federal Programs Consolidated Monitoring Requirements (EDGAR 34 C.F.R ) and peer review requirements (U.S. Department of Education, 2009) to report the state s procedure for assuring that accommodations specified on all IEPs and Section 504 plans are the ones provided to students during assessments. Under Policy 2340 West Virginia includes monitoring to apply to students identified as having limited English proficiency. The monitoring process is discussed later in this section (see Provision of Accommodations, page 7). In summary, federal law and state policy require provisions of accommodations identified in students IEPs, Section 504 plans, or ELL plans; therefore, examiners must provide accommodations as listed. Any change in accommodations must be addressed through a SAT, IEP team, Section 504 committee, and/or ELL committee meeting prior to the testing window. West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

24

25 Section I, Introduction to Accommodations Research Base The WVDE used the nationally recognized research base of acceptable and recommended accommodations for students with disabilities (Thompson, Johnstone, & Thurlow, 2002; Thompson, Morse, Sharpe, & Hall, 2005; Thompson, Thurlow, & Walz, 2000; Thurlow & Bolt, 2001; Thurlow, Quenemoen & Lazarus, 2011; Thurlow, Quenemoen, Thompson, & Lehr, 2001). These documents guide the work of the WVDE and West Virginia Technical Assistance Committee in reviews and approval of the accommodations for use in WV-MAP. Additionally, WV-MAP assessments were developed using principles of universal design and computer-based testing practices (Thurlow, Lazarus, Albus & Hodgson 2010). Accommodations appropriate for students who are English Language Learners were developed with technical assistance offered by the Appalachia Regional Comprehensive Center and its partner, The George Washington University Center for Equity and Excellence in Education. Accommodations provide students with limited English proficiency access to the content of the test by providing either direct linguistic support with the language of the test or indirect linguistic support with the conditions under which students with limited English proficiency take the test (Rivera, Collum, Willner, & Sia, 2006, p. 48). Research indicates that students with limited English proficiency who have accommodations assigned to them that match their linguistic and cultural needs scored higher than (a) ELL students with incomplete accommodations (i.e., accommodations assigned without matching to ELL-responsive criteria) and (b) ELL students who were not assigned any accommodations at all (Kopriva, Emick, Hipolito- Delgado, & Cameron, 2007). WV is part of three consortia for the development of rigorous assessments, Smarter Balanced, Dynamic Learning Maps and ELPA 21 consortia. All of the assessments have an agreed upon set of designated supports, accommodations and/or access tools specifically related to and designed for each specific assessment. The research base of accommodations from each of these consortia have been reviewed and accepted by the WVDE. The parameters of each assessment are provided within these participation guidelines, but in no way seeks to replace the approved set of tools, supports and accommodations for each consortia requirements. Smarter Balanced online assessments were built on principles of universal design based on a framework of accessibility for all students, including English Language Learners (ELLs), students with disabilities, and ELLs with disabilities, but not limited to those groups. In the process of developing its next-generation assessments to measure students knowledge and skills as they progress toward college and career readiness, Smarter Balanced recognized that the validity of assessment results depends on each and every student having appropriate universal tools, designated supports, and accommodations when needed based on the constructs being measured by the assessment. Thus, the universal tools, designated supports, and accommodations that are available for the Smarter Balanced assessment consortia may be different from those that states allowed in the past. State members of the Smarter Balanced Consortia have agreed only the universal tools, designated supports, and accommodations included in the Smarter Balanced Usability, Accessibility, and Accommodations Guidelines may be used. This document has incorporated the Smarter Balanced guidelines to represent the adopted universal tools, designated supports, and accommodations to ensure valid assessment results (See section IV). Science 5 West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

26 Section I, Introduction to Accommodations and social studies tests were developed prior and are not part of the consortia requirements. Therefore, these contents allow for a separate set of accommodations that are outlined in the General Summative Assessment Section 5. The development of the alternate assessment accessibility tools and features are based on principles of universal design identified by the Dynamic Leaning Maps (DLM) consortium. The DLM assessment was developed to align to the alternate achievement standards which are linked to the common core state standards for English language arts and mathematics. These standards have been adopted as Next Generation Alternate Academic Achievement Standards Policy and The Alternate Performance Task Assessment (APTA) is based on the standards outlined in Policy For more information on alternate assessment see Section VI. The English Language Proficiency Assessment for the 21st Century (ELPA 21) is a consortium of states committed to supporting educators, member states, and members of the public as they adopt and implement the English Language Proficiency (ELP) Standards and college and career-ready standards. The consortium is developing an assessment system based on the ELP Standards that will inform instruction so that all English language learners (ELLs) leave high school prepared for college and career success. For more information on English Language Learners see Section III. Test Administration Options for West Virginia Measures of Academic Progress (WV-MAP) The General Summative Assessment; Alternate Assessments (APTA and D y n a m i c L e a r n i n g M a p s ), ACT COMPASS a n d N A E P have been designed to allow a variety of test administration options and accommodations that do not change what is intended to be measured by the assessment or the meaning of the resulting scores. E a c h a s s e s s m e n t has its own guidelines for options and accommodations, presented in Sections IV-VII respectively. For these assessments, options to standard testing conditions are changes in presentation, response, or setting that may be provided to any student participating in the testing that is, these options do not require authorization through an IEP, Section 504 plan, or ELL plan. Modifications Modifications change what is intended to be measured by the assessment or the meaning of the resulting scores and are not allowed. One example of unallowable modifications are off-grade-level testing for assessments. The WVDE distinguishes among assessment options, accommodations, and modifications as shown in Exhibit 1. Exhibit 1. Characteristics of Options and Accommodations versus Modifications Options and accommodations (allowed) Modifications (not allowed) West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

27 Section I, Introduction to Accommodations Provide equitable access during assessments by mitigating the effects of a student s disability or limited English proficiency. Do not reduce learning achievement expectations for a student. Do not change the construct being assessed. Do not compromise the integrity or validity of the test. Provide unfair advantage by reducing the difficulty of a test or altering the nature of the test. Reduce the learning or achievement expectations for a student. Change the construct being assessed. Compromise the integrity of the test, resulting in invalid scores that are not meaningful. Assuring Accommodations As mentioned earlier, federal law requires that accommodations specified in a student s IEP, Section 504 plan, or ELL plan be provided during testing. Any desire to change the accommodation(s) by the school, teacher, or student can only be addressed through an IEP team, Section 504 committee, or E L L committee meeting prior to the testing window. WVDE has established the WVS.326 Accommodations Monitoring Process to ensure that all eligible students are provided the assessment designated supports and accommodations specified on their p l a n s ( IEP, Section 504, ELL A N D S A T ) during testing; and documentation is available for monitoring and accountability purposes. The procedures for the WVS.326 process have met federal review and approval requirements and are required for state and district assessments. State assessments include the General Summative Assessment ; alternate assessment including APTA and DLM; ACT COMPASS; and NAEP. Because NAEP has other monitoring procedures, the WVS.326 procedure is not required. District assessments include any assessment given to students of an entire grade without exclusion of, for example, students who take alternate assessment, or have IEPs, ELL plans or Section 504 plans. Accommodations monitoring is required for a l l r e q u i r e d district-wide assessments. Districts must notify the Office of Assessment and Research regarding any such district-administered tests (see Appendix I, page 154 for a copy of the notification form). If a district is excluding any student(s) from the general assessment, an alternative assessment must be made for the student. Provision of Accommodations West Virginia requires documentation and monitoring for the provision of all designat ed s upports and accommodations documented within an individual student plan (IEP, Section 504, E L L or SAT). Assessments required under WV-MAP will use the following process for the provision of accommodations. Prior to assessment 1. Five weeks prior to state assessment window, the Principal/BLC should use the WVEIS WOW Accommodations 14 Application to identify all students who need designated supports and accommodations for assessment. The Principal/BLC should make any corrections necessary by adjusting the information on a student plan at no later than one month prior to assessment window. 7 West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

28 Section I, Introduction to Accommodations 2. Two weeks before test administration, the CTC receives the pre-slugged WVS.326 accommodations monitoring forms (to view a copy of the WVS.326 form, see Appendix K, page 156). The CTC distributes the WVS.326 forms to each school. 3. The principal and/or building level coordinator (BLC) upon receipt of the WVS.326 forms must: Review the WVS.326 forms to verify accuracy of the student data information (student name, county and school codes, student WVEIS ID, date of birth, grade, and assessment). Verify that all data errors are corrected in WVEIS data system. Verification of the WVS 326 data should be compared to the data contained in the Accommodations 14 Application is required. Make any changes necessary into the WVEIS data system. o o o o The information for students with IEPs may be changed by entering and finalizing data in the Online IEP. The information for students with a 504 plan is entered into WVEIS. The information for ELL students is entered into the ELL PLAN in WVEIS WOW. Students with SAT Plans should be designated by appropriately tagging the student record and by identifying the appropriate supports in WOW. Follow these options to correctly prepare the forms: o o o If a pre-slugged form has not been provided for a student, a blank WVS.326 must be completed. A #2 pencil must be used to fill out the forms. If the received pre-slugged form contains incorrect data (either in the student information or accommodations information), a new form must be filled out. If an accommodation is missing but the remaining information is correct, the accommodation can be added to a pre-slugged form. The principal/blc distributes the forms to teacher(s) responsible for implementing students plans to verify that d e s i g n a t e d s u p p o r t s a n d / o r accommodations listed match those identified in the most current IEP, Section 504 plan, and ELL or SAT plan. Principals/BLCs should document data inconsistencies, verify any errors reported, and verify all corrections and changes are made immediately before the test window begins. 4. The m o n i t o r i n g teacher responsible for implementing a student s plan may add a missing accommodation by filling in the bubble beside the accommodation on the preslugged form. However, if an accommodation is marked incorrectly, the teacher must fill out a new form for the student including all student information. This step includes a comparison of the WVS.326 forms to current plans (see step 3 preparing forms for making changes). If the monitoring teacher finds an error, they must notify the principal/blc immediately and corrections must be made to the plan prior to the student West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

29 Section I, Introduction to Accommodations being able to receive the support or accommodation. All WVS.326 form(s), including those containing errors, must be returned and reported to the principal/blc. All changes on forms must be verified and the correction of all errors must be entered in the WVEIS data system. Report any changes to the principal/blc, who needs to make corrections to WVEIS. 5. All forms a r e submitted to the principal/blc who confirms any changes with monitoring teacher and verifies the accuracy of WVS. 326 forms to current student plans. 6. The principal/blc will distribute the WVS.326 forms to the assigned examiner who will review each student s listed testing accommodation(s) on the WVS.326 form. If the assigned examiner has any questions on the provision of a support or accommodation, the principal/examiner will clarify any questions. If the principal/blc is not sure, they will contact the CTC. The provision of designated supports and accommodations is requirement under Policy During the administration of the assessment The examiner will use the WVS.326 form (pre-slugged and manually gridded forms) during the administration of the test and the principal/blc will monitor the test administration to ensure the examiner is providing t h e d e s i g n a t e d s u p p o r t s a n d / o r accommodations as specified by the plan. 1. During the test, the examiner reviews and implements the accommodations specified and completes the individual student s WVS.326 accommodations form, following these steps: Verify that student name and 9 digit WVEIS IDs is correct. Provide the identified designated supports and/or accommodations listed on the form. Using a #2 pencil, complete the forms indicating whether highlighted designated supports and/or accommodations were provided to the student by marking, Yes (Provided) or No (Not Provided). When marking No, indicate either Code 1 (Refused) or Code 2 (Not Allowed or Not Applicable for this assessment). Codes 1 and 2 represent the only acceptable reasons for not providing an accommodation listed on the WVS.326. Code 1 is used when students either refuse to accept an accommodation or finish the test before extra time (T04) or breaks (T03) were necessary. Code 2 is used when accommodations are not allowed or not applicable for the test being administered; for example, accommodation P31 (Provide translation glossary) is not provided for the science and social studies. If an accommodation was not provided for any other reason, do not mark Code 1 or Code 2. Provide a comment on the back of the form explaining why the designated support and/or accommodation was not provided. The examiner signs all WVS.326 forms with a legible signature and fills in the date of test administration at the bottom of each form. More than one examiner may sign the form, if appropriate. Make sure any comments on the back of the form are legible. 2. The examiner reviews and returns all the WVS.326 accommodations forms to the school principal/blc with the testing materials and notifies him or her if there were any accommodation administration errors. 9 West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

30 Section I, Introduction to Accommodations 3. The principal/blc verifies the return of the WVS.326 accommodations forms each day. The WVS.326 form is secure test material. 4. The principal/blc monitors the provision of designated supports and accommodations. This includes following up immediately on accommodations administration errors (see next section). After the assessment The principal/blc should review the forms for any designated supports or accommodations that were not provided. If any form contains a no without a code 1 or 2, there should be documentation or comments on the back of the form. Follow up on all accommodation errors. If no accommodation administration errors took place during testing, proceed to Managing the WVS.326 forms, (page 11). If such an error did take place, follow the procedures outlined. Following up on an accommodations administration error 1. If a designated support and /or accommodation was not provided for any reason other than those represented by Codes 1 or 2, or if an accommodation was given that was not indicated on the WVS.326 form, follow these procedures: a. The principal/blc immediately informs the CTC of all designated support and/or accommodation administration errors, including incidents of students being overaccommodated or under-accommodated. These incidents represent a breach in the integrity and accuracy of test results and require written documentation. b. The principal/blc informs the parent or guardian of the accommodation administration error and offers the following options: Option 1. Invalidate the test and, if the testing window is still open, retest the student using a breach form. Note: No breach form is available for APTA or the General Summative Large Print Version. Parents of students who are over-accommodated can only choose Option 1 or 3. Students may take ACT COMPASS again in the event of an accommodation error. Option 2. Accept the test as administered. This option is available only if a student was under-accommodated. Option 3. Invalidate the test. This option is available but not recommended for an under-accommodated student. Parents of students who are overaccommodated can only choose Option 1 or 3. For all cases where the parent chooses Option 2 or 3, there must be a signed written agreement between the parent or guardian and principal/blc. A copy of the agreement must be kept on file at the school and with the CTC or county special education director, Section 504 director, or Title III director. A copy must also be included in the affected student s record. 2. The CTC will review accommodation administration errors with principals/blcs and report any findings to the district superintendent and to the district special education, Title III, and or Section 504 director(s). The CTC will also contact the WVDE Office of Assessment and Research for further instructions. West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

31 Section I, Introduction to Accommodations 3. The CTC and WVDE Office of Assessment and Research may further investigate and document this event. The district must follow up with a written report of any corrective action taken as a result of the investigation within 30 days, and submit it to the following address: Office of Assessment and Research West Virginia Department of Education 1900 Kanawha Blvd., East Building 6, Suite 825 Charleston, WV Copies of the WVS.326 forms and any investigation reports must be maintained for 3 years by the district for review by the Office of Education Performance Audits, Office of International Schools, and the Office of Special Programs. Notice In accordance with both special education monitoring and state special education compliance procedures, district noncompliance with federal statutory requirements results in corrective actions and technical assistance, if appropriate. Continued and/or persistent noncompliance at the district or school can result in state-imposed enforcement, which may include a variety of sanctions, including the withholding or redirection of federal and/or state funds. Managing the WVS.326 forms 1. The principal/blc makes two copies of all WVS.326 forms. One copy (including any parent agreements) is to be retained at the school for verification should there be a WVDE or federal review. The other copy and the original forms are sent to the CTC no later than 1 week following testing. Use the following procedure: a. Copies for CTC Sort all copies in a separate envelope or box labeled WVS.326 Copies. Be sure to include the school name. CTCs maintain these for their records. b. Sort out the form copies that indicate a designated support and/or accommodation administration error and the attached original signed and dated parent contact documentation and place them on top of the remaining WVS.326 copies. CTCs must maintain these records. Principals/BLC must maintain documentation of over and under accommodated students. c. Originals for CTC All original WVS.326 forms must be returned to the CTC. Do not use staples, paperclips, or rubber bands on these forms. Each envelope or box also should include the school name (see Appendix L, page 158, for label information). Sort all original forms into four categories and place them into appropriately labeled envelopes or boxes: Blank Forms (may be reused by the district) Completed and Correct (valid forms only-these represent what happened on test day) Not Completed (pre-slug error, not used for test or absent students) Accommodations Administration Errors (under-accommodated and/or over-accommodated and a copy of the documentation) d. Return one set of copies and the original WVS.326 forms to the CTC. Do not send the WVS.326 forms to any testing vendor/company. 11 West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

32 2. The CTC should: Section I, Introduction to Accommodations a. verify the return of the WVS.326 accommodations forms from each school b. separate the WVS.326 forms from any other testing materials. c. sort the originals from all schools into the same four categories listed above (i.e., Blank Forms, Completed and Correct, Not Completed, and Accommodations Administration Errors). d. retain any blank forms for future reuse, retain a copy of the WVS.326 forms that are completed and correct and the accommodation administration errors for district records and destroy any not completed forms. Retain the original parent agreements. e. return the Completed and Correct original WVS.326 forms and the Accommodations Administration Error forms with a copy of the documentation to the: Medical Emergency Exemptions Office of Assessment and Research West Virginia Department of Education Building 6, Suite Kanawha Boulevard East Charleston, WV Special Assessment Circumstances Policy 2340 requires that all students participate in state assessments. Similarly, federal law requires that all students, including students with disabilities, be assessed through each state s assessment system. However, if a student in a school or district has a medical emergency that precludes him or her from participating in the statewide assessments, an exception can be granted during the Not Tested window following the assessment window. A request for participation rate exemption can be submitted to WVDE for review during the Not Tested window. Each request will be reviewed by the Accountability team at WVDE to determine whether the request and the circumstances warrant an exemption from participation. Additional information may be requested to better understand the situation in order to make a determination for accountability purposes. Any request applies only to the accountability year of the request. Information that will need to be submitted for review during the Not Tested window should include: Brief description of the emergency Date(s) of the emergency Date(s) the assessment is scheduled to be administered at the school Confirmation that a doctor s note is on file Hospitalization and debilitating illness are two examples of approved medical emergencies, whereas non-limiting illnesses and pregnancy are examples of situations that would not be approved. More information about the submission of exemption requests as part of the West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

33 Section I, Introduction to Accommodations Not Tested process will be available as a download on the WVEIS calendar page in the Spring of Please contact the Accountability team with any questions via at or by phone at Homebound students Homebound students are students enrolled in public school who, due to injury or for any other health-related issue (a) are temporarily confined to home or a hospital for a period that has lasted or will last more than 3 consecutive weeks; (b) are certified in writing by a licensed physician or other licensed health care provider; and (c) meet the eligibility criteria for home/hospital instruction in WVBE Policy 2510, Assuring Quality Education: Regulations for Education Programs. All homebound public school students are to be assessed at the schools in which they are enrolled or at alternate testing sites approved by the county test coordinator. All participating educators and students shall be required to follow all testing guidelines and security procedures set forth in WV-MAP WVBE Policy 2340, 4.8. The examiner must meet the definition of an examiner as defined in Policy Further, all signed agreements must be on file at the student s home school; no family member may be present in the testing area during the test administration; no family member may read any of the test materials; and all test security procedures and schedules must be followed. If it is possible for the homebound student to come to the school for testing, he or she should follow the school s testing schedule. If it is impossible for the homebound student to go to the school, the county will determine how the administration of the assessment will occur. Alternative schools An alternative education program (WVBE Policy 4373) is a temporary authorized departure from the regular school program, designed to provide educational and social development for students whose behavior places them at risk of not succeeding in the traditional school structure and in adult life without positive interventions. Students in public alternative education programs are tested at the school site where they receive instruction. All test security procedures and schedules must be followed exactly as prescribed in this guide and administration manuals. Instructions for Nonpublic Students and Schools Home-instructed students Home-instructed (home-schooled) students may participate in the WV-MAP under standard conditions administered in the public schools of the district in which they reside. Each academic year, the home instructor must notify the district test coordinator of the intent to participate in the WV-MAP. Students may participate in the West Virginia statewide General Summative Assessment and ACT COMPASS mathematic and writing skills test for 11 th graders provided that the home instructor notifies the district test coordinator of the intention to participate at least two months prior to the testing window. Home-instructed students enrolled in 12 th grade may not participate in either ACT COMPASS mathematics test or ACT COMPASS writing skills test. 13 West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

34 Section I, Introduction to Accommodations Home-instructed students will be assigned: 1) a location for testing with an approved educator who has completed the required training as an examiner/scribe and signed the WVBE Examiner s/scribe s Secure Materials and Test Procedures Agreement, and 2) test dates by the district test coordinator during the testing window. All educators and nonpublic school students participating in the assessments of the WV-MAP shall be required to follow all testing guidelines and procedures set forth in this policy. Violations of this policy shall result in the loss of testing privileges. No breach form will be administered to homeinstructed students. No family member may be present in the testing area during the administration of the test. All test security procedures and schedules must be followed. Nonpublic schools All nonpublic school students may participate in WV-MAP. Each academic year, the nonpublic school administrator must submit a Participation Form and a Verification of Certification Form to the Office of Assessment and Research and to the district test coordinator in the district where the nonpublic school is located by August 31. The district test coordinator, not the nonpublic school, will receive all testing material and release the testing materials to the nonpublic principal/assigned building level coordinator upon completion of the required training and receipt of signed WVBE Principal and/or Building Level Coordinator Secure Materials and Test Procedures Agreement (required annually). All educators and nonpublic school students participating in the assessments of the WV- MAP shall be required to follow all testing guidelines and procedures set forth in this policy. All educators who have access to secure test materials must be trained annually. The district test coordinator, in conjunction with the principal/building level coordinator at the participating nonpublic school, will determine training dates. Violations of this policy shall result in the loss of testing privileges. Nonpublic students enrolled in 11 th grade may participate in the ACT COMPASS mathematics and in the ACT COMPASS writing skills test. Nonpublic students enrolled in 12 th grade may not participate in either ACT COMPASS mathematics test or ACT COMPASS writing skills test. WV-MAP Online Resources Testing Calendar for all parts of WV-MAP: West Virginia State Board Policies: Administration manuals for all WV-MAP assessments (except NAEP): https://sites.google.com/a/wvde.k12.wv.us/oaar-file-cabinet/. West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

35 Section II. Guidelines for Supporting and Accommodating Students with Disabilities To appropriately assess all students, the West Virginia Department of Education (WVDE) must ensure assessments are valid, reliable, and consistent with national assessment standards. When using assessments to identify schools needing improvement over a period of time, assessment administration and content must be consistent and scores must be comparable. The challenge is to maintain a fair assessment that meets the technical quality requirements of statewide assessment and accountability, while also avoiding discrimination against students with disabilities or limited English proficiency (or both). To this end, these guidelines are provided to aid schools and districts in their decisionmaking and assessment responsibilities. This section offers guidance on the assessment of students with disabilities, which includes: students with disabilities as defined by the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act of 2004 (IDEA 2004), and more specifically, those meeting the eligibility criteria in West Virginia Board of Education (WVBE) Policy 2419, whose individualized education plans (IEPs) must address assessment participation; and the criteria for participation in an alternate assessment for students with disabilities as defined by the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act of 2004 (IDEA 2004), and more specifically, those meeting the eligibility criteria in West Virginia Board of Education (WVBE) Policy 2419 (for more guidance on alternate assessment see section X of this document). students who are not eligible under WVBE Policy 2419 and do not have an IEP, but who meet the definition of disability under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and whose Section 504 plans call for instructional and assessment accommodations. For guidance in addressing accommodations for students w h o a r e E n g l i s h L a n g u a g e L e a r n e r s ( E L L s) without disabilities (also refer to section III of this document). For guidance in addressing students with plans refer to section X. For purposes of No Child Left Behind (NCLB) reporting and accountability, only students with disabilities eligible under IDEA 2004 and WVBE Policy 2419 (i.e., students with IEPs) are included in the students with disabilities subgroup; however, any of these groups may receive accommodations when determined appropriate by their respective IEP teams or Section 504 committees. Role of IEP Teams and Section 504 Committees Guidelines in this document for IEP teams and Section 504 committees serve the following purposes: to define appropriate and nationally researched and accepted accommodations and how they are to be implemented for all West Virginia Measures of Academic Progress (WV-MAP) assessments except the National Assessment of Education Progress (NAEP) (see Section IV for separate information about accommodations for NAEP); to prohibit modifications that change what the test measures and ensure that modifications are not written into IEPs or Section 504 plans; West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

36 Section II. Guidelines for Accommodating Students with Disabilities to define criteria for participation in statewide assessments; and to describe how decisions are documented in IEPs or Section 504 plans IEP teams Special education law and policy require that an IEP be developed and implemented to meet the individual needs of each eligible student with a disability as defined under IDEA An IEP is a written plan, developed by a team as defined in WVBE Policy 2419, Regulations for the Education of Students with Exceptionalities. The IEP describes the specially designed instruction and appropriate accommodations, if any, needed for an eligible student to master the content standards and objectives as outlined in policy, and to prepare for postsecondary education and the workplace. The IEP also identifies the assessment accommodations that a student needs to receive. Both general and special education federal laws and state policies require the provision of these assessment accommodations for eligible students with disabilities. IDEA 2004 also requires state guidelines for provision of appropriate accommodations to students with disabilities in statewide assessments and for participation in Alternate Performance Task Assessment (APTA) when necessary as determined by students IEP teams. According to the January 12, 2001, joint memorandum issued by the U.S. Department of Education (ED), Office of Elementary and Secondary Education (which governs the administration of ESEA) 5, and the ED Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services (which ensures the provisions of IDEA 2004), decisions regarding accommodations must be based on a full understanding of the consequences for reporting and accountability. Section 504 committees For students with disabilities as defined under Section 504, who do not have an IEP, the Section 504 committee determines any needed accommodations for WV-MAP assessments. 6 The Section 504 plan is developed by a group of stakeholders qualified to evaluate and determine whether the student meets the definition of a student with a disability under Section 504, and plan for the educational needs of the student. LEAs are required to have written procedures for developing Section 504 plans. English Language Learners with Disabilities For appropriate selection of designated supports and accommodations for students who are English Language Learners (ELL s) with disabilities the IEP or 504 team must include a member to specifically address the individual language needs of the student. The ELL team member may appropriately identify any designated supports and accommodations that may be added to the 5 Specifically, these requirements include ESEA requirements as amended by the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (PL ); WVBE Policy 2510, Assuring the Quality of Education; Regulations for Educational Programs; WVBE Policy 2340, WV-MAP; the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act of 2004 (IDEA-PL ); and WVBE Policy 2419, Regulations for the Education of Students with Exceptionalities. 6 The Americans with Disabilities Act Amendments Act of 2008 (Amendments Act), effective January 1, 2009, amended the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) and included a conforming amendment to the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (Rehabilitation Act) that affects the meaning of disability in Section 504. West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

37 student s plan for instruction and assessment. Accessibility Guidelines for Classroom Activities Students with disabilities are allowed to have accommodations, and English learners with disabilities should have access to language supports that they regularly use during classroom instruction. Designated supports and strategies may be made available to any student based on the student s individual needs and are not limited to particular impairments or to students who have Individualized Education Programs (IEPs) or 504 plans. Accommodations are only made to students with disabilities. The chart below has been taken from the test administration manual (TAM) so that teams recognize student need for accessibility instructionally. The designated supports and accommodations a student received routinely may indicate the selection of the designated supports and accommodations need for state assessments. The comparison of the resources and practices are included in the section on assessment codes. Classroom Activity Guidance for Needs-Specific Accessibility Options Student Need Visual Impairments Guidance for Accessibility (Student IEP and 504 Plans supersede these guidelines) Reading Materials: All materials that are required to be read by a student may be read aloud to the student. Pictures, Figures, Drawings, and Photographs: Descriptions may be read to students. In addition, teachers can provide students with further explanation of the descriptions. These explanations may clarify the description without adding additional content. Graphs: Further descriptions or repetition of descriptions may be necessary for a student. These explanations may clarify the description without adding additional content. Venn Diagrams: Venn diagrams may be described to the student. In addition, a teacher may use a different chart, diagram format, or graphic organizer. Reading Impairments Physical Impairments Reading Materials: All materials that are required to be read by students may be read aloud to the student. Writing Activities: All activities that require the student to write may allow for an oral response or the use of technology usually used by the student in a classroom environment. Kinesthetic Activities: If a student cannot participate in a kinesthetic activity, the student may be asked to describe the activity orally. Activities Requiring Movement: Tasks such as moving around the room or coming up to the board can be modified to allow the teacher or other students to interact with the student or allow for the student to respond orally. Writing Activities: If helpful to a student, all activities that require the student to write may allow for an oral response or the use of technology usually used by the student in a classroom environment. 17 West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

38 Section II. Guidelines for Accommodating Students with Disabilities Student Need Hearing Impairments Expressive Language Impairments English Learners Separate Setting Guidance for Accessibility (Student IEP and 504 Plans supersede these guidelines) Activities Requiring Listening: Listening activities may be presented in American Sign Language (ASL). For activities that require students to describe sounds, such as those from a thunderstorm, a sound may be described by the student as how it feels and looks. Activities Requiring Oral Responses: Oral responses may be provided via sign language or in writing. Activities Requiring Oral Responses: Oral responses may be provided in writing, using a communication device, or any other means that the student uses to communicate. Reading Materials: All materials that are required to be read by students may be read aloud to the student. Writing Activities: All activities that require the student to write may allow for an oral response. Visual Supports: If helpful to a student, vocabulary and key contextual topics may be supplemented with visual supports. Flexible Grouping: Teachers may administer the Classroom Activity in flexible groups based on English language proficiency. Activities Requiring Oral Responses: Oral responses may be provided in writing. Students may use an English, non-english, and bilingual dictionary and thesaurus as needed. Group activities may be tailored to occur between a single student and his or her educator where the educator and student share discussion and work. Activities between student(s) and an educator may be conducted online or via a telephone connection. All student-facing information included in a Classroom Activity should be presented to students working in a separate setting. Selecting general assessment designated supports and accommodations: Three steps When participation in the general assessment is determined to be the appropriate assessment choice, the student will participate in all other components of WV-MAP (except for students on alternate assessment). SAT, IEP teams, Section 504 and ELL committees must actively engage in a planning process that addresses the provision of d e s i g n a t e d s u p p o r t s a n d accommodations if needed, to facilitate student access to grade-level instruction and state assessments. That is, S A T, IEP teams, Section 504 committees and ELL committees must determine if the student will participate under standard conditions for all students, (b) standard conditions with options available to all students (see Options to Standard Conditions and/or universal tools), or (c) standard conditions with d e s i g n a t e d s u p p o r t s a n d / o r accommodations. If the latter is chosen, the following three-step process should be followed for deciding which designated supports and accommodations are needed, for which tests and subtests. Students with SAT plans and ELL without disabilities may receive designated supports (see subsequent sections for more information). Students with disabilities including students with IEPs or 504s may be eligible for accommodations. Many supports and accommodations for the General Summative Assessment and other tests in the WV-MAP are considered options to West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

39 standard conditions for alternate assessment; therefore, they are not considered accommodations but accessibility features. Step one Select appropriate designated supports and accommodations Decisions about appropriate assessment accommodations must be reviewed annually. The parent(s) and student, if appropriate, must be involved in and informed of decisions regarding assessment participation. The implications of the decisions must be carefully explained to the parent(s) and student. When making decisions about which assessment accommodations to allow, IEP teams and Section 504 committees should consider the following: Which supplementary aids, services, and program modifications are being provided in the IEP or Section 504 plan for classroom instruction? Would using this d e s i g n a t e d s u p p o r t o r accommodation in the various assessments in the WV-MAP result in getting the best measure of what the student knows and can do on the skill being tested? Not every accommodation used in instruction is appropriate or helpful in assessment. Consider whether accommodations used to assist a student in learning also are needed to show what he or she has learned. Accommodations should address the barriers to accessing the test resulting from the student s disability; therefore, ensuring that the skill, rather than the disability, is being measured. Factors to weigh in making the decision may include the effectiveness of the accommodation according to available research and difficulties encountered when using the accommodation. Will the student actually use the accommodation when testing occurs? When possible, the student should be involved in the decision. An accommodation is more likely to be effective if the student understands how to use it and is willing to do so. Which specific assessment accommodations, if any, should be required when assessing for the General Summative Assessment and other components of the WV-MAP and to which tests and subtests do these accommodations apply? Universal tools are accessibility tools that allow any student access to the assessment and are available under standard conditions. Accessible tools are available for any student taking the General Summative Assessment. The chart includes universal tools that may support any student and will not need identified on the assessment page of the IEP or 504 plan. Consider using these tools if these are provided to students instructionally. Universal Tools for General Summative Assessment (available for all students) Guidelines Resource Breaks Digital Notepad Global Notes Scratch Paper Description Instructional Practices Description The number of items per session can be flexibly defined based on the student s need. These tools are used for making notes, computations, or responses about an item or performance task. Breaks AVID Style Notes, brainstorming ideas, writing down connections, scratch 19 West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments, Students pace themselves while completing work. Students may move about the classroom or take a short break outside to refocus. Strategies allow students to create notes or work on computations. Students may create two-column notes to record main ideas and to make

40 Section II. Guidelines for Accommodating Students with Disabilities Highlighter Keyboard Navigation A digital tool for marking desired text, item questions, item answers, or parts of these with a color. Navigation throughout text can be accomplished by using a keyboard. Mark for Review Allows students to flag items for future review during the assessment. Spell Check Strikethrough Zoom Writing tool for checking the spelling of words in student-generated responses. Allows users to cross out answer options. A tool for making text or other graphics in a window or frame appear larger on the screen. paper, whiteboards, or notepaper Highlighter Students applying keyboarding skills using knowledge/skill of software Circle, star, or check () the item numbers of problems or questions that have not been answered Proofreading Automated spellcheck device Process of elimination Large-print texts connections with previous knowledge or ask questions. Students can organize ideas by listing all ideas for each topic and then prioritize. A digital or physical tool for marking desired text with a color. Students use highlighters to distinguish useful/meaningful text when completing an assignment. Students can denote main ideas, supporting details, and conclusion. Students use classroom software programs such as Accelerated Reader, Interactive Math, Rosetta Stone, or EDMODO to complete classroom assignments, and make use of keyboarding skills in doing so. Circling, starring, or placing a check mark by an item about which a student is unsure enables the student to proceed to the next item. Students may also use paper sticky flags to notate areas for review or rereading. Students can also circle steps within a mathematics problem to revisit or ask questions. Students proofread other students work using a dictionary. Teachers proofread students work and have students make specific corrections. Students use rubrics to evaluate their own work, including checking for spelling, grammar, or content. Students use an automated spellcheck device during instruction. Students cross out the answers to multiple-choice items that are obviously wrong. Students cross out incorrect words in sentences. Students receive large-print versions of state textbooks, or other text, to enable access to curriculum. Students have access to enlarged mathematics problems to make sure all steps are completed. West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

41 English Dictionary An embedded English dictionary will be available for the full write portion of an ELA/literacy performance task. A non-embedded English dictionary may be available for the same portion of the test. Electronic or paper English dictionary Students use an electronic or paper English dictionary to look up word meanings. Thesaurus A thesaurus contains synonyms of terms while a student interacts with text included in the assessment. Electronic or paper thesaurus Students utilize a thesaurus to enrich their writing vocabulary and to hone their knowledge of nuances in the English language. Math Tools Examples include embedded ruler or embedded protractor. Rulers, protractors, number lines, manipulatives Students can use rulers, protractors, and manipulative materials to complete graphs, rays, and circumferences. Writing Tools Examples include bold, italic, bullets, undo/redo. Writing tools Students use desktop publishing software (Microsoft Word) in order to type up a story or article during instruction. Students can use italics and bullets to cite a reference or to emphasize important ideas. Acceptable designated supports and accommodations for the General Summative Assessment follow below with specific guidance on each of the WV-MAP components in subsequent sections (the general summative in Section IV; alternate assessment in section V; COMPASS in Section VI; and NAEP in Section VII). Step Two Document the reasons for designated supports and accommodations selected As mentioned earlier, the student who participates in the General Summative Assessment also will participate in the other components of the WV-MAP, as appropriate by grade level, including ACT COMPASS; and N A E P. A ny d esignat ed s upports and acco mmodations must b e sp ecified o n t h e IEP or S ect ion 5 04 p lan. In the documentation, the committee must articulate the reasons for differentiating accommodations for this student. 1. What does this individual student need, in order to show us what he/she really knows? 2. If provided, will the accommodation change what the test is trying to measure? 3. If an accommodation is deemed appropriate has the student had prior experience using it? Step Three Verification of information to WVEIS Testing conditions and accommodations identified, if any, must also be documented in the student s IEP, Section 504 plan, and/or ELLs with disabilities plan. The same information should be verified in the WVEIS student information, as applicable. The Accommodations 14 Application should reflect any codes that are currently on a plan. 21 West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

