Q = mc T f T i ) Q = mc T)

Save this PDF as:
 WORD  PNG  TXT  JPG

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "Q = mc T f T i ) Q = mc T)"

Transcription

1 Problem Solving with Heat Heat is quite a complex concept. Heat can be effected by how much of the substance there is, what temperature the substance is at, and what the substance is. We need a unit define and quantify heat. It is a unit that you are very familiar with already; the calorie. Calories A calorie is a unit of energy, of heat. With every substance having a different specific heat capacity, it can be difficult to come up with a unit that describes all energy. It was decided to pick a common substance to act as a standard against which all other substances would be measured. The common substance picked was water. We know that mass, specific heat, and temperature all effect the energy of a substance so to keep the numbers very simple: a calorie was defined as the amount of energy needed to raise 1 grams of water by 1 o C Do you notice that all three aspects of heat are included; mass, temperature, and identity? Thus, the specific heat capacity of water (as indicated in the previous section) is defined as 1 cal/g o C. So if 1 calorie of heat is applied to 1 gram of water at 20 o C, the water increases to 21 o C. If 10 calories of heat are applied to 1 gram of water at 20 o C, the water increases to 30 o C. If 10 calories of heat are applied to 10 grams of water at 20 o C, the water increase to 21 o C! Let s put all this into a simple equation which includes all of our variables: Heat Mass Specific heat capacity Q = mc T f T i ) Q = mc T) Change in temperature The heat quantity is Q, the mass is m, the specific heat capacity is c, and the final temperature is T f while the initial temperature is T i.. Another way to represent this equation is by combining T f and T i into one variable T, which is the change in the temperature; the same thing as T f- T i. Lets look at some examples of typical problems you will see: Final temperature minus the inititial temperature

2 Example 1: How much heat (in calories) is needed to raise 20 grams of water from 5 o C to 40 o C? m = 20 grams T f = 40 o C T i = 5 x = (20 g) (1 cal/g o C)( C) = 700 cal Example 2: How much heat (in calories) is needed to raise 140 grams of water from 20 o C to 25 o C? m = 140 grams T f = 25 o C T i = 20 o C x = (140 g) (1 cal/g o C)( ) = 700 cal Please note that the amount of calories is the same in both problems. In example 1 we have 20 grams being changed by 35 o C while in example 2 we have much more water (140 grams) being changed by a much smaller amount (5 o C). Example 3: How much heat (in calories) is needed to raise 250 grams of water from 80 o C to 87 o C? m = 250 grams T f = 87 o C T i = 80 o C x = (250 g) (1 cal/g o C)( C) = 1750 cal

3 Example 4: How many calories are needed to raise 50 grams of iron from 55 o C to 200 o C? The specific heat capacity of iron is 0.11 cal/g o C. Example 5: m = 50 grams c = 0.11 cal/g o C T f = 200 o C T i = 55 o C x = (50 g) (0.11 cal/g o C)( C) = cal How many grams of aluminum can be heated from 90 o C to 120 o C if 500 calories are applied? The specific heat of aluminum is 0.21 cal/g o C. Example 6: Q = 500 calories m = x grams c = 0.21 cal/g o C T f = 120 o C T i = 90 o C 500 cal= (x) (0.21 cal/g o C)( C) x = 79.4 grams What is the specific heat capacity of a substance if 400 calories cause 25 grams of it to go from 60 o C to 190 o C? Q = 400 calories m = 25 grams c = x cal/g o C T f = 190 o C T i = 60 o C 400 calories = (25 g) (x)(130 0 C) x = cal/g o C