42 Section II. Guidelines for Accommodating Students with Disabilities Guide to Designated Supports and Accommodations for Students with Disabilities Standard designated supports and accommodations fall into three categories: presentation affecting how test items are presented to students; response affecting how students are allowed to convey their responses to items; and setting and time affecting where, when, and on what schedule testing takes place. All allowable options, supports and accommodations for students with disabilities fall into these categories and are described in detail by category of presentation, response, and timing. The codes to the left of each accommodation/option heading are the WVEIS codes associated with the allowed support or accommodation. Those with no WVEIS code and marked with a long dash ( ) are standard options available to any student. Presentation Presentation supports and accommodations allow students to access instruction and assessments in ways that do not require them to read standard print visually. These alternate modes of access include auditory, tactile, visual, and a combination of auditory and visual accommodations. Students who benefit most from presentation accommodations are those with print disabilities, defined as difficulty or inability to read standard print visually because of a physical, sensory, or cognitive disability. Testing presentation options available to all students include use of audio amplification equipment. The following list of all WVEIS presentation codes for all assessments in WV-MAP designated supports and/or accommodations for all state assessments. P01 Use text to speech (TTS), excluding ELA reading passages Allowed for: NAEP and General Summative Assessment. Description: Text is read aloud to the student via embedded text-to-speech technology. The student is able to control the speed as well as raise or lower the volume of the voice via a volume control. Instructional Practices: Text is read aloud to the student via embedded text-to-speech technology or a human. Teacher or assistant reads aloud instructions. Listening skills are taught using read-aloud material, and then students are checked for understanding. Students listen to a prerecorded audio interpretation (book-on-tape) of text or a book. When to select: For students who are struggling readers who may need assistance accessing the assessment by having all or portions of the assessment read aloud. This support also may be needed by students with reading-related disabilities, or by students who are blind and do not yet have adequate braille skills. This accommodations is for students who are unable to decode text visually or by using contracted braille or Nemeth code. Notes for implementation: This is considered a designated support which will likely be confusing and may impede the performance of students who do not regularly receive this support during instruction. Students who use text-to-speech will need headphones unless tested individually in a separate setting. This accommodation excludes all COMPASS assessments. P02 Have test read aloud Allowed for: All WV-MAP tests excluding general summative ELA reading passages, ACT COMPASS Writing Skills* and NAEP Reading. West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

43 * ACT COMPASS Writing is allowed for a student who is blind because there is no braille version available Description: Text is read aloud to the student by a trained and qualified human reader. The trained examiner reads aloud the directions, stimulus material, questions, and answer choices. This accommodation excludes passages. Instructional Practices: Text is read aloud to the student via embedded text-to-speech technology or a human. Teacher or assistant reads aloud instructions. Listening skills are taught using read-aloud material, and then students are checked for understanding. Students listen to a prerecorded audio interpretation (book-on-tape) of text or a book. When to select: Students who are struggling readers may need assistance accessing the assessment by having the assessment read aloud. This support also may be needed by students with reading-related disabilities, or by students who are blind and do not yet have adequate braille skills. Notes for implementation: If not used regularly during instruction, this support is likely to be confusing and may impede the performance on assessments. Read aloud should be provided to students on an individual basis not to a group of students. A student should have the option of asking a reader to slow down or repeat text. This is difficult when a person is reading to an entire group of students. However, verbatim reading to a group of students is permitted in testing if the accommodation is provided to the student on that basis during regular instruction. Test readers must be familiar with the terminology and symbols specific to the content (see Appendix M) 7 for Read Aloud Guidelines. ensure that all students understand what is expected of them when reading test directions; must NOT clarify, elaborate, or answer questions about test items; or give clues while reading items that indicate the correct answer or help eliminate answer choices. This accommodation is often paired with T04 (extra time). Allow students an opportunity to ask questions about how to mark their answers before they begin taking the test and be prepared to answer questions about item format and timing. This is considered a designated support. P03 Use contracted braille or tactile graphics static (fixed) Allowed for: All tests in WV-MAP excluding COMPASS* and NAEP computer-based. Description: This is a static non-embedded form of the test which is contracted braille. A raised-dot code that individuals read with the fingertips. Graphic material (e.g. maps, charts, graphs, diagrams, and illustrations) is presented in a raised format (paper, thermoform or refreshable braille display when available). The student uses contracted braille (a system that reduces the number of cells by abbreviating words or parts of words), and Nemeth code braille (a system used to convey technical expressions that occur in mathematics and science). Instructional Practices: Instructional materials and assignments are completed in braille. When to select: For students who are blind and read braille fluently or choose braille as their primary mode of reading. Students with visual impairments may read text via braille. Tactile 7 See Appendix M on page West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

44 Section II. Guidelines for Accommodating Students with Disabilities overlays and graphics also may be used to assist the student in accessing content through touch. The use of this accommodation may result in the student needing additional overall time to complete the assessment. Notes for implementation: P06 Braille test editions are ordered prior to the assessment. There is no Braille version of ACT COMPASS; the test will be read to the student in a oneon-one setting. This is considered an accommodation. Have test presented through sign language, locally provided Allowed for: All WV-MAP tests for the General Summative Assessment for any items where the ASL support is provided excluding COMPASS Writing Skills and NAEP Reading. Description: A trained examiner may present directions, stimulus material, questions, and answer choices in sign language. Instructional Practices: For students who are deaf or hard of hearing and use sign as the dominant mode of communication. When to select: For students who are deaf or hard of hearing, and who are unable to effectively use English print and use sign as their mode of communication. Notes for implementation: P13 Educational sign language interpreters must not clarify, elaborate, paraphrase, or provide assistance with the meaning of words, intent of test questions, or responses to test items. A student s teacher should not serve as the interpreter/translator in a testing situation unless a second person is present to monitor for quality and fairness. This accommodation is not allowed on the general summative portions of the test where sign is not provided in ASL or other language supports. Have text to speech (TTS), including ELA reading passages Allowed for: All General Summative Assessment including ELA passages for documented need, grades 6-11 only Description: Text is read aloud to the student via embedded text-to-speech technology. The student is able to control the speed as well as raise or lower the volume of the voice via a volume control. Instructional Practices: Nearly all text is read aloud to the student via embedded text-tospeech technology or a human. Teacher or assistant reads aloud instructions. Listening skills are taught using read-aloud material, and then students are checked for understanding. Students listen to a prerecorded audio interpretation (book-on-tape) of text or a book. The student receives accessible instructional materials (AIM) for instructional purposes and has a documented reading disability. When to select: This accommodation is appropriate for a very small number of students (estimated to be approximately 1-2% of students with disabilities participating in a general assessment) who have a documented reading disability. For students in grades 6 11, text tospeech is available as an accommodation for students whose need is documented in an IEP, 504 plan. This accommodation is not available for students in grades 3-5. Content experts West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

45 agree that this accommodation should not be provided during these grades because it would compromise the construct being measured. Students who use text-to-speech will need headphones unless tested individually in a separate setting. Notes for implementation: This is considered an accommodation. NAEP computer-based assessments have text-to-speech capability built into the universal design. For information on students who use screen readers, such as JAWS or Win-eyes or voiceover, see code P21 (Use screenreading software to access computer). P14 Have test read aloud including passages Allowed for: General Summative Assessment, excluding COMPASS Writing Skills* and NAEP Reading. *COMPASS does not have a braille version. Students who are blind may have COMPASS read aloud. Description: Text is read aloud to the student by a trained and qualified human reader. The trained examiner must follow administration guidelines. All or portions of the test may be read aloud including ELA reading passages, grades All portions of the test including passages may be read to blind students in grades 3-11 who do not yet have adequate braille skills. Instructional Practices: Teacher or assistant reads aloud instructions. Listening skills are taught using read-aloud material, and then students are checked for understanding. Students listen to a prerecorded audio interpretation (book-on-tape) of text or a book. Students most likely qualify for AIM and have a documented reading disability. Student may be blind and not yet be able to read braille fluently. When to select: For students who are struggling readers may need assistance accessing the assessment by having all or portions of the assessment read aloud. This support also may be needed by students with documented reading-related disabilities, or by students who are blind and do not yet have adequate braille skills. If not used regularly during instruction, this support is likely to be confusing and may impede the performance on assessments. Readers should be provided to students on an individual basis not to a group of students. A student should have the option of asking a reader to slow down or repeat text. The use of this support may result in the student needing additional overall time to complete the assessment. Notes for implementation: This accommodation is appropriate for a very small number of students (estimated to be approximately 1-2% of students with disabilities participating in a general assessment). For students in grades 3-5, read aloud will not be an available accommodation. Content experts agree that this accommodation should not be provided during these grades because it would compromise the construct being measured. Reports can be run to indicate the percent of students who had access to read aloud on reading test passages. Readers should be provided to students on an individual basis not to a group of students. A student should have the option of asking a reader to slow down or repeat text. P15 Have directions only read aloud Allowed for: All tests in WV-MAP Description: A trained examiner reads aloud verbatim the directions for the test. When to select: For students unable to decode text visually or by using contracted braille or 25 West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

46 Section II. Guidelines for Accommodating Students with Disabilities Nemeth code. Notes for implementation: This is not considered an accommodation and is allowable for the General Summative Assessment ELA and math. This is considered an accommodation for science and social studies. This may need to paired with T04 (extra time) and/or separate setting T09. P16 Have directions presented through sign language, locally provided Allowed for: All tests in WV-MAP. Description: A qualified examiner presents test directions in sign language. Instructional Practices: Students who are hearing impaired and use an interpreter for instructional presentation of materials and directions. When to select: For students who are deaf or hard of hearing who receive this support from an interpreter. Notes for implementation: Educational sign language interpreters must not clarify, elaborate, paraphrase, or provide assistance with the meaning of words, intent of test questions, or responses to test items. A student s teacher should not serve as the interpreter/translator in a testing situation unless a second person is present to monitor for quality and fairness. This accommodation can be provided in the regular session in the back of the room (or wherever it is typically provided to the student for classes). This accommodation is allowed for the General Summative Assessment science and social studies. P17 Use braille embedded (refreshable or embossers) Allowed for: General Summative Assessment English language arts and mathematics subtests excluding science and social studies, ACT COMPASS and NAEP Description: Use embedded braille. This is for students who will use the platform embedded braille which includes refreshable braille and/ or embossers to print the ELA and math sections for the General Summative Assessment. Instructional Practices: Students who use instructional materials and assignments are provided using refreshable braille or an embosser. When to select: For students who are blind or visually impaired, when it is the typical mode of communication. Notes for implementation: This is an accommodation. The files for the embosser will need to be downloaded and may take additional time to print. This accommodation may need to be paired with T04 (extra time). For students who are blind and need to take COMPASS, no braille is available and you will need to select the read test aloud accommodation. P18 Have directions rephrased by trained examiner Allowed for: All tests in WV-MAP excluding the General Summative Assessment West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

47 Description: A trained examiner reads aloud verbatim the directions for the test and states the same message in a new or different way. Instructional Practices: For students who need directions broken into steps and/or into more simple language. When to select: For students with auditory processing difficulties or unable to decode text visually or by using contracted braille or Nemeth code. Notes for implementation: This accommodation is not allowable for the General Summative Assessment English language arts and math portions of the test. See P02, have test read aloud verbatim. P19 Use large print edition Allowed for: All tests in WV-MAP including the General Summative Assessment excluding APTA, which is formatted in large print, DLM, ACT COMPASS Mathematics and Writing Skills which are delivered on a computer. Description: The student uses a large print edition of the assessment and materials. Instructional Practices: Students who are unable to access the computer or need a hard copy or enlarged version of print for access. Students receive large-print versions of state textbooks, or other text, to enable access to curriculum. Students have access to enlarged mathematics problems to make sure all steps are completed. When to select: For a student who needs a paper pencil version of the assessment. F o r students unable to access a computer who use this accommodation as their typical mode. This may be appropriate for some students with vision impairment, such as cortical vision impairment when the computer does not provide access or when students have documented medical conditions such as epilepsy and screen use causes a seizure. Notes for implementation: P21 This is considered an accommodation. All text and graphic materials, including labels and captions on pictures, diagrams, maps, charts, exponential numbers, notes, and footnotes, are presented in at least 18- point type for students who need large print. After a student completes a large print edition of a test, student responses must be transcribed to the computer by the student or an examiner if scribing is selected. The science and social st udies large print version does not contain contrast and is useful for students who have vision impairment or have difficulty in discriminating shades of contrast in graphs and charts. APTA uses large print as a standard testing condition; therefore, it should not be listed as an accommodation. DLM and ACT COMPASS are delivered on a computer platform. Use screen-reading software to access computer Allowed for: ACT COMPASS Writing* and Mathematics and other computer-based assessments *This is allowed for students who are blind when it is typical access. Description: Screen-reading software provides text-to-speech translation for students who are visually impaired or blind. For example, Job Access With Speech (JAWS) is a popular computer screen reader program that allows blind and visually impaired users to read the screen either 27 West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

48 Section II. Guidelines for Accommodating Students with Disabilities with text to speech output or by a refreshable braille display. JAWS provides speech and braille output for most computer applications. Instructional Practices: For students who routinely use JAWS or other screen reader for navigation and access to screen information. When to select: For students who are vision impaired and for whom the use of screen-reading software is the typical mode of navigation of computer and accessing written material. Notes for implementation: This is an accommodation. Screen readers are allowed only when it is typical access. On NAEP the text-to-speech function is a built-in universal design element. This is not the same accommodation as a text to speech (see P01 or P13). Many versions of JAWS and/or different screen tools are used. Therefore, there is no way to assure that the version of the screen-reading software is compatible for multiple test platforms. See test administration manuals for more information. If you cannot be sure, you should also select other accommodations that could provide access in case software does not function correctly, for example, read aloud and/or scribe. P22 Enlarge text on screen Allowed for: ACT COMPASS, NAEP, and other computer-based assessments Description: The size of font and or specific areas of the screen (e.g., text, formulas, tables, graphics, and navigation buttons) may be adjusted by the student. Screen-enlarging software may involve the use of enlarged computer monitors or computers with screen-enlargement programs. Some students use closed-circuit television to enlarge print and display printed material with various image enhancements on a screen. Instructional Practices: Students receive large-print texts or use of magnifying devices during instruction large-print versions of state textbooks, or other text, to enable access to curriculum. Students have access to enlarged mathematics problems to make sure all steps are completed. When to select: For students with vision impairment and for whom computer screen adjustment is the typical mode of navigating and accessing onscreen written material. Notes for implementation: This is a designated support. The General Summative Assessment platform has a default of 14 point font size. The universal tool allows for the screen to be increased from 1.5X to 3.0X default size. This can be set in the TIDE locally by the test coordinator prior to the test. NAEP Writing has the universal design element of text enlargement up to a 48-point font for prompts, stimuli, and responses, not tool icons, menus, etc. Use the text size typically used by the student to gain access to materials. P23 Use a magnifying device to enlarge assessment material Allowed for: General Summative Assessment, ACT COMPASS Mathematics and Writing Skills, NAEP and other computer-based assessments Description: Magnification devices include eyeglass-mounted magnifiers, free-standing or hand-held magnifiers, or a lens that is placed over the computer monitor and may include the use of video magnifiers. The size of specific areas of the screen (e.g., text, formulas, tables, graphics, and navigation buttons) may be adjusted by the student with an assistive technology device. Magnification must be local set in TIDE for the General Summative Assessment. Vision support staff should be able to provide the setting for each student who has this need. West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

49 Instructional Practices: Students receive large-print texts or use of magnifying devices during instruction to enable access to curriculum. Some students with specific learning disabilities may use this feature to enlarge mathematics problems to make sure all steps are completed. When to select: This is for students who are vision impaired and for whom the use of magnifying equipment is the typical mode of accessing written material. Students used to viewing enlarged text or graphics, or navigation buttons may need magnification to comfortably view content. This support also may meet the needs of students with visual impairments and other print disabilities. Notes for implementation: This is a designated support. Use whatever magnifier the student uses during instruction. Use visual magnifying equipment (standard option). The size of specific areas of the screen (e.g., text, formulas, tables, graphics, and navigation buttons) may be adjusted by the student with an assistive technology device. Magnification allows increasing the size to a level not provided for by the Zoom universal tool. The use of this designated support may result in the student needing additional overall time to complete the assessment. This is an option to standard testing conditions that is allowed to all students, with or without an IEP or Section 504 plan on some WV-MAP assessments. P24 Use translator to present test Allowed for: All WV-MAP tests including COMPASS Mathematics, General Summative Assessment ELA and mathematics excluding ACT COMPASS Writing Skills and NAEP Reading Description: Human translators are allowed on the General Summative Assessment for any item where language support is offered on the platform. The support is only provided on items that provide that language support not in the student s native language. Please make sure that all translators are proficient in the language they are translating and follow the guidance for translators and interpreters. A student s teacher should not serve as the interpreter/translator in a testing situation unless a second person is present to monitor for quality and fairness. For COMPASS, electronic dictionaries, and e l e c t r o n i c translators are tools for students who are English language learners. Students may use this equipment to present directions, stimulus material, questions, and answer choices. Translators are limited to word-to-word. Instructional Practices: For students who are English Language learners (ELLs) who are using language translator as a language support. When to select: For students who are ELLs, when it is typical access. Refer to Section III for English language learners. Notes for implementation: This is an accommodation. NAEP only allows the use of hard copy or hand-held (not computer-based) word-to-word translators. Translators other than human are not allowed on the General Summative Assessment for English language arts and mathematics. P25 Use translator to present directions only Allowed for: All tests in WV-MAP including general summative ELA and mathematics Description: Dictionaries and translators are tools for English language learners to present directions only. On the General Summative Assessment only a human translation may be provided if the language is not supported by the testing platform. 29 West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

50 Section II. Guidelines for Accommodating Students with Disabilities Instructional Practices: For students who are English Language learners (ELLs) who are using electronic language translators as a language support. For the General Summative Assessment only a human translator is allowed. When to select: For students who have limited English proficiency and who receive this support instructionally. Refer to Section III for English language learners. Notes for implementation: This is an accommodation. NAEP only allows the use of hard copy or hand-held (not computer-based) word-to-word translators. P27 Use approved bilingual word to word dictionary for directions only Allowed for: All WV-MAP tests includes the full write performance task on the ELA General Summative Assessment excluding other ELA portions and math on the General Summative Assessment and NAEP Reading and Writing Description: A bilingual/dual-language paper word-to-word dictionary is a language support. Instructional Practices: For students who are English Language learners (ELLs) who are using approved bilingual word to word dictionary as a language support. Students use electronic or paper bilingual/dual-language dictionaries to look up word meanings during instruction. When to select: For students who are English Language Learners (ELL) who use this instructionally as a language support. For students whose primary language is not English and who use dual language supports in the classroom, use of a bilingual/dual language word-to-word dictionary may be appropriate. Students participate in the assessment regardless of the language. Refer to Section III for English language learners. Notes for implementation: This accommodation is not allowed for the General Summative Assessment on the math portion of the test. For the General Summative Assessment the ELA portion does allow bilingual word to word dictionaries for the General Summative Assessment (see R15). A bilingual/dual language wordto-word dictionary for the full write portion of a performance task. A full write is the second part of a performance task. The use of this support may result in the student needing additional overall time to complete the assessment. For more information refer to R15 and or the Section IV for ELLs. P28 Use high contrast for online assessments Allowed for: General Summative Assessment, ACT COMPASS, NAEP, and other computer based assessments Description: Enable students to adjust screen background or font color, based on student needs or preferences. This may include reversing the colors for the entire interface or choosing the color of font and background. Reverse contrast turns the screen from white to black and creates text in white. The color for students who need this support must be set locally in the TIDE prior to the student assessment. Instructional Practices: Students have instructional materials that have different font or background paper color(s). Students use one color for a main idea and another color for details when outlining or taking notes. Students need varying contrast to see visually presented material. When to select: For students who have vision or perception difficulties and use this accommodation instructionally. Students with attention difficulties may need this support for West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

51 viewing test content. It also may be needed by some students with visual impairments or other print disabilities (including learning disabilities). Notes: This is a designated support. Choice of colors should be informed by evidence that color selection meet the student s needs. P29 Use sign dictionary to present test, including directions Allowed for: All WV-MAP tests excluding General Summative Assessment ELA and mathematics, ACT COMPASS English Writing Skills and NAEP Reading Description: The use of a sign dictionary is permitted to make content available to a student who is hearing impaired. This accommodation is provided for instructional purposes. Instructional Practices: For students who are hearing impaired and use a sign dictionary for clarification on assignments. When to select: For students with hearing impairment who are not proficient with ASL. Notes for implementation: This accommodation is not allowed for the General Summative Assessment ELA and math portion of the test. It may be used by the student independently or with an interpreter most familiar with the student and who is also a trained examiner. P30 Provide translated test directions Allowed for: English Language Learners General Summative Assessment for math items only Description: Translation of test directions is a language support available prior to beginning the actual test items. Students can see test directions in another language. Instructional Practices: Written translated test directions are provided on the page, on the board, or on a classroom visual media device. Students are provided both English and nativelanguage directions to build skill and understanding in classroom directions. Students have their assignment directions translated into their native language. When to select: Students who have limited English language skills can use the translated directions support. This support should only be used for students who are proficient readers in the other language and not proficient in English. Refer to section III on ELLs. Notes for implementation: This designated support is for the General Summative Assessment ELA and mathematics only. P31 Provide translations glossary Allowed for: English Language Learners General Summative Assessment for math items only Description: Translated glossaries are a language support. The translated glossaries are provided for selected construct-irrelevant terms for math. Translations for these terms appear on the computer screen when students click on them. Instructional Practices: Students use a translation glossary at the rear of their text to facilitate transferring knowledge/skills from their primary language to English. Students use bilingual glossaries to find the meanings of content-specific words (e.g., mathematics, science, history). Glossaries may be located in the appendices of their textbooks or instructional materials. When to select: Students who have limited English language skills (whether or not designated as ELLs or ELLs with disabilities) can use the translation glossary for specific items. The use of this 31 West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

52 Section II. Guidelines for Accommodating Students with Disabilities support may result in the student needing additional overall time to complete the assessment. Refer to Section III on ELLs. Notes for implementation: This designated support is not provided for science and social studies. P32 Provide translations stacked Allowed for: English Language Learners General Summative Assessment for math items only Description: Stacked translations are a language support. Stacked translations are available for some students; stacked translations provide the full translation of each test item above the original item in English. Instructional Practices: Students utilize bilingual glossaries in the rear of textbooks to find unknown word meanings. Students use bilingual word list(s) appropriate to the subject area and language acquisition. Students use bilingual translations during their instruction (homework, worksheets, etc.). When to select: For students whose primary language is not English and who use dual language supports in the classroom, use of the stacked (dual language) translation may be appropriate. Students participate in the assessment regardless of the language. This support will increase reading load and cognitive load. The use of this support may result in the student needing additional overall time to complete the assessment. Refer to Section III on ELLs. Notes for implementation: This designated support is not available for other portions of WV- MAP. P33 Turn off any universal tools Allowed for: General Summative Assessment Description: Disabling any universal tools that might be distracting or that students do not need to use, or are unable to use. Instructional Practices: Blocking off any tool that is not of immediate need or that may be distracting to the student. Students are not able to focus and maintain attention if there is too much stimuli. When to select: For students who are easily distracted (whether or not designated as having attention difficulties or disabilities) may be overwhelmed by some of the universal tools. Knowing which specific tools may be distracting is important for determining which tools to turn off. Note: This designated support must consider the impact that eliminating a tool might have on student performance. The tools turned off or left enabled are determined locally and based on a plan. P34 Use embedded American Sign Language Allowed for: General Summative Assessment for ELA listening and math items only Description: Test content is translated into ASL video. ASL human signer and the signed test content are viewed on the same screen. Students may view portions of the ASL video as often as needed. Instructional Practices: An ASL interpreter or ASL-certified instructor signs during instruction. When to select: Some students who are deaf or hard of hearing and who typically use ASL may need this accommodation when accessing text-based content in the assessment. The use of this accommodation may result in the student needing additional overall time to complete the assessment. For many students who are deaf or hard of hearing, viewing signs is the only way to West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

53 access information presented orally. It is important to note, however, that some students who are hard of hearing will be able to listen to information presented orally if provided with appropriate amplification and a setting in which extraneous sounds do not interfere with clear presentation of the audio presentation in a listening test. Notes for implementation: This accommodation must be carefully monitored to ensure that signing is working for the items which is allowed. P35 Use non-contracted braille Allowed for: Students who are not yet able to use contracted braille. Description: This is a static non-embedded non-contracted braille form. It is expected that this is not a very time efficient way to access information and students will need additional time. A raised-dot code that individuals read with the fingertips. Graphic material (e.g., maps, charts, graphs, diagrams, and illustrations) is presented in a raised format (paper or thermoform). Contracted (P03) braille is also available; Nemeth code is available for math in a fixed form or as embedded see (P17). The use of tactile graphics is permitted to make visual content available to a student who is visually impaired. This is only when provided typically for the student and may not include any changes to the image. Instructional Practices: Instructional materials and assignments are completed in noncontracted braille. Student is not yet fluent in contracted braille. When to select: Students with visual impairments may read text via braille. Tactile overlays and graphics also may be used to assist the student in accessing content through touch. Refreshable braille is available only for ELA because Nemeth Code is not available via refreshable braille. For math, braille will be presented via embosser; embosser-created braille can be used for ELA also. The type of braille presented to the student (contracted or non-contracted) must be identified. The use of this accommodation may result in the student needing additional overall time to complete the assessment. Notes for implementation: This accommodation is for students who are not using contracted braille. The student is using non-contracted braille for instructional materials consistently. P36 Use closed captioning Allowed for: General Summative Assessment for ELA listening portion and NAEP Description: Printed text that appears on the computer screen as audio materials are presented. Instructional Practices: Students use in-class videos and films are used that contain closed captioning. Closed captioning is used in foreign-language classes. When to select: Students who are deaf or hard of hearing and who typically access information presented via audio by reading words that appear in synchrony with the audio presentation may need this support to access audio content. For many students who are deaf or hard of hearing, viewing words (sometimes in combination with reading lips and ASL) is how they access information presented orally. It is important to note, however, that some students who are hard of hearing will be able to listen to information presented orally if provided with appropriate amplification and a setting in which extraneous sounds do not interfere with clear presentation of the audio presentation in a listening test. Notes for implementation: The use of this accommodation may need additional test time and a separate setting. 33 West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

54 P37 Use masking Allowed for: General Summative Assessment Section II. Guidelines for Accommodating Students with Disabilities Description: Masking involves blocking off content that is distracting to the student. Students are able to focus their attention on a specific part of a test item by masking. Instructional Practices: During instruction, students use a masking device that covers up sections of text before/after they read it, to maintain visual attention. Teachers create a clean document for students to work from that is not too busy or crowded with distracting information. Students use paper to block test questions to decrease distractions. Teachers block off text on classroom boards or overhead projectors to focus students on topics during whole-group discussions. When to select: Students with attention difficulties may need to mask content not of immediate need or that may be distracting during the assessment. This support also may be needed by students with print disabilities (including learning disabilities) or visual impairments. Masking allows students to hide and reveal individual answer options, as well as all navigational buttons and menus. Notes for implementation: This designated support is a universal tool for science and social studies. P38 Use color contrast Allowed for: General Summative Assessment in conjunction with print on demand Description: Test content of online items may be printed with different colors. This is a nonembedded support. Instructional Practices: Students have instructional materials that have different font or background paper color(s).color coding using a variety of print colors on paper is used for students. Students can use one color for a main idea and another color for details when outlining or taking notes. When to select: Students with attention difficulties may need this support for viewing the test when digitally provided color contrasts do not meet their needs. Some students with visual impairments or other print disabilities (including learning disabilities) also may need this support. Choice of colors should be informed by evidence of those colors that meet the student s needs. Notes for implementation: * For the General Summative Assessment this should be paired with print on demand. Any printed items must follow security procedures. The student may need additional test time. Print on demand is a special accommodation for students. P39 Use color overlays Allowed for: All WV-MAP including the General Summative Assessment* Description: Color transparencies are placed over a paper based assessment. Instructional Practices: Color transparencies are placed over a paper-based instructional materials. When to select: Students with attention difficulties may need this support to view test content. This support also may be needed by some students with visual impairments or other print disabilities (including learning disabilities). Choice of color should be informed by evidence of those colors that meet the student s needs. Notes for implementation: * For the General Summative Assessment this designated support West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

55 should be paired with print on demand. Any printed items must follow security procedures. Any printed items must be treated as a secure material and shredded after testing. Steps to follow security procedures should be monitored at all testing sites. The student may need additional time for testing. Print on demand is a special accommodation for students. P40 Use print on demand Allowed for: General Summative Assessment Description: Paper copies of either passages/stimuli and/or items are printed for students. For those students needing a paper copy of a passage or stimulus, permission for the students to request printing must first be set in the WVEIS data system. For those students needing a paper copy of one or more items, contact the school and/or district coordinator to have the accommodation set in advance for the student. Instructional Practices: Teacher-provided print materials are used to facilitate learning activities. Photocopies of passages are used instead of textbooks so that students can write and/or highlight. Student does not access materials solely using the computer. When to select: Some students with disabilities may need paper copies of either passages/stimuli and/or items. A very small percentage of students should need this accommodation. The use of this accommodation may result in the student needing additional time to complete the assessment. Notes for implementation: This is an accommodation. Any printed items must be treated as a secure material and shredded after testing. Steps to follow security procedures should be monitored at all testing sites. Keep in mind this may add to the time needed for testing. P41 Provide Translation Glossary (Paper/Pencil Tests*) Allowed for: General Summative Assessment Description: Translated glossaries are a language support. Translated glossaries are provided for selected construct-irrelevant terms for math. Glossary terms are listed by item and include the English term and its translated equivalent. Paper copies are printed for students. Permission to request printing must first be set in WVEIS. Instructional Practices: Students use a translation glossary at the rear of their text to facilitate transferring knowledge/skills from their primary language to English. Students use bilingual glossaries to find the meanings of content-specific words (e.g., mathematics, science, history). Glossaries may be located in the appendices of their textbooks or instructional materials. When to select: Students who have limited English language skills can use the translation glossary for specific items. The use of this support may result in the student needing additional overall time to complete the assessment. Some students with disabilities may need paper copies of either passages/stimuli and/or items. A very small percentage of students should need this accommodation. The use of this accommodation may result in the student needing additional time to complete the assessment. Refer to Section IV on ELLs. Notes for implementation: This is a designated support. Any printed items must follow security procedures. Documentation of why a student is unable to take an online version of the test may be requested. This designated support is for the General Summative Assessment and used in conjunction with print on demand. P42 Provide noise buffers 35 West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

56 Allowed for: General Summative Assessment Section II. Guidelines for Accommodating Students with Disabilities Description: Ear mufflers, white noise, and/or other equipment used to block external sounds. Instructional Practices: Student wears devices to block out auditory stimuli. When to select: Student (not groups of students) wears equipment to reduce environmental noises. Students may have these testing variations if regularly used in the classroom. Students who use noise buffers will need headphones unless tested individually in a separate setting Use audio amplification equipment (standard option) Allowed for: All students, with or without an IEP or Section 504 plan (option to standard testing conditions) Description: Students use amplification equipment in addition to hearing aids to increase clarity; useful in environments with a great deal of ambient noise. When to select: For students who are hearing impaired, and who may or may not have an IEP or Section 504 plan. Notes for implementation: When arranging for testing, take into consideration the distractions of this accommodation to other students. Streamlined Allowed for: General Summative Assessment Description: Provides a streamlined interface of the test in an alternate, simplified format in which items are displayed below the stimuli. This feature has been enabled for students with print disabilities and vision impairment to reduce stimuli. Instructional Practices: Students use altered text that is structured in a sequential format. When to select: This accommodation may benefit a small number of students who have specific learning and or reading disabilities in which the text is presented in a more sequential format. Notes: This accommodation will be enabled in the platform for students who receive R11 use assistive technology, P21 screen reading and any braille code (P03, P13, P14, P17, P35). Response Response accommodations allow students to complete assignments, tests, and activities in different ways or to solve or organize problems using some type of assistive device or organizer. Response accommodations can benefit students with physical, sensory, or learning disabilities, including difficulties with memory, sequencing, directionality, alignment, and organization. R02 Indicate responses to a scribe (multiple-choice items) Allowed for: All WV-MAP tests for students who need assistance in selecting multiple choice answers. For more scribing of extended responses see R04 and NAEP Writing Description: A scribe is a trained examiner who writes down or enters into a secure computer testing program what a student has dictated using one or more of the following modes: an assistive communication device, pointing, communication by the student via interpretation. The guiding principle in scribing is to assist the student in accessing the test and responding to it. After this year this code will no longer be used and all students needing this support or accommodation will use R04. West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

57 Instructional Practices: Students use a tape recorder or scribe as an alternative to writing when a processing or physical challenge is present. Student s word-for-word response for tests and/or assignments is recorded. When to select: This is a designated support. Scribes may be provided for students with verified disabilities that significantly impact motor skills for written responses. This code is also used for students who need to answer within the test booklet and/or need to have a scribe mark their answers on an answer document or entered into a secure computer testing platform due to a physical or vision disability. Notes for implementation: Appendix N. Guidelines for Scribing and Transcribing Student Responses (page 167) should be read carefully to gain an understanding of how scribing can and cannot be used. R03 A student using this accommodation should be tested in a quiet room apart from other students to avoid interruption while testing and to avoid examinees being able to hear or see other students responses. Remember that extra time is allowed to complete this process For transcribing student responses to an answer sheet or platform. For the General Summative Assessment and ACT COMPASS, a scribe must enter the student s responses into the secure testing platform. Scribes must be trained carefully in how to record responses (e.g., whether students must indicate spelling, punctuation, etc.). T04 (Use extra time for any timed test) must be an identified accommodation to receive extra time for ACT COMPASS. Use braille or tactile to respond Allowed for: All tests in WV-MAP Description: For this response mode, a student uses a brailler, which is a braille keyboard used for typing braille that can then be printed in standard print or braille (embosser). The brailler is similar to a typewriter or computer keyboard. Paper is inserted into the brailler, and multiple keys are pressed at once, creating braille dots with each press. Instructional Practices: Student uses a braille notetaker to record notes and create documents. When to select: This accommodation is for students who are blind or vision impaired who respond in braille. This may need an R04 scribe accommodation. Notes for implementation: R04 See detailed instructions for scribing and transcribing student responses in Appendix N (page 167). A scribe must transcribe the student s response to the testing website using the student s site code, user name, and password. A trained examiner acts as a scribe to transcribe student responses to the testing platform. For ACT COMPASS, a scribe must enter the student s response into the secure testing platform. Indicate responses to a scribe, all elements 37 West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

58 Allowed for: All WV-MAP including General Summative Assessment Section II. Guidelines for Accommodating Students with Disabilities Description: Students dictate their responses to a human who records verbatim what they dictate. The scribe must be trained and qualified, and must follow the administration guidelines provided in the administration manual. Instructional Practices: Students use a tape recorder or scribe as an alternative to writing when a processing or physical challenge is present. Student s word-for-word response for tests and/or assignments is recorded. When to select: Students who have documented significant motor or processing difficulties, or who have had a recent injury (such as a broken hand or arm) that makes it difficult to produce responses may need to dictate their responses to a human, who then records the students responses verbatim. For many students dictating to a human scribe is the only way to demonstrate their composition skills. It is important that these students be able to develop planning notes via the human scribe, and to view what they produce while composing via dictation to the scribe. Scribes may be provided for any student (with or without an IEP or Section 504 plan) who have a short-term medical condition (e.g., a fractured arm in a cast) that precludes the student from word processing a response. Approval needs to be obtained from the county test coordinator and/or the county special education director prior to testing. Notes for implementation: See guidelines for scribing in appendix X. The use of this accommodation may result in the student needing overall additional time to complete the assessment. This is a designated support. Scribes should be monitored to be certain that students verbatim responses are recorded. On the day of testing, before testing begins, the principal/building coordinator should give the scribe no more than 2 hours to become familiar with the directions and format of the test. Scribes should be familiar with the test so they can easily record student answers (Thompson, Thurlow, & Walz, 2000). To the extent possible, the same scribe should have responsibility for transcribing information given by students during educational instruction and assessments. R05 Scratch paper, rough drafts, and login information must be collected immediately at the end of the testing session. These items are considered secure material and must be collected and shredded according to procedures established by the principal/building level coordinator (BLC) at the end of the testing session. Use an abacus Allowed for: General Summative Assessment mathematics and science portion, APTA, ACT COMPASS Mathematics Description: This tool may be used in place of scratch paper for students who typically use an abacus. Instructional Practices: Students use items to count during their instruction. Counting devices (blocks, tiles, chips, etc.) or scratch paper When to select: Some students with visual impairments who typically use an abacus may use an abacus in place of using scratch paper. West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

59 Notes for implementation: The abacus should be one that the student uses during instruction on a regular basis. R11 Use computer or other assistive technology device to respond Allowed for: All tests in WV-MAP Description: Alternate response options include but are not limited to adapted keyboards, large keyboards, Sticky Keys, MouseKeys, Filter Keys, adapted mouse, touch screen, head wand, and switches. Students may use a computer, typewriter, or other assistive technology device to respond. Instructional Practices: Students dictate responses to a teacher or an instructional assistant who records them. Students use communication boards, picture representations, or other individual expressive communication devices and assistive technologies. When to select: Students with some physical disabilities (including both fine motor and gross motor skills) may need to use the alternate response options accommodation. Some alternate response options are external devices that must be plugged in and be compatible with the assessment delivery platform. Students who have physical limitations use alternate response options and assistive technologies or devices during routine instruction and are identified in the IEP or Section 504 plan. Notes for implementation: Refer to test administration manuals for additional guidance. R13 Provide physical support Allowed for: All tests in WV-MAP excluding the General Summative Assessment Description: A student may be provided physical support by an aide if this support is provided routinely and if the aide has been trained as an examiner. Instructional Practices: Students who need positioning during instructional activities for maximizing participation. Students who have physical support such as materials or adaptive furniture or equipment and/or behavioral needs to attend to task or follow directions. When to select: For students who routinely receive support for physical, health, medical or behavioral needs. Notes for implementation: This is an accommodation. Additional test security requirements should be assured. R15 The use of physical support does not include the use of physical support for making responses for communication unless the student is taking the APTA. For students on general assessments, teams should consider including response accommodations such as R04 (Indicate responses to a scribe, specifically all elements to be scored). Students may use assistive technology or communication devices for responses see R11 (Use computer, typewriter, or other assistive technology device to respond). The critical issue is that the student must be able to provide a response. Use bilingual word-to word dictionary Allowed for: WV-MAP (including ACT COMPASS Mathematics and the general summative ELAperformance task full writes only excluding ACT COMPASS Writing Skills and NAEP Reading and Writing 39 West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

60 Section II. Guidelines for Accommodating Students with Disabilities Description: A bilingual/dual language word-to-word dictionary is a language support. On Smarter Balanced a bilingual/dual language word-to-word dictionary can be provided for the full-write portion of an ELA performance task. A full write is the second part of a performance task. Instructional Practices: Students use electronic or paper bilingual/dual-language dictionaries to look up word meanings during instruction. When to select: For students whose primary language is not English and who use dual language supports in the classroom, use of a bilingual/dual language word-to-word dictionary may be appropriate. Students participate in the assessment regardless of the language. The use of this support may result in the student needing additional overall time to complete the assessment. Notes for implementation: This designated support is not allowed for the general summative mathematics, but is allowed on the science and social studies. R16 Mark responses on large-print test book Allowed for: All WV-MAP tests excluding ACT COMPASS Mathematics and Writing Skills and NAEP computer based assessments Description: Students write their responses on a large-print test booklet. Instructional Practices: Students mark responses on paper based instructional activities and tests. When to select: For students taking a paper-pencil test who have visual impairment and/or fine motor impairment. All student responses must be transcribed in the platform on the General Summative Assessment. Notes for implementation: The examiner transcribes the student responses to the testing platform. Students who receive this accommodation will need an R04 scribe accommodation. A trained examiner must enter all student response into platform. R17 Use a translator to respond Allowed for: General Summative Assessment allows for human translator on items where the students native language is not supported by the platform on the ELA and mathematics portion of the test. Electronic translators may be used for the science and social studies portion; COMPASS Mathematics and NAEP; excluding ACT COMPASS Writing Skills and NAEP Reading and Writing Description: A student may use a translator to indicate answer choices when typical access. Instructional Practices: Students use an approved electronic translator to respond to instructional activities and tests. When to select: For students who are English Language Learners who use approved versions of translators. The use of electronic translators is not allowed on the ELA and math portion of the General Summative Assessment. Only human translators may be provided when the platform does not provide for the students native language. Notes for implementation: NAEP does not allow for the use of a computer-based translator. Specific requirements for use of bilingual translators are found in the ELL section V. For a list of approved bilingual dictionaries see ELL_bilingual_dictionarywithoutDis tributorsrevised2011april.doc West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

61 R18 Use a sign dictionary to respond Allowed for: All WV-MAP tests excluding the General Summative Assessment ELA and mathematics portions, ACT COMPASS Writing Skills and NAEP Reading and Writing Description: A student may use a sign-dictionary to indicate answer choices when signing is typical access. Instructional Practices: Student who is hearing impaired uses a sign dictionary to respond to instructional activities and tests for communication. When to select: For students who have limited English proficiency or those who primarily use sign as their communication mode. Notes for implementation: This accommodation should be used only when it is a typical instructional tool or for communicating and clarifying response to those who are not proficient in sign or when students also has physical limitations. R19 Use calculator Allowed for: General Summative Assessment mathematics and science for students needing a special calculator, e.g. braille or talking Description: A non-embedded calculator for students needing a special calculator, such as a braille calculator or a talking calculator, currently unavailable within the assessment platform. Instructional Practices: A student uses a calculator offered with assistive technology devices (such as a talking calculator or a braille calculator). Calculators can be used to do basic calculation in multi-step mathematics processes that are not being assessed. When to select: Students with visual impairments who are unable to use the embedded calculator for calculator-allowed items will be able to use the calculator that they typically use, such as a braille calculator or a talking calculator. Test administrators should ensure that the calculator is available only for designated calculator items. Notes for implementation: Calculator is to be used on calculator allowed items only. For more information on calculator refer to General Summative Assessment section X. R20 Use multiplication table Allowed for: General Summative Assessment Description: A paper-based single digit (1-9) multiplication table will be available from Smarter Balanced for reference. This accommodation is allowed for grade 4 and above math items. Instructional Practices: Students use a multiplication table (often it is a sticker on their desk) during regular instruction and assessments. When to select: For students with a documented and persistent calculation disability (i.e., dyscalculia). Notes for implementation: This accommodation is not allowed for third grade. The table is available by the assessment system. R21 Use Speech to Text Allowed for: General Summative Assessment Description: Voice recognition allows students to use their voices as input devices to the computer, to dictate responses or give commands (e.g., opening application programs, pulling 41 West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

62 Section II. Guidelines for Accommodating Students with Disabilities down menus, and saving work). Voice recognition software generally can recognize speech up to 160 words per minute. Students may use their own assistive technology devices. Instructional Practices: Allows students to use their voices as input devices to the computer (or a human), to dictate responses or give commands (e.g., opening application programs, pulling down menus, and saving work). Students also use the speech to text as an alternative to writing rather than using a scribe. For example, as student uses software program to create and edit a writing assignment. When to select: This is an accommodation for students who have motor or processing disabilities (such as dyslexia) or who have had an injury that make it difficult to produce text or commands using computer keys who may need alternative ways to work with computers. Students must be familiar with the software and have had many opportunities to use it prior to testing. Speech-to-text software requires that the student go back through all generated text to correct errors in transcription, including use of writing conventions; thus, prior experience with this accommodation is essential. If students use their own assistive technology devices, all assessment content should be deleted from these devices after the test for security purposes. For many of these students, using voice recognition software is the only way to demonstrate their composition skills. Still, use of speech-to-text does require that students know writing conventions and that they have the review and editing skills required of students who enter text via the computer keyboard. It is important that students who use speech-to-text also be able to develop planning notes via speech-to-text, and to view what they produce while composing via speech-to-text. Notes for implementation: Students need to be comfortable and proficient in using the software instructionally. Students who need to use other alternate responses and/or assistive technology may also need that accommodation. Setting and time accommodations T03 Take more breaks (no studying) Allowed for: All WV-MAP tests Description: Students are allowed to take additional breaks as requested or at predetermined intervals. Instructional Practice: Students are provided with frequent breaks during instructional activities and for tests to assist with concentration. When to select: Students who cannot concentrate continuously for an extended period or who become frustrated or stressed easily may need frequent or extended relaxation breaks. Restrictions: Students are not allowed to study for tests they have already begun and must be monitored during breaks. Notes for implementation: These students may need to be assigned to a different location to prevent distractions. T04 Use extra time for any timed test Allowed for: All WV-MAP tests, NAEP, and college entrance tests* Description: Timed tests require a request for a specific amount of extra time. A common extension is time and one half for example, an extension from 60 minutes to 90 minutes. If a reader or scribe is used, double time may be appropriate. West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

63 Instructional Practice: Students who need additional testing time on timed assignments and tests. When to select: Timing accommodations are most helpful for students who need more time than generally allowed to complete activities, assignments, and tests. Extra time may be needed to process written text (e.g., a student with a learning disability who processes information slowly), to write (e.g., a student with limited dexterity as a result of arthritis), or to use other accommodations or equipment (e.g., assistive technology, audio tape, or scribe). Restrictions: Tests must be completed within the confines of the regular testing day. NAEP assessments must be completed within three times the regular time allotted for each section of the test. Notes for implementation: Decisions about how much extended time is to be provided must be made on a case-by-case basis for each individual student not by any category of students keeping in mind the type of accommodations being provided, the disability involved, and the type of test. This accommodation must be identified on an IEP for a student to receive this accommodation for the ACT or SAT College Entrance Exam*. T07 Flexible scheduling, same day (no studying) Allowed for: All WV-MAP tests Description: Students are scheduled to allow for the best conditions for their performance, and/or may be allowed to take the test during more than one sitting during a single day. Instructional Practice: Students who have a schedule that allows for selecting the most appropriate time for concentration. When to select: Scheduling changes can be helpful for students on medications that affect their ability to stay alert or who have more productive times of the day. For example, for students who have difficulty concentrating or staying on task as the day progresses, it may help to schedule tests that require the greatest concentration in the morning. Restrictions: Tests must be completed within the confines of the regular testing day. Students are not allowed to study for tests they have already begun and must be monitored during breaks. Notes for implementation: These students may need to be assigned to a separate location to prevent distractions. Decisions about how to schedule and provide extra time must be made on a case-by-case basis for each individual student not by any category of students keeping in mind the type of accommodations being provided, the disability involved, and the type of test. T09 Provide separate setting Allowed for: General Summative Assessment ELA and mathematics Description: Test location is altered so that the student is tested in a setting different from that made available for most students. Instructional Practice: Special seating arrangements for students who are easily distractible are provided within the classroom to improve focus. Students can come in during off periods to do homework or class assignments when the classroom has only a few students. During instruction and or testing, students are allowed an alternative environment. When to select: Students who are easily distracted (or may distract others) in the presence of other students, for example, may need an alternate location to be able to take the assessment. 43 West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

64 Section II. Guidelines for Accommodating Students with Disabilities The separate setting may be in a different room that allows them to work individually or among a smaller group, or in the same room but in a specific location (for example, away from windows, doors, or pencil sharpeners, in a study carrel, near the teacher s desk, or in the front of a classroom). Some students may benefit from being in an environment that allows for movement, such as being able to walk around. In some instances, students may need to interact with instructional or test content outside of school, such as in a hospital or their home. Notes for implementation- This is not considered an accommodation for General Summative Assessment science and social studies. Changes in instructional and assessment locations can benefit students who are easily distracted in large group settings and who concentrate best in a small group or individual setting. Changes in location also benefit students who receive accommodations (e.g. reader, scribe, or frequent breaks) that might distract other students. Students with physical disabilities might need a more accessible location, specific room conditions, or special equipment. Students must be monitored during the entire testing period. It may be difficult to find testing locations that are private and free of distractions, especially when many students in a building are tested at the same time. Each student tested in a private location must be under the supervision of a trained examiner. These requirements apply to students tested in all locations, whether the student is assessed in the school building, at home, in a hospital, or a residential or other alternative setting. When to Choose Alternate Assessment West Virginia Board of Education Policy 2510, Assuring the Quality of Education: Regulations for Education Programs 10 provides a definition of a delivery system for assessment and accountability that assures a thorough and efficient education for West Virginia public school students. 11 According to this policy, all students must participate in state assessments, and for the vast majority of students, the general summative is the appropriate assessment. All students under SAT, Section 504 plans and or ELLs without disabilities, for example, participate in the general summative and other WV-MAP assessments. For students with disabilities qualifying under IDEA 2004, however, the IEP team must determine how a student will participate in the WV-MAP, including the possible use of an alternate assessment. The state alternate assessment is specifically designed for students with significant intellectual disabilities whose performance cannot be adequately assessed through the General Summative Assessment instrument, even with accommodations. Students who are administered the alternate assessment must meet specific criteria to be determined eligible (see criteria below). For students who meet these criteria, the Next Generation Alternate Achievement Standards are determined more appropriate. The IEP document identifies the appropriate assessment and any allowable designated supports and accommodations for the student. Establishing eligibility for alternate assessment should include documentation of the student s individualized need to be instructed using the appropriate grade-level alternate achievement standards, as well as assurances that the student will be educated in the general curriculum to the extent possible. Students whose IEPs identify alternate assessment are not required to participate in other assessments in the WV-MAP, which do not have alternate forms for students with significant cognitive disabilities. Yet, they cannot be prohibited from the opportunity. Parent(s) or guardian(s) must be involved in and informed of all decisions regarding the use of alternate assessment, and made aware that performance measures are based on West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

65 alternate academic achievement standards. All implications of assessment decisions must be carefully explained to the parent and the student, including that the student will graduate with a modified diploma. For students designated to take alternate assessment, the IEP must specify that the student meets criteria for an alternate assessment explain why the student cannot participate in the general assessment, and document any accommodations used in accordance with WVS.326 procedures. Eligibility criteria for Alternate Assessment Students with significant cognitive disabilities whose performance cannot be adequately assessed through the General Summative Assessment even with accommodations may be considered for alternate assessment. Students with significant cognitive disabilities have a disability or multiple disabilities that significantly impact, intellectual functioning and adaptive behavior. Adaptive behaviors are essential to live independently and to function safely in daily life. When adaptive behaviors are significantly impacted it means that the individual is unlikely to develop the skills necessary to live independently and function safely in daily life. In other words, significant cognitive disabilities impact students both in and out of the classroom and across life domains, not just in academic domains. Eligibility for participation requires that the student have a current IEP and multidisciplinary evaluation and educational performance data that supports the decision for an alternate assessment. 45 West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

66 Section II. Guidelines for Accommodating Students with Disabilities Alternate Assessment Participation Criteria Participation Criterion 1. The student has a significant cognitive disability Participation Criterion Descriptors Review of student records indicate a disability or multiple disabilities that significantly impact intellectual functioning and adaptive behavior. *Adaptive behavior is defined as essential for someone to live independently and to function safely in daily life. Agree (Yes) or Disagree (No)? Provide documentation for each criterion Yes / No 2. The student is primarily being instructed (or taught) using the Next Generation Alternate Academic Achievement Standards as content standards 3. The student requires extensive direct individualized instruction and substantial supports to achieve measureable gains in the grade-and age-appropriate curriculum. Goals and instruction listed in the IEP for this student are linked to the enrolled grade level Next Generation Alternate Academic Achievement Standards and address knowledge and skills that are appropriate and challenging for this student. The student a. requires extensive, repeated, individualized instruction and support that is not of a temporary or transient nature and b. uses substantially adapted materials and individualized methods of accessing information in alternative ways to acquire, maintain, generalize, demonstrate and transfer skills across multiple settings. Yes / No Yes / No The following are not allowable (or acceptable) considerations for determining participation in the alternate assessment. 1. A disability category or label 2. Poor attendance or extended absences 3. Native language/social/cultural or economic difference 4. Expected poor performance on the general education assessment 5. Academic and other services student receives 6. Educational environment or instructional setting 7. Percent of time receiving special education 8. English Language Learner (ELL) status 9. Low reading level/achievement level 10. Anticipated student s disruptive behavior 11. Impact of student scores on accountability system 12. Administrator decision 13. Anticipated emotional duress 14. Need for accommodations (e.g., assistive technology/aac) to participate in assessment process West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

67 Students may be made eligible when all of the criteria is met and there is evidence that the student cannot participate in the General Summative Assessment and other components of the WV-MAP, even with accommodations. The IEP should include documentation of the criteria in the above chart and any other reasons considered by the IEP team. An eligible student with disabilities who has been determined by an IEP Team to be unable even with extended learning opportunities and significant instructional modifications to meet state and county standard graduation requirements may receive a modified diploma. A modified diploma is formal documentation and recognition that an eligible student with disabilities, who is unable to meet the graduation requirements for a standard diploma, has met the modified diploma requirements specified on the student s IEP. A student receiving a modified diploma may continue his or her education until the student turns 21 years of age, that is, the year in which the student is 21 years of age prior to September (see WVBE Policy 2510, Assuring the Quality of Education: Regulations for Education Programs section b.).It is recommended students with disabilities who receive a modified diploma participate in general graduation ceremonies with their ninth grade cohort peers. Students with disabilities receiving modified diplomas shall be allowed to participate in graduation ceremonies with their same grade classmates and continue with special education eligibility services (WVBE Policy 2510, Assuring the Quality of Education: Regulations for Education Programs section 5.4.h.1). 47 West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

68 III. Guidelines for Supporting and Accommodating English Language Learner (ELL) Students An English language learner student is defined in two West Virginia Board of Education (WVBE) policies: Policy 2340, West Virginia Measures of Academic Progress (WV-MAP); and Policy 2417, Programs of Study for Limited English Proficient Students. These policies are based on the federal government definition as described in Public Law , the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA), also known as the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB). According to this definition, a student with limited English proficiency is classified as one who is age 3 through 21; and who is enrolled or preparing to enroll in an elementary school or secondary school; and who o o was not born in the United States or whose native language is a language other than English; or is an American Indian or Alaska Native or a native resident of outlying areas; and who comes from an environment where a language other than English has had a significant impact on the individual s level of English language proficiency; or who is migratory, whose native language is a language other than English and who comes from an environment where a language other English is dominant; and whose difficulties speaking, reading, writing, or understanding the English language are significant enough to deny the individual o o o the ability to meet the state s proficiency level of achievement on state assessments; the ability to achieve successfully in classrooms where the language of instruction is English; or the opportunity to participate fully in society. Federal Inclusion Requirements for English Language Learner Students Federal provisions for inclusion and accommodation of English language learner students were first required in the 1994 reauthorization of ESEA, The Improving America s Schools Act of 1994 (IASA) and then updated in 2001 in NCLB. IASA stipulated that states provide for... the inclusion of English language learner students who shall be assessed, to the extent practicable, in the language and form most likely to yield accurate and reliable information on what such students know and can do, to determine such students mastery of skills in subjects other than English. 14 NCLB supports the same schema, adding the clarification that English language learner students should be eligible for other assessments until students have achieved English language proficiency. According to a guidance document from the U. S. Department of Education (2007, p. 3), Under Title I of ESEA, states must include English language learner students in their assessments of academic achievement in reading/ language arts and mathematics, and must provide English language learner students with appropriate accommodations including, to the extent practicable, assessments in the language and form most likely to yield accurate data on what English language learner students know and can do in the academic content areas West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

69 Section III. Guidelines for Supporting and Accommodating English Language Leaners (ELL) Students until they have achieved English language proficiency. West Virginia Inclusion Requirements for English Language Learner Students All English language learner students (ELLs) participate in WV-MAP at the grade level in which they are enrolled. English language learners with disabilities have an individualized education plan (IEP). All decisions regarding assessment follow the same procedures outlined in the students with disabilities section (Section II). For English language learners with disabilities it is recommended that IEP committees include both a special educator and an English language learner specialist. Reclassified or exited ELL students are allowed the use of accommodations on state assessments during a 2-year monitoring period. The following exception applies: The accommodation requirements for WV-MAP assessments do not apply to the state English language development assessment (ELDA), called the West Virginia Test of English Language Learning (WESTELL); that is, all ELL students, Grades K-12, must take the WESTELL annually, regardless of how long they have been in a U.S. school. The role of the ELL committee in assigning accommodations The provision of testing accommodations is one of the primary strategies for increasing the likelihood that English language learners are tested on their knowledge of the content rather than their proficiency in English. Accommodations for ELL students involve changes to testing procedures, testing materials, or the testing situation to allow students meaningful participation in an assessment (Acosta, Rivera, & Willner, 2008, p. 1). Effective accommodations for ELL students address the unique linguistic and sociocultural needs of the student by reducing construct- irrelevant variance due to language, without altering the test construct. Decisions about accommodations should not be made by an individual (Acosta, Rivera, & Willner, 2008, p. 1). Decisions should be made by the ELL committee responsible for planning the student s academic program. The role of the ELL committee is to discuss the accommodations that a student may need for state testing, decide which accommodations will be offered to the student, and document the process. The committee should coordinate with all teachers of English language learners to ensure that these students use the accommodations as part of classroom instruction. The day of the assessment should not be the first time an ELL student uses the accommodation(s) called for in his or her ELL plan. 49 West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

70 Section III. Guidelines for Supporting and Accommodating English Language Leaners (ELL) Students Making Accommodations Decisions: Three Steps The following guidance is for ELL committees as they assign accommodations for ELL students. Recommended steps for matching accommodations with specific characteristics of individual English language learners are described, including specific directions for providing each accommodation. Later in this section, a brief overview of the accommodations allowed on the General Assessment is provided. Accommodations for other assessments are represented in their respective guidance documents. Step One Select appropriate accommodations When making decisions about accommodations, the E L L committee should consider the student s level of proficiency in both English and his or her native language, asking themselves the following three questions: Question 1. What is the student s composite English language proficiency level according to WESTELL? Is it Beginning (Level 1), Advanced Beginning (Level 2), Intermediate (Level 3), Early Fluent (Level 4), or Fluent (Level 5)? 816 Question 2. Can the student read or write proficiently in his or her native language? Research indicates that native language accommodations can validly support English language learner s access to an assessment offered in English. 9 Even if bilingual instruction is not a part of the student s ELL plan, the ELL committees should consider the role of the native language when determining English-as-a-second-language (ESL) services Baseline information for example, writing samples the student produced during the initial language proficiency placement and identification process, or in the classroom can be obtained to indicate whether the student has any proficiency in reading and writing his or her native language. The ELL committee should use this information about the student s native language literacy to determine whether accommodations, such as use of a bilingual word-to- word dictionary or an electronic translator, would be helpful to the student during instruction and assessment. I f t h e s t u d e n t r e c e i v e s a h u m a n t r a n s l a t o r f o r i n s t r u c t i o n, t h e n i t m a y b e p r o v i d e d f o r t h e a s s e s s m e n t o n l y w h e n t h a t l a n g u a g e i s n o t p r o v i d e d b y t h e a s s e s s m e n t p l a t f o r m. Basic guidelines include the following three native language proficiency categories: 1. Strong native language proficiency The student can speak and read proficiently in his or her native language. 2. Intermediate native language proficiency The student has strong native language oral skills but limited native language reading skills. 8 See for more information. 9 For information, please refer to Francis, Rivera, Lesaux, Kieffer, and Rivera (2006), (http://www.centeroninstruction.org/files/ell3-assessments.pdf); and Acosta, Rivera, and Willner (2008) (http://ceee.gwu.edu/sites/files/acosta.rivera.shaferwillner_2008.pdf). 10 For more information, see page 9 in Toolkit: Connecting ESL Best Practices and Limited English Proficient Students, published by WVDE and available at documents/wvtoolkitconnectingeslbestpracticessingellages2009.pdf. West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

71 Section III. Guidelines for Supporting and Accommodating English Language Leaners (ELL) Students 3. Limited native language proficiency The student has limited native language speaking and reading skills. In summary, the E L L committee identifies both the student s English and native language proficiency levels to select the accommodations that have been identified as best for supporting ELL students. The accommodations described in the next section (beginning on page 48), are categorized by students levels of English and native language proficiencies. Question 3. How might you increase the likelihood that the accommodations will be used effectively during the assessment? Research indicates there are a number of student background factors that can help ensure the usefulness of accommodations to the student. Grade or age, time in U.S. schools, and affective needs may all impact students ability to use accommodations. For example, older students sometimes refuse accommodations due to the embarrassment of receiving additional support in front of classmates. Students who have just arrived in the U.S. need to gain familiarity with U.S. testing practices and expectations. Anxiety can raise an English language learner s affective filter and impact test performance. To ease these barriers consider taking the following approaches: Include the student in the process of assigning accommodations to ensure use of the accommodation and student understanding of its use. If the student is unfamiliar with standardized testing, provide test preparation activities prior to the assessment. Offer opportunities to use the accommodation(s) available to the student prior to the assessment, during classroom instruction and assessment. When appropriate, administer tests in special settings with specialized personnel, in small groups or individually. While not accommodations, such arrangements are standard administration options that might be helpful for increasing students level of comfort, facilitating test administration, and ensuring more accurate test results. A listing of the designated supports that are available for ELL s in assigning accommodations is provided in the following table by content assessment. Specific considerations related to language designated supports have been included to clarify appropriate use for each content assessment. 51 West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

72 Section III. Guidelines for Supporting and Accommodating English Language Leaners (ELL) Students Designated Supports for ELLs Support Code ELA Math Science Social Studies Text to speech P01 Y Y Y Y Y Read aloud P02 Y Y Y Y Y Have directions only read aloud P15 Y Y Y Y Y Have directions rephrased by trained examiner P18 N N Y Y N Magnification P23 Y Y Y Y Y Use translators to present test P24 N N Y Y N Use translators to present test directions only P25 N N Y Y N Use approved bilingual word-to-word dictionary P27 N N Y Y N directions only Color contrast P28 Y Y Y Y Y Provide translated test directions P30 N Y N N Y Provide translations glossary P31 N Y N N N Provide translations stacked P32 N Y N N N Turn off any universal tools P33 Y Y Y Y Y Masking P37 Y Y Y Y Y Provide translations glossary - locally provided P41 N Y N N N Indicate responses to a scribe (multiple choice R02 Y Y Y Y Y item) Indicate responses to a scribe, all elements R04 Y Y Y Y Y Use a bilingual word-to-word dictionary R15 Y Y Y Y N Use a translator to response R17 N N Y Y N Take more breaks (no study) T03 Y Y Y Y Y Use extra time for any timed test T04 Y Y Y Y Y Use flexible scheduling, same day T07 Y Y Y Y Y Provide separate setting T09 Y Y Y Y Y ELPA21 Field Test Math Allowable Designated Supports for ELLs *P01 Text to speech - Text is read aloud to the student via embedded text-to-speech technology. The student is able to control the speed as well as raise or lower the volume of the voice via a volume control. Computer voice Instructional practices: Teacher or assistant reads aloud instructions. Listening skills are taught using read-aloud material, and then students are checked for understanding. Students listen to a prerecorded audio interpretation (book-on-tape) of text or a book. Considerations: Students who are struggling readers may need assistance accessing the assessment by having all or portions of the assessment read aloud. This support will likely be confusing and may impede the performance of students who do not regularly have the support during instruction. Students who use text-to-speech will need headphones unless tested individually in a separate setting. West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

73 Section III. Guidelines for Supporting and Accommodating English Language Leaners (ELL) Students P02 Read aloud - Text is read aloud to the student by a trained and qualified human reader. The trained examiner reads aloud the directions, stimulus material, questions, and answer choices. This accommodation excludes passages. Instructional practices: Teacher or assistant reads aloud instructions. Listening skills are taught using read-aloud material, and then students are checked for understanding. Students listen to a prerecorded audio interpretation (book-on-tape) of text or a book. Considerations: If not used regularly during instruction, this support is likely to be confusing and may impede the performance on assessments. Read aloud should be provided to students on an individual basis not to a group of students. A student should have the option of asking a reader to slow down or repeat text. This is difficult when a person is reading to an entire group of students. However, verbatim reading to a group of students is permitted in testing if the accommodation is provided to the student on that basis during regular instruction. Test readers must be familiar with the terminology and symbols specific to the content. P15 Have directions only read aloud - A trained examiner reads aloud verbatim the directions for the test. P23 Use a magnifying device to enlarge assessment material - Magnification devices include eyeglass-mounted magnifiers, free- standing or hand-held magnifiers, or a lens that is placed over the computer monitor and may include the use of video magnifiers. *P28 Use high contrast for online assessments - Enable students to adjust screen background or font color, based on student needs or preferences. This may include reversing the colors for the entire interface or choosing the color of font and background. Reverse contrast turns the screen from white to black and creates text in white. *P30 Provide translated test directions - Translation of test directions is a language support available prior to beginning the actual test items. Students can see test directions in another language. Instructional practices: Translated test directions, translated instruction on assignments. Considerations: Students who have limited English language skills (whether or not designated as ELLs or ELLs with disabilities) can use the translated test directions. In addition, a biliterate adult trained in the test administration manual can read the test directions to the student. The use of this support may result in the student needing additional overall time to complete the assessment. *P31 Provide translations glossary - Translated glossaries are a language support. The translated glossaries are provided for selected construct-irrelevant terms for math. Translations for these terms appear on the computer screen when students click on them. **Language available: Spanish, Vietnamese, Arabic, Tagalog, Ilokano, Cantonese, Mandarin, Korean, Punjabi, Russian, and Ukrainian Instructional practices: Students are provided both English and native-language directions to build skill and understanding in classroom directions. Glossaries may be located in the appendices of their textbooks or instructional materials so that students are used to glossaries. 53 West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

74 Section III. Guidelines for Supporting and Accommodating English Language Leaners (ELL) Students Considerations: Students who have limited English language skills (whether or not designated as ELLs or ELLs with disabilities) can use the translation glossary for specific items. The use of this support may result in the student needing additional overall time to complete the assessment. *P32 Provide translations stacked - Stacked translations are a language support. Stacked translations are available for some students; stacked translations provide the full translation of each test item above the original item in English. **Spanish (Spanish translation presented directly above the English Item) Instructional practices: Students utilize bilingual glossaries in the rear of textbooks to find unknown word meanings. Students use bilingual word list(s) appropriate to the subject area and language acquisition. Students use bilingual translations during their instruction (homework, worksheets, etc.). Considerations: For students whose primary language is not English and who use dual language supports in the classroom, use of the stacked (dual language) translation may be appropriate. Students participate in the assessment regardless of the language. This support will increase reading load and cognitive load. The use of this support may result in the student needing additional overall time to complete the assessment. *P33 Turn off any universal tools - Disabling any universal tools that might be distracting or that students do not need to use, or are unable to use. *P37 Use masking - Masking involves blocking off content that is distracting to the student. Students are able to focus their attention on a specific part of a test item by masking. P41 Provide Translation Glossary (Paper/Pencil Tests) - Translated glossaries are a language support. Translated glossaries are provided for selected construct-irrelevant terms for math. Glossary terms are listed by item and include the English term and its translated equivalent. Paper copies of either are printed for students. Considerations: Students who have limited English language skills can use the translation glossary for specific items. The use of this support may result in the student needing additional overall time to complete the assessment. R02 Indicate responses to a scribe (multiple-choice items) - A scribe is a trained examiner who writes down or enters into a secure computer testing program what a student has dictated using one or more of the following modes: an assistive communication device, pointing, communication by the student via interpretation. The guiding principle in scribing is to assist the student in accessing the test and responding to it. R04 Indicate responses to a scribe, all elements to be scored - Students dictate their responses to a human who records verbatim what they dictate. The scribe must be trained and qualified, and must follow the administration guidelines provided in the administration manual. R15 Use bilingual word-to word dictionary - A bilingual/dual language word-toword dictionary is a language support. West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

75 Section III. Guidelines for Supporting and Accommodating English Language Leaners (ELL) Students Instructional Practices: Students use electronic or paper bilingual/dual-language dictionaries to look up word meanings during instruction. Considerations: For students whose primary language is not English and who use dual language supports in the classroom, use of a bilingual/dual language word-to-word dictionary may be appropriate. Students participate in the assessment regardless of the language. The use of this support may result in the student needing additional overall time to complete the assessment. T03 Take more breaks (no studying) - Students are allowed to take additional breaks as requested or at predetermined intervals. T04 Use extra time for any timed test - Timed tests require a request for a specific amount of extra time. A common extension is time and one half for example, an extension from 60 minutes to 90 minutes. If a reader or scribe is used, double time may be appropriate. T07 Flexible scheduling, same day (no studying) - Students are scheduled to allow for the best conditions for their performance, and/or may be allowed to take the test during more than one sitting during a single day. T09 Provide separate setting - Test location is altered so that the student is tested in a setting different from that made available for most students. English Language Arts Allowable Designated Supports for ELLs *P01 Text to speech - Text is read aloud to the student via embedded text-to-speech technology. The student is able to control the speed as well as raise or lower the volume of the voice via a volume control. Computer voice not for reading passages Instructional practices: Teacher or assistant reads aloud instructions. Listening skills are taught using read-aloud material, and then students are checked for understanding. Students listen to a prerecorded audio interpretation (book-on-tape) of text or a book. Considerations: Students who are struggling readers may need assistance accessing the assessment by having all or portions of the assessment read aloud. This support will likely be confusing and may impede the performance of students who do not regularly have the support during instruction. Students who use text-to-speech will need headphones unless tested individually in a separate setting. P02 Read aloud - Text is read aloud to the student by a trained and qualified human reader. The trained examiner reads aloud the directions, stimulus material, questions, and answer choices. This accommodation excludes passages. Considerations: If not used regularly during instruction, this support is likely to be confusing and may impede the performance on assessments. Read aloud should be provided to students on an individual basis not to a group of students. A student should have the option of asking a reader to slow down or repeat text. This is difficult when a person is reading to an entire group of students. However, verbatim reading to a group of students is permitted in testing if the accommodation is provided to the student on that basis during regular instruction. Test readers must be familiar with the terminology and symbols specific to the content. 55 West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