4 Example 7: What is the final temperature if 500 calories are applied to 40 grams of copper at 20 o C? The specific heat capacity of copper is cal/g o C. Example 8: Q = 500 m = 40 grams c = cal/g o C T f = x T i = 20 o C 500 cal = (40 g) (0.092 cal/g o C)(x 20 0 C) x = 156 o C What was the initial temperature if 250 calories were applied to 100 grams of gold and the final temperature of the gold was 175 o C? The specific heat capacity of gold is cal/g o C. Example 9: Q = 250 calories m = 100 grams c = cal/g o C T f = 175 o C T i = x o C 250 cal= (100 g) (0.031 cal/g o C)(175 x 0 C) x = 94 o C What is the change in the temperature if 75 calories are applied to 10 grams of water? Q = 75 calories m = 10 grams c = 1 cal/g o C T f T i = x (note that in this problem we want the change so both T f T i are included as x) 75 calories = (10 g) (1 cal/g o C)(x) x = 7.5 o C

5 Questions Specific Heat Capacities Substance Specific Heat Capacity (cal/g o C) Water 1.0 Ice 0.49 Copper Gold Iron 0.11 Aluminum How many calories would it take to raise the temperature of 200 grams of water from 5 o C to 85 o C? 2. How many calories would problem number 1 be if it was aluminum instead of water? 3. How many grams of copper could be heated from 20 o C to 75 o C if 1200 calories are applied to it? 4. How many grams of iron could be heated from 15 o C to 300 o C if 8000 calories are applied to it? 5. What is the specific heat capacity of a substance if 750 calories caused 100 grams of it to go from 90 o C to 135 o C? 6. When 400 calories are applied to 20 grams of a substance, it goes from 62 o C to 82 o C. Which of the substances in the table above is this? 7. What is the final temperature if 400 calories are applied to 225 grams of iron at 40 o C? 8. What would the final temperature be if 500 calories are applied to 150 grams of ice at 90 o C? 9. What is the temperature change if 50 calories are applied to 4 grams of water? 10. What would the temperature change by if a 90 gram piece of hot iron cooled by losing 200 calories. We typically think of calories as the energy from food. However, food calories are actually Calories with a capital C. This small change is very important as a Calorie is equal to 1000 calories or 1 kilocalorie. This nutrition fact shows that an egg can give 70 Calories which would be 70,000 calories. This is enough energy to raise 70,000 grams of water by 1 o C! A typical diet is supposed to have about 2000 Calories or 2,000,000 calories which seems like a lot. Keep in mind, though, that our bodies have to keep us at about 31 o C every minute of the day and a typical person weighs around 175 pounds or around 80,000 grams. Also, our bodies are not perfect in turning every bit of that energy into useful, productive outcomes.

Worksheet #17. 2. How much heat is released when 143 g of ice is cooled from 14 C to 75 C, if the specific heat capacity of ice is 2.087 J/(g C).

Worksheet #17. 2. How much heat is released when 143 g of ice is cooled from 14 C to 75 C, if the specific heat capacity of ice is 2.087 J/(g C). Worksheet #17 Calculating Heat 1. How much heat is needed to bring 12.0 g of water from 28.3 C to 43.87 C, if the specific heat capacity of water is 4.184 /(g? 2. How much heat is released when 143 g of

More information

EXPERIMENT 4 THE DETERMINATION OF THE CALORIC CONTENT OF A CASHEW NUT

EXPERIMENT 4 THE DETERMINATION OF THE CALORIC CONTENT OF A CASHEW NUT EXPERIMENT 4 THE DETERMINATION OF THE CALORIC CONTENT OF A CASHEW NUT Textbook reference: pp103-105 Purpose: In this Activity, students determine how many calories are released per gram when cashews burn

More information

Chapter 18 Temperature, Heat, and the First Law of Thermodynamics. Problems: 8, 11, 13, 17, 21, 27, 29, 37, 39, 41, 47, 51, 57

Chapter 18 Temperature, Heat, and the First Law of Thermodynamics. Problems: 8, 11, 13, 17, 21, 27, 29, 37, 39, 41, 47, 51, 57 Chapter 18 Temperature, Heat, and the First Law of Thermodynamics Problems: 8, 11, 13, 17, 21, 27, 29, 37, 39, 41, 47, 51, 57 Thermodynamics study and application of thermal energy temperature quantity

More information

2. Room temperature: C. Kelvin. 2. Room temperature:

2. Room temperature: C. Kelvin. 2. Room temperature: Temperature I. Temperature is the quantity that tells how hot or cold something is compared with a standard A. Temperature is directly proportional to the average kinetic energy of molecular translational

More information

Chapter 4 Practice Quiz

Chapter 4 Practice Quiz Chapter 4 Practice Quiz 1. Label each box with the appropriate state of matter. A) I: Gas II: Liquid III: Solid B) I: Liquid II: Solid III: Gas C) I: Solid II: Liquid III: Gas D) I: Gas II: Solid III:

More information

5 Answers and Solutions to Text Problems

5 Answers and Solutions to Text Problems Energy and States of Matter 5 Answers and Solutions to Text Problems 5.1 At the top of the hill, all of the energy of the car is in the form of potential energy. As it descends down the hill, potential

More information

REASONING AND SOLUTION

REASONING AND SOLUTION 39. REASONING AND SOLUTION The heat released by the blood is given by Q cm T, in which the specific heat capacity c of the blood (water) is given in Table 12.2. Then Therefore, T Q cm 2000 J 0.8 C [4186

More information

UNIT (1) MEASUREMENTS IN CHEMISTRY

UNIT (1) MEASUREMENTS IN CHEMISTRY UNIT (1) MEASUREMENTS IN CHEMISTRY Measurements are part of our daily lives. We measure our weights, driving distances, and gallons of gasoline. As a health professional you might measure blood pressure,

More information

UNIT 6a TEST REVIEW. 1. A weather instrument is shown below.

UNIT 6a TEST REVIEW. 1. A weather instrument is shown below. UNIT 6a TEST REVIEW 1. A weather instrument is shown below. Which weather variable is measured by this instrument? 1) wind speed 3) cloud cover 2) precipitation 4) air pressure 2. Which weather station

More information

Chapter 2 Measurements in Chemistry. Standard measuring device. Standard scale gram (g)

Chapter 2 Measurements in Chemistry. Standard measuring device. Standard scale gram (g) 1 Chapter 2 Measurements in Chemistry Standard measuring device Standard scale gram (g) 2 Reliability of Measurements Accuracy closeness to true value Precision reproducibility Example: 98.6 o F 98.5 o

More information

Chapter 3 Student Reading

Chapter 3 Student Reading Chapter 3 Student Reading If you hold a solid piece of lead or iron in your hand, it feels heavy for its size. If you hold the same size piece of balsa wood or plastic, it feels light for its size. The

More information

Chapter 1 Lecture Notes: Science and Measurements

Chapter 1 Lecture Notes: Science and Measurements Educational Goals Chapter 1 Lecture Notes: Science and Measurements 1. Explain, compare, and contrast the terms scientific method, hypothesis, and experiment. 2. Compare and contrast scientific theory

More information

Energy Conversions I. Unit of measure (most common one) Form Definition Example

Energy Conversions I. Unit of measure (most common one) Form Definition Example Energy Conversions I Energy can take many forms, but any one form can usually be converted into another. And no matter what form we talk about, we can use conversion factors to calculate equivalent amounts

More information

Chemical Changes. Measuring a Chemical Reaction. Name(s)

Chemical Changes. Measuring a Chemical Reaction. Name(s) Chemical Changes Name(s) In the particle model of matter, individual atoms can be bound tightly to other atoms to form molecules. For example, water molecules are made up of two hydrogen atoms bound to

More information

Chapter 10 Temperature and Heat

Chapter 10 Temperature and Heat Chapter 10 Temperature and Heat GOALS When you have mastered the contents of this chapter, you will be able to achieve the following goals: Definitions Define each of the following terms, and use it an