76 Section III. Guidelines for Supporting and Accommodating English Language Leaners (ELL) Students P15 Have directions only read aloud - A trained examiner reads aloud verbatim the directions for the test. P23 Use a magnifying device to enlarge assessment material - Magnification devices include eyeglass-mounted magnifiers, free- standing or hand-held magnifiers, or a lens that is placed over the computer monitor and may include the use of video magnifiers. *P28 Use high contrast for online assessments - Enable students to adjust screen background or font color, based on student needs or preferences. This may include reversing the colors for the entire interface or choosing the color of font and background. Reverse contrast turns the screen from white to black and creates text in white. *P33 Turn off any universal tools - Disabling any universal tools that might be distracting or that students do not need to use, or are unable to use. *P37 Use masking - Masking involves blocking off content that is distracting to the student. Students are able to focus their attention on a specific part of a test item by masking. R02 Indicate responses to a scribe (multiple-choice items) - A scribe is a trained examiner who writes down or enters into a secure computer testing program what a student has dictated using one or more of the following modes: an assistive communication device, pointing, communication by the student via interpretation. The guiding principle in scribing is to assist the student in accessing the test and responding to it. R04 Indicate responses to a scribe, all elements to be scored - Students dictate their responses to a human who records verbatim what they dictate. The scribe must be trained and qualified, and must follow the administration guidelines provided in the administration manual. R15 Use bilingual word-to word dictionary - A bilingual/dual language word-toword dictionary is a language support. - This can be provided for the full write portion of an ELA performance task. A full write is the second part of a performance task. Instructional Practices: Students use electronic or paper bilingual/dual-language dictionaries to look up word meanings during instruction. Considerations: For students whose primary language is not English and who use dual language supports in the classroom, use of a bilingual/dual language word-to-word dictionary may be appropriate. Students participate in the assessment regardless of the language. The use of this support may result in the student needing additional overall time to complete the assessment. T03 Take more breaks (no studying) - Students are allowed to take additional breaks as requested or at predetermined intervals. T04 Use extra time for any timed test - Timed tests require a request for a specific amount of extra time. A common extension is time and one half for example, an extension from 60 minutes to 90 minutes. If a reader or scribe is used, double time may be appropriate. West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

77 Section III. Guidelines for Supporting and Accommodating English Language Leaners (ELL) Students T07 Flexible scheduling, same day (no studying) - Students are scheduled to allow for the best conditions for their performance, and/or may be allowed to take the test during more than one sitting during a single day. T09 Provide separate setting - Test location is altered so that the student is tested in a setting different from that made available for most students. Science Allowable Designated Supports for ELLs *P01 Text to speech - Text is read aloud to the student via embedded text-to-speech technology. The student is able to control the speed as well as raise or lower the volume of the voice via a volume control. human recorded voice Instructional practices: Teacher or assistant reads aloud instructions. Listening skills are taught using read-aloud material, and then students are checked for understanding. Students listen to a prerecorded audio interpretation (book-on-tape) of text or a book. Considerations: Students who are struggling readers may need assistance accessing the assessment by having all or portions of the assessment read aloud. This support will likely be confusing and may impede the performance of students who do not regularly have the support during instruction. Students who use text-to-speech will need headphones unless tested individually in a separate setting. P02 Read aloud - Text is read aloud to the student by a trained and qualified human reader. The trained examiner reads aloud the directions, stimulus material, questions, and answer choices. This accommodation excludes passages. not for reading passages Considerations: If not used regularly during instruction, this support is likely to be confusing and may impede the performance on assessments. Read aloud should be provided to students on an individual basis not to a group of students. A student should have the option of asking a reader to slow down or repeat text. This is difficult when a person is reading to an entire group of students. However, verbatim reading to a group of students is permitted in testing if the accommodation is provided to the student on that basis during regular instruction. Test readers must be familiar with the terminology and symbols specific to the content. P15 Have directions only read aloud - A trained examiner reads aloud verbatim the directions for the test. P18 Have directions rephrased by trained examiner - A trained examiner reads aloud verbatim the directions for the test and states the same message in a new or different way. P23 Use a magnifying device to enlarge assessment material - Magnification devices include eyeglass-mounted magnifiers, free-standing or hand-held magnifiers, or a lens that is placed over the computer monitor and may include the use of video magnifiers. P24 Use translator to present test - Electronic dictionaries and translators are tools for students who are English language learners. Students may use this equipment to present directions, stimulus material, questions, and answer choices. Translators are limited to word-to-word. Human translators are only able to provide when the language support is 57 West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

78 Section III. Guidelines for Supporting and Accommodating English Language Leaners (ELL) Students being offered to other students and then assessment platform does not provide the language support in their native language. P25 Use translator to present directions only - Electronic dictionaries and translators are tools for English language learners to present directions only. Human translators may provide language support only when the platform provides such supports and the supports provided are not in the student s native language. P27 Use approved bilingual word-to-word dictionary for directions only *P28 Use high contrast for online assessments - Enable students to adjust screen background or font color, based on student needs or preferences. This may include reversing the colors for the entire interface or choosing the color of font and background. Reverse contrast turns the screen from white to black and creates text in white. *P33 Turn off any universal tools - Disabling any universal tools that might be distracting or that students do not need to use, or are unable to use. *P37 Use masking - Masking involves blocking off content that is distracting to the student. Students are able to focus their attention on a specific part of a test item by masking. R02 Indicate responses to a scribe (multiple-choice items) - A scribe is a trained examiner who writes down or enters into a secure computer testing program what a student has dictated using one or more of the following modes: an assistive communication device, pointing, communication by the student via interpretation. The guiding principle in scribing is to assist the student in accessing the test and responding to it. R04 Indicate responses to a scribe, all elements to be scored - Students dictate their responses to a human who records verbatim what they dictate. The scribe must be trained and qualified and must follow the administration guidelines provided in the administration manual. R15 Use bilingual word-to word dictionary - A bilingual/dual language word-toword dictionary is a language support. This can be provided for the full write portion of an ELA performance task. A full write is the second part of a performance task. Instructional Practices: Students use electronic or paper bilingual/dual-language dictionaries to look up word meanings during instruction. Considerations: For students whose primary language is not English and who use dual language supports in the classroom, use of a bilingual/dual language word-to-word dictionary may be appropriate. Students participate in the assessment regardless of the language. The use of this support may result in the student needing additional overall time to complete the assessment. R17 Use a translator to respond - A student may use an electronic translator to indicate answer choices when used for typical access. Human translation is only provided when the language support for other languages is provided by the assessment platform. The human translator may provide a translation but only on those items where language support is provided. West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

79 Section III. Guidelines for Supporting and Accommodating English Language Leaners (ELL) Students T03 Take more breaks (no studying) - Students are allowed to take additional breaks as requested or at predetermined intervals. T04 Use extra time for any timed test - Timed tests require a request for a specific amount of extra time. A common extension is time and one half for example, an extension from 60 minutes to 90 minutes. If a reader or scribe is used, double time may be appropriate. T07 Flexible scheduling, same day (no studying) - Students are scheduled to allow for the best conditions for their performance and/or may be allowed to take the test during more than one sitting during a single day. T09 Provide separate setting - Test location is altered so that the student is tested in a setting different from that made available for most students. Social Studies Allowable Designated Supports for ELLs *P01 Text to speech - Text is read aloud to the student via embedded text-to-speech technology. The student is able to control the speed as well as raise or lower the volume of the voice via a volume control. human recorded voice Instructional practices: Teacher or assistant reads aloud instructions. Listening skills are taught using read-aloud material, and then students are checked for understanding. Students listen to a prerecorded audio interpretation (book-on-tape) of text or a book. Considerations: Students who are struggling readers may need assistance accessing the assessment by having all or portions of the assessment read aloud. This support will likely be confusing and may impede the performance of students who do not regularly have the support during instruction. Students who use text-to-speech will need headphones unless tested individually in a separate setting. P02 Read aloud - Text is read aloud to the student by a trained and qualified human reader. The trained examiner reads aloud the directions, stimulus material, questions, and answer choices. Considerations: If not used regularly during instruction, this support is likely to be confusing and may impede the performance on assessments. Read aloud should be provided to students on an individual basis not to a group of students. A student should have the option of asking a reader to slow down or repeat text. This is difficult when a person is reading to an entire group of students. However, verbatim reading to a group of students is permitted in testing if the accommodation is provided to the student on that basis during regular instruction. Test readers must be familiar with the terminology and symbols specific to the content. P15 Have directions only read aloud - A trained examiner reads aloud verbatim the directions for the test. P18 Have directions rephrased by trained examiner - A trained examiner reads aloud verbatim the directions for the test and states the same message in a new or different way. 59 West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

80 Section III. Guidelines for Supporting and Accommodating English Language Leaners (ELL) Students P23 Use a magnifying device to enlarge assessment material - Magnification devices include eyeglass-mounted magnifiers, free- standing or hand-held magnifiers, or a lens that is placed over the computer monitor and may include the use of video magnifiers. P24 Use translator to present test - Electronic dictionaries and translators are tools for students who are English language learners. Students may use this equipment to present directions, stimulus material, questions, and answer choices. Translators are limited to word-to-word. Human translators are provided only when the assessment platform does not support the language of the student. P25 Use translator to present directions only - Electronic dictionaries and translators are tools for English language learners to present directions only. Human translators are provided only if the assessment platform does not provide for a student s native language. For example, the glossary items are available in Spanish but not Japanese. The human translator would provide language support for the glossary items that were provided for other languages. P27 Use approved bilingual word-to-word dictionary for directions only *P28 Use high contrast for online assessments - Enable students to adjust screen background or font color, based on student needs or preferences. This may include reversing the colors for the entire interface or choosing the color of font and background. Reverse contrast turns the screen from white to black and creates text in white. *P33 Turn off any universal tools - Disabling any universal tools that might be distracting or that students do not need to use, or are unable to use. *P37 Use masking - Masking involves blocking off content that is distracting to the student. Students are able to focus their attention on a specific part of a test item by masking. R02 Indicate responses to a scribe (multiple-choice items) - A scribe is a trained examiner who writes down or enters into a secure computer testing program what a student has dictated using one or more of the following modes: an assistive communication device, pointing, communication by the student via interpretation. The guiding principle in scribing is to assist the student in accessing the test and responding to it. R04 Indicate responses to a scribe, all elements to be scored - Students dictate their responses to a human who records verbatim what they dictate. The scribe must be trained and qualified and must follow the administration guidelines provided in the administration manual. R15 Use bilingual word-to word dictionary - A bilingual/dual language word-toword dictionary is a language support. This can be provided for the full write portion of an ELA performance task. A full write is the second part of a performance task. Instructional Practices: Students use electronic or paper bilingual/dual-language dictionaries to look up word meanings during instruction. Considerations: For students whose primary language is not English and who use dual language supports in the classroom, use of a bilingual/dual language word-to-word dictionary may be appropriate. Students participate in the assessment regardless of the West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

81 Section III. Guidelines for Supporting and Accommodating English Language Leaners (ELL) Students language. The use of this support may result in the student needing additional overall time to complete the assessment. R17 Use a translator to respond - A student may use an electronic translator to indicate answer choices when typical access. Only a human translator is allowed on the ELA and mathematics portion of the test. T03 Take more breaks (no studying) - Students are allowed to take additional breaks as requested or at predetermined intervals. T04 Use extra time for any timed test - Timed tests require a request for a specific amount of extra time. A common extension is time and one half for example, an extension from 60 minutes to 90 minutes. If a reader or scribe is used, double time may be appropriate. T07 Flexible scheduling, same day (no studying) - Students are scheduled to allow for the best conditions for their performance, and/or may be allowed to take the test during more than one sitting during a single day. T09 Provide separate setting - Test location is altered so that the student is tested in a setting different from that made available for most students. Step Two Document the reasons for accommodations selected After assigning designated supports and accommodations by category (Step One), be sure to consider other student background characteristics such as (a) time in the United States, (b) student s affective needs, (c) student s academic capacity, (d) age and maturity, (e) sociocultural background, and (f) transitory or migrant status. In the documentation, the committee must articulate the reasons for differentiating accommodations for this student by providing answers to the following questions: 1. What does this individual student need to show us what he or she really knows? 2. If provided, will the accommodation change what the test is trying to measure? 3. If appropriate, has the student had prior experience using this accommodation? NOTES: Accommodations such as dictionaries need to be introduced well before the test. However, this prerequisite is not as important for the other accommodations such as plain (simplified) English assessment, oral English (read-aloud, audiotape/cds, repetition, or clarification), oral translations, native language tests, or extended time. A list of approved bilingual dictionaries for WV-MAP assessments can be accessed at h t t p : / / w v c o n n e c t i o n s. k 1 2. w v. u s / d o c u m e n t s / l e p _ b i l i n g u a l _ d i c t i o n a r y w i t h o u t D i s t r i b u t o r s r e v i s e d A p r i l. d o c. Reminder for ELL students with disabilities: Refer to the accommodations listed on the IEP or Section 504 Plan. According to guidance released by the U.S. Department of Education (July 18,2014), all ELLs with disabilities are required to participate in annual state ELP assessments. The ELL committee may request permission to use accommodations other than those just described. Such requests must be received by the Office of Assessment and Research no later than 4 weeks prior to the testing date. 61 West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

82 Section III. Guidelines for Supporting and Accommodating English Language Leaners (ELL) Students Step Three Submit ELL assessment participation form Document the accommodations selected in the student s E L L Assessment Participation Form included after this section. Review administrative directions or requirements that should be communicated to the school/ district test coordinator or the person administering the test to the student. The accommodations and designated supports selected on the ELL Assessment Participation Form should be transferred to the WOW ELL Screen in order for the students to access the assigned items on the actual assessment. West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

83 Section III. Guidelines for Supporting and Accommodating English Language Leaners (ELL) Students ELL Assessment Participation Form School Year: Date: Page: of A. District and School Information District Name: ELL Committee Contact Names: B. Student Information Student Name: Student ID Number: Grade: C. ELL Status* D. Native Language Status* School Name: Gender: Country of Origin: Native Language: E. Additional Factors* Beginning (Level 1) Limited Comments: Advanced Beginning (Level 2) Intermediate Intermediate (Level 3) Strong Early Fluent (Level 4) Fluent (Level 5) Monitored Former ELL Student * Refer to STEPS ONE and Two in the West Virginia Participation Guidelines, Additional Guidance for Assigning Accommodations PART VII: Statewide Testing (Please check all appropriate boxes) 1) Indicate the appropriate WV Measures of Academic Progress Assessment (WV-MAP) and 2) Check standard conditions or standard conditions w/accommodations. General Assessment Grades 3-11 ACT PLAN/EXPLORE & NAEP Alternate Assessment Grade 3-11 A) Standard Conditions A) Standard Conditions B) Standard Conditions w/accommodations B) Standard Conditions w/accommodations NOTE: For Alternate Assessment eligibility, the student must exhibit significant cognitive disabilities, be instructed through Alternate Academic Achievement Standards and be pursuing a modified diploma (age 14+). 63 West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

84 Section III. Guidelines for Supporting and Accommodating English Language Leaners (ELL) Students WVEIS Code Standard Conditions with Accommodations WVEIS Codes: P Presentation; R Response; T Timing Check all that apply Direct Linguistic Support: * Codes in bold indicate embedded supports/accommodations. P01 P02 P15 P18 P23 P24 P25 P27 P28 P30 P31 P32 P33 P37 P41 P42 R02 R04 R15 R17 Text to speech Read aloud Have directions only read aloud Have directions rephrased by trained examiner Magnification Use translators to present test Use translators to present test directions only Use approved bilingual word-to-word dictionary for directions only Color contrast Provide translated test direction Provide translations glossary Provide translations stacked Turn off any universal tools Masking Provide translations glossary - locally provided Noise buffers Indicate responses to a scribe (multiple choice item) Indicate responses to a scribe, all elements to be scored Use a bilingual word-to-word dictionary Use a translator to response Indirect Linguistic Support: * T03 T04 T07 T09 Take more breaks (no studying) Use extra time for any timed test Use flexible scheduling, same day Provide separate setting ELL Committee Members Signatures: West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

85 Section III. Guidelines for Supporting and Accommodating English Language Leaners (ELL) Students Guide to Accommodations for Various English and Native Language Proficiency Levels Beginning (Level 1) or Advanced Beginning (Level 2) English language proficiency Students at the lowest levels of English language proficiency tend to experience the greatest need for accommodations but are the least able to use them. In general, the use of oral supports is recommended over written accommodations in English; however, most of these supports would not be expected to produce much of an effect for the lowest proficiency levels. Oral accommodations are particularly helpful to students with limited formal studies who have low literacy skills in both their native language and English. Beginning (Level 1) or Advanced Beginning (Level 2) English language proficiency with strong native language literacy Students at the lowest levels of English language proficiency tend to experience the greatest need of accommodations but are the least able to use them. In general, the use of oral supports is recommended over written accommodations in English; however, most of these supports would not be expected to produce much of an effect for the lowest proficiency levels. Native language support in the form of bilingual word-to-word dictionaries or electronic translators can be helpful if the ELL student is literate in his or her native language and has received recent instruction in that language, whether in the United States or abroad. Human translators may also be provided as long as the translator is proficient in both English and the native language support. Intermediate (Level 3) English language proficiency and low levels of native language proficiency Students at the intermediate level of English language proficiency have usually developed some literacy in English and are expected to benefit from a wider variety of both written and oral accommodation options. Decision makers should note that the need for accommodations at this level varies considerably depending upon the unique background characteristics of the student as well as the literacy demands of the test. Similar to students with beginning English language proficiency levels, the existing research suggests that native language accommodations are more useful than English accommodation at the intermediate level. Students with low levels of native language proficiency (e.g., those who do not have formal native language education), however, will not necessarily benefit from the provision of accommodations in the native language. Intermediate (Level 3) English language proficiency and strong native language skills Because students with limited English proficiency at the intermediate level of English language proficiency have usually developed some literacy in English, these students are expected to benefit from a wider variety of both written and oral accommodation options. Decision makers should note that the need for accommodations at this level varies considerably depending upon the unique background characteristics of the student as well as the literacy demands of the test. Similar to students with beginning English language proficiency levels, the existing research suggests that native language accommodations are considered more useful than English accommodation at the intermediate level. Thus, native language support in the form of bilingual word-to-word dictionaries or electronic translators can be helpful if the ELL student is literate in his or her native language and has received recent instruction in that language, whether in the United States or abroad. 65 West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

86 Section III. Guidelines for Supporting and Accommodating English Language Leaners (ELL) Students Early Fluent (Level 4), Fluent (Level 5) English language proficiency, or monitored former ELL students For students at advanced English language proficiency levels (Levels 4 and 5) and monitored former ELL students, the need for most kinds of accommodations is expected to decrease. However, customized glossaries are useful for these students. English-language glossaries are appropriate for most groups at the advanced level and dual language glossaries are recommended for advanced students who are literate in the native language and have received instruction in it. Experts note that students at the advanced English language proficiency level typically have enough English that they do not need oral translation or response accommodations. Native language support in the form of bilingual word-to-word dictionaries or electronic translators can be helpful if the ELL student is literate in his or her native language and has received recent instruction in that language, whether in the United States or abroad. ELL students with IEPs and Section 504 plans For ELL students with IEPs and Section 504 plans, make sure they receive all assessment accommodations as outlined in the ELL Assessment Participation Form and the IEP or Section 504 plan. Information about IEPs and Section 504 plans can be found in Guidelines for Accommodating Students with Disabilities. Accommodations and WESTELL Unless an ELL student has an IEP or 504 Plan on file, that student will not receive accommodations on the WESTELL, as it is a measure of the English language ability of an ELL student. According to guidance released by the U.S. Department of Education (July 18, 2014), all ELLs with disabilities are required to participate in annual state ELP assessments. West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

87 Section IV. Guidelines for Supporting Students with Assistance Team (SAT) Plans Scores achieved by any students using designated supports will be included for federal accountability purposes. It is recommended that a consistent process be used to determine these supports for individual students. All educators making these decisions should be trained on the process and should be made aware of the range of designated supports available. On the General Summative Assessment any student with a current SAT plan may be eligible to receive designated supports. Each public school has an established Student Assistance Team (SAT) that consists of at least three persons, including a school administrator or designee, who shall serve as a chairperson, a current teacher (s) and other appropriate staff. A trained school based team provides a formalized process for the review of student needs and complements the work of instruction and intervention teams. The team invites parents to review recommendations made by the team in regard to educational programming and provides feedback to the team about those recommendations (see Policy 2510, section 8.2 and 13.58). The student assistance team may select designated supports for use by a student for whom the need has been indicated by SAT team of educators along with the parent/guardian for the general state assessment. The decisions are made by educators familiar with the student s characteristics and needs, as well as those supports that the student has been using during instruction and for other assessments. Designated supports for the General Summative Assessment should be selected when tools support the student s needs and are similar to instructional supports provided regularly. Student input to the decision, particularly for older students, is also recommended. A form is available for SAT use to identify the appropriate universal tools and designated supports based on a student s need on page 77. Both digitally-embedded and non-embedded designated supports are available for students with an identified need for the support on an active SAT plan. Embedded supports are available as part of the technology platform used for the assessment. Non-embedded supports are provided outside of the computer test administration system and must be provided locally. Universal tools are access features of the assessment that are either provided as embedded digitally-delivered components of the test administration system or are provided locally. Universal tools are available to all students based on student preference and selection. SAT team process: Three steps Students with plans participate in the general assessment and all other components of WV-MAP. SAT teams must actively engage in a planning process that addresses the provision of designated supports if needed to facilitate student access to grade-level instruction and state assessments. That is, SAT teams must determine if the student will (a) participate under standard conditions for all students, (b) standard conditions with specific available options and/or universal tools or (c) standard conditions with designated supports. If the latter is chosen, this three-step process should be followed for deciding which designated supports and accommodations are needed, for which tests and subtests. Students with SAT plans may receive designated supports. Designated supports must be identified prior to assessment administration. West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

88 Step one Guidance to teams to determine appropriate tools and designated supports Decisions about appropriate assessment supports must be reviewed annually. The parent(s) and student, if appropriate, must be involved in and informed of decisions regarding assessment participation. The implications of the decisions must be carefully explained to the parent(s) and student. When making decisions about which assessment supports to allow, SAT committees should consider the following: Which supplementary aids, services, and program modifications are being provided in the SAT plan for classroom instruction? Would using this universal tool an/or designated support for assessments in the WV- MAP result in getting the best measure of what the student knows and can do on the skill being tested? Not every support used in instruction is appropriate or helpful in assessment. Consider whether tools or supports used to assist a student in learning also are needed to show what he or she has learned. Designated supports should address the barriers to accessing the test resulting from the student s need, therefore, ensuring that the skill is being measured. Factors to weigh in making the decision may include the effectiveness of the designated support according to available research, and difficulties encountered when using the support. Will the student actually use the tool or support when testing occurs? When possible, the student should be involved in the decision. A designated support is more likely to be effective if the student understands how to use it and is willing to do so. Which specific assessment supports, if any, should be required when assessing for the General Summative Assessment and other components of the WV-MAP and to which tests and subtests do these supports apply? Universal tools are accessibility tools that allow any student access to the assessment and are available under standard conditions. Accessible tools are available for any student taking the General Summative Assessment. The chart includes universal tools that may support any student and will not need identified on the assessment page of the plan. Consider using these tools when they are provided to students instructionally. Be sure that students have been adequately prepared to use any universal tools prior to assessment. Teams may consider the available universal tools and designated supports to determine which will address the needs of the student in accessing the test and supporting the student in demonstrating what they know and can do. Universal Tools Available To All Students Universal tools are access features of the assessment that are either provided as digitally-delivered components of the test administration system or separate from it. Universal tools are available to all students based on student preference and selection. Embedded universal tools are available to all students as part of the technology platform. Some universal tools are non-embedded and may need to be provided outside of the computer test administration system and those must be provided locally for students. Although these tools are generally available to all students, educators may determine that one or more might be distracting for a particular student, and thus might indicate that the tool should be turned off for the administration of the assessment to the student. It is recommended that all students practice using the tools prior to the assessment. West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

89 Section IV. Guidelines for Supporting Students with Assistance Team (SAT) Plans Embedded Universal Tools Available to All Students Breaks Universal Tool Calculator (for calculator-allowed items only) (See Non-embedded Accommodations for students who cannot use the embedded calculator) Digital notepad English Dictionary (for ELA-performance task full writes) English glossary Expandable passages Global notes (for ELA performance tasks) Highlighter Keyboard navigation Mark for review Math tools Spell check (for ELA Description The number of items per session can be flexibly defined based on the student s need. Breaks of more than 20 minutes will prevent the student from returning to items already attempted by the student. There is no limit on the number of breaks that a student might be given. The use of this universal tool may result in the student needing additional overall time to complete the assessment. An embedded on-screen digital calculator can be accessed for calculator-allowed items when students click on the calculator button. This tool is available only with the specific items for which the Smarter Balanced Item Specifications indicated that it would be appropriate. When the embedded calculator, as presented for all students, is not appropriate for a student (for example, for a student who is blind), the student may use the calculator offered with assistive technology devices (such as a talking calculator or a braille calculator). This tool is used for making notes about an item. The digital notepad is item-specific and is available through the end of the test segment. Notes are not saved when the student moves on to the next segment or after a break of more than 20 minutes. An English dictionary may be available for the full write portion of an ELA performance task. A full write is the second part of a performance task. The use of this universal tool may result in the student needing additional overall time to complete the assessment. Grade- and context-appropriate definitions of specific constructirrelevant terms are shown in English on the screen via a pop-up window. The student can access the embedded glossary by clicking on any of the pre-selected terms. The use of this accommodation may result in the student needing additional overall time to complete the assessment. Each passage or stimulus can be expanded so that it takes up a larger portion of the screen. Global notes is a notepad that is available for ELA performance tasks in which students complete a full write. A full write is the second part of a performance task. The student clicks on the notepad icon for the notepad to appear. During the ELA performance tasks, the notes are retained from segment to segment so that the student may go back to the notes even though the student is not able to go back to specific items in the previous segment. A digital tool for marking desired text, item questions, item answers, or parts of these with a color. Highlighted text remains available throughout each test segment. Navigation throughout text can be accomplished by using a keyboard. Allows students to flag items for future review during the assessment. Markings are not saved when the student moves on to the next segment or after a break of more than 20 minutes. These digital tools (i.e., embedded ruler, embedded protractor) are used for measurements related to math items. They are available only with the specific items for which the Smarter Balanced Item Specifications indicate that one or more of these tools would be appropriate. Writing tool for checking the spelling of words in student-generated 69 West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

90 Universal Tool items) Strikethrough Writing tools Zoom Description responses. Spell check only gives an indication that a word is misspelled; it does not provide the correct spelling. This tool is available only with the specific items for which the Smarter Balanced Item Specifications indicated that it would be appropriate. Spell check is bundled with other embedded writing tools for all performance task full writes (planning, drafting, revising, and editing). A full write is the second part of a performance task. Allows users to cross out answer options. If an answer option is an image, a strikethrough line will not appear, but the image will be grayed out. Selected writing tools (i.e., bold, italic, bullets, undo/redo) are available for all student-generated responses. (Also see spell check.) A tool for making text or other graphics in a window or frame appear larger on the screen. The default font size for all tests is 14 pt. The student can make text and graphics larger by clicking the Zoom In button. The student can click the Zoom Out button to return to the default or smaller print size. When using the zoom feature, the student only changes the size of text and graphics on the current screen. To increase the default print size of the entire test (from 1.5X to 3.0X default size), the print size must be set for the student in the Test Information Distribution Engine (TIDE, or state s comparable platform), or set by the test administrator prior to the start of the test. This is the only feature that test administrators can set. The use of this universal tool may result in the student needing additional overall time to complete the assessment. Non-Embedded Universal Tools Available To All Students Breaks Universal Tool English Dictionary (for ELA-performance task full writes) Scratch paper Description Breaks may be given at predetermined intervals or after completion of sections of the assessment for students taking a paper-based test. Sometimes students are allowed to take breaks when individually needed to reduce cognitive fatigue when they experience heavy assessment demands. The use of this universal tool may result in the student needing additional overall time to complete the assessment. An English dictionary can be provided for the full write portion of an ELA performance task. A full write is the second part of a performance task. The use of this universal tool may result in the student needing additional overall time to complete the assessment. Scratch paper to make notes, write computations, or record responses may be made available. Only plain paper or lined paper is appropriate for ELA. Graph paper is required beginning in sixth grade and can be used on all math assessments. A student can use an assistive technology device for scratch paper as long as the device is certified. 11 CAT: All scratch paper must be collected and securely destroyed at the end of each CAT assessment session to maintain test security. Performance Tasks: For mathematics and ELA performance tasks, if a student needs to take the performance task in more than one session, scratch paper may be collected at the end of each session, 11 Smarter Balanced is working closely with our test administration platform vendor to create a process through which assistive technology devices can be certified. Certification ensures that the device functions properly and appropriately addresses test security. West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

91 Section IV. Guidelines for Supporting Students with Assistance Team (SAT) Plans Universal Tool Description securely stored, and made available to the student at the next performance task testing session. Once the student completes the performance task, the scratch paper must be collected and securely destroyed to maintain test security. Thesaurus (for ELA-performance task full writes) A thesaurus contains synonyms of terms while a student interacts with text included in the assessment. A full write is the second part of a performance task. The use of this universal tool may result in the student needing additional overall time to complete the assessment. Step Two Select and document the reasons for any designated supports As mentioned earlier, the student who participates in the General Summative Assessment components of the WV-MAP, as appropriate by grade level, including ACT COMPASS and NAEP may receive designated supports as specified on the students SAT plan. In the documentation, the committee must articulate the reasons for differentiating supports for this student. 1. What does this individual student need in order to show us what he/she really knows? 2. If provided, will the accommodation change what the test is trying to measure? 3. If a tool or designated support is deemed appropriate, has the student had prior experience using it? Designated Supports Acceptable designated supports for the General Summative Assessment follow with further guidance for each of the WV-MAP components in sections (the general summative in Section V; COMPASS in Section VI; and NAEP in Section VII). Guide to Designated Supports and Accommodations for Students with Plans Standard designated supports and accommodations fall into three categories: presentation affecting how test items are presented to students; response affecting how students are allowed to convey their responses to items; and setting and time affecting where, when, and on what schedule testing takes place. All allowable options and supports for students with plans fall into these categories, and are described in detail by category of presentation, response and timing. The codes to the left of each accommodation/option heading are the WVEIS codes associated with the allowed support or accommodation. Those with no WVEIS code and marked with a long dash ( ) are standard options available to any student. Presentation Presentation supports and accommodations allow students to access instruction and assessments in ways that do not require them to read standard print visually. These alternate modes of access include auditory, tactile, visual, and a combination of auditory and visual accommodations. Students who benefit most from presentation accommodations are those 71 West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

92 with print disabilities, defined as difficulty or inability to read standard print visually because of a physical, sensory, or cognitive disability. Testing presentation options available to all students include use of audio amplification equipment. The following list of all WVEIS presentation codes for all assessments in WV-MAP designated supports for state assessment. P01 Use text to speech (TTS), excluding ELA reading passages Allowed for: NAEP and General Summative Assessment. Description: Text is read aloud to the student via embedded text-to-speech technology. The student is able to control the speed as well as raise or lower the volume of the voice via a volume control. Instructional Practices: Text is read aloud to the student via embedded text-to-speech technology or a human. Teacher or assistant reads aloud instructions. Listening skills are taught using read-aloud material, and then students are checked for understanding. Students listen to a prerecorded audio interpretation (book-on-tape) of text or a book. When to select: Students who are struggling readers may need assistance accessing the assessment by having all or portions of the assessment read aloud. This support also may be needed by students with reading-related disabilities, or by students who are blind and do not yet have adequate braille skills. For students who are unable to decode text visually or by using contracted braille or Nemeth code. Notes for implementation: This is considered a designated support which will likely be confusing and may impede the performance of students who do not regularly receive this support during instruction. Students who use text-to-speech will need headphones unless tested individually in a separate setting. This accommodation excludes all COMPASS assessments. P02 Have test read aloud Allowed for: All WV-MAP tests excluding general summative ELA reading passages, ACT COMPASS Writing Skills* and NAEP Reading. * ACT COMPASS Writing is allowed for a student who is blind because there is no braille version available Description: Text is read aloud to the student by a trained and qualified human reader. The trained examiner reads aloud the directions, stimulus material, questions, and answer choices. This accommodation excludes passages. Instructional Practices: Text is read aloud to the student via embedded text-to-speech technology or a human. Teacher or assistant reads aloud instructions. Listening skills are taught using read-aloud material, and then students are checked for understanding. Students listen to a prerecorded audio interpretation (book-on-tape) of text or a book. When to select: Students who are struggling readers may need assistance accessing the assessment by having the assessment read aloud. This support also may be needed by students with reading-related disabilities or by students who are blind and do not yet have adequate braille skills. Notes for implementation: If not used regularly during instruction, this support is likely to be confusing and may impede the performance on assessments. Read aloud should be provided to students on an individual basis not to a group of students. A student should have the option of asking a reader to slow down or repeat text. This is difficult when a person is reading West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

93 Section IV. Guidelines for Supporting Students with Assistance Team (SAT) Plans to an entire group of students. However, verbatim reading to a group of students is permitted in testing if the accommodation is provided to the student on that basis during regular instruction. Test readers must be familiar with the terminology and symbols specific to the content (see Appendix K) for Read Aloud Guidelines. ensure that all students understand what is expected of them when reading test directions; must NOT clarify, elaborate, or answer questions about test items; or give clues while reading items that indicate the correct answer or help eliminate answer choices. This accommodation is often paired with T04 (extra time). Allow students an opportunity to ask questions about how to mark their answers before they begin taking the test; and be prepared to answer questions about item format and timing. P23 This is considered a designated support. Use a magnifying device to enlarge assessment material Allowed for: General Summative Assessment, ACT COMPASS Mathematics and Writing Skills, NAEP and other computer-based assessments Description: Magnification devices include eyeglass-mounted magnifiers, free- standing or hand-held magnifiers, or a lens that is placed over the computer monitor and may include the use of video magnifiers. The size of specific areas of the screen (e.g., text, formulas, tables, graphics, and navigation buttons) may be adjusted by the student with an assistive technology device. Instructional Practices: Students receive large-print texts or use of magnifying devices during instruction to enable access to curriculum. Some students with specific learning disabilities may use this feature to enlarge mathematics problems to make sure all steps are completed. When to select: This is for students who are vision impaired, and for whom the use of magnifying equipment is the typical mode of accessing written material. Students used to viewing enlarged text or graphics, or navigation buttons may need magnification to comfortably view content. This support also may meet the needs of students with visual impairments and other print disabilities. Notes for implementation: This is a designated support. Use whatever magnifier the student uses during instruction. Use visual magnifying equipment (standard option). The size of specific areas of the screen (e.g., text, formulas, tables, graphics, and navigation buttons) may be adjusted by the student with an assistive technology device. Magnification allows increasing the size to a level not provided for by the Zoom universal tool. Must be set locally in TIDE. The use of this designated support may result in the student needing additional overall time to complete the assessment. This is an option to standard testing conditions that is allowed to all students, with or without an IEP or Section 504 plan on some WV-MAP assessments. P28 Use high contrast for online assessments Allowed for: General Summative Assessment, ACT COMPASS, NAEP, and other computer based assessments Description: Enable students to adjust screen background or font color, based on student needs or preferences. This may include reversing the colors for the entire interface or choosing the color of font and background. Reverse contrast turns the screen from white to black and creates text in white. 73 West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

94 Instructional Practices: Students have instructional materials that have different font or background paper color(s). Students use one color for a main idea and another color for details when outlining or taking notes. Students need varying contrast to see visually presented material. When to select: For students who have vision or perception difficulties and use this accommodation instructionally. Students with attention difficulties may need this support for viewing test content. It also may be needed by some students with visual impairments or other print disabilities (including learning disabilities). Notes: This is a designated support. Choice of colors should be informed by evidence that color selection meet the student s needs. Must be locally set in TIDE. P33 Turn off any universal tools Allowed for: General Summative Assessment Description: Disabling any universal tools that might be distracting or that students do not need to use, or are unable to use. Instructional Practices: Blocking off any tool that is not of immediate need or that may be distracting to the student. Students are not able to focus and maintain attention if there is too much stimuli. When to select: For students who are easily distracted (whether or not designated as having attention difficulties or disabilities) may be overwhelmed by some of the universal tools. Knowing which specific tools may be distracting is important for determining which tools to turn off. Note: This designated support must consider the impact that eliminating a tool might have on student performance. The tools turned off or left enabled are determined locally and based on a plan. P37 Use masking Allowed for: General Summative Assessment Description: Masking involves blocking off content that is distracting to the student. Students are able to focus their attention on a specific part of a test item by masking. Instructional Practices: During instruction, students use a masking device that covers up sections of text before/after they read it, to maintain visual attention. Teachers create a clean document for students to work from that is not too busy or crowded with distracting information. Students use paper to block test questions, to decrease distractions. Teachers block off text on classroom boards or overhead projectors to focus students on topics during whole-group discussions. When to select: Students with attention difficulties may need to mask content not of immediate need or that may be distracting during the assessment. This support also may be needed by students with print disabilities (including learning disabilities) or visual impairments. Masking allows students to hide and reveal individual answer options, as well as all navigational buttons and menus. Notes for implementation: This designated support is a universal tool for science and social studies. P38 Use color contrast Allowed for: General Summative Assessment used in conjunction with print on demand West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