More information

Chapter 10: Temperature and Heat

Chapter 10: Temperature and Heat Chapter 10: Temperature and Heat 1. The temperature of a substance is A. proportional to the average kinetic energy of the molecules in a substance. B. equal to the kinetic energy of the fastest moving

More information

Recovery of Elemental Copper from Copper (II) Nitrate

Recovery of Elemental Copper from Copper (II) Nitrate Recovery of Elemental Copper from Copper (II) Nitrate Objectives: Challenge: Students should be able to - recognize evidence(s) of a chemical change - convert word equations into formula equations - perform

More information

Name: Unit 2- Elements, Compounds and Mixtures and Physical/Chemical Properties and Changes. Elements, Compounds and Mixtures

Name: Unit 2- Elements, Compounds and Mixtures and Physical/Chemical Properties and Changes. Elements, Compounds and Mixtures Name: Unit 2- Elements, Compounds and Mixtures and Physical/Chemical Properties and Changes Day Page # Description IC/HW All 2 Warm-up IC 1 3 5 Matter Notes IC 1 6 Nuts & Bolts IC 1 7 Elements, Compounds

More information

Preview of Period 5: Thermal Energy, the Microscopic Picture

Preview of Period 5: Thermal Energy, the Microscopic Picture Preview of Period 5: Thermal Energy, the Microscopic Picture 5.1 Temperature and Molecular Motion What is evaporative cooling? 5.2 Temperature and Phase Changes How much energy is required for a phase

More information

5.4 Solving Percent Problems Using the Percent Equation

5.4 Solving Percent Problems Using the Percent Equation 5. Solving Percent Problems Using the Percent Equation In this section we will develop and use a more algebraic equation approach to solving percent equations. Recall the percent proportion from the last

More information

Energy and Chemical Reactions. Characterizing Energy:

Energy and Chemical Reactions. Characterizing Energy: Energy and Chemical Reactions Energy: Critical for virtually all aspects of chemistry Defined as: We focus on energy transfer. We observe energy changes in: Heat Transfer: How much energy can a material

More information

MOLES, MOLECULES, FORMULAS. Part I: What Is a Mole And Why Are Chemists Interested in It?

MOLES, MOLECULES, FORMULAS. Part I: What Is a Mole And Why Are Chemists Interested in It? NAME PARTNERS SECTION DATE_ MOLES, MOLECULES, FORMULAS This activity is designed to introduce a convenient unit used by chemists and to illustrate uses of the unit. Part I: What Is a Mole And Why Are Chemists

More information

Chapter 1: Chemistry: Measurements and Methods

Chapter 1: Chemistry: Measurements and Methods Chapter 1: Chemistry: Measurements and Methods 1.1 The Discovery Process o Chemistry - The study of matter o Matter - Anything that has mass and occupies space, the stuff that things are made of. This

More information

PART A: For each worker, determine that worker's marginal product of labor.

PART A: For each worker, determine that worker's marginal product of labor. ECON 3310 Homework #4 - Solutions 1: Suppose the following indicates how many units of output y you can produce per hour with different levels of labor input (given your current factory capacity): PART

More information

SEPARATION OF A MIXTURE OF SUBSTANCES LAB

SEPARATION OF A MIXTURE OF SUBSTANCES LAB SEPARATION OF A MIXTURE OF SUBSTANCES LAB Purpose: Every chemical has a set of defined physical properties, and when combined they present a unique fingerprint for that chemical. When chemicals are present

More information

Mechanical Energy and Heat

Mechanical Energy and Heat Mechanical Energy and Heat Purpose: Students will observe the conversion of mechanical energy to thermal energy. Introduction: The principle of conservation of energy is surprisingly new. No one person

More information

CHEM 150 Exam 1 KEY Name Multiple Choice

CHEM 150 Exam 1 KEY Name Multiple Choice CEM 150 Exam 1 KEY Name Multiple Choice Identify the letter of the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question. _B 1. Which of the following is synonymous with "fact"? a. a hypothesis

More information

Vaporization of Liquid Nitrogen

Vaporization of Liquid Nitrogen Vaporization of Liquid Nitrogen Goals and Introduction As a system exchanges thermal energy with its surroundings, the temperature of the system will usually increase or decrease, depending on the direction

More information

Temperature Scales. The metric system that we are now using includes a unit that is specific for the representation of measured temperatures.