95 Section IV. Guidelines for Supporting Students with Assistance Team (SAT) Plans Description: Test content of online items may be printed with different colors. Instructional Practices: Students have instructional materials that have different font or background paper color(s).color coding using a variety of print colors on paper is used for students. Students can use one color for a main idea and another color for details when outlining or taking notes. When to select: Students with attention difficulties may need this support for viewing the test when digitally provided color contrasts do not meet their needs. Some students with visual impairments or other print disabilities (including learning disabilities) also may need this support. Choice of colors should be informed by evidence of those colors that meet the student s needs. Notes for implementation: * For the General Summative Assessment this should be paired with print on demand. Any printed items must follow security procedures. The student may need additional test time. Print on demand is a special accommodation for students. Teams should seek additional guidance prior to selecting in students with disabilities section P40 print on demand. P39 Use color overlays Allowed for: All WV-MAP including the General Summative Assessment* Description: Color transparencies are placed over a paper based assessment Instructional Practices: Color transparencies are placed over paper-based instructional materials. When to select: Students with attention difficulties may need this support to view test content. This support also may be needed by some students with visual impairments or other print disabilities (including learning disabilities). Choice of color should be informed by evidence of those colors that meet the student s needs. Notes for implementation: * For the General Summative Assessment this designated support should be paired with print on demand. Any printed items must follow security procedures. Any printed items must be treated as a secure material and shredded after testing. Steps to follow security procedures should be monitored at all testing sites. The student may need additional time for testing. Teams should seek additional guidance prior to selecting in students with disabilities section P40 print on demand. P42 Provide noise buffers Allowed for: General Summative Assessment Description: Ear mufflers, white noise, and/or other equipment used to block external sounds. Instructional Practices: Student wears devices to block out auditory stimuli. When to select: Student (not groups of students) wears equipment to reduce environmental noises. Students may have these testing variations if regularly used in the classroom. Students who use noise buffers will need headphones unless tested individually in a separate setting Use audio amplification equipment (standard option) Allowed for: All students, with or without an IEP or Section 504 plan (option to standard testing conditions) Description: Students use amplification equipment in addition to hearing aids to increase 75 West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

96 clarity; useful in environments with a great deal of ambient noise. When to select: For students who are hearing impaired, and who may or may not have an IEP or Section 504 plan. Notes for implementation: When arranging for testing, take into consideration the distractions of this accommodation to other students. Response Response accommodations allow students to complete assignments, tests, and activities in different ways or to solve or organize problems using some type of assistive device or organizer. Response accommodations can benefit students with physical, sensory, or learning disabilities, including difficulties with memory, sequencing, directionality, alignment, and organization. Allowable response supports for assessment are listed below. R04 Indicate responses to a scribe, all elements Allowed for: All WV-MAP including General Summative Assessment Description: Students dictate their responses to a human who records verbatim what they dictate. The scribe must be trained and qualified, and must follow the administration guidelines provided in the administration manual. Instructional Practices: Students use a tape recorder or scribe as an alternative to writing when a processing or physical challenge is present. Student s word-for-word response for tests and/or assignments is recorded. When to select: Students who have documented significant motor or processing difficulties, or who have had a recent injury (such as a broken hand or arm) that makes it difficult to produce responses may need to dictate their responses to a human, who then records the students responses verbatim. For many students dictating to a human scribe is the only way to demonstrate their composition skills. It is important that these students be able to develop planning notes via the human scribe, and to view what they produce while composing via dictation to the scribe. Scribes may be provided for any student (with or without an IEP or Section 504 plan) who have a short-term medical condition (e.g., a fractured arm in a cast) that precludes the student from word processing a response. Approval needs to be obtained from the county test coordinator and/or the county special education director prior to testing. Notes for implementation: See guidelines for scribing in appendix X. The use of this accommodation may result in the student needing overall additional time to complete the assessment. This is a designated support. Scribes should be monitored to be certain that students verbatim responses are recorded. On the day of testing, before testing begins, the principal/building coordinator should give the scribe no more than 2 hours to become familiar with the directions and format of the test. Scribes should be familiar with the test so they can easily record student answers (Thompson, Thurlow, & Walz, 2000). To the extent possible, the same scribe should have responsibility for transcribing information given by students during educational instruction and assessments. West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

97 Section IV. Guidelines for Supporting Students with Assistance Team (SAT) Plans Scratch paper, rough drafts, and login information must be collected immediately at the end of the testing session. These items are considered secure material and must be collected and shredded according to procedures established by the principal/building level coordinator (BLC) at the end of the testing session. Setting and time accommodations T09 Provide separate setting Allowed for: General Summative Assessment ELA and mathematics Description: Test location is altered so that the student is tested in a setting different from that made available for most students. Instructional Practice: Special seating arrangements for students who are easily distractible are provided within the classroom to improve focus. Students can come in during off periods to do homework or class assignments when the classroom has only a few students. During instruction and or testing, students are allowed an alternative environment. When to select: Students who are easily distracted (or may distract others) in the presence of other students, for example, may need an alternate location to be able to take the assessment. The separate setting may be in a different room that allows them to work individually or among a smaller group, or in the same room but in a specific location (for example, away from windows, doors, or pencil sharpeners, in a study carrel, near the teacher s desk, or in the front of a classroom). Some students may benefit from being in an environment that allows for movement, such as being able to walk around. In some instances, students may need to interact with instructional or test content outside of school, such as in a hospital or their home. Notes for implementation- This is not considered an accommodation for General Summative Assessment science and social studies. Changes in instructional and assessment locations can benefit students who are easily distracted in large group settings and who concentrate best in a small group or individual setting. Changes in location also benefit students who receive accommodations (e.g. reader, scribe, or frequent breaks) that might distract other students. Students with physical disabilities might need a more accessible location, specific room conditions, or special equipment. Students must be monitored during the entire testing period. It may be difficult to find testing locations that are private and free of distractions, especially when many students in a building are tested at the same time. Each student tested in a private location must be under the supervision of a trained examiner. These requirements apply to students tested in all locations, whether the student is assessed in the school building, at home, in a hospital, or a residential or other alternative setting. Step Three Verification of information to WVEIS Testing conditions and designated supports must be documented in the student s SAT plan and entered into the student s record in WVEIS. The process for entering students with active plans includes tagging the student in the WVEIS St.301 screen and entering the necessary designated supports into the WVEIS on the Web (WOW) screen. Designated supports must be activated prior to assessment. Administrators use the Accommodations 14 Application to review, schedule and provide designated supports. The Accommodations West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

98 Application should reflect any codes that are currently on a plan. The Accommodations 14 Application should be used to assist with the planning, scheduling and provision of supports and accommodations. Directions for using the Accommodations 14 Application are available in the WOW Applications screen. A document for teams to use to capture the decision making is provided below. Student Assistance Team (SAT) State Assessments Form School Year: Date: Page: District: Student Name: Student ID Number: Universal Tools and Designated Supports Universal Tools Instructional (Available to all Supports students) (Used routinely in the classroom) Embedded within the test platform Nonembedded and locally provided during the test session Breaks Calculator Digital Notepad English Dictionary Expandable Passages Global Notes Highlighter Keyboard Navigation Mark for Review Math Tools Spell Check Strikethrough Writing Tools Zoom Breaks English Dictionary Scratch Paper Thesaurus Color Contrast Masking Text to Speech Turn off any universal tools Noise buffers Color Contrast Color Overlay Magnification Read Aloud Scribe Separate Setting School: Grade: Birthdate: WVEIS Assessment Accommodation Codes P28 P37 P01 P33 P42 P38 P39 P23 P02 R04 T09 Designated Supports (Only available to students with a plan) Color Contrast Masking Text to Speech Turn off any universal tools Noise buffers Color Contrast Color Overlay Magnification Read Aloud Scribe Separate Setting West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

99 Section V. General Summative Assessment Overview The West Virginia statewide General Summative Assessment includes individual content assessments in the areas of English language arts (ELA), mathematics, science and social studies that measure a student s levels of performance on clearly defined standards, objectives and skills. Student scores in mathematics and English language arts are based on test questions that have been developed as part of the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium and aligned to the Common Core State Standards. The ELA and mathematics assessments include computer adaptive items, constructed responses and performance tasks. Student scores in science are based on test questions that have been developed and aligned to the West Virginia 21st Century CSOs; student scores in social studies are based on test questions that have been aligned to the Next Generation Social Studies Standards. The science and social studies assessment are fixed form assessments (not computer adaptive) and include multiple-choice items. The science assessment also includes gridded response items, while the social studies assessment includes Document-based Questions (DBQs). All four content area assessments are delivered on the same computer platform. The assessment results provide information about a student s academic strengths, as well as areas that need improvement. The parent/guardian will receive a student report that indicates levels of performance in each of the content areas. Results of the tests will be used by educators to improve student learning and performance. Students enrolled in grades 3 through 11 shall participate in the General Summative Assessments at the grade level in which they are enrolled unless they have been made eligible for alternate assessment (See Section VI). Universal tools are access features that are available to all students based on student preference and selection. Designated supports for the Smarter Balanced assessments are those features that are available for use by any student (students with SAT plans, English language learners, students with disabilities, and English language learners with disabilities) for whom the need has been indicated by an educator or team of educators (with parent/guardian and student input as appropriate). Accommodations are changes in procedures or materials that increase equitable access during the Smarter Balanced assessments by generating valid assessment results for students who need them and allowing these students the opportunity to show what they know and can do. Designated supports and accommodations for the statewide General Summative Assessments differ for each content area assessment. It is important to be aware of and to understand these differences to ensure the needs of all students are being met and the proper designated supports and/or accommodations are selected and provided both in terms of instruction and assessment. Universal tools, designated supports, and accommodations may be either embedded in the test administration system or provided locally (non-embedded). See figure below for a graphic organizer of the allowable designated supports and accommodations for the General Summative Assessment. West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

100 Section V. General Summative Assessment Accessibility and Accommodations for General Summative Assessment Universal Tools Available To All Students Universal tools are access features of the assessment that are either provided as digitally-delivered components of the test administration system or separate from it. Universal tools are available to all students based on student preference and selection. Embedded universal tools are available to all students as part of the technology platform. Some universal tools are non-embedded may need to be provided outside of the computer test administration system and must be provided locally for students. Although these tools are generally available to all students, educators may determine that one or more might be distracting for a particular student, and thus might indicate that the tool should be turned off for the administration of the assessment to the student. It is recommended that all students practice with the tools prior to the assessment. Embedded Universal Tools Available to All Students Breaks Universal Tool Calculator (for calculator-allowed Description The number of items per session can be flexibly defined based on the student s need. Breaks of more than 20 minutes will prevent the student from returning to items already attempted by the student. There is no limit on the number of breaks that a student might be given. The use of this universal tool may result in the student needing additional overall time to complete the assessment. An embedded on-screen digital calculator can be accessed for calculator-allowed items when students click on the calculator button. This tool is available only with the specific items for which the Smarter West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

101 Section V. General Summative Assessment Universal Tool items only) (See Non-embedded Accommodations for students who cannot use the embedded calculator) Digital notepad English Dictionary (for ELA-performance task full writes) English glossary Expandable passages Global notes (for ELA performance tasks) Highlighter Keyboard navigation Mark for review Math tools Spell check (for ELA items) Strikethrough Description Balanced Item Specifications indicated that it would be appropriate. When the embedded calculator, as presented for all students, is not appropriate for a student (for example, for a student who is blind), the student may use the calculator offered with assistive technology devices (such as a talking calculator or a braille calculator). This tool is used for making notes about an item. The digital notepad is item-specific and is available through the end of the test segment. Notes are not saved when the student moves on to the next segment or after a break of more than 20 minutes. An English dictionary may be available for the full write portion of an ELA performance task. A full write is the second part of a performance task. The use of this universal tool may result in the student needing additional overall time to complete the assessment. Grade- and context-appropriate definitions of specific constructirrelevant terms are shown in English on the screen via a pop-up window. The student can access the embedded glossary by clicking on any of the pre-selected terms. The use of this accommodation may result in the student needing additional overall time to complete the assessment. Each passage or stimulus can be expanded so that it takes up a larger portion of the screen. Global notes is a notepad that is available for ELA performance tasks in which students complete a full write. A full write is the second part of a performance task. The student clicks on the notepad icon for the notepad to appear. During the ELA performance tasks, the notes are retained from segment to segment so that the student may go back to the notes even though the student is not able to go back to specific items in the previous segment. A digital tool for marking desired text, item questions, item answers, or parts of these with a color. Highlighted text remains available throughout each test segment. Navigation throughout text can be accomplished by using a keyboard. Allows students to flag items for future review during the assessment. Markings are not saved when the student moves on to the next segment or after a break of more than 20 minutes. These digital tools (i.e., embedded ruler, embedded protractor) are used for measurements related to math items. They are available only with the specific items for which the Smarter Balanced Item Specifications indicate that one or more of these tools would be appropriate. Writing tool for checking the spelling of words in student-generated responses. Spell check only gives an indication that a word is misspelled; it does not provide the correct spelling. This tool is available only with the specific items for which the Smarter Balanced Item Specifications indicated that it would be appropriate. Spell check is bundled with other embedded writing tools for all performance task full writes (planning, drafting, revising, and editing). A full write is the second part of a performance task. Allows users to cross out answer options. If an answer option is an image, a strikethrough line will not appear, but the image will be grayed out. 81 West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

102 Section V. General Summative Assessment Universal Tool Writing tools Zoom Description Selected writing tools (i.e., bold, italic, bullets, undo/redo) are available for all student-generated responses. (Also see spell check.) A tool for making text or other graphics in a window or frame appear larger on the screen. The default font size for all tests is 14 pt. The student can make text and graphics larger by clicking the Zoom In button. The student can click the Zoom Out button to return to the default or smaller print size. When using the zoom feature, the student only changes the size of text and graphics on the current screen. To increase the default print size of the entire test (from 1.5X to 3.0X default size), the print size must be set for the student in the Test Information Distribution Engine (TIDE, or state s comparable platform), or set by the test administrator prior to the start of the test. This is the only feature that test administrators can set. The use of this universal tool may result in the student needing additional overall time to complete the assessment. Non-Embedded Universal Tools Available To All Students Breaks Universal Tool English Dictionary (for ELA-performance task full writes) Scratch paper Thesaurus (for ELA-performance task full writes) Description Breaks may be given at predetermined intervals or after completion of sections of the assessment for students taking a paper-based test. Sometimes students are allowed to take breaks when individually needed to reduce cognitive fatigue when they experience heavy assessment demands. The use of this universal tool may result in the student needing additional overall time to complete the assessment. An English dictionary can be provided for the full write portion of an ELA performance task. A full write is the second part of a performance task. The use of this universal tool may result in the student needing additional overall time to complete the assessment. Scratch paper to make notes, write computations, or record responses may be made available. Only plain paper or lined paper is appropriate for ELA. Graph paper is required beginning in sixth grade and can be used on all math assessments. A student can use an assistive technology device for scratch paper as long as the device is certified. 12 CAT: All scratch paper must be collected and securely destroyed at the end of each CAT assessment session to maintain test security. Performance Tasks: For mathematics and ELA performance tasks, if a student needs to take the performance task in more than one session, scratch paper may be collected at the end of each session, securely stored, and made available to the student at the next performance task testing session. Once the student completes the performance task, the scratch paper must be collected and securely destroyed to maintain test security. A thesaurus contains synonyms of terms while a student interacts with text included in the assessment. A full write is the second part of a performance task. The use of this universal tool may result in the student needing additional overall time to complete the assessment. 12 Smarter Balanced is working closely with our test administration platform vendor to create a process through which assistive technology devices can be certified. Certification ensures that the device functions properly and appropriately addresses test security. West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

103 Section V. General Summative Assessment Designated Supports Available to Students with Plans Designated supports for the Smarter Balanced assessments are those features that are available for use by any student for whom the need has been documented on a plan by a team of educators with parent/guardian and student. This would include IEP Teams, 504 Committees, ELL Committees and Student Assistance Teams (SATs). Designated supports need to be identified prior to assessment administration. Embedded and non-embedded supports must be entered into WVEIS for the supports in order to display for verification in the Accommodations 14 Application on WOW. Any non-embedded designated supports must be identified and activated prior to testing and provided locally during test administration. All embedded designated supports must be activated prior to testing. Embedded Designated Supports for Students with Plans Designated Support Color contrast (P28) Masking (P37) Text-to-speech (P01) (for math stimuli items and ELA items, not for reading passages) 13 (See Embedded Accommodations for ELA reading passages) Description Enable students to adjust screen background or font color, based on student needs or preferences. This may include reversing the colors for the entire interface or choosing the color of font and background. Masking involves blocking off content that is not of immediate need or that may be distracting to the student. Students are able to focus their attention on a specific part of a test item by masking. Text is read aloud to the student via embedded text-to-speech technology. The student is able to control the speed as well as raise or lower the volume of the voice via a volume control. Recommendations for Use Students with attention difficulties may need this support for viewing test content. It also may be needed by some students with visual impairments or other print disabilities (including learning disabilities). Choice of colors should be informed by evidence that color selections meet the student s needs. Students with attention difficulties may need to mask content not of immediate need or that may be distracting during the assessment. This support also may be needed by students with print disabilities (including learning disabilities) or visual impairments. Masking allows students to hide and reveal individual answer options, as well as all navigational buttons and menus. Students who are struggling readers may need assistance accessing the assessment by having all or portions of the assessment read aloud. This support also may be needed by students with reading-related disabilities, or by students who are blind and do not yet have adequate braille skills. This support will likely be confusing and may impede the performance of students who do not regularly have the support during instruction. Students who use 13 See Embedded Accommodations for guidelines on the use of Text-to-speech for ELA reading passages. 83 West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

104 Section V. General Summative Assessment Designated Support Description Recommendations for Use text-to-speech will need headphones unless tested individually in a separate setting. Translated test directions (P30) (for math items) Translation of test directions is a language support available prior to beginning the actual test items. Students can see test directions in another language. As an embedded designated support, translated test directions are automatically a part of the stacked translation designated support. Students who have limited English language skills can use the translated directions support. This support should only be used for students who are proficient readers in the other language and not proficient in English. Translations (glossaries) (P31) (for math items) Translations (stacked) (P32) (for math items) Turn off any universal tools (P33) Translated glossaries are a language support. The translated glossaries are provided for selected constructirrelevant terms for math. Translations for these terms appear on the computer screen when students click on them. Students with the language glossary setting enabled can view the translated glossary. Students can also select the audio icon next to the glossary term and listen to the audio recording of the glossary. Stacked translations are a language support. Stacked translations are available for some students; stacked translations provide the full translation of each test item above the original item in English. Disabling any universal tools that might be distracting or that students do not need to use, or are unable to use. Students who have limited English language skills (whether or not designated as ELLs or ELLs with disabilities) can use the translation glossary for specific items. The use of this support may result in the student needing additional overall time to complete the assessment. For students whose primary language is not English and who use dual language supports in the classroom, use of the stacked (dual language) translation may be appropriate. Students participate in the assessment regardless of the language. This support will increase reading load and cognitive load. The use of this support may result in the student needing additional overall time to complete the assessment. Students who are easily distracted (whether or not designated as having attention difficulties or disabilities) may be overwhelmed by some of the universal tools. Knowing which specific tools may be distracting is important for determining which tools to turn off. West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

105 Section V. General Summative Assessment Non-Embedded Designated Supports for Students with Plans Designated Support Description Recommendations for Use Bilingual dictionary (P27) (for ELAperformance task full writes) A bilingual/dual language word-toword dictionary is a language support. A bilingual/dual language word-toword dictionary can be provided for the full write portion of an ELA performance task. A full write is the second part of a performance task. For students whose primary language is not English and who use dual language supports in the classroom, use of a bilingual/dual language word-to-word dictionary may be appropriate. Students participate in the assessment regardless of the language. The use of this support may result in the student needing additional overall time to complete the assessment. Color contrast (P38) Test content of online items may be printed with different colors. Students with attention difficulties may need this support for viewing the test when digitally-provided color contrasts do not meet their needs. Some students with visual impairments or other print disabilities (including learning disabilities) also may need this support. Choice of colors should be informed by evidence of those colors that meet the student s needs. Color overlays (P39) Color transparencies are placed over a paper-based assessment. Students with attention difficulties may need this support to view test content. This support also may be needed by some students with visual impairments or other print disabilities (including learning disabilities). Choice of color should be informed by evidence of those colors that meet the student s needs. Magnification (P23) Noise Buffers (P42) The size of specific areas of the screen (e.g., text, formulas, tables, graphics, and navigation buttons) may be adjusted by the student with an assistive technology device. Magnification allows increasing the size to a level not provided for by the Zoom universal tool. Ear mufflers, white noise, and/or other equipment used to block external sounds. Students used to viewing enlarged text or graphics, or navigation buttons may need magnification to comfortably view content. This support also may meet the needs of students with visual impairments and other print disabilities. The use of this designated support may result in the student needing additional overall time to complete the assessment. Student (not groups of students) wears equipment to reduce environmental noises. Students may have these testing variations if regularly used in the classroom. Students who use noise buffers will need headphones unless tested individually in a separate setting. Read aloud Text is read aloud to the student by a Students who are struggling readers 85 West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

106 Section V. General Summative Assessment Designated Support Description Recommendations for Use (P02) (for math items and ELA items, not for reading passages) (See Nonembedded Accommodations for ELA reading passages) trained and qualified human reader who follows the administration guidelines provided in the Smarter Balanced Test Administration Manual. All or portions of the content may be read aloud. may need assistance accessing the assessment by having all or portions of the assessment read aloud. This support also may be needed by students with reading-related disabilities, or by students who are blind and do not yet have adequate braille skills. If not used regularly during instruction, this support is likely to be confusing and may impede the performance on assessments. Readers should be provided to students on an individual basis not to a group of students. A student should have the option of asking a reader to slow down or repeat text. The use of this support may result in the student needing additional overall time to complete the assessment. Scribe (R02)* (for ELA nonwriting items and math items) 14 *(R04) is also supported Students dictate their responses to a human who records verbatim what they dictate. The scribe must be trained and qualified, and must follow the administration guidelines. Students who have documented significant motor or processing difficulties, or who have had a recent injury (such as a broken hand or arm) that make it difficult to produce responses may need to dictate their responses to a human, who then records the students responses verbatim. The use of this support may result in the student needing additional overall time to complete the assessment. Separate setting (T09) Test location is altered so that the student is tested in a setting different from that made available for most students. Students who are easily distracted (or may distract others) in the presence of other students, for example, may need an alternate location to be able to take the assessment. The separate setting may be in a different room that allows them to work individually or among a smaller group, or in the same room but in a specific location (for example, away from windows, doors, or pencil sharpeners, in a study carrel, near the teacher s desk, or in the front of a classroom). Some students may benefit from being in an environment that allows for movement, such as being able to walk around. In some instances, students may need to interact with instructional or test content outside of school, such as in a hospital or their home. A specific test examiner is 14 See Accommodations for use of Scribe for Writing items West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

107 Section V. General Summative Assessment Designated Support Description Recommendations for Use Translated test directions (P30) Translations (glossaries) (P41) (for math items) PDF of directions translated in each of the languages currently supported. Bilingual adult can read to student. Translated glossaries are a language support. Translated glossaries are provided for selected constructirrelevant terms for math. Glossary terms are listed by item and include the English term and its translated equivalent. allowed. Students who have limited English language skills (whether or not designated as ELLs or ELLs with disabilities) can use the translated test directions. In addition, a biliterate adult trained in the test administration manual can read the test directions to the student. The use of this support may result in the student needing additional overall time to complete the assessment. Students who have limited English language skills can use the translation glossary for specific items. The use of this support may result in the student needing additional overall time to complete the assessment. Accommodations Accommodations are changes in procedures or materials that increase equitable access during the assessments. In addition to the options listed above, some students with disabilities will need accommodations, which must be specified in an IEP or Section 504 plan. All embedded accommodations must be activated prior to testing. As with testing options, accommodations do not alter what the test measures or how the test is scored or reported. Allowable accommodations are listed below. Embedded Accommodations for Students with Disabilities Accommodation Description Recommendations for Use American Sign Language (ASL) (P34) (for ELA Listening items and math items) Test content is translated into ASL video. ASL human signer and the signed test content are viewed on the same screen. Students may view portions of the ASL video as often as needed. Some students who are deaf or hard of hearing and who typically use ASL may need this accommodation when accessing text-based content in the assessment. The use of this accommodation may result in the student needing additional overall time to complete the assessment. For many students who are deaf or hard of hearing, viewing signs is the only way to access information presented orally. It is important to note, however, that some students who are hard of hearing will be able to listen to information presented orally if provided with appropriate 87 West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

108 Section V. General Summative Assessment Accommodation Description Recommendations for Use amplification and a setting in which extraneous sounds do not interfere with clear presentation of the audio presentation in a listening test. Braille (P03)-contracted braille Fixed form (P17)- Refreshable or embosser using embedded technologies) (P35) Noncontracted braille fixed form A raised-dot code that individuals read with the fingertips. Graphic material (e.g., maps, charts, graphs, diagrams, and illustrations) is presented in a raised format (paper or thermoform). Contracted and non-contracted braille is available; Nemeth code is available for math. Students with visual impairments may read text via braille. Tactile overlays and graphics also may be used to assist the student in accessing content through touch. Refreshable braille is available only for ELA because Nemeth Code is not available via refreshable braille. For math, braille will be presented via embosser; embosser-created braille can be used for ELA also. The type of braille presented to the student (contracted or non-contracted) is set in TIDE. The default is always contracted. The use of this accommodation may result in the student needing additional overall time to complete the assessment. Closed captioning (P36) (for ELA listening items) Printed text that appears on the computer screen as audio materials are presented. Students who are deaf or hard of hearing and who typically access information presented via audio by reading words that appear in synchrony with the audio presentation may need this support to access audio content. For many students who are deaf or hard of hearing, viewing words (sometimes in combination with reading lips and ASL) is how they access information presented orally. It is important to note, however, that some students who are hard of hearing will be able to listen to information presented orally if provided with appropriate amplification and a setting in which extraneous sounds do not interfere with clear presentation of the audio presentation in a listening test. Streamline This accommodation provides a streamlined interface of the test in an alternate, simplified format in which the items are displayed below the stimuli. This accommodation may benefit a small number of students who have specific learning and/or reading disabilities in which the text is presented in a more sequential format. This will be set in the test delivery interface for students with assistive technology needs. See codes R11, P03, P17, P21, P35 in the Students with Disabilities section. West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

109 Section V. General Summative Assessment Accommodation Description Recommendations for Use Text-to-speech (P13) (for ELA reading passages grades 6-11 only) [*see column far right] Text is read aloud to the student via embedded text-to-speech technology. The student is able to control the speed as well as raise or lower the volume of the voice via a volume control. * This accommodation is appropriate for a very small number of students (estimated to be approximately 1-2% of students with disabilities participating in a general assessment). * For students in grades 3-5, text-to-speech will not be an available accommodation. Content experts agree that this accommodation should not be provided during these grades because it would compromise the construct being measured. For students in grades 6 11, text-to-speech is available as an accommodation for students whose need is documented in an IEP or 504 plan. Reports can be run to indicate the percent of students who had access to text-to-speech on reading test passages. Students who use text-to-speech will need headphones unless tested individually in a separate setting. Non-Embedded Accommodations for Students with Disabilities Accommodation Description Recommendations for Use Abacus (R05) This tool may be used in place of scratch paper for students who typically use an abacus. Some students with visual impairments who typically use an abacus may use an abacus in place of using scratch paper. Alternate response options (R11) Alternate response options include but are not limited to adapted keyboards, large keyboards, StickyKeys, MouseKeys, FilterKeys, adapted mouse, touch screen, head wand, and switches. Students with some physical disabilities (including both fine motor and gross motor skills) may need to use the alternate response options accommodation. Some alternate response options are external devices that must be plugged in and be compatible with the assessment delivery platform. Calculator (R19) (for calculator allowed items only) A non-embedded calculator for students needing a special calculator, such as a braille calculator or a talking calculator, currently unavailable within the Students with visual impairments who are unable to use the embedded calculator for calculator-allowed items will be able to use the calculator that they typically use, such as a 89 West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

110 Section V. General Summative Assessment Accommodation Description Recommendations for Use assessment platform. braille calculator or a talking calculator. Test administrators should ensure that the calculator is available only for designated calculator items. Multiplication Table (R20) (grade 4 and above math items) A paper-based single digit (1-9) multiplication table will be available from Smarter Balanced for reference. For students with a documented and persistent calculation disability (i.e., dyscalculia). Print on demand (P40) Paper copies of either passages/stimuli and/or items are printed for students. For those students needing a paper copy of a passage or stimulus, permission for the students to request printing must first be set in TIDE. For those students needing a paper copy of one or more items, the state s help desk must be contacted by the school or district coordinator to have the accommodation set for the student. Some students with disabilities may need paper copies of either passages/stimuli and/or items. A very small percentage of students should need this accommodation. The use of this accommodation may result in the student needing additional time to complete the assessment. Read aloud (P14) (for ELA reading passages, grades 6-11; blind students in grades 3-11 who do not yet have adequate braille skills) Text is read aloud to the student by a trained and qualified human reader who follows the administration guidelines. All or portions of the content may be read aloud. This accommodation is appropriate for a very small number of students (estimated to be approximately 1-2% of students with disabilities participating in a general assessment). For students in grades 3-5, read aloud will not be an available accommodation. Content experts agree that this accommodation should not be provided during these grades because it would compromise the construct being measured. For students in grades 6 11, read aloud is available as an accommodation for students whose need is documented in an IEP or 504 plan. Reports can be run to indicate the percent of students who had access to read aloud on reading test passages. Readers should be provided to students on an individual basis not to a group of students. A student should have the option of asking a West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

111 Section V. General Summative Assessment Accommodation Description Recommendations for Use reader to slow down or repeat text. Scribe (R04)* (See Designated Supports for math and non-writing ELA) *R02 may also be used Students dictate their responses to a human who records verbatim what they dictate. The scribe must be trained and qualified, and must follow the administration guidelines. Students who have documented significant motor or processing difficulties that makes it difficult to produce responses may need to dictate their responses to a human, who then records the students responses verbatim. The use of this accommodation may result in the student needing overall additional time. For many of these students, dictating to a human scribe is the only way to demonstrate their composition skills. Students should be able to develop planning notes via the human scribe, and to view what they produce while composing via dictation to the scribe. Speech-to-text (R21) Voice recognition allows students to use their voices as input devices to the computer, to dictate responses or give commands (e.g., opening application programs, pulling down menus, and saving work). Voice recognition software generally can recognize speech up to 160 words per minute. Students may use their own assistive technology devices. Students who have motor or processing disabilities (such as dyslexia) or who have had a recent injury (such as a broken hand or arm) that make it difficult to produce text or commands using computer keys may need alternative ways to work with computers. Students will need to be familiar with the software, and have had many opportunities to use it prior to testing. Speech-to-text software requires that the student go back through all generated text to correct errors in transcription, including use of writing conventions; thus, prior experience with this accommodation is essential. If students use their own assistive technology devices, all assessment content should be deleted from these devices after the test for security purposes. For many of these students, using voice recognition software is the only way to demonstrate their composition skills. Still, use of speech-to-text does require that students know writing conventions and that they have the review and editing skills required of students who enter text via the computer keyboard. It is important that students who use speech-to-text also be able to develop planning notes via speech-to-text, and to view what they produce while composing via speechto-text. 91 West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

112 Section V. General Summative Assessment Options to Standard Conditions Use of audio amplification equipment Use of a scribe for a student with a short-term medical condition that precludes the student from writing with the dominant hand to mark responses (e.g., a fractured arm in a cast). For this testing option, approval needs to be obtained from the county test coordinator or the county special education director on a case-by-case basis. Provision for adaptive furniture Provision for special lighting and/or acoustics Additional accommodation(s) requests IEP teams, Section 504 committees, and ELL committees may request permission to use accommodations other than those included in this manual. 15 Such requests must be received by the Office of Assessment and Research no later than 4 weeks prior to the testing window. The request must come from the county test coordinator, county special education director, or Title III coordinator. The following information must be included in the request: Student s name, West Virginia Education Information System (WVEIS) number, school, and county Specific requested accommodation(s) Rationale for the request provided by the IEP team, Section 504 committee, or ELL committee Verification that the student receives the accommodation(s) on a regular basis during classroom instruction and classroom assessment, and is familiar with the accommodation(s) Impact on student s assessment results if the student is not permitted to use the requested accommodation(s) Send requests at least 4 weeks prior to the assessment to: Office of Assessment and Research West Virginia Department of Education Building 6, Suite Kanawha Boulevard East Charleston, WV Upon completion of the review of the request, the county test coordinator and/or the county Title III coordinator (ELL students only) will be notified of the review committee s decision. 15 The administration manuals can be downloaded at https://sites.google.com/a/wvde.k12.wv.us/oaar-file-cabinet/. West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

113 Section V. General Summative Assessment English Language Arts (ELA) Allowable Designated Supports and Accommodations for the General Summative Assessment Designated Supports Designated supports are those features that are available for use by any student for whom the need has been indicated by an educator or team of educators with parent/guardian and student. Table A reflects the designated supports for English Language Arts. Table A: ELA Designated Supports Type of Code Code Designated Support Notes Embedded into the testing platform Nonembedded into the platform (Provided Locally) Presentation Presentation P01 Text-to-Speech Available for ELA items, not for reading passages (See Embedded Accommodations for ELA reading passages) P28 Color Contrast Enables students to adjust screen background or font color based on student needs or preferences P33 Turn off Any Universal Tools Disabling any universal tools that might be distracting or that students do not need to use, or are unable to use. P37 Masking Masking involves block off content that is not of immediate need or that may be distracting to the students. Students are able to focus their attention on a specific part of a test item by masking. P02 Read Aloud For ELA items, not for reading passages. (See Non-embedded Accommodations for ELA reading passages) P03 Non-Embedded Contracted static Use contacted braille or tactile graphics. P22 Enlarge Text Text can be enlarged. Not to be confused with Zoom feature, which is a universal tool. P23 Magnification The size of specific areas of the screen (e.g., text, formulas, tables, graphics, and navigation buttons) may be adjusted by the student with an assistive technology device. Magnification allows increasing the size to a level not provided for by the Zoom universal tool. 93 West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

114 Section V. General Summative Assessment P27 P35 Approved bilingual wordto-word dictionary Non-Contracted static form A bilingual/dual language word-to-word dictionary, which is a language support, can be provided only for the full write portion of an ELA performance task. A full write is the second part of a performance task. Use non-contracted braille and tactile graphics P38 Color Contrast Test content of online items may be printed with different colors. P39 Color Overlay Color transparencies are placed over a paperbased assessment. P42 Noise Buffers Ear mufflers, white noise, and/or other equipment used to block external sounds. Response Timing R02 Scribe For ELA non-writing items. Students dictate their responses to a human who records verbatim what they dictate. The scribe must be trained and qualified, and must follow the administration guidelines provided in the Test Administration Manual. R15 Bilingual Dictionary A bilingual/dual language word-to-word dictionary, which is a language support, can be provided only for the full write portion of an ELA performance task. A full write is the second part of a performance task. T09 Separate Setting Test location is altered so that the student is tested in a setting different from that made available for most students. West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