Temperature Scales. The metric system that we are now using includes a unit that is specific for the representation of measured temperatures. Temperature Scales INTRODUCTION The metric system that we are now using includes a unit that is specific for the representation of measured temperatures. The unit of temperature in the metric system is

More information

EXPERIMENT 7 Reaction Stoichiometry and Percent Yield

EXPERIMENT 7 Reaction Stoichiometry and Percent Yield EXPERIMENT 7 Reaction Stoichiometry and Percent Yield INTRODUCTION Stoichiometry calculations are about calculating the amounts of substances that react and form in a chemical reaction. The word stoichiometry

More information

1. At which temperature would a source radiate the least amount of electromagnetic energy? 1) 273 K 3) 32 K 2) 212 K 4) 5 K

1. At which temperature would a source radiate the least amount of electromagnetic energy? 1) 273 K 3) 32 K 2) 212 K 4) 5 K 1. At which temperature would a source radiate the least amount of electromagnetic energy? 1) 273 K 3) 32 K 2) 212 K 4) 5 K 2. How does the amount of heat energy reflected by a smooth, dark-colored concrete

More information

10 g 5 g? 10 g 5 g. 10 g 5 g. scale

10 g 5 g? 10 g 5 g. 10 g 5 g. scale The International System of Units, or the SI Units Vs. Honors Chem 1 LENGTH In the SI, the base unit of length is the Meter. Prefixes identify additional units of length, based on the meter. Smaller than

More information

EXPERIMENT 15: Ideal Gas Law: Molecular Weight of a Vapor

EXPERIMENT 15: Ideal Gas Law: Molecular Weight of a Vapor EXPERIMENT 15: Ideal Gas Law: Molecular Weight of a Vapor Purpose: In this experiment you will use the ideal gas law to calculate the molecular weight of a volatile liquid compound by measuring the mass,

More information

The Great Peanut Problem

The Great Peanut Problem elearning 2009 Introduction The Great Peanut Problem Calorimetry Publication No. 91259 All human activity requires burning food for energy. How much energy is released when food burns in the body? How

More information

Name: Class: Date: 10. Some substances, when exposed to visible light, absorb more energy as heat than other substances absorb.

Name: Class: Date: 10. Some substances, when exposed to visible light, absorb more energy as heat than other substances absorb. Name: Class: Date: ID: A PS Chapter 13 Review Modified True/False Indicate whether the statement is true or false. If false, change the identified word or phrase to make the statement true. 1. In all cooling

More information

Energy and Matter CHAPTER OUTLINE CHAPTER GOALS

Energy and Matter CHAPTER OUTLINE CHAPTER GOALS 4 When sweat evaporates, it cools the skin by absorbing heat from the body. Energy and Matter CAPTER OUTLINE 4.1 Energy 4.2 The Three States of Matter 4.3 Intermolecular Forces 4.4 Boiling Point and Melting

More information

Answer, Key Homework 6 David McIntyre 1

Answer, Key Homework 6 David McIntyre 1 Answer, Key Homework 6 David McIntyre 1 This print-out should have 0 questions, check that it is complete. Multiple-choice questions may continue on the next column or page: find all choices before making

More information

Test Bank - Chapter 3 Multiple Choice

Test Bank - Chapter 3 Multiple Choice Test Bank - Chapter 3 The questions in the test bank cover the concepts from the lessons in Chapter 3. Select questions from any of the categories that match the content you covered with students. The