115 Section V. General Summative Assessment Accommodations Accommodations are changes in procedures or materials that increase equitable access during the statewide General Summative Assessment. Assessment accommodations generate valid assessment results for students who need them; they allow these students to show what they know and can do. Accommodations have been identified as either digitally-embedded or nonembedded for students for whom there is documentation of the need for the accommodations on an Individualized Education Program (IEP) or 504 accommodations plan. One exception to the IEP or 504 requirement is for students who have had a physical injury (e.g., broken hand or arm) that impairs their ability to use a computer. These students may use the speech-to-text or the scribe accommodations (if they have had sufficient experience with the use of these). Table B reflects the allowable accommodations for English Language Arts. ELA Allowable Accommodations Type of Code Code Accommodation Notes Embedded into the testing platform Presentation P17 Braille Embeddedrefreshable and embosser A raised-dot code that individuals read with the fingertips. Graphic material (e.g., maps, charts, graphs, diagrams, and illustrations) is presented in a raised format (paper or thermoform). Contracted and noncontracted braille is available. 95 West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

116 Section V. General Summative Assessment Embedded into the testing platform Presentation P13 Text-to-Speech Test is read aloud to the student via embedded text-to-speech technology. The student is able to control the speed as well as raise or lower the volume of the voice via a volume control. This is accommodation is appropriate for a very small number of students (estimated to be approximately 1-2% of students with disabilities participating in a general assessment). For students in grades 3-5, text-tospeech will not be an available accommodation. Content experts agree that this accommodation should not be provided during these grades because it would compromise the construct being measured. For students in grades 6-11, textto-speech is available as an accommodation for students whose need is documented in an IEP or 504 plan. Reports can be run to indicate the percent of students who had access to text-to-speech on reading test passages. Students who use text-to-speech will need headphones unless tested individually in a separate setting. If a separate setting is required, students also must have T09 on IEP or 504 plan. P34 American Sign Language (for ELA listening items) Test content is translated into ASL video. ASL human signer and the signed test content are viewed on the same screen. Students may view portions of the ASL video as often as needed. West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

117 Section V. General Summative Assessment Embedded into the testing platform Presentation P35 P36 Braille Non contracted Closed captioning A raised-dot code that individuals read with the fingertips. Graphic material (e.g., maps, charts, graphs, diagrams, and illustrations) is presented in a raised format (paper or thermoform). This is the code for non-contracted braille. Printed text that appears on the computer screen as audio materials are presented. Nonembedded into the platform (Provided Locally) Presentation P14 Read Aloud (for ELA reading passages, grades 6-11; blind students in grades 3-11 who do not yet have adequate braille skills) Test is read aloud to the student via embedded text-to-speech technology. The student is able to control the speed as well as raise or lower the volume of the voice via a volume control. This is accommodation is appropriate for a very small number of students (estimated to be approximately 1-2% of students with disabilities participating in a general assessment). For students in grades 3-5, read aloud will not be an available accommodation. Content experts agree that this accommodation should not be provided during these grades because it would compromise the construct being measured. For students in grades 6-11, read aloud is available as an accommodation for students whose need is documented in an IEP or 504 plan. Reports can be run to indicate the percent of students who had access to text-to-speech on reading test passages. Readers should be provided to students on an individual basis not to a group of students. A student should have the option of asking a reader to slow down or repeat text. 97 West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

118 Section V. General Summative Assessment P15 Have directions only read aloud Only the directions on the English Language Arts test are read aloud. No passages or items are read aloud. P19 Large print edition Students mark answers in a large print edition of the test. Answers are scribed on to the an answer sheet. If students will not enter their responses on the computer, students also will require R04, Scribe, accommodation, and R16, Mark responses in large-print test book. Nonembedded into the platform (Provided Locally) Presentation P21 P40 Screen Reading Software Print on Demand Students use screen reading software, such as JAWS or Systems Access, to access the test. This is the same as alternate response option. Paper copies of either passages/stimuli and/or items are printed for students. For these students need a paper copy of a passage or stimulus, permission for the students to request printing must first be set in TIDE. For the students needing a paper copy of one or more items, the Office of Assessment and Research must be contacted by the school or district coordinator to have the accommodation set for the student. Ro3 Braille or tactile Students respond using a braille note-taker. Response R04 Scribe Students dictate their responses to a human who records verbatim what they dictate. The scribe must be trained and qualified, and must follow the administration guidelines provided in the Test Administration Manual. West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

119 Section V. General Summative Assessment R11 Alternate Response options Alternate response options include but are not limited to adapted keyboards, large keyboards, StickyKeys, MouseKeys, FilterKeys, adapted mouse, touch screen, head wand, and switches. Nonembedded into the platform (Provided Locally) Response R16 Mark responses in large-print test book Students mark answers in a large print edition of the test. Answers are scribed on to the an answer sheet. Also requires P19, Large Print editions; and R04, Scribe, accommodation. R21 Speech to Text Voice recognition allows students to use their voices as input devices to the computer, to dictate responses or give commands (e.g., opening application programs, pulling down menus, and saving work). Voice recognition software generally can recognize speech up to 160 words per minute. Students may use their own assistive technology devices. Also should have R11, Alternate Response options. 99 West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

120 Section V. General Summative Assessment Mathematics Allowable Designated Supports and Accommodations for the General Summative Assessment Designated Supports Designated supports are those features that are available for use by any student for whom the need has been indicated by an educator (or team of educators with parent/guardian and student). Table C reflects the allowable designated supports for mathematics. Mathematics Allowable Designated Supports Type of Code Code Designated Support Notes P01 Text-to-Speech Text-to-speech is available for mathematics stimuli items. The student can control the speed as well as raise or lower the volume of the voice. P28 Color Contrast Enables students to adjust screen background or font color based on student needs or preferences. P30 Translated Test Directions Translation of test directions is a language support available prior to beginning test items. ELL students with limited English language skills, but proficient in another language can use this support. Embedded into the testing platform Presentation P31 Translations (Glossary) Translated glossaries are provided for selected construct-irrelevant terms. Translations appear on the computer screen when selected by students. P32 Translations (Stacked) Stacked translations provide the full translation of each test item above the original item (which is in English). P33 Turn Off Any Universal Tools Disabling any universal tools that might be distracting or that students do not need to use, or are unable to use. P37 Masking Masking involves block off content that is not of immediate need or that may be distracting to the students. Students are able to focus their attention on a specific part of a test item by masking. West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

121 Section V. General Summative Assessment P02 Read Aloud Test is read aloud to the student by a trained and qualified human reader. All or portions of the content may be read aloud. P22 Enlarge Text Text can be enlarged. P23 Magnification The size of specific areas of the screen (e.g., text, formulas, tables, graphics, and navigation buttons) may be adjusted by the student with an assistive technology device. Magnification allows increasing the size to a level not provided for by the Zoom universal tool. Nonembedded into the platform (Provided locally) Presentation P30 Translated Test Directions PDF of directions translated in each of the languages currently supported. Bilingual adult can read to student. P38 Color Contrast Test content of online items may be printed with different colors. P39 Color Overlay Color transparencies are placed over a paperbased assessment. P41 Translation (Glossary) Translated glossaries are provided for selected construct-irrelevant terms for math. Glossary terms are listed by item and include the English term and its translated equivalent. P42 Noise Buffers Ear mufflers, white noise, and/or other equipment used to block external sounds. Response R02 Scribe Students dictate their responses to a human who records verbatim what they dictate. The scribe must be trained and qualified, and must follow the administration guidelines provided in the Test Administration Manual. Timing T09 Separate Setting Test location is altered so that the student is tested in a setting different from that made available for most students. 101 West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

122 Section V. General Summative Assessment Accommodations Accommodations are changes in procedures or materials that increase equitable access during the statewide General Summative Assessment. Assessment accommodations generate valid assessment results for students who need them; they allow these students to show what they know and can do. Accommodations have been identified as either digitally-embedded or nonembedded for students for whom there is documentation of the need for the accommodations on an Individualized Education Program (IEP) or 504 accommodations plan. One exception to the IEP or 504 requirement is for students who have had a physical injury (e.g., broken hand or arm) that impairs their ability to use a computer. These students may use the speech-to-text or the scribe accommodations (if they have had sufficient experience with the use of these). Table D reflects the allowable accommodations for mathematics. Mathematics Allowable Accommodations Type of Code Code Accommodat ion Notes P03 Braille (contracted) STATIC A raised-dot code that individuals read with the fingertips. Graphic material is presented in a raised format (paper or thermoform). P03-is fixed form that is contracted. Embedded into the testing platform Presentation P17* P34 Embedded braillecontracted or non-contracted versions for embossers American Sign Language *Refreshable braille is not available for math. Nemeth code is not able to use this method. Test content is translated into ASL video. ASL human signer and the signed test content are viewed on the same screen. Students may view portions of the ASL video as often as needed. P35 Braille (Noncontracted) STATIC A raised-dot code that individuals read with the fingertips. Graphic material (e.g., maps, charts, graphs, diagrams, and illustrations) is presented in a raised format (paper or thermoform). Non-contracted braille code is a static fixed form. P36 Closed Printed text that appears on the screen as West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

123 Section V. General Summative Assessment Captioning audio materials are presented. P19 Large Print Edition Students mark answers in a large print edition of the test. Answers are scribed on to the testing platform. If students will not enter their responses on the computer, students also will require R04, Scribe, accommodation, and R16, Mark responses in large-print test book. Nonembedded into the platform (Provided locally) Presentation P21 P40 Screen Reading Software Print on Demand Students use screen reading software, such as JAWS or Systems Access, to access the test. Paper copies of either passages/stimuli and/or items are printed for students. For these students need a paper copy of a passage or stimulus, permission for the students to request printing must first be set in TIDE. For the students needing a paper copy of one or more items, the Office of Assessment and Research must be contacted by the school or district coordinator to have the accommodation set for the student. Ro3 Braille or Tactile Students respond using a braille note-taker. Response R02 Or R04 Scribe Students dictate their responses to a human who records verbatim what they dictate. The scribe must be trained and qualified, and must follow the administration guidelines provided in the Test Administration Manual. R05 Abacus Used in place of scratch paper for students who typically use an abacus. 103 West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

124 Section V. General Summative Assessment R11 Alternate Response Options Alternate response options include but are not limited to adapted keyboards, large keyboards, StickyKeys, MouseKeys, FilterKeys, adapted mouse, touch screen, head wand, and switches. R16 Mark Responses in Large-Print Test Book Students mark answers in a large print edition of the test. Answers are scribed on to the testing platform. Also requires P19, Large Print editions; and R04, Scribe, accommodation. Nonembedded into the platform (Provided locally) Response R19 R20 Use Special Calculator Use Multiplication Table For grades 6-11, a non-embedded calculator for students needing a special calculator, such as a braille calculator or a talking calculator. This accommodation is for calculator allowed items only. For grades 4 and above, a paper-based single-digit (1-9) multiplication table will be available from Smarter Balanced for reference. This is for students with a documented and persistent calculation disability (i.e., dyscalculia). R21 Speech to Text Voice recognition allows students to use their voices as input devices to the computer, to dictate responses or give commands (e.g., opening application programs, pulling down menus, and saving work). Voice recognition software generally can recognize speech up to 160 words per minute. Students may use their own assistive technology devices. Science and Social Studies Allowable Designated Supports and Accommodations for the General Summative Assessment Additional accommodations allowable for science and social studies are available for those subtests only for students with disabilities (IEP or 504) and ELLs or ELLs with disabilities. Guidance for the selection of these accommodations is available in section on students with disabilities (Section II) or English Language Learners (Section III). Allowable codes for science and social studies include: Presentation-P01, P02, P03, P06, P13, P14, P15, P16, P18, P19, P21, P22, P23, P24, P25, P27, P28, P29, P33, P35, P37, P38, P39, P40, P41, P42 West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

125 Section V. General Summative Assessment Response- R02, R03, R04, R05, R11, R13, R15, R16, R17, R18, R19 Timing-T03, Too4, To7, T09 Social Studies and Science Designated Supports and Accommodations The following accommodations should be provided to students who have these as part of their IEP or 504 Plan. Please note also that the accommodations are to be provided to students in their instructional settings throughout the school year. Social Studies and Science Allowed Accommodations Type of Code Code Accommodation Notes P01 Text-to-Speech Text is read aloud to the student via embedded text-to-speech technology P03 Use contracted braille or tactile graphics For students who are blind and read braille fluently or choose braille as their primary mode of reading. Embedded in the testing platform Presentation P24 Use translator to present test Electronic dictionaries and translators are tools for students who are English language learners. Students may use this equipment to present directions, stimulus material, questions, and answer choice. Translators are limited to word-toword. Human translators are allowed to present the test when that support is provided in other language supports but does not offer that test in the student s native language. P25 Use translator to present directions only For students who are English Language Learners and receive this support instructionally. P28 Color Contrast Enables students to adjust screen background or font color based on student needs or preferences P33 Turn off Any Universal Tools Disabling any universal tools that might be distracting or that students do not need to use, or are unable to use. 105 West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

126 Section V. General Summative Assessment P37 Masking Masking involves block off content that is not of immediate need or that may be distracting to the students. Students are able to focus their attention on a specific part of a test item by masking. P02 Read Aloud Text is read aloud to the student by a trained and qualified human reader. P06 Have test presented through sign language A trained examiner may present directions, stimulus material, questions, and answer choices in sign language. P15 Have only directions read aloud A trained examiner reads aloud verbatim the directions for the test. P16 Have directions presented through sign language A qualified examiner presents test directions in sign language. Not embedded in the testing platform (Provided Locally) Presentation P17 P18 Use secure electronic braille note taker Have directions rephrased by trained examiner Students may use a secure electronic Braille note taker A trained examiner reads aloud verbatim the directions for the test and states the same message in a new or different way. P19 Use large print edition The student uses a large print edition of the assessment and materials. P21 Use screen-reading software to access computer Students may use screen-reading software other than what is embedded in platform if it is recorded in their IEP/504 Plan and if has been used during instruction P22 Enlarge Text Text can be enlarged. Not to be confused with Zoom feature, which is a universal tool. P23 Magnification The size of specific areas of the screen (e.g., text, formulas, tables, graphics, and navigation buttons) may be adjusted by West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

127 Section V. General Summative Assessment P27 P29 P35 Approved bilingual word-to-word dictionary Sign dictionary to present test, including directions Non-contracted braille and tactile graphics the student with an assistive technology device. Magnification allows increasing the size to a level not provided for by the Zoom universal tool. For students who are English language learners. For students with hearing impairment. For students who are visually impaired. P38 Color Contrast Test content of online items may be printed with different colors. P39 Color Overlay Color transparencies are placed over a paper-based assessment. P42 Noise Buffers Ear mufflers, white noise, and/or other equipment used to block external sounds. Not embedded in the platform (Provided Locally) R02 Scribe Students dictate their responses to a human who records verbatim what they dictate. The scribe must be trained and qualified, and must follow the administration guidelines provided in the Test Administration Manual. Response R03 R04 Use braille or tactile Indicate responses to a scribe, all elements to be scored For this response mode, a student uses a brailler. Students dictate their responses to a human who records verbatim what they dictate. The scribe must be trained and qualified, and must follow the administration guidelines provided in the administration manual. R11 Use computer or other assistive technology device Students with some physical disabilities (including both fine motor and gross motor skills) may need to use the 107 West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

128 Section V. General Summative Assessment to respond alternate response options. R13 Provide physical support A student may be provided physical support by an aide if this support is provided routinely and if the aide has been trained as an examiner. R15 Bilingual Dictionary A bilingual/dual language word-to-word dictionary, which is a language support, can be provided only for the full write portion of an ELA performance task. A full write is the second part of a performance task. R16 Mark responses on large-print test book Students write their responses on a largeprint test booklet. R17 Use a translator to respond Students with limited English proficiency may use an electronic translator to indicate answer choices. For the ELA and math portion of the general summative only a human translator is allowed. He human translator must be proficient in English and the student s native language. R18 Use a sign dictionary to respond A student may use a sign-dictionary to indicate answer choices when signing is typical access. Not embedded in the platform (Provided Locally) Timing T03 T07 Take more breaks (no studying) Flexible scheduling, same day (no studying) Students are allowed to take additional breaks as requested or at predetermined intervals. Students are scheduled to allow for the best conditions for their performance, and/or may be allowed to take the test during more than one sitting during a single day. Resources for Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium Please see the links below to access information related to Smarter Balanced resources that will assist teachers and schools. West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

129 Section V. General Summative Assessment Smarter Balanced Support for Under-Represented Students: This webpage provides the rationale for the Smarter Balanced assessment system being designed for all students. It contains all information related to accessibility, such as item development and review and guidelines for online test delivery. The accommodation categories of universal accessibility tools, designated supports, and accommodations for students with a documented need noted in an IEP or 504 plan are defined. Smarter Balanced K-12 Education: This webpage addresses the needs of the K-12 education community by explaining the differences between most state assessments and the Smarter Balanced Assessments. Smarter Balanced Frequently Asked Questions: The Frequently Asked Questions webpage offers readers the topics to explore related to Smarter Balanced. These topics are About Smarter Balanced, About the Smarter Balanced Assessment System, Common Core State Standards, Accessibility and Accommodations, Higher Education, and Technology and Computer Adaptive Testing. Smarter Balanced Interim Assessments: The Interim Assessments webpage defines and explains what interim assessments are in the Smarter Balanced Assessment System. It provides the key features of these assessments and a statement of their purpose. Smarter Balanced Practice and Training Tests: This webpage explains the Practice Tests and Training Tests available from Smarter Balanced. Readers can also learn how to access the Practice Tests and Training Tests using the correct operating systems and web browsers. Smarter Balanced Sample Items and Performance Tasks: Accessing this webpage allows readers to learn more about sample items and performance tasks created by Smarter Balanced. It also explains how to access the sample items and performance tasks. Readers can find advice on effective use of the sample items and performance tasks and the alignment to the Common Core State Standards. Lastly, the item and task types are defined and accessibility and accommodations are addressed in relation to the items and performance tasks. Smarter Balanced Computer Adaptive Testing: This webpage provides the rationale for utilizing computer adaptive testing on the summative and interim assessments. Additional information is provided for a deeper understanding of this testing system. Additionally, see the following link for access to Common Core State Standards and Tools: This webpage provides a link to the Common Core State Standards webpage and its resources West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

130 Section V. General Summative Assessment General Summative Assessment Crosswalk of Codes (General Summative ELA & Math to WVEIS System) Embedded Non-embedded Universal Tools Designated Supports Accommodations Breaks Calculator 16 Digital Notepad English Dictionary 17 English Glossary Expandable Passages Global Notes Highlighter Keyboard Navigation Mark for Review Math Tools 18 Spell Check 19 Strikethrough Writing Tools 20 Zoom Breaks English Dictionary 28 Scratch Paper Thesaurus 29 P28-Color Contrast P37-Masking P01-Text-to-Speech 21 P30-Translated Test Directions 22 P31-Translations (Glossary) 23 P32-Translations (Stacked) 24 P33-Turn off Any Universal Tools R15-Bilingual Dictionary 30 P38-Color Contrast P39-Color Overlay P23-Magnification P02-Read Aloud P42-Noise Buffers R04**Scribe 31 T09-Separate Setting P30-Translated Test Directions P41-Translations (Glossary) 32 P34-American Sign Language 25 P17-Braille P36-Closed Captioning 26 P13-Text-to-Speech 27 Streamlined*** R05-Abacus R11-Alternate Response Options 33 P03-Braille (contracted static) P35-Braille (non-contracted static) R19-Calculator 34 R20-Multiplication Table 35 P40-Print on Demand P14-Read Aloud 16 For calculator-allowed items only 17 For ELA performance task full-writes 18 Includes embedded ruler, embedded protractor 19 For ELA items 20 Includes bold, italic, underline, indent, cut, paste, spell check, bullets, undo/redo. 21 For ELA items (not ELA reading passages) and math items 22 For math items 23 For math items 24 For math test 25 For ELA listening Items and math items 26 For ELA listening items 27 For ELA reading passages grades 6-8 and For ELA performance task full-writes 29 For ELA performance task full-writes 30 For ELA performance task full-writes 31 For ELA non-writing items and math items 32 For math items 33 Includes adapted keyboards, large keyboards, StickyKeys, MouseKeys, FilterKeys, adapted mouse, touch screen, head wand, and switches. 34 For calculator-allowed items only 35 For math items beginning in grade 4. West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

131 Section V. General Summative Assessment R04-Scribe R21-Speech-to-Text *Items shown are available for ELA and math unless otherwise noted. **R02 will also be allowed. R02 will be dropped after this school year. ***Streamlined will be available for students who have codes: P03, P17, P21, P35, R11 and upon special request 111 West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

132 Section VI. Alternate Assessment All students must participate in state assessments, and for the vast majority of students, the general summative is the appropriate assessment. For students with disabilities qualifying under IDEA 2004, however, the IEP team must determine how a student will participate in the WV-MAP, including the possible use of an alternate assessment. The state alternate assessment i s specifically designed for students with significant intellectual disabilities whose performance cannot be adequately assessed through the General Summative Assessment instrument, e v e n with accommodations. Students who are administered the alternate assessment must meet specific criteria to be determined eligible. The IEP team makes the decision regarding student eligibility. For more information on guidance for participation in statewide assessment and the criteria for participating in an alternate assessment, see section II page 110. Students who meet the criteria for an alternate assessment have significant intellectual disabilities and are taught using the Next Generation Alternate Achievement Standards. This section on alternate assessment discusses available accessibility features for both state alternate assessments: the Alternate Performance Task Assessment (APTA) and Dynamic Learning Maps (DLM). APTA The Alternate Performance Task Assessment (APTA) is a paper based alternate assessment that assesses RLA and mathematics in grades 3-8 and 11; and grades 4, 6 and 10 in the area of science. APTA is constructed in a way that allows students to take the assessment using accommodations that are routinely provided during instruction. Assistive technology is not considered an accommodation for students taking APTA that is, students who use assistive technology routinely in the classroom may use s u c h technology during the assessment. APTA is untimed and individually administered. APTA examiners must be trained and follow all procedures outlined in Policy 2340 and this document. For more specific information about the administration of APTA see the APTA Examiner s Manual. 36 The accommodations for APTA are listed below. Allowable Accommodations for APTA WVEIS Code P03 Description Braille or tactile graphics R03 Braille or other tactile 36 The current APTA Examiner s Manual can be downloaded at West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

133 Section VI. Alternate Assessment Dynamic Learning Maps Dynamic Learning Maps (DLM) is a multiple-state consortium that has developed a new type of computer-delivered alternate assessment for English language arts and mathematics in grades The DLM alternate assessment system is an assessment program designed to validly measure what students with significant cognitive disabilities know and can do. DLM provides accessibility by design and is guided by the core belief that all students should have access to challenging, grade-level content, and that educators adhere to the highest levels of integrity in providing instruction and administering assessments based on this challenging content. The DLM system provides alternate assessment for students with significant cognitive disabilities students for whom general education assessments, even with accommodations, are not appropriate. Students taking the DLM require extensive, direct instruction and substantial supports to achieve measurable gains. These students learn academic content aligned to grade level content standards, but at reduced depth, breadth, and complexity. The alternate achievement content standards, are derived from college and career readiness standards and are the learning targets for the assessments. Having accessible content is essential to the success of the student. DLM has integrated accessible content by developing various testlet levels, grade appropriate vocabulary, multiple and alternate pathways to the nodes, and item writing guidelines based on universal design. Universal Design for Learning (UDL) is a scientifically valid framework for guiding education practice that (a) provides flexibility in the ways students respond or demonstrate knowledge and skills, as well as in the ways students are engaged, and (b) reduces barriers in instruction, provides appropriate challenges, accommodations, and supports, and maintains high achievement expectations for all students, including students with disabilities and students who have limited English proficient (Higher Education Opportunity Act, [HEOA, P.L , 103(a)(24)]). UDL is a framework that is critical to understanding how students with significant cognitive disabilities can achieve success with content standards. The Accessibility Manual for the Dynamic Learning Maps Alternate Assessment (DLM- AA) provides guidance to state leaders, districts, educators, and Individualized Education Program (IEP) teams on the selection and use of accessibility features available in the Dynamic Learning Maps (DLM ) system. Informed decision making regarding accessibility is critical to ensure successful and effective participation in the assessment. It is important for educators to understand the full scope of how accessibility is provided through DLM assessment design and through features selected online or provided offline to determine the most appropriate access for each student. Decision making teams can use the manual to assist with the selection, provision, implementation, and evaluation of the effectiveness of accessibility features in the DLM-AA for students with significant cognitive disabilities. Additional how-to information is provided in the Test Administration Manual on manipulatives, Braille tests, language translation, and signing. The Test Administration Manual is available on the DLM website. Accessibility to the assessment is provided via the Personal Learning Profile (PLP) and technology. The PLP consists of two sources of information: the Access (Personal Needs and Preferences) (PNP) Profile and the First Contact survey (FC). The First Contact Survey used to collect background information about students who are eligible for DLM assessments. The survey goes beyond basic demographic information and includes questions on topics such as communication, assistive technology devices, motor and sensory impairments, and academic performance. Some questions from the First Contact survey are used to determine a student s entry point, or initialization, into the assessment. This information is needed so that the system 113 West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

134 Section VI. Alternate Assessment knows how to customize each student s experience and can determine which test form from the most appropriate linkage level to deliver. Technology enriches the interaction between the student and the content by delivering a special user interface. After the educator completes the Access (Personal Needs and Preferences) (PNP) Profile and First Contact information, the system uses that information to route the student to a first test that provides an appropriate balance of accessibility and challenge for that student. The PNP profile is used to select the appropriate accessibility features and supports within the system, and thus to tailor each student s experience based on individual needs. It can be completed any time before testing begins. It can also be changed as a student s needs change. The access features in the PNP profile are listed in four categories: display enhancements, language and Braille, audio and environment support, and other supports. The accessibility features and supports embedded into the DLM platform are available if the PNP indicates that the student needs the support. Embedded Available Supports based on PNP Magnification (P22) Magnification allows educators to choose the amount of screen magnification during testing. Educators can choose between a magnification of 2x, 3x, 4x, or 5x. Without magnification, the font is Report School, size 22. Scrolling may be required when the level of magnification is increased and the entire item can no longer been seen on the screen. This will vary due to the level of magnification, the amount of text in the item, and the size of the screen. Invert Color Choice (P28) In Invert Color Choice, the background is black and the font is white. Images display with a white background in both ELA and mathematics. Color Contrast (P28) The Color Contrast allows educators to choose from several background and lettering color schemes. Overlay Color (P28) The Overlay Color is the background color of the test. The default color is white; educators may select the alternate colors blue, green, pink, gray, and yellow. Read Aloud with Highlighting (P13) Text to Speech (TTS) is read from left to right and top to bottom. There are four preferences for TTS: text only, text and graphics, graphics only, and nonvisual (this preference also describes page layout for students who are blind).for students on alternate assessment, this is allowed for all tested grades. Supports requiring additional materials These supports include Braille, switch system preferences, ipad administration, and use of special equipment and materials. These supports typically require prior planning and setup. These supports are all recorded in the PNP even though two-switch system is the only option actually activated by PNP. Uncontracted Braille (P35) This support will be available for the spring assessment in Because the testlets are determined dynamically, fixed form Braille versions are not possible. Single-switch system (R11) Single switch scanning is activated using a switch set up to emulate the "Enter" key on the keyboard. In PNP, educators can set scan speed, indicate whether scanning should begin automatically when the page appears, and select the number of times the scan cycle repeats before stopping. Two-switch system (R11) Two-switch scanning does not require any activation in PNP. The system automatically supports two-switch step scanning, with one-switch set up to emulate the "Tab" key to move between choices, and the other switch set up to emulate the "Enter" key to West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

135 Section VI. Alternate Assessment select the choice when highlighted. Administration via ipad (R11) Students are able to take the assessment via an ipad. Other tablet options are not available at this time. Consider the fine motor skills of student prior to using ipad. Adaptive equipment used by student (R11) Educators may use any familiar adaptive equipment needed for the student. While educators are able to test devices beforehand, we cannot guarantee all devices are compatible (e.g., keyboard, mouse, touchpads). Individualized manipulatives Educators may use manipulatives that are familiar to students (e.g., abacus, unit cubes, interlocking blocks, counters, linking letters, etc.). Locally provided supports These supports require actions by the test administrator, such as reading the test, signing or translating, and assisting the student with entering responses. These supports are recorded in the PNP even though they are delivered by the test administrator. Human Read Aloud (P13) If the student does not respond well to the synthetic voice, the test administrator may read the assessment to the student. For students on alternate assessment this applies to all grades. Sign interpretation of text (P06) Sign is not provided via the computer. For students who sign, test administrators may sign the content to the student using American Sign Language (ASL), Exact English, or personalized sign systems. This is allowed for math items of the general summative as well as the ELA listening portion of the test in place of the ASL videos. Language translation of text (P24, 27, P30) For students who are English learners or respond best to a language other than English, test administrators may translate the text for the student. Language translations are not provided via the computer. For students on alternate assessment, this includes using electronic translators, bilingual word to word dictionaries and or a trained test examiner who is proficient in providing a native language translation. Test administrator enter responses for student (R02, Ro4) If students are unable to select their answer choices themselves, they may indicate their selected responses through normal response types and/or forms of communication, such as eye gaze, and then test administrators are able to key in those responses. This should only be used when students are unable to independently and accurately record their responses into the system. Partner-Assisted Scanning (PAS) (R04) PAS is a strategy in which test administrators assist students with scanning, or going through, students answer choices. Students make indications when their desired choices are presented. Timing and setting options are not defined in the DLM system because there are no timed or group tests, so any flexibility the student needs is permissible. For example, the student may take as many breaks as needed throughout the assessment. The system can sit inactive for up to 28 minutes before automatically logging out. If additional time is needed, the student will need to be logged back into the system Supports Not Available in DLM IEP teams may be accustomed to seeing longer lists of supports than are provided in DLM, especially when they consider accommodations that students with disabilities may need for the general education assessments. Because students participating in DLM also have 115 West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

136 Section VI. Alternate Assessment significant cognitive disabilities, many of these accommodations are not appropriate for DLM. Sign language using human or avatar videos on screen is not provided. Fewer than 2,000 students who participate in DLM use ASL; many students who sign use exact English or personalized sign systems. Tactile graphics are too complex and abstract for most blind students with significant cognitive disabilities. Instead, DLM incorporates the use of objects for concrete representations of content. Masking and auditory background supports are not available to students taking the DLM. Decisions about supports not available in DLM alternate assessments were made using results from more than 50,000 First Contact survey responses, feedback from national experts on sensory impairments who also have expertise in this population of students, and lessons learned from test administration observation studies. Selecting Allowable Supports For most students, the effective use of the PNP options allows for appropriate access, so the assessment is a meaningful indicator of the student's knowledge and abilities. For a limited number of students, educators may need to provide additional supports to provide access for their students. When additional supports to the assessment process are needed, educators should follow two general principles: 1. The student should be expected to respond independently. 2. Supports should be familiar to the student because they have been used during routine instruction. The following table describes some common allowable supports for testlets delivered directly to the student via computer. Further guidance on the delivery of these supports is provided in the Test Administration Manual. Educators should use the two general principles above and specific examples of allowable and non- allowable supports when planning test sessions for a student who needs additional supports. West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

137 Section VI. Alternate Assessment Allowable Supports Accessibility Issue The student has limited experience with, motor skills for, and/or devices for interacting directly with the computer. The student is blind and typically reads Braille. The student has a severe visual impairment and needs larger presentation of content than the 5x magnification setting provides. The student uses sign language to communicate and has limited proficiency in reading text. The student uses eye gaze to communicate. The student has needs special equipment for positioning (e.g., slant board) or non- computerized materials (e.g., Velcro objects on a board) to respond to questions. The student uses graphic organizers, manipulatives, or other tools to complete academic work. Allowable Support The test administrator may navigate the screens. The student may indicate answer choices to the educator and the educator may enter the responses on behalf of the student. The test administrator may only repeat the question as written until the student makes a choice. Until Braille forms become available, the test administrator may read aloud using the feature available in KITE (synthetic) or human read aloud. The test administrator may use objects in place of graphics. Descriptions of graphics may be provided through synthetic read aloud or human read aloud using scripted descriptions. Once Braille forms become available, further instructions will be provided on how to access those forms. The test administrator may use an interactive whiteboard or projector, or a magnification device that works with the computer screen. For familiar texts in ELA assessments, the test administrator may retrieve the texts from the DLM bookshelf in the Tar Heel Readers library and print the texts in the size the student needs. The test administrator may sign the text, spelling unfamiliar words and adapting or interpreting the language as needed based on the signs the student is familiar with. The test administrator may represent the answer options in an alternate format or layout and enter the student s response. The test administrator may use the equipment and materials the student is familiar with. The student should still interact with the content on the screen but the educator may navigate and enter answers the student has demonstrated outside the system. The test administrator may use the equipment and materials the student is familiar with. The student should still interact with the content on the screen but the educator may navigate and enter answers the student has demonstrated outside the system. 117 West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

138 Section VI. Alternate Assessment Supports Not Allowed The following supports are not allowed. Repeating the question again, even after the student has selected a response, in order to prompt the student to choose a different answer Using physical prompts or hand-over-hand guidance Removing answer options or giving content hints Modifying the content of a performance task in a computer-administered testlet in an attempt to help the student arrive at the correct response More information about delivering these supports is provided in the Test Administration Manual. Supports that are not listed in this guide, must be requested and educators may be asked to describe these supports to the County Test Coordinator to see if a special accommodations request is warranted. Additional resources for Test Administrators, Assessment Coordinators, Data Stewards, and Technical Liaisons are available on the DLM website under Assessments Operational Testing Resources include required test administration materials such as the Test Administration Manual that provides additional information on assessing students who require Braille, sign, and language translations. Step-by-step instructions on how to access the practice activities and released testlets are also included. For DLM state specific information go to West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

139 Section VII. ACT COMPASS COMPASS is an untimed computer-adaptive test (CAT) college placement test developed by ACT to measure academic readiness for college-level courses. Colleges and universities use the results to place students into developmental or college-credit bearing courses. Scores range from 1 to 99. Since the test is computer-adaptive, the COMPASS program adjusts the item difficulty to the skills of the individual student, eliminating items that are too easy or difficult. These items contribute little to the student s score. This flexibility reduces the number of items and testing time, while maintaining the accuracy of the results. Few students receive the same items or even the same number of items. Students begin testing with a medium level difficulty question. If the student answers correctly, a more difficult level item is provided to the student. If the student answers the medium difficulty item incorrectly, a less difficult item is provided to the student. The software continues to provide more or less difficult questions until a reliable score is obtained. COMPASS Mathematics (Pre-Algebra and Algebra) Test The COMPASS Mathematics (Pre-Algebra and Algebra) Test evaluates a student s ability levels in terms of basic skills such as performing a sequence of basic operations, application skills such as applying sequences of basic operations to novel settings or in complex ways, and analysis skills such as demonstrating conceptual understanding of principles and relationships of mathematical operations. The test contains five-option, multiple-choice items. All students start with the Pre-Algebra Test. If the student performs well enough, the student will continue automatically to the Algebra Test. Not all students will take the Algebra Test Both the Pre-Algebra Test and Algebra Test are scored separately. All students will receive a pre-algebra score. Only those students who take the Algebra Test will receive an algebra score; students may not be aware they did not perform well enough on the Pre-Algebra Test to take the Algebra Test. The COMPASS Mathematics Test is a multiple-choice test that evaluates a student s ability in terms of basic skills such as performing a sequence of basic operations, application skills such as applying sequences of basic operation to novel settings or in complex ways, and analysis skills such as demonstrating conceptual understanding of principles and relationships in mathematical operations. Pre-Algebra/Numerical Skills Test. Questions range in content from basic arithmetic concepts and skills to the knowledge and skills considered prerequisites for a first algebra course. Items are included from more than a dozen content areas; however, a majority of the questions come from the following categories: Integers Fractions West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