More information

Experiment 6 ~ Joule Heating of a Resistor

Experiment 6 ~ Joule Heating of a Resistor Experiment 6 ~ Joule Heating of a Resistor Introduction: The power P absorbed in an electrical resistor of resistance R, current I, and voltage V is given by P = I 2 R = V 2 /R = VI. Despite the fact that

More information

Temperature. Temperature

Temperature. Temperature Chapter 8 Temperature Temperature a number that corresponds to the warmth or coldness of an object measured by a thermometer is a per-particle property no upper limit definite limit on lower end Temperature

More information

SOLUBILITY OF A SALT IN WATER AT VARIOUS TEMPERATURES LAB

SOLUBILITY OF A SALT IN WATER AT VARIOUS TEMPERATURES LAB SOLUBILITY OF A SALT IN WATER AT VARIOUS TEMPERATURES LAB Purpose: Most ionic compounds are considered by chemists to be salts and many of these are water soluble. In this lab, you will determine the solubility,

More information

Classifying Matter. reflect. look out!

Classifying Matter. reflect. look out! reflect Do you know what air, water, and an apple all have in common? They are all examples of matter. Matter is a word we use a lot in science. It means stuff. All of the stuff in the world that has mass

More information

Aquatic Animal Nutrition: Understanding Feed Conversion Ratios

Aquatic Animal Nutrition: Understanding Feed Conversion Ratios Aquatic Animal Nutrition: Understanding Feed Conversion Ratios Grade Level: 9-12 Subject Area: Aquaculture, Nutrition Time: 30 minutes +introduction/discussion time Student Performance Standards (Sunshine

More information

Thermochemistry. r2 d:\files\courses\1110-20\99heat&thermorans.doc. Ron Robertson

Thermochemistry. r2 d:\files\courses\1110-20\99heat&thermorans.doc. Ron Robertson Thermochemistry r2 d:\files\courses\1110-20\99heat&thermorans.doc Ron Robertson I. What is Energy? A. Energy is a property of matter that allows work to be done B. Potential and Kinetic Potential energy

More information

Test 5 Review questions. 1. As ice cools from 273 K to 263 K, the average kinetic energy of its molecules will

Test 5 Review questions. 1. As ice cools from 273 K to 263 K, the average kinetic energy of its molecules will Name: Thursday, December 13, 2007 Test 5 Review questions 1. As ice cools from 273 K to 263 K, the average kinetic energy of its molecules will 1. decrease 2. increase 3. remain the same 2. The graph below

More information

HEAT UNIT 1.1 KINETIC THEORY OF GASES. 1.1.1 Introduction. 1.1.2 Postulates of Kinetic Theory of Gases

HEAT UNIT 1.1 KINETIC THEORY OF GASES. 1.1.1 Introduction. 1.1.2 Postulates of Kinetic Theory of Gases UNIT HEAT. KINETIC THEORY OF GASES.. Introduction Molecules have a diameter of the order of Å and the distance between them in a gas is 0 Å while the interaction distance in solids is very small. R. Clausius

More information

EXPERIMENT 12: Empirical Formula of a Compound

EXPERIMENT 12: Empirical Formula of a Compound EXPERIMENT 12: Empirical Formula of a Compound INTRODUCTION Chemical formulas indicate the composition of compounds. A formula that gives only the simplest ratio of the relative number of atoms in a compound

More information

Specific Heat (slope and steepness)

Specific Heat (slope and steepness) 1 Specific Heat (slope and steepness) 10 pages. According to the Physical Science text book, the Specific Heat of a material is DEFINED as the following: Specific heat is the amount of heat energy required

More information

Chapter 4: Transfer of Thermal Energy

Chapter 4: Transfer of Thermal Energy Chapter 4: Transfer of Thermal Energy Goals of Period 4 Section 4.1: To define temperature and thermal energy Section 4.2: To discuss three methods of thermal energy transfer. Section 4.3: To describe

More information

Teacher s Guide for No pots. No pans. No problem!