140 Section VII. ACT COMPASS Decimals Exponents Square roots Scientific notation Ratios and proportions Percentages Averages (means, medians, and modes) Algebra Test. Items come from three curricular areas: elementary algebra, coordinate geometry, and intermediate algebra. Overall, the Algebra Test includes items from more than 20 content areas; however, the majority of test questions fall within the following eight content areas: Substituting values into algebraic expressions Setting up equations Basic operations with polynomials Factoring polynomials Linear equations/inequalities with one variable Exponents and radicals Rational expressions Linear equations/inequalities with two variables COMPASS Writing Skills Test The COMPASS Writing Skills measures a student s ability to apply the appropriate standard written English conventions of grammar, usage, and mechanics to actual passages. That is, a student performs simulated editing tasks to passages presented on the computer screen. Each passage contains several embedded errors that the student must find and correct. This is done by clicking on a suspected error, which will highlight the segment of text that contains a test item. Only one test item is found within each highlighted segment. The item presents five multiple-choice options. As the student chooses to retain the original text (option A) or to revise it (options B, C, D, or E), the text will be retained or revised accordingly in the passage presented. The end result is the complete new version of the passage as the student revised it. After finishing the revision, the student is presented with one or two test items that pose questions related to the author s strategy and the passage as a whole. Passage topics appeal to a diverse variety of students entering two- or four-year colleges and fall into categories of natural sciences, social sciences, prose fiction, practical writing, and humanities. The writing styles may be persuasive, informative, or narrative and expressive. Writing Skills Test. The items fall into two main classification categories and six subcategories, respectively. Usage/Mechanics - surface-level characteristics of writing o Punctuation o Basic grammar and usage o Sentence structure Rhetorical skills purposes and methods of effective writing o Strategy o Organization o Style West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

141 Section VII. ACT COMPASS Students with Individual Education Plans (IEPs) and Section 504 Plans All public school students with disabilities enrolled in grade 11, Transition Mathematics for Seniors and Transition English Language Arts for Seniors, unless they meet the criteria for participation in the alternate assessment are to be assessed by the COMPASS Mathematics Test and/or the COMPASS Writing Skills Test. Their respective IEP Teams and Section 504 Committees determine the assessment accommodations they are to receive during testing. Because of federal requirements, WVDE requires confirmation that testing accommodations as documented on the student s IEP or Section 504 Plan are honored when the student takes COMPASS. Refer to the West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments for additional information (http://wvde.state.wv.us/oaa). There are no large-print or Braille test forms for COMPASS. Blind students may have the tests read to them. The student s assistive technology is to be launched prior to testing. The have test read out loud verbatim accommodation (P02) for the COMPASS Mathematics Test must be provided in a one-on-one setting; it is not an allowable accommodation for the COMPASS Writing Skills Test unless the student is blind. COMPASS does not provide embedded text to-speech. Standard Conditions with Accommodations for Students with an IEP or Section 504 Plan It is recommended that a student with an IEP or a Section 504 Plan be assessed following the same testing schedule as his/her regular education peers. The student is to receive all allowable assessment accommodations as outlined in the IEP or Section 504 Plan. o Note: The assessment accommodations for COMPASS Mathematics differ from the assessment accommodations for COMPASS Writing Skills. Refer to the Participation Guidelines for additional information. Accommodations An accommodation is a change in the administration of an assessment, such as setting, scheduling, timing, presentation format, response mode or other changes, including any combination of these that does not change what is intended to be measured by the assessment or the meaning of the resulting scores. An accommodation does not change the construct of the test. Presentation Read or sign only the directions for the Writing Skills Test. Use of sign language to present directions, stimulus material, questions, and answer choices for the Mathematics Test. Read aloud verbatim the directions, stimulus material, questions, and answer choices for Mathematics. o For the Writing Skills Test, only the directions may be read. Because there is no braille version available for COMPASS, the Writing Skills Test may be read to blind students. Rephrase directions to state the same message in a new or different way and not breach security of the test items or give away an answer. Use a sign-dictionary to present test, including directions for the Mathematics Test. 121 West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

142 Section VII. ACT COMPASS o For the Writing Skills Test, only the directions may be presented using an electronic translator. Use a secure electronic braille note taker. Use screen-reading software. Use a magnifying device to enlarge assessment material. Use high contrast. Response Indicate responses to a scribe. Student responses must be transcribed directly into the online testing platform. Refer to Directions for Transcribing in this document. Use a computer, a typewriter or other assistive technology device to respond. Student responses must be transcribed directly into the online testing platform. Refer to Directions for Transcribing in this document. The scribe must complete Appendix E, COMPASS Scribe Verification Form. Provide physical support for a student if this support is provided routinely and if the aide has been trained as an examiner. Use braille or other tactile form of print when that is the student s typical mode of responding to written material. Transcribe student response directly into the online testing platform. Refer to Directions for Transcribing in this document. The scribe must complete Appendix E, COMPASS Scribe Verification Form. Use an abacus on the Mathematics Test. Use a sign dictionary to respond for the Mathematics Test. Timing/Scheduling Provide more breaks than are scheduled as long as the breaks do not allow an opportunity for the student to study information on a test already started. Security measures must be followed during the breaks. Provide flexible scheduling, extra time within the same day (no studying). Student is scheduled to allow for the best condition for performance. Use a separate setting. Additional Accommodation Request A request for a student with an IEP or Section 504 Plan to use an assessment accommodation that does not appear in this document must be received by the Office of Assessment, attention: Dr. Beth Cipoletti, Assistant Director, no later than two weeks before testing. The request must come from either the county test coordinator or the county special education director. The following information must be included in the request: Student s name, school and county Specific requested accommodation(s) Rationale for request (for example, IEP or Section 504 update) Verification that the student receives the accommodation(s) on a regular basis during classroom instruction and classroom assessment and is familiar with the accommodation(s) Impact on student s COMPASS results if the student is not permitted to use the requested accommodation(s) Upon completion of the review of the request, the county test coordinator and county special education director will be notified of the determination of the Review Committee. West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

143 Section VII. ACT COMPASS English Language Learners English Language Learners (ELLS) All public school English language learners (ELLs) enrolled in grade 11, Transition Mathematics for Seniors and Transition English Language Arts for Seniors are to be assessed by COMPASS Mathematics and/or COMPASS Writing Skills, unless they meet the criteria for participation in the West Virginia alternate assessment. An ELL student is defined in WVBE Policy 2340: Measures of Academic Progress and WVBE Policy 2417: Programs of Study for Limited English Proficient Students. An ELL student in the state of West Virginia is classified according to the federal government definition as described in Public Law , the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB). Because of federal requirements, WVDE requires confirmation that testing accommodations as documented on the student s ELL Assessment Participation Document are honored when the student takes COMPASS. Standard Conditions with Accommodations for ELL Students The student is to receive all assessment accommodations as outlined in the ELL Assessment Participation Form. After examining the student s background characteristics, the ELL committee members must determine appropriate accommodations and document their decisions using the ELL Assessment Participation Form (http://wvconnections.k12.wv.us/assessment. html). It is recommended that all ELL students be assessed following the same testing schedule as their regular education peers. Accommodations An accommodation is a change in the administration of an assessment, such as setting, scheduling, timing, presentation format, response mode or other changes, including any combination of these that does not change what is intended to be measured by the assessment or the meaning of the resulting scores. An accommodation does not change the construct of the test. Presentation Read aloud verbatim the directions, stimulus material, questions, and answer choices for Mathematics. o For the Writing Skills Test, only the directions may be read. Because there is no braille version available for COMPASS, the Writing Skills Test may be read to blind students. Rephrase directions to state the same message in a new or different way and not breach security of the test items or give away an answer. Use an electronic translator or approved bilingual word-to-word dictionary to present directions, stimulus material, questions and/or answer choices verbatim except for COMPASS Writing Skills Test. Response Indicate responses to a scribe. Student responses must be transcribed directly into the online testing platform. Refer to Directions for Transcribing in this document. Use of a computer, a typewriter or other assistive technology device to respond. Student responses must be transcribed directly into the online testing platform. Refer to Directions for Transcribing in this document. The scribe must complete Appendix E, COMPASS Scribe Verification Form. Provide physical support for a student if this support is provided routinely and if the aide has been trained as an examiner. Use an electronic translator or approved bilingual word-to-word dictionary to indicate answer choices. 123 West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

144 Section VII. ACT COMPASS Timing/Scheduling Provide more breaks than are scheduled as long as the breaks do not allow an opportunity for the student to study information on a test already started. Security measures must be followed during breaks. Provide flexible scheduling, extra time within the same day (no studying). Student is scheduled to allow for the best condition for performance. Use separate setting. Additional Accommodations Request A request for a student with limited English proficiency to use an assessment accommodation that does not appear in this document must be received by the Office of Assessment, attention: Dr. Beth Cipoletti, Assistant Director, no later than two weeks before testing. The request must come from either the county test coordinator or the Title III/county ELL coordinator. The following information must be included in the request: Student s name, school and county Specific requested accommodation(s) Rationale for request Verification that the student receives the accommodation(s) on a regular basis during classroom instruction and classroom assessment and is familiar with the accommodation(s) Impact on student s COMPASS results if the student is not permitted to use the requested accommodation(s) Upon completion of the review of the request, the county test coordinator and county Title III/ELL coordinator will be notified of the determination of the review committee. Established Procedure for Accommodations Monitoring As mentioned earlier, federal law requires that accommodations specified in a student s IEP, Section 504 plan, or ELL plan be provided during testing. Any desire to change the accommodation(s) by the school, teacher, or student can only be addressed through an IEP team, Section 504 committee, or ELL committee meeting prior to the testing window. WVDE has established the WVS.326 Accommodations Monitoring Process to ensure that (a) all eligible students are provided the assessment accommodations specified on their IEPs, Section 504 plans, or ELL plans during testing; and (b) documentation is available for monitoring and accountability purposes. The procedures called for in the WVS.326 process have met federal review and approval requirements and are required for state and district assessments. 37 State assessments include COMPASS. West Virginia requires documentation and monitoring for the provision of all accommodations documented within an individual student plan (IEP, 504 and ELL plan). Transcribing Student Answers Transcribing is the process of transferring student responses onto a regular-sized PLAN answer folder so responses can be electronically scored. Responses should be transcribed under the following conditions. West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

145 Section VII. ACT COMPASS CONDITIONS FOR TRANSCRIBING The student is tested using oral, signed or electronic responses. The student has verified disabilities that significantly impact motor skills, has a physical or vision disability and/or a medical condition which precludes the student from entering responses into the secure COMPASS testing platform. ANY PERSON WHO SCRIBES/TRANSCRIBES MUST Be a trained principal/building level coordinator or examiner as defined by West Virginia Board of Education Policy An examiner o must be a currently employed educator and/or an approved employee of the state, county or RESA, or a currently employed educator of a nonpublic school; o must hold a valid West Virginia teaching license or certification granted by the Office of Professional Preparation; o must have been trained and must have on file a signed WVBE Policy 2340 Examiner s/scribe s Secure Materials and Test Procedures Agreement (Appendix E) for the purpose of administering or assisting with the administration of an assessment included in the WV-MAP; o may be a substitute teacher or an aide serving as an examiner for special needs students when instructionally assigned; o all aides and nonpublic school educators must be approved by WVDE; o may not be a student teacher; o may not administer WV-MAP assessments to his/her child/ren. Complete and sign the COMPASS Scribe Verification Form (COMPASS User Guide, Appendix E)) at the conclusion of the transcription. The form must be sent to the principal/building level coordinator upon completion. The principal/building level coordinator shall send a copy of this form to the county test coordinator at the end of the testing window. DIRECTIONS FOR TRANSCRIBING Enter the student s marked responses into the secure COMPASS testing platform. TRANSCRIBING BRAILLE The scribe will demonstrate proficiency in braille. The scribe will work with another scribe who knows braille to proofread the student s transcribed responses for accuracy. SCRIBING ORAL AND SIGNED RESPONSES The scribe will remain silent while the student is dictating or signing and will not indicate correct or incorrect responses. The scribe should confirm the student s responses before entering the response into the secure COMPASS testing platform. The scribe may ask a student to repeat a word or phrase for understanding, if necessary. If the scribe cannot understand a student s pattern of speech, or it is barely audible, large cards, each indicating one of the response options can be used. The student can then choose the card that indicates the student s desired response. The scribe will not complete a student s incomplete response. The scribe will record the interpreter s response if the student is using an interpreter. The scribe will demonstrate proficiency in signing if serving as both the interpreter and scribe. The scribe will test in a location where other examinees are not able to hear or see the students responses. 125 West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

146 Section VII. ACT COMPASS Accommodations Allowed for COMPASS Additional information on each accommodation can be found in the Participation Guidelines. Presentation P02 Have test read aloud, except for Writing Skills Test PO6 Have test presented through sign language, locally provided, except for Writing Skills Test P15 Have directions only read aloud P16 Have directions presented through sign language, locally provided P17 Use secure electronic braille note taker P18 Have directions rephrased by trained examiner P21 Use screen reader software P23 Use magnifying device to enlarge assessment material P24 Use translator to present test except for Writing Skills Test P25 Use translator to present directions only P27 Use approved bilingual word-to-word dictionary for directions only P28 Use high contrast on screen P29 Use sign-dictionary to present test, including directions except for Writing Skills Test Response R02 Indicate response to a scribe R03 Use braille or other tactile form of print R05 Use an abacus R11 Use computer or other assistive technology device to respond R11 Provide physical support R15 Use a bilingual word-to-word dictionary R17 Use a translator R18 Use a sign-dictionary to respond Response T03 Take more breaks (no studying) T07 Use flexible scheduling, same day T09 Use separate setting West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

147 Section VIII. Accommodations Guidelines for the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) The National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) is a national assessment of a representative sampling of America's students in Grades 4, 8, and 12 conducted by the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES). NAEP measures what America's students know and can do in various subject areas. Assessments are conducted periodically in various subjects, such as reading, mathematics, science, writing, U.S. history, civics, geography, and the arts. As defined in the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, NAEP reading and mathematics assessments are required to be administered to fourth and eighth graders. As defined by West Virginia Code 18-2E-2, NAEP shall be administered in academic areas at various grades designated by NAEP officials. As indicated in West Virginia Board of Education (WVBE) Policy 2340, NAEP is part of the West Virginia Measures of Academic Progress (WV-MAP). Students participation on NAEP is required by Policy Only students who take the statewide alternate summative assessment or who have assessment accommodations for the statewide general assessment that are not allowed on NAEP may be considered for exclusion on NAEP. NAEP assessments are administered uniformly using the same sets of test books across the nation. Its results serve as a common metric for all states and selected urban districts. The assessment stays essentially the same from year to year, with only carefully documented changes. This consistency permits NAEP to provide a clear picture of the academic progress of the nation s students over time. Some NAEP assessments also produce state-level results. The allowed accommodations and requirements for administration of NAEP are determined by NCES and the National Assessment Governing Board (NAGB) and information about them is provided to the schools through the MyNAEP secure website for NAEP sampled schools. 20 NAEP accommodations for each assessment year are typically finalized in late fall prior to the assessment year. Sampled schools should check the MyNAEP site for the current accommodations. The accommodations listed in this document were used for NAEP in the most recent assessment at the time of publication. On March 6, 2010, NABG adopted a new Policy Statement on NAEP Testing and Reporting on Students with Disabilities and English Language Learners. 21 This policy statement provides the following guidance for inclusion of students with disabilities and English language learners: The proportion of all students excluded from any NAEP sample should not exceed 5%. Samples exceeding this goal shall be prominently designated in reports as not attaining the desired inclusion rate of 95% of the total sample. Among students classified as being either English language learners (i.e., having limited English proficiency) or students with disabilities, a goal of 85% inclusion shall be established. National, state, and district samples falling below this goal shall be identified in NAEP reporting. NAEP assesses a representative sample of all students across the state, including West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

148 Section VIII. Accommodations Guidelines for the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) those with special needs. NAEP strives to obtain as complete a picture as possible of the educational progress of all students. Thus, the NAEP sample includes students who have been identified as having physical, emotional, or developmental disabilities; or who have had limited exposure to the English language. NAEP s goal is to include as many students with disabilities and/or limited English proficiency as possible; therefore, NAEP s advice to schools is, when in doubt, include the student. NAEP is administered by a federally contracted assessment team that receives extensive training to ensure consistent administration across the nation. School personnel may be asked to assist with some accommodations, such as signing questions for students. Questions regarding accommodations on NAEP should be directed to your school s NAEP coordinator. Determination of accommodations should be made during the NAEP preassessment review call conducted in January prior to the assessment administration and updated as necessary. WVBE Policy 2340 states: All public school students enrolled at Grades 4, 8 and 12 who are part of the NAEP state sample shall participate in the NAEP. Students participating in statewide alternate summative assessment and students with IEPs, Section 504 Plans, or ELL Assessment Participation Forms who cannot be accommodated by NAEP may be excluded from participation or assessed and not scored after having been randomly selected. School personnel with the best knowledge of the student s accommodation needs should use the guidance provided on the MyNAEP site to decide if the student should be included in the NAEP assessment and the accommodations needed. In general, students should receive the same accommodations on NAEP that are provided for the statewide General Summative Assessment. Since NAEP is a low-stakes assessment for students, students should not be excluded on NAEP solely because an accommodation allowed on the statewide General Summative Assessment is not allowed on NAEP. Each student s participation or exclusion should be considered carefully. Every student who can participate should. Procedures for Monitoring NAEP Exclusions and Accommodations As with all state assessments, NAEP accommodations and exclusions must be monitored. NAEP exclusions are monitored by the NAEP state coordinator. Accommodations on NAEP are monitored by the assessment administration contractor. Since accommodations on NAEP and exclusions from NAEP are monitored using these two procedures, schools are not required to complete the WVS.326 process. In compliance with federal regulations, the NAEP state coordinator must monitor exclusions on NAEP. For each student excluded from the NAEP assessment, the NAEP school coordinator or principal should the following information to the NAEP state coordinator as instructed on the MyNAEP site: NAEP Session # Line # Subject Assigned to Student West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

149 Section VIII. Accommodations Guidelines for the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) Reason for Exclusion (Student takes statewide alternate summative assessment or specify the accommodation required for student but not available on NAEP) Student names should not be ed. Remember that students should take NAEP using the same accommodations used on statewide General Summative Assessment. Any exclusion that appears to violate WVBE Policy 2340 may be reviewed further. NAEP Accommodations for Students with IEPs and Section 504 Plans The accommodation information listed in this document reflects the most current known accommodations. The accommodation information and administration practices for NAEP testing for any given assessment year are provided to schools through the MyNAEP site and/or discussed with school personnel during the preassessment review call in January. Each accommodation is described below. If a student needs an accommodation not listed, the NAEP school coordinator should discuss the specific accommodation need with the assessment administration team during the preassessment review call. The assessment administration team will determine if it is possible to provide the accommodation on a case-bycase basis. Text-to-Speech (English) Directions Only Universal Design Feature for Technology-Based Assessment Description: General directions are read aloud to all students. Directions within the assessment can be read aloud using the text-to-speech function. The tutorial explains how to do this and has full audio Text-to-Speech (English) Occasional or Most or All Universal Design Feature for Technology-Based Assessment (not allowed on Reading for passages or items) Description: Students select some or all text to be read aloud. The tutorial explains how to do this and has full audio Read aloud in English Directions only Allowed for mathematics, reading and science Description: For this accommodation, students may have the general directions (the same for all students) and/or the subject-specific directions read aloud, repeated, or reworded in any way in English so that students understand what to do. NOTE: Some students IEPs or 504 Plans stipulate that they should receive this accommodation. For those students, this will be coded as an accommodation. Students who do not have this as an IEP or 504 requirement, but who need the general directions (the same for all students) and/or the subject-specific directions read aloud, repeated, or reworded in any way in 129 West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

150 Section VIII. Accommodations Guidelines for the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) English can request this by raising his or her hand during the session, and it will not be recorded as an accommodation. Read aloud in English Occasional Allowed for mathematics and science Description: For this accommodation, students may request to have words, phrases, or sentences read aloud to them in English. Read aloud in English occasional is not allowed for Reading. Read aloud in English Most or All Allowed for mathematics and science Description: For this accommodation, students may request to have most or all of the assessment booklet read aloud to them in English. Read aloud in English most or all is not allowed for Reading. NOTE: This accommodation requires a separate session. Responds Orally to a Scribe Allowed for mathematics, reading and science, writing, U.S. history, civics, geography, economics, technology and engineering literacy Description: This accommodation requires that the student respond orally to a scribe provided by the school or respond by pointing to his/her answers. The scribe then records the student s responses in the assessment booklet for paper-pencil or on the tablet for technology based. Must Have an Aide Administer the Test or Be Present in Room Allowed for mathematics, reading and science Description: This accommodation requires that a school staff member familiar to the student administer or be present during the session. The school staff member may be the teacher that usually works with the student. NOTE: Only trained NAEP staff may conduct the technology-based testing session. Calculator Version of the Test Allowed for mathematics Description: This accommodation provides a mathematics test form that permits the use of a calculator. The calculator version of the assessment contains items that assess problemsolving, not calculations. For technology-based assessments, the calculator is an onscreen calculator provided as part of the assessment system. Calculator version of the test is not allowed for Reading or Science. Presentation in Braille Allowed for mathematics, reading and science West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

151 Section VIII. Accommodations Guidelines for the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) Description: This is a Braille version of the booklet. For technology-based assessments, a paper-pencil Braille version of the assessment will be provided. Response in Braille Allowed for mathematics, reading and science Description: This accommodation requires that a visually impaired student record his/her answers using a Braille output device, a slate and stylus, or an electronic Brailler note taker provided by the school, or uses a scribe to record the answers (see Responds orally to a scribe accommodation). Large Print Version of the Test Allowed for mathematics, reading and science Description: NAEP provides large-print booklets to students who are visually impaired. These are assessment booklets that have been enlarged to 129 percent. Magnification Equipment Allowed for mathematics, reading and science Description: For paper-pencil assessments, this is a lens or system provided by the school that enhances visual function. Magnification devices include eyeglass-mounted magnifiers, freestanding or handheld magnifiers, enlarged computer monitors, or computers with screenenlargement programs. Some students use closed-circuit television to enlarge print and display printed material with various image enhancements on a screen. For technology-based assessments, this accommodation is for students requiring magnification of all assessment content, including tools, menus, and scenario-based tasks. Screen magnification software allows students to scroll over a portion of the screen to magnify the image on the screen. NOTE: See Zooming to determine if students need additional magnification. Zooming Universal Design Feature for Technology-Based Assessment Description: Text size options are provided for short standalone items (e.g., multiple-choice and short constructed-response items) but not for the scenario-based tasks, which will be the standard 12-point font. For the short standalone items, students can change sizes ranging from approximately 12-point font to approximately 24-point font. Twenty-four point font is approximately 1/3-inch tall. NOTE: This only enlarges the short standalone items, NOT the scenario-based tasks, tool icons, menus, etc. Color Contrast Allowed for mathematics and science as universal design but an accommodation for Reading (see Color Contrast for Visually Impaired Students) 131 West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

152 Section VIII. Accommodations Guidelines for the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) Description: Universal Design for Mathematics and Science--Students may choose from three color contrast options, including one high-contrast option. The default is black text on white background and the two other options are white text on black background and black text on beige background. Accommodation for Reading (Color Contrast for Visually-Impaired Students) This accommodation provides a reading test form with black text on white background. NOTE: This tool is not available for the tutorial, the scenario-based tasks, or any image/video content. Low Mobility Version of the Test Allowed for mathematics, science, and reading Description: This accommodation provides a test form with short-standalone items that are keyboard navigable and do not require the use of the mouse or touch pad. Presentation in Sign Language Allowed for mathematics, reading and science, Description: This accommodation requires that a qualified sign language interpreter at the school sign the instructions included in the session script and some or all of the test questions or answer choices for the student. Presentation in sign language is not allowed for Reading passages or test questions. NOTE: If a student needs directions signed for Reading, please select Other (specify) and note the needed accommodation. The qualifications for sign language interpreter are determined by school. The interpreter should be someone who typically works with the student. Hearing Impaired Version of the Test Allowed for mathematics, science, and reading Description: This accommodation provides a test form that has all auditory content closed captioned. Closed Captioning Universal Design Feature for Technology-Based Assessment Description: All voice-over narration is closed captioned. Volume Adjustment Universal Design Feature for Technology-Based Assessment Description: Some portions of the assessment feature audio, such as text-to-speech or multimedia item content. Students may raise or lower the volume using a control on the tablet. Scratchwork/Highlighter Capability West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

153 Section VIII. Accommodations Guidelines for the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) Universal Design Feature for Technology-Based Assessment Description: A scratchwork/highlighter tool is available for short standalone items (e.g., multiple-choice and short constructed-response items). This tool contains an embedded pencil mode and highlighter mode. The tutorial explains how to do this and has full audio. NOTE: This tool is not available for the scenario-based tasks. Eliminating Capability Universal Design Feature for Technology-Based Assessment Description: A tool for eliminating answer choices for multiple-choice items, as appropriate. NOTE: This tool is not available for the scenario-based tasks. Uses Template: Allowed for mathematics, reading and science, writing, U.S. history, civics, geography, economics, technology and engineering literacy Description: For paper-pencil assessments, this is a cutout or overlay provided by the school that is used to focus a student s attention on one part of a page by obscuring other parts of the page. For technology-based assessments, this is a cutout or overlay provided by the school that is used to focus a student s attention on one part of a screen by obscuring the other parts of the screen. Uses Special Writing Tool Allowed for mathematics, reading and science, writing, U.S. history, civics, geography, economics, technology and engineering literacy This is a large-diameter pencil, pencil grip, or other special writing tool provided by the school that a student uses to record his/her answers in the assessment booklet. NOTE: Some students IEPs or 504 Plans stipulate that they should receive this accommodation. For those students, this will be coded as an accommodation. Students who do not have this as an IEP or 504 requirement, but who typically use large-diameter pencils, pencil grips, or other special writing tools during assessments, may use these for NAEP, and it will not be recorded as an accommodation. Use a Computer/Tablet to Respond Allowed for paper-pencil assessments in mathematics, reading and science, writing, U.S. history, civics, geography, economics, technology and engineering literacy Universal Design Feature for Technology-Based Assessment Description: This accommodation requires that the student record his/her answers using a computer or typewriter provided by the school. For technology-based assessments, all students respond on NAEP-provided tablets. Preferential Seating Allowed for mathematics, reading and science, writing, U.S. history, civics, geography, 133 West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

154 economics, technology and engineering literacy Section VIII. Accommodations Guidelines for the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) Description: This accommodation requires that a student sit in a designated area for the assessment; such as away from other students to limit distractions; a location where there is access to special equipment; or close to the front of the room so that a student can see or hear more easily. It may also include special light and furniture used by the student. Study Carrel/Special Equipment Allowed for mathematics, reading, science, writing, U.S. history, civics, geography, economics, technology and engineering literacy Description: This is a study carrel or portable screen provided by the school used to limit distractions for a student. Requires that a student sit in a designated area for the assessment, such as away from other students to limit distractions, a location where there is access to special equipment or close to the front of the room so that a student can see or hear more easily. It may also include special light and furniture used by the student. Breaks During Test Allowed for mathematics, reading, science, writing, U.S. history, civics, geography, economics, technology and engineering literacy Description: This accommodation requires that the student be allowed to take breaks as requested or at predetermined intervals during the assessment. This also could mean that the student is allowed to take the assessment in more than one sitting during a single day. Extended Time Allowed for mathematics, reading, science, writing, U.S. history, civics, geography, economics, technology and engineering literacy Description: This accommodation requires that students be given extra time to complete the assessment. NOTE: If state test is untimed, students may or may not require extended time on NAEP. NAEP is a timed, but not a speeded test (it is not designed to evaluate how many questions a student can answer in a limited amount of time). Generally, most students are able to complete the NAEP cognitive sections in the time allowed (25-30 minutes per section). Students are expected to answer the questions in order. Any question remaining (not answered at the end of booklet) will not be scored Small Group Allowed for paper-pencil assessments in mathematics, reading and science, writing, U.S. history, civics, geography, economics, technology and engineering literacy Description: For paper-pencil assessments, a small group session includes no more than five students. A student can be assigned to a small group session because he/she requires one, or because one or more of the accommodations he/she typically requires must be administered in a separate session to minimize distractions to other students in the regular session. For technology-based assessments, this accommodation is considered unnecessary due to the mode of test administration. All students are interacting on a one-on-one basis with the tablet and will have earbuds to reduce distractions. Read aloud and other accommodations will be West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

155 Section VIII. Accommodations Guidelines for the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) provided through the computer and will not distract other students in the room. NOTE: If students taking a technology-based assessment needs to be tested separately from other students, see Must be Tested in Separate Session accommodation. One-on-One Allowed for paper-pencil assessments in mathematics, reading and science, writing, U.S. history, civics, geography, economics, technology and engineering literacy Description: For paper-pencil assessments, this accommodation requires that a student is assessed individually in an area free of distractions. For technology-based assessments, this accommodation is considered unnecessary due to the mode of test administration. All students are interacting on a one-on-one basis with the tablet and will have earbuds to reduce distractions. Read aloud and other accommodations will be provided through the computer/tablet and will not distract other students in the room. NOTE: If students taking a technology-based assessment needs to be tested separately from other students, see Must be Tested in Separate Session accommodation. Must be Tested in Separate Session Allowed for mathematics, reading, science, writing, U.S. history, civics, geography, economics, technology and engineering literacy Description: This accommodation requires that the student be tested away from other students in a separate testing area. NAEP Accommodations for English Language Learners The information listed in this document reflects the most current known accommodations. The accommodation information and administration practices for NAEP testing for any given assessment year will be provided to schools through the MyNAEP site and/or discussed with school personnel during the preassessment review call in January. Each accommodation is described below. Please note some of the accommodations allowable on NAEP are not allowed on other West Virginia assessments. Careful consideration needs to be given to each decision regarding these accommodations. If the student has not had the opportunity to practice with the accommodation during instructions, it may adversely affect student performance on the NAEP assessment. If a student needs an accommodation not listed, the NAEP school coordinator should discuss the specific accommodation need with the assessment administration team during the preassessment review call. The assessment administration team will determine if it is possible to provide the accommodation on a case-bycase basis. Text-to-Speech (English) Directions Only Universal Design Feature for Technology-Based Assessment Description: General directions are read aloud to all students. Directions within the 135 West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

156 Section VIII. Accommodations Guidelines for the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) assessment can be read aloud using the text-to-speech function. The tutorial explains how to do this and has full audio Text-to-Speech (English) Occasional or Most or All Universal Design Feature for Technology-Based Assessment (not allowed on Reading for passages or items) Description: Students select some or all text to be read aloud. The tutorial explains how to do this and has full audio Read aloud in English Directions only Allowed for mathematics, reading and science Description: For this accommodation, students may have the general directions (the same for all students) and/or the subject-specific directions read aloud, repeated, or reworded in any way in English so that students understand what to do. NOTE: Some students IEPs or 504 Plans stipulate that they should receive this accommodation. For those students, this will be coded as an accommodation. Students who do not have this as an IEP or 504 requirement, but who need the general directions (the same for all students) and/or the subject-specific directions read aloud, repeated, or reworded in any way in English can request this by raising his or her hand during the session, and it will not be recorded as an accommodation. Read aloud in English Occasional Allowed for mathematics and science Description: For this accommodation, students may request to have words, phrases, or sentences read aloud to them in English. Read aloud in English occasional is not allowed for Reading. Read aloud in English Most or All Allowed for mathematics and science Description: For this accommodation, students may request to have most or all of the assessment booklet read aloud to them in English. Read aloud in English most or all is not allowed for Reading. NOTE: This accommodation requires a separate session. Must Have an Aide Administer the Test or Be Present in Room Allowed for mathematics, reading and science Description: This accommodation requires that a school staff member familiar to the student administer or be present during the session. The school staff member may be the teacher that usually works with the student. NOTE: Only trained NAEP staff may conduct the technology-based testing session. West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

157 Section VIII. Accommodations Guidelines for the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) Bilingual Dictionary without Definition in Any Language Allowed for mathematics and science Description: This is a hand-held electronic or hard copy bilingual dictionary provided by the school in any language that contains English translations of words but does not contain definitions. It is sometimes referred to as a word-for-word dictionary, word-to-word translation dictionary, or a bilingual word list. Bilingual dictionary is not allowed for Reading. Spanish/English Version of the Test Allowed for mathematics and science (Grades 4 & 8) Not Allowed for Reading (any grade) or Grade 12 Mathematics & Science Description: NAEP has bilingual Spanish/English assessment booklets available for students who require them. When a bilingual booklet is open, one page has the directions and questions in Spanish, and the facing page will have the same directions and questions in English. Because of the size, the booklets are printed in a set of two. Students may mark their answers on either page and in either language. Spanish/English version of the test is not allowed for Reading or grade 12 Mathematics and Science. Zooming Universal Design Feature for Technology-Based Assessment Description: Text size options are provided for short standalone items (e.g., multiple-choice and short constructed-response items) but not for the scenario-based tasks, which will be the standard 12-point font. For the short standalone items, students can change sizes ranging from approximately 12-point font to approximately 24-point font. Twenty-four point font is approximately 1/3-inch tall. NOTE: This only enlarges the short standalone items, NOT the scenario-based tasks, tool icons, menus, etc. Color Contrast Allowed for mathematics and science as universal design but an accommodation for Reading (see Color Contrast for Visually Impaired Students) Description: Universal Design for Mathematics and Science Students have a choice of three color contrast options, including one high-contrast option. The default is black text on white background and the two other options are white text on black background and black text on beige background. Accommodation for Reading (Color Contrast for Visually-Impaired Students) This accommodation provides a reading test form with black text on white background. NOTE: This tool is not available for the tutorial, the scenario-based tasks, or any image/video content. Closed Captioning Universal Design Feature for technology-based assessment 137 West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

158 Section VIII. Accommodations Guidelines for the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) Description: All voice-over narration is closed captioned. Volume Adjustment Universal Design Feature for technology-based assessment Description: Some portions of the assessment feature audio, such as text-to-speech or multimedia item content. Students may raise or lower the volume using a control on the tablet. Scratchwork/Highlighter Capability Universal Design Feature for technology-based assessment Description: A scratchwork/highlighter tool is available for short standalone items (e.g., multiple-choice and short constructed-response items). This tool contains an embedded pencil mode and highlighter mode. The tutorial explains how to do this and has full audio. NOTE: This tool is not available for the scenario-based tasks. Eliminating Capability Universal Design Feature for technology-based assessment Description: A tool for eliminating answer choices for multiple-choice items, as appropriate. NOTE: This tool is not available for the scenario-based tasks. Use a Computer/Tablet to Respond Allowed for paper-pencil assessments in mathematics, reading and science, writing, U.S. history, civics, geography, economics, technology and engineering literacy Universal Design Feature for technology-based assessment Description: This accommodation requires that the student record his/her answers using a computer or typewriter provided by the school. For technology-based assessments, all students respond on NAEP-provided tablets. Breaks During Test Allowed for mathematics, reading, science, writing, U.S. history, civics, geography, economics, technology and engineering literacy Description: This accommodation requires that the student be allowed to take breaks as requested or at predetermined intervals during the assessment. This also could mean that the student is allowed to take the assessment in more than one sitting during a single day. Extended Time Allowed for mathematics, reading, science, writing, U.S. history, civics, geography, economics, technology and engineering literacy Description: This accommodation requires that students be given extra time to complete the West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