Teacher s Guide for No pots. No pans. No problem! Teacher s Guide for No pots. No pans. No problem! Overview This heat transfer activity highlights the Native Americans use of fire-heated stones to boil water. It provides students with an interesting

More information

What s in a Mole? Molar Mass

What s in a Mole? Molar Mass LESSON 10 What s in a Mole? Molar Mass OVERVIEW Key Ideas Lesson Type Lab: Groups of 4 Chemists compare moles of substances rather than masses because moles are a way of counting atoms. When considering

More information

EXAMPLE EXERCISE 3.1 Metric Basic Units and Prefixes

EXAMPLE EXERCISE 3.1 Metric Basic Units and Prefixes EXAMPLE EXERCISE 3.1 Metric Basic Units and Prefixes Give the symbol for each of the following metric units and state the quantity measured by each unit: (a) gigameter (b) kilogram (c) centiliter (d) microsecond

More information

A 1.008 g sample of H contains 6.0221415 x 10 23 H atoms.

A 1.008 g sample of H contains 6.0221415 x 10 23 H atoms. 7 Chemical Composition 7. Avogadro s umber n 8, the talian scientist, Amadeo Avogadro proposed that: Equal volumes of gas at equal temperatures and pressures have the same number of particles. This law,

More information

Chapter 10 Temperature and Heat

Chapter 10 Temperature and Heat Chapter 10 Temperature and Heat What are temperature and heat? Are they the same? What causes heat? What Is Temperature? How do we measure temperature? What are we actually measuring? Temperature and Its

More information

c. Given your answer in part (b), what do you anticipate will happen in this market in the long-run?

c. Given your answer in part (b), what do you anticipate will happen in this market in the long-run? Perfect Competition Questions Question 1 Suppose there is a perfectly competitive industry where all the firms are identical with identical cost curves. Furthermore, suppose that a representative firm

More information

Releasing Energy From Food

Releasing Energy From Food 13 LESSON Releasing Energy From Food INTRODUCTION In Lesson 12, you explored how oxygen and nutrients react chemically in your cells to release energy. But do all foods release the same amount of energy?

More information

SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIAL

SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIAL SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIAL (Student Instructions) Determination of the Formula of a Hydrate A Greener Approach Objectives To experimentally determine the formula of a hydrate salt. To learn to think in terms

More information

Name: Class: Date: ID: A

Name: Class: Date: ID: A Name: Class: Date: ID: A Chapter 2 Assessment Multiple Choice Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question. Complete short answer questions on a separate sheet of paper.

More information

Burn Baby Burn: The Power Within! Feedstock Calorimetry. (by Mary C. Criss & Shannon Ralph)

Burn Baby Burn: The Power Within! Feedstock Calorimetry. (by Mary C. Criss & Shannon Ralph) Burn Baby Burn: The Power Within! Feedstock Calorimetry (by Mary C. Criss & Shannon Ralph) Objective The purpose of this experiment is to determine the amount of chemical energy stored in different biofuel

More information

Sample Questions Chapter 2. Stoker

Sample Questions Chapter 2. Stoker Sample Questions Chapter 2. Stoker 1. The mathematical meaning associated with the metric system prefixes centi, milli, and micro is, respectively, A) 2, 4, and 6. B) 2, 3, and 6. C) 3, 6, and 9. D) 3,

More information

HEAT OF FORMATION OF AMMONIUM NITRATE

HEAT OF FORMATION OF AMMONIUM NITRATE 303 HEAT OF FORMATION OF AMMONIUM NITRATE OBJECTIVES FOR THE EXPERIMENT The student will be able to do the following: 1. Calculate the change in enthalpy (heat of reaction) using the Law of Hess. 2. Find

More information

Hands-On Labs SM-1 Lab Manual

Hands-On Labs SM-1 Lab Manual EXPERIMENT 4: Separation of a Mixture of Solids Read the entire experiment and organize time, materials, and work space before beginning. Remember to review the safety sections and wear goggles when appropriate.

More information

Chemical Calculations: Formula Masses, Moles, and Chemical Equations

Chemical Calculations: Formula Masses, Moles, and Chemical Equations Chemical Calculations: Formula Masses, Moles, and Chemical Equations Atomic Mass & Formula Mass Recall from Chapter Three that the average mass of an atom of a given element can be found on the periodic

More information

Stoichiometry. 1. The total number of moles represented by 20 grams of calcium carbonate is (1) 1; (2) 2; (3) 0.1; (4) 0.2.

Stoichiometry. 1. The total number of moles represented by 20 grams of calcium carbonate is (1) 1; (2) 2; (3) 0.1; (4) 0.2. Stoichiometry 1 The total number of moles represented by 20 grams of calcium carbonate is (1) 1; (2) 2; (3) 01; (4) 02 2 A 44 gram sample of a hydrate was heated until the water of hydration was driven

More information

Market Supply in the Short Run

Market Supply in the Short Run Equilibrium in Perfectly Competitive Markets (Assume for simplicity that all firms have access to the same technology and input markets, so they all have the same cost curves.) Market Supply in the Short

More information

Supply and Demand. A market is a group of buyers and sellers of a particular good or service.

Supply and Demand. A market is a group of buyers and sellers of a particular good or service. Supply and Demand A market is a group of buyers and sellers of a particular good or service. The definition of the good is a matter of judgement: Should different locations entail different goods (and

More information

Chapter 4. Chemical Energy

Chapter 4. Chemical Energy hapter 4 hemical Energy Perhaps the most convenient form in which to store energy is chemical energy. The foods we eat, combined with the oxygen we breathe, store energy that our bodies extract and convert

More information

A n = 2 to n = 1. B n = 3 to n = 1. C n = 4 to n = 2. D n = 5 to n = 2

A n = 2 to n = 1. B n = 3 to n = 1. C n = 4 to n = 2. D n = 5 to n = 2 North arolina Testing Program EO hemistry Sample Items Goal 4 1. onsider the spectrum for the hydrogen atom. In which situation will light be produced? 3. Which color of light would a hydrogen atom emit

More information

Stoichiometry. 1. The total number of moles represented by 20 grams of calcium carbonate is (1) 1; (2) 2; (3) 0.1; (4) 0.2.

Stoichiometry. 1. The total number of moles represented by 20 grams of calcium carbonate is (1) 1; (2) 2; (3) 0.1; (4) 0.2. Stoichiometry 1 The total number of moles represented by 20 grams of calcium carbonate is (1) 1; (2) 2; (3) 01; (4) 02 2 A 44 gram sample of a hydrate was heated until the water of hydration was driven

More information

Chemistry 110 Lecture Unit 5 Chapter 11-GASES

Chemistry 110 Lecture Unit 5 Chapter 11-GASES Chemistry 110 Lecture Unit 5 Chapter 11-GASES I. PROPERITIES OF GASES A. Gases have an indefinite shape. B. Gases have a low density C. Gases are very compressible D. Gases exert pressure equally in all

More information

Ecology Pre-Test (High School)

Ecology Pre-Test (High School) Ecology Pre-Test (High School) Science is easier to understand if you can make connections between what you know now and the new ideas that you are studying. This is a test that will help us to understand

More information

Phys222 W11 Quiz 1: Chapters 19-21 Keys. Name:

Phys222 W11 Quiz 1: Chapters 19-21 Keys. Name: Name:. In order for two objects to have the same temperature, they must a. be in thermal equilibrium.

More information

PREPARATION FOR CHEMISTRY LAB: COMBUSTION

PREPARATION FOR CHEMISTRY LAB: COMBUSTION 1 Name: Lab Instructor