159 Section VIII. Accommodations Guidelines for the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) assessment. NOTE: If state test is untimed, students may or may not require extended time on NAEP. NAEP is a timed, but not a speeded test (it is not designed to evaluate how many questions a student can answer in a limited amount of time). Generally, most students are able to complete the NAEP cognitive sections in the time allowed (25-30 minutes per section). Students are expected to answer the questions in order. Any question remaining (not answered at the end of booklet) will not be scored Small Group Allowed for paper-pencil assessments in mathematics, reading and science, writing, U.S. history, civics, geography, economics, technology and engineering literacy Description: For paper-pencil assessments, a small group session includes no more than five students. A student can be assigned to a small group session because he/she requires one, or because one or more of the accommodations he/she typically requires must be administered in a separate session to minimize distractions to other students in the regular session. For technology-based assessments, this accommodation is considered unnecessary due to the mode of test administration. All students are interacting on a one-on-one basis with the tablet and will have earbuds to reduce distractions. Read aloud and other accommodations will be provided through the computer and will not distract other students in the room. NOTE: If students taking a technology-based assessment needs to be tested separately from other students, see Must be Tested in Separate Session accommodation. One-on-One Allowed for paper-pencil assessments in mathematics, reading and science, writing, U.S. history, civics, geography, economics, technology and engineering literacy Description: For paper-pencil assessments, this accommodation requires that a student is assessed individually in an area free of distractions. For technology-based assessments, this accommodation is considered unnecessary due to the mode of test administration. All students are interacting on a one-on-one basis with the tablet and will have earbuds to reduce distractions. Read aloud and other accommodations will be provided through the computer/tablet and will not distract other students in the room. NOTE: If students taking a technology-based assessment needs to be tested separately from other students, see Must be Tested in Separate Session accommodation. Must be Tested in Separate Session Allowed for mathematics, reading, science, writing, U.S. history, civics, geography, economics, technology and engineering literacy Description: This accommodation requires that the student be tested away from other students in a separate testing area. 139 West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

160 References Acosta, B., Rivera, C., & Willner, L. S. (2008). Best practices in the accommodation of English language learners: A Delphi study. Prepared for the ELL Partnership, U.S. Department of Education. Arlington, VA: The George Washington University. Bielinski, J., & Sheinker, A. (2001). Varied opinions on how to report accommodated test scores: Findings based on CTB/McGraw-Hill s framework for classifying accommodations. Paper presented at the Council of Chief State School Officers Largescale Assessment Conference, Houston, TX. Christensen, L., Thurlow, M., and Wang, T. (2009). Improving accommodations outcomes: Monitoring instructional and assessment accommodations for students with disabilities. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota, National Center on Educational Outcomes. Christensen, L., Carver, W., VanDeZande, J., & Lazarus, S. (2011). Accommodations manual: How to select, administer, and evaluate the use of accommodations for instruction and assessment of students with disabilities (3 rd ed.). Washington, DC: Assessing Special Education Students State Collaborative on Assessment and Student Standards, Council of Chief State School Officers. Christensen, L., Shyyan, V., Schuster, T., Mahaley, P., & Saez, S. (2012). Accommodations manual: How to select, administer, and evaluate use of accommodations for instruction and assessment of English language learners. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota, National Center on Educational Outcomes. Dynamic Learning Maps. (2014). Retrieved from EDGAR 34 C.F.R Education Department General Administrative Regulations. December (2008). Retrieved from Elliott, J. L., Thurlow, M. L., & Ysseldyke, J. E. (1996). Assessment guidelines that maximize the participation of students with disabilities in large-scale assessment: Characteristics and considerations (Synthesis Report 25). Minneapolis: University of Minnesota, National Center on Educational Outcomes. ELPA 21. (2014) English Language Proficiency Assessment for the 21 st Century. Retrieved from Francis, D., Rivera, M., Lesaux, N., Kieffer, M., & Rivera, H. (2006). Research-based recommendations for the use of accommodations in large-scale assessments. Book 3 in Center on Instruction (Ed.) Practical guidelines for the education of English language learner series. Portsmouth, NH: RMC Research Corporation, Center on Instruction. Retrieved from Assessments.pdf. Heumann, J. E., & Cantu, N. V. (1997). Dear colleague letter: Including students with disabilities in all educational reform activities (September 29, 1997). Washington, DC: United States Department of Education. Retrieved from West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

161 References Hixson, N., & Hammer, P. C. (2011). Examining accommodations in West Virginia: A descriptive analysis of accommodations specified for students in individualized education plans, 504 plans, and limited English proficient plans in Charleston, WV: West Virginia Department of Education, Division of Curriculum and Instructional Services, Office of Research. Hughes, G. K., D Brot, J. M., Bradley, K., Holloway, J. L., Howley, C. W., & Chadwick, K. L. (2006). Special education testing accommodations in West Virginia: An overview of practices in Charleston, WV: Edvantia. Kopriva, R. J., Emick, J. E., Hipolito-Delgado, C., & Cameron, C. A. (2007). Do proper accommodation assignments make a difference? Examining the impact of improved decision making on scores for English language learners. Educational Measurement: Issues & Practice, 26(3), Measured Progress. (2013). Framework for Accessibility and Accommodations. Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium. (Forthcoming Spring 2014) National Center on Educational Outcomes. (2009). Accommodations bibliography. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota, National Center on Educational Outcomes. Available at: https://apps.cehd.umn.edu/nceo/accommodations/ National Council on Measurement in Education. (2012). Testing and data integrity in the administration of statewide student assessment programs. National Assessment Governing Board (2010). NAEP testing and reporting on students with disabilities and English language learners. Policy statement. March 6, Washington, DC: Author. Retrieved from assets/documents/policies/naep_testandreport_studentswithdisabilities.pdf. Rivera, C., Collum, E., Willner, L. S., & Sia, J. K. (2006). Study 1: An analysis of state assessment policies regarding the accommodation of English language learners. In E. Collum & C. Rivera (Eds.), State assessment policy and practice for English language learners: A national perspective (pp ). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. Shyyan, V., Christensen, L., Touchette, B., Lightborne, L., Gholson, M., & Burton, K. (2013). Accommodations manual: How to select, administer, and evaluate use of accommodations for instruction and assessment of English language learners with disabilities. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota, National Center on Educational Outcomes. Smarter Balanced. (2012). Translation accommodations framework for testing ELLs in mathematics. Available at: content/uploads/2012/09/translation-accommodations-framework-for-testing-ell- Math.pdf Smarter Balanced. (2012). Accommodations for English Language Learners and Students with Disabilities: A research-based decision algorithm. Available at: Smarter Balanced (2014) Retreived from Smarter Balanced Support for Under-Represented Students available at 141 West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

162 References Thompson, S. J., Johnstone, C. J., & Thurlow, M. L. (2002). Universal design applied to large scale assessments (Synthesis Report 44). Minneapolis: University of Minnesota, National Center on Educational Outcomes. Retrieved from Thompson, S. J., Morse, A. B., Sharpe, M., & Hall, S. (2005). Accommodations manual: How to select, administer, and evaluate use of accommodations for instruction and assessment of students with disabilities. Second edition. Washington, DC: Council of Chief State School Officers. Retrieved from Accommodations_Manual_How_2005.pdf. Thompson, S., Thurlow, M., & Walz, L. (2000). Student perspectives on the use of accommodations on large-scale assessments (Minnesota Report No. 35). Minneapolis: University of Minnesota, National Center on Educational Outcomes. Retrieved from Thurlow, M. and Bolt, S. (2001). Empirical support for accommodations most often allowed in state policy. (Synthesis Report 41). Minneapolis: University of Minnesota, National Center on Educational Outcomes. Retrieved from Thurlow, M., Lazarus, S. S., Albus, D., & Hodgson, J. (2010). Computer-based testing: Practices and considerations (Synthesis Report 78). Minneapolis: University of Minnesota, National Center on Educational Outcomes. Retrieved from Thurlow, M. L., Quenemoen, R. F., & Lazarus, S. S. (2011). Meeting the needs of special education students: Recommendations for the Race-to-the-Top consortia and states. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota, National Center on Educational Outcomes. Retrieved from Thurlow- Meeting_the_Needs_of_Special_Education_Students.pdf. Thurlow, M., Quenemoen, R., Thompson, S., & Lehr, C. (2001). Principles and characteristics of inclusive assessment and accountability systems (Synthesis Report 40). Minneapolis: University of Minnesota, National Center on Educational Outcomes. Retrieved from Synthesis40.html. U.S. Department of Education (nd). Federal Programs Consolidated Monitoring Requirements. Education Department General Administrative Regulations (EDGAR) Title 34, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Washington, DC: Author. U. S. Department of Education (2007). Assessment and accountability for recently arrived and former limited English proficient (ELL) students. Non-Regulatory Guidance. May Washington, DC: Author, Office of Elementary and Secondary Education. Retrieved from U.S. Department of Education (2009). Standards and Assessments Peer Review Guidance: Information and Examples for Meeting Requirements of the No Child Left Behind Act of Washington, DC: Author Office of Elementary and Secondary Education. Retrieved from West Virginia Board of Education. (2004). Policy 2417: Programs of study for limited English proficient students. Charleston, WV: Author Retrieved from West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

163 References West Virginia Board of Education. (2012). Policy 2419: Regulations for the Education of Students with Exceptionalities. Charleston, WV: Author. Retrieved from West Virginia Board of Education. (2011). Policy 2340: West Virginia measures of academic progress. Charleston, WV: Author. Retrieved from West Virginia Board of Education. (2012). Policy 2510: Assuring the quality of education: regulations for education programs. Charleston, WV: Author. Retrieved from West Virginia Board of Education. (2011). Policy : Alternate academic achievement standards for West Virginia schools. Charleston, WV: Author. Retrieved from White, L., Hixson, N., D Brot, J., & Perdue, J. (2009). Examining accommodation recommendations in West Virginia ( ). Charleston, WV: West Virginia Department of Education, Office of Assessment and Accountability. Retrieved from pdf. 143 West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

164 Appendices Appendix A The WVBE Testing Code of Ethics addresses special concerns regarding appropriate professional practices within the West Virginia Measures of Academic Progress (WV-MAP), as well as appropriate professional conduct. The WVBE Testing Code of Ethics supplements the practices and procedures set forth by W. Va.126CSR14, WVBE Policy ETHICAL TESTING PRACTICES Test Security 1. District school personnel shall establish and implement procedures to ensure maximum test security and limit access of secure materials to applicable district/school personnel. 2. Apart from the scheduled test administration to students, secure test materials shall be stored in a locked and secured location by the district test coordinator in accordance with the test administration guidelines of each assessment. 3. The district test coordinator shall be responsible for the test booklets/answer sheets received by the district and shall maintain a record of the booklets sent to each school in accordance to the test administration guidelines of each assessment. 4. Before each test administration, materials must be distributed and stored according to instructions provided with the test. Tests must be secured at all times during test administration, including all breaks in the testing sequence. All test booklets (used and unused) and answer sheets, if applicable, must be counted, reconciled, and returned to a locked and secured area immediately upon the completion of each daily testing session. 5. Secure test materials in a school must be stored in a locked and secured location(s) prior to and following each daily testing session. Secure test materials are to be stored in the building prior to and after testing in accordance to the test administration guidelines of each assessment. Testing, including makeups, must occur during the testing window. Access to test booklets and answer sheets shall be restricted to the scheduled dates of test administration. 6. Any allegations of cheating, security breach, testing administration breach, copyright infringement, loss of materials, or other deviation from acceptable and ethical security procedures shall be reported immediately to the principal, district test coordinator, district superintendent, and the WVDE Office of Assessment and Research. The WVDE Office of Assessment and Research, in conjunction with the WVDE Office of Legal Services and Accountability, shall report allegations to the State Superintendent of Schools according to the protocol set forth in this policy. 7. No secure test materials, test questions or student responses/answer sheets shall be reviewed, retained, reproduced, paraphrased, or discussed in any manner. Additionally, teachers and/or students may not alert examinees to the correct answer choice by pointing to the correct answer, eliminating answer choices, or mouthing the correct answer. 8. Personnel responsible for the testing program shall be properly instructed and participate in the training for each assessment s appropriate test administration procedures as set forth in Appendices B-G in this policy. 9. Each district test coordinator shall complete each required WVDE s assessment training and sign a WVBE District Test Coordinator s Secure Materials and Test Procedures Agreement. The agreements shall be filed at the WVDE prior to the fifteenth of September each year. 144 West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

165 Appendix A Ethical Testing Practices 10. Each district technology coordinator shall complete each required WVDE assessment training and sign a WVBE RESA/District/School Technology Personnel Security Agreement. The agreement shall be on file with the district test coordinator prior to the last day of September each year. 11. Principals shall complete each required district test coordinator s assessment training and sign a WVBE Principal s/secure Materials and Test Procedures Agreement. The agreement shall be on file with the district test coordinator prior to the last day of September each year. 12. Building level coordinators shall complete each required district test coordinators training and sign WVBE Building Level Coordinator s Security Agreement to remain with the district test coordinator prior to the last day of September. 13. Any individual who administers, handles, or has access to secure test materials at the district or school shall complete each required assessment s training and sign the appropriate training verification form.to remain on file in the appropriate office each year. 14. No one shall compromise test security or the accuracy of the test data score results by manipulating the test administration, test equipment, demographic data, or the students' answers or data. 15. Student test scores or test performance shall not be disclosed to unauthorized persons as per the FERPA, the Student Data Accessibility, Transparency, and Accountability Act, Policy 4350, and the WVDE Data Access and Management Guidance and Policy Test Administration 1. Tests shall be administered only during the testing window established by the WVBE, except when requested, in writing, by the district superintendent and district test coordinator and subsequently approved by the WVDE Office of Assessment and Research. 2. Examiners of standardized tests shall rigorously follow the appropriate administrative procedures as directed in the test's administration manual(s). 3. All examiners shall strive to create a positive testing environment. 4. Students shall not have access to secure test content and materials. 5. Examiners shall limit assistance to students to only those issues concerning the mechanical aspects of selecting answers, clarifying directions, and finding the right place on answer sheets or electronic display. Examiners shall not indicate answers, point out the rationale of an item, or prompt students in any manner. 6. Students, examiners, and technology specialists shall be monitored to ensure that appropriate test taking procedures and test security measures are followed. 7. Specific information, as specified by the test manual, shall not be displayed in the room during test administration. 8. Only references or tools specifically designated in test manuals are provided to students. 9. Accommodations and designated supports, as appropriate, for students with IEPs, SAT Plans, Section 504 Plans, or ELL Assessment Participation Forms shall be provided as established by their respective plans. 145 West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

166 Appendix A. Ethical Testing Practices 10. An examiner shall not administer tests to his/her family. 11. Appropriate test preparation is recommended and may include the use of diagnostic and interim assessments, classroom formative assessment, standards-focused instruction, and the development of study skills and test-taking strategies. Test Notification 1. Students and parent(s)/guardian(s) shall be a) given notification before testing; b) provided information on the purposes and descriptions of the test and uses of the test results; and c) encouraged to follow test preparation procedures. West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

167 Appendix B. District Test Coordinator's Secure Materials and Test Procedures Agreement State of West Virginia District of West Virginia Board of Education West Virginia Measures of Academic Progress West Virginia Constitution, Article XII, 2; W. Va. Code 18-2E-1a(4), requires that the West Virginia Board of Education ensure that all statewide assessments of student performance are secure. District Test Coordinator's Secure Materials and Test Procedures Agreement I acknowledge that I will have access to secure assessments in the West Virginia Measures of Academic Progress. I also acknowledge that I have read, understand, and agree to adhere to West Virginia Board of Education Policy 2340, including the Testing Code of Ethics, Appendix A, for all assessments within the West Virginia Measures of Academic Progress. I understand that these materials are secure, and it is my professional responsibility to protect their security. I agree to complete each assessment s required training. I therefore pledge: 1. I will not retain, copy, reproduce, paraphrase, distribute, or review/discuss secure test items or student responses. 2. I will implement procedures to ensure maximum test security. Access to secure materials, including methods of authentication, will be restricted to the test administration period designated by the State mandated testing window. 3. I am responsible for the distribution of secure testing materials, including counting, reconciling, and returning all test booklets/answer sheets (used and unused) according to the instructions provided with the test, before and after each test administration. A record of the number of booklets and other identifying characteristics sent to and returned from each school shall be kept. 4. I am responsible for the shipment of the test booklets/answer sheets to the schools no earlier than five instructional days prior to the testing window and returned to me by the schools on the date determined by the district. I will ensure that test materials are securely stored in the buildings according to the instructions provided with the test and that all testing must occur during the testing window. 5. I will immediately report any loss of materials, cheating, security breach, testing administration breach, copyright infringement, or other deviation from acceptable security procedures to the district superintendent and to the Office of Assessment and Research. 6. I will properly instruct the principals and building level coordinators in appropriate test security and test administration procedures, including the WVBE Testing Code of Ethics. 7. I will collect and retain the signed WVBE Principal s Secure Materials and Test Procedures Agreement and WVBE Building Level Coordinator s Secure Materials and Test Procedures Agreement if applicable, for each school in the district by the last of September. 8. I will not release secure test administration materials to a school without the signed WVBE Principal s Secure Materials and Test Procedures Agreement and verification of training of all other applicable school personnel. 9. I will not disclose individual student test scores or test performance data to unauthorized persons as set forth in FERPA, the Student Data Accessibility, Transparency, and Accountability Act, Policy 4350, the WVDE Data Access and Management Guidance and Policy I will not violate test security or the accuracy of the test data score results by manipulating the test administration, demographic data, or the students answers or data. 11. I will not give students access to test questions or answer keys. 12. If serving as an examiner for an online assessment, I will not offer technical (accessing dictionary, grammar checks, formatting functions, etc.) assistance that might alter the accuracy of student responses in the webbased assessment before, during, or after the administration of the test. 13. I understand that if a breach of test security or copyright infringement occurs as a direct result of my actions, my license/certification may be suspended or revoked, or I may be suspended, terminated, or have other action taken. Please print your name, sign, and return the District Test Coordinator s Secure Materials and Test Procedures Agreement to the WVDE, Office of Assessment and Research prior to the fifteenth day of September. Signature: Print Name: Date: If this form is not on file, it will be considered a breach of security by the district and state boards of education. This agreement is valid for the academic year of signatory date West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

168 Appendix C. District Technology Coordinator or Technology Vendor Secure Materials and Test Procedures Agreement State of West Virginia District of West Virginia Board of Education West Virginia Measures of Academic Progress West Virginia Constitution, Article XII, 2; W. Va. Code 18-2E-1a(4), requires that the West Virginia Board of Education ensure that all statewide assessments of student performance are secure. District Technology Coordinator or Technology Vendor Secure Materials and Test Procedures Agreement I acknowledge that I will have access to secure assessments in the West Virginia Measures of Academic Progress. I also acknowledge that I have read, understand, and agree to adhere to West Virginia Board of Education Policy 2340, including the Testing Code of Ethics, Appendix A, for all assessments within the West Virginia Measures of Academic Progress. I understand that these materials are secure, and it is my professional responsibility to protect their security. I therefore pledge: 1. I will not retain, copy, reproduce, paraphrase, distribute, or review/discuss secure test items, testing materials or student responses. 2. I will implement or follow (as my position requires) procedures to ensure maximum test security. Access to secure materials, including methods of authentication, will be restricted to the test administration period designated by the State mandated testing window. 3. I will immediately report any loss of materials, cheating, security breach, testing administration breach, copyright infringement, or other deviation from acceptable security procedures to the district superintendent and to the Office of Assessment and Research. 4. I will not release or upload secure test administration materials, questions, answer keys or other testing materials to a school before having signed the WVBE District Technology Coordinator or Technology Vendor Secure Materials and Test Procedures Agreement. 5. I will not disclose individual student test scores or test performance data to unauthorized persons as set forth in FERPA, the Student Data Accessibility, Transparency, and Accountability Act, Policy 4350, the WVDE Data Access and Management Guidance and Policy I will not violate test security or the accuracy of the test data score results by manipulating the test administration, demographic data, or the students answers or data. 7. I will not provide access to test items or answer keys. 8. If serving as an examiner for an online assessment, I will not offer technical (accessing dictionary, grammar checks, formatting functions, etc.) assistance that might alter the accuracy of student responses in the web-based assessment before, during, or after the administration of the test. 9. I understand that, if I am a district employee, and if a breach of test security or copyright infringement occurs as a direct result of my actions, my license/certification may be suspended or revoked, or I may be suspended, terminated, or have other action taken. 10. I understand that, if I am a vendor or employed by a vendor, and if a breach of test security or copyright infringement occurs as a direct result of my actions the vendor contract may be revoked and other action may be taken. Please print your name, sign, and return the District Technology Coordinator or Technology Vendor Secure Materials and Test Procedures Agreement to the WVDE, Office of Assessment and Research prior to the fifteenth day of September. Signature: Print Name: Date: If this form is not on file, it will be considered a breach of security by the district and state boards of education. This agreement is valid for the academic year of signatory date. West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

169 Appendix D. Principals Secure Materials and Test Procedures Agreement State of West Virginia District of 149 West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments, West Virginia Board of Education West Virginia Measures of Academic Progress West Virginia Constitution, Article XII, 2; W. Va. Code 18-2E-1a(4), requires that the West Virginia Board of Education ensure that all statewide assessments of student performance are secure. Principal's Secure Materials and Test Procedures Agreement I acknowledge that I will have access to secure assessments in the West Virginia Measures of Academic Progress. I also acknowledge that I have read, understand, and agree to adhere to West Virginia Board of Education Policy 2340, including the Testing Code of Ethics, Appendix A, for all assessments within the West Virginia Measures of Academic Progress. I understand that these materials are secure, and it is my professional responsibility to protect their security. I agree to complete each assessment s required training. I therefore pledge: 1. I will not keep, copy, reproduce, paraphrase, distribute, or review/discuss secure test items or student responses. 2. I will implement procedures to ensure maximum test security. Access to secure materials, including methods of authentication, will be restricted to the test administration period designated by the State mandated testing window. 3. I am responsible for the distribution of secure testing materials, including counting, reconciling, and returning all test booklets/answer sheets (used and unused) according to the instructions provided with the test, before and after each test administration. A record of the number of booklets and other identifying characteristics sent to and returned from my assigned school shall be kept. 4. I am responsible for the test booklets/answer sheets shipped to and returned from my school and will ensure that test materials are securely stored in locked and secure central location(s) prior to and immediately following each daily testing session. 5. I will immediately report any loss of materials, cheating, security breach, testing administration breach, copyright infringement, or other deviation from acceptable security procedures to the district test coordinator. 6. I will ensure all applicable personnel receive the proper instruction in appropriate test security and test administration procedures, including the WVBE Testing Code of Ethics. 7. I will collect and retain the signed WVBE Examiner s/scribe s Secure Materials and Test Agreement and WVBE RESA/District/School Personnel Secure Materials Agreement for all applicable personnel in the building no later than five instructional days prior to the first day of testing. Verification of all trained school personnel with a signed WVBE Examiner s/scribe s Secure Materials and Test Procedures Agreement and WVBE RESA/District/School/Personnel Secure Materials Agreement will be on file with the district test coordinator no later than five instructional days prior to the first day of testing. 8. I will not disclose individual student test scores or test performance data to unauthorized persons as set forth in FERPA, the Student Data Accessibility, Transparency, and Accountability Act, found in W. Va. Code h, Policy 4350, the WVDE Data Access and Management Guidance, and Policy I will not violate test security or the accuracy of the test data score results by manipulating the test administration, demographic data, or the students answers or data. 10. I will not give students access to test questions or answer keys.

170 Appendix D. Principal s Secure Materials and Test Procedures Agreement 11. I will monitor examiners and students to ensure that only references or tools specifically designated in test manuals or by accommodations are provided. 12. I will check testing rooms prior to the beginning of test administration to ensure that all specific information, as specified by the test manual, is not displayed in the room during the test administration. 13. I will ensure that examiners comply with the appropriate accommodations for students with IEPs, SAT Plans, Section 504 Plans, and ELL Assessment Participation Forms when so designated in the test manual. 14. I am responsible for monitoring and verifying that the building level coordinator(s), if applicable, has fulfilled his/her assigned duties. 15. If serving as an examiner for an online assessment, I will not offer technical (accessing dictionary, grammar checks, formatting functions, etc.) assistance that might alter the accuracy of student responses in the web-based assessment before, during, or after the administration of the test. 16. I understand that if a breach of test security or copyright infringement occurs as a direct result of my actions, my license/certification may be suspended or revoked, or I may be suspended, terminated, or have other action taken. Please print your name, sign, and return the Principal s Secure Materials and Test Procedures Agreement to the district test coordinator prior to the last day of September. Signature: Print Name: School: Date: If this form is not on file, it will be considered a breach of security by the district and state boards of education. This agreement is valid for the academic year of signatory date. West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

171 Appendix E. Building Level Coordinator s Secure Materials and Test Procedures Agreement (Other than Principal) State of West Virginia District of West Virginia Board of Education West Virginia Measures of Academic Progress West Virginia Constitution, Article XII, 2; W. Va. Code 18-2E-1a(4), requires that the West Virginia Board of Education ensure that all statewide assessments of student performance are secure. Building Level Coordinator's Secure Materials and Test Procedures Agreement (Other than Principal) I acknowledge that I will have access to secure assessments in the West Virginia Measures of Academic Progress. I also acknowledge that I have read, understand, and agree to adhere to West Virginia Board of Education Policy 2340, including the Testing Code of Ethics, Appendix A, for all assessments within the West Virginia Measures of Academic Progress. I understand that these materials are secure, and it is my professional responsibility to protect their security. I agree to complete each assessment s required training. I therefore pledge: 1. I will not keep, copy, reproduce, paraphrase, distribute, or review/discuss secure test materials and/or test items or student responses. 2. I will implement procedures to ensure maximum test security. Access to secure materials, including methods of authentication, will be restricted to the test administration period designated by the State mandated testing window. 3. I will distribute the secure testing materials, including counting, reconciling, and returning all test booklets/answer sheets (used and unused) according to the instructions provided with the test, before and after each test administration. A record of the number of booklets and other identifying characteristics sent to and returned to my school shall be given to and kept by the principal. 4. I am responsible, to the principal, for the test booklets/answer sheets shipped to and returned from my school and will ensure that test materials are securely stored in locked and secure location(s) prior to and immediately following each daily testing session. 5. I will immediately report any loss of materials, cheating, security breach, testing administration breach, copyright infringement, or other deviation from acceptable security procedures to the principal. 6. I will ensure all applicable personnel receive the proper instruction in appropriate test security and test administration procedures, including the WVBE Testing Code of Ethics, if assigned by the principal to do so. 7. I will collect, if assigned to do so, and give to the principal, the signed WVBE Examiner s/scribe s Secure Materials and Test Procedures Agreement and WVBE RESA/District/School Personnel Secure Materials Agreement for all applicable personnel in the building no later than five instructional days prior to the first day of testing. Verification of all trained school personnel with a signed WVBE Examiner s/scribe s Secure Materials and Test Procedures Agreement and WVBE RESA/District/School Personnel Secure Materials Agreement will be given to the principal no later than five instructional days prior to the first day of testing. 8. I will not disclose individual student test scores or test performance data to unauthorized persons as set forth in FERPA, the Student Data Accessibility, Transparency, and Accountability Act, found in W. Va. Code h, Policy 4350 and Policy West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

172 Appendix E. Building Level Coordinator s Secure Materials and Test Procedures Agreement (Other than Principal) 9. I will not violate test security or the accuracy of the test data score results by manipulating the test administration, demographic data, or the students answers or data. 10. I will not give students access to test questions or answer keys. 11. I will monitor examiners and students to ensure that only references or tools specifically designated in test manuals or by accommodations are provided. 12. I will check testing rooms prior to the beginning of test administration to ensure that all specific information, as specified by the test manual, is not displayed in the room during the test administration. 13. I will ensure that examiners comply with the appropriate accommodations for students with IEPs, SAT Plans, Section 504 Plans, and ELL Assessment Participation Forms when so designated in the test manual. 14. If serving as an examiner for online assessment, I will not offer technical (accessing dictionary, grammar checks, formatting functions, etc.) assistance that might alter the accuracy of student responses in the web-based assessment before, during, or after the administration of the test. 15. I understand that if a breach of test security or copyright infringement occurs as a direct result of my actions, my license/certification may be suspended or revoked, or I may be suspended, terminated, or have other action taken. Please print your name, sign, and return the Building Level Coordinator s Secure Materials and Test Procedures Agreement to the district test coordinator prior to the last day of September. Signature: Print Name: School: Date: If this form is not on file, it will be considered a breach of security by the district and state boards of education. This agreement is valid for the academic year of signatory date. West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

173 Appendix F. Examiner s/scribe s Secure Materials Agreement State of West Virginia District of West Virginia Board of Education West Virginia Measures of Academic Progress West Virginia Constitution, Article XII, 2; W. Va. Code 18-2E-1a(4), requires that the West Virginia Board of Education ensure that all statewide assessments of student performance are secure. Examiner s/scribe s Secure Materials and Test Procedures Agreement I acknowledge that I will have access to secure assessments in the West Virginia Measures of Academic Progress. I also acknowledge that I have read, understand, and agree to adhere to the West Virginia Board of Education Policy 2340, including the Testing Code of Ethics, Appendix A, for all assessments within the West Virginia Measures of Academic Progress. I understand that these materials are secure, and it is my professional responsibility to protect their security. I agree to complete each assessment s required training. I therefore pledge: 1. I will not keep, copy, reproduce, paraphrase, distribute, or review/discuss secure test materials and/or test items. 2. I will not use test items, test booklets/answer sheets, or any of the information contained in an assessment to review/prepare students for a test. 3. I will not allow access to the test materials or answer keys to any student or any other person not so authorized by the principal. 4. I will not alter students responses in any manner (indicate answers, point out rationale, prompt, etc.). 5. I will not disclose individual student test scores or test performance data to unauthorized persons as set forth in FERPA, the Student Data Accessibility, Transparency, and Accountability Act, found in W. Va. Code h, Policy 4350, the WVDE Data Access and Management Guidance, and Policy If serving as an examiner for APTA, I will adhere to the prompting hierarchies and document all applicable assistive technology to ensure the accuracy of student responses. 7. If serving as an examiner for students with IEPs, SAT Plans, Section 504 Plans, or ELL Assessment Participation Forms, I will adhere to the accommodations listed therein and monitor using the appropriate process (WV 326). 8. If serving as an examiner for an online assessment, I will not offer technical (accessing dictionary, grammar checks, formatting functions, etc.) assistance that might alter the accuracy of student responses in the webbased assessment before, during, or after the administration of the test. 9. I have read Policy I understand that if a breach of test security or copyright infringement occurs as a direct result of my actions, my license/certification may be suspended or revoked, or I may be suspended, terminated, or have other action taken. Please print your name, sign, and return the Examiner s/scribe s Secure Materials and Test Procedures Agreement to the appropriate test administrator five instructional days prior to the administering any assessment. Signature: Print Name: Position: School: Date: If this form is not on file, it will be considered a breach of security by the district and state boards of education. This agreement is valid for the academic year of signatory date. 153 West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

174 Appendix G. RESA/District/School Personnel Secure Materials Agreement State of West Virginia District of Progress West Virginia Board of Education West Virginia Measures of Academic West Virginia Constitution, Article XII, 2; W. Va. Code 18-2E-1a(4), requires that the West Virginia Board of Education ensure that all statewide assessments of student performance are secure. RESA/District/School Personnel Secure Materials Agreement (For all personnel with access to secure materials who will not administer or transcribe an assessment.) I acknowledge that I will have access to secure assessments in the West Virginia Measures of Academic Progress. I also acknowledge that I have read, understand, and agree to adhere to West Virginia Board of Education Policy 2340, including the Testing Code of Ethics, Appendix A, for all assessments within the West Virginia Measures of Academic Progress. I understand that these materials are secure, and it is my professional responsibility to protect their security. I therefore pledge: 1. I will not keep, copy, reproduce, paraphrase, distribute, or review/discuss secure test materials and/or test items. 2. I will not allow access to the test materials or answer keys to any person, unless authorized to do so by the district test coordinator or principal. 3. I will not alter students responses in any manner. 4. I will immediately report any loss of materials, damages, or other deviations from acceptable security procedures to either district test coordinator or principal. 5. I will not offer technical (accessing dictionary, grammar checks, formatting functions, etc.) assistance that might alter the accuracy of student responses in the web-based assessment, before, during, or after the administration of the test. 6. I understand that if a breach of test security or copyright infringement occurs as a direct result of my actions, my license/certification, if applicable, may be suspended or revoked, or I may be suspended, terminated, or have other action taken. Please print your name, sign, and return the RESA/District/School Personnel Secure Materials Agreement to the district test coordinator or principal prior to access to secure test materials. Signature: Print Name: Position: School/Department: Date: If this form is not on file, it will be considered a breach of security by the district and state boards of education. This agreement is valid for the academic year of signatory date. West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

175 Appendix H. WVDE/RESA/District/School Technology Personnel Secure Materials and Test Procedures Agreement State of West Virginia District of West Virginia Board of Education West Virginia Measures of Academic Progress West Virginia Constitution, Article XII, 2; W. Va. Code 18-2E-1a(4), requires that the West Virginia Board of Education ensure that all statewide assessments of student performance are secure. WVDE/RESA/District/School Technology Personnel Secure Materials and Test Procedures Agreement (For all technology personnel with access to online testing systems.) I acknowledge that I will have access to secure assessments in the West Virginia Measures of Academic Progress. I also acknowledge that I have read, understand, and agree to adhere to West Virginia Board of Education Policy 2340, including the Testing Code of Ethics, Appendix A, for all assessments within the West Virginia Measures of Academic Progress, including pilot tests and field tests sanctioned by WVDE. I understand that these materials are secure, and it is my professional responsibility to protect their security. I therefore pledge: 1. I will implement procedures to ensure maximum test security. Access to secure materials, including methods of authentication, will be restricted to the test administration period designated by the State mandated testing window. 2. I will ensure that all secure content and security features have been installed and/or updated on all devices to be used for administering statewide assessments, and shall ensure the school s wireless connections are secure for testing. 3. I will not access operational test materials or answer keys. 4. I will not provide access to test items or answer keys. 5. I will not keep, copy, reproduce, paraphrase, distribute, or review/discuss secure test materials and/or test items. 6. I will not answer any items on the operational test as a student or with a fictitious name. 7. I will immediately report any loss of materials, damages, or other deviations from acceptable security procedures to either district test coordinator or principal. 8. I understand that if a breach of test security or copyright infringement occurs as a direct result of my actions, my license/certification, if applicable, may be suspended or revoked, or I may be suspended, terminated, or have other action taken. Please print your name, sign, and return the WVDE/RESA/District/School Technology Secure Materials Agreement to the district test coordinator or principal prior to access to secure test materials. Signature: Print Name: Position: School/Department: Date: If this form is not on file, it will be considered a breach of security by the district and state boards of education. This agreement is valid for the academic year of signatory date. 155 West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

176 Appendix I. Verification of Training for Principals, Building Level Coordinators, District/School, RESA Personnel (Examiners/Scribes/Other School Personnel) Training Session of Page of State of West Virginia County of School West Virginia Board of Education West Virginia Measures of Academic Progress West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessment, Verification of Training for Principals, Building Level Coordinators, County/School, RESA Personnel (Examiners/Scribes/Other School Personnel) By signing my name below, I acknowledge that I have received training in secure materials, test procedures, test administration and Policy 2340 for the assessment indicated by a. Check ACT COMPASS ACT EXPLORE ACT PLAN WV statewide alternate summative assessment Pilot/Field Test Policy 2340 WV statewide General Summative Assessment Date of Training Printed Name Signature Position By signing below, I verify I have trained the above personnel in secure materials, test procedures, and test administration for the indicated assessment. Signature of Trainer Printed Name of Trainer Date County administrator/principal/building level coordinator must have signed copies Appendix G on file five instructional days prior to each testing window.

177 Appendix J District Supplemental Assessments Notification Form Does your county require any assessments other than the components of West Virginia Measures of Academic Progress (General summative, Alternate Assessment, ACT COMPASS and NAEP)? Yes No If yes, please list the assessment(s) and outline the county process to ensure that students with disabilities receive the appropriate accommodations on the assessment(s). Signature Position Date County 157 West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

178 Appendix K. WVS.326 Accommodations Monitoring Form West Virginia Guidelines for Participation in State Assessments,

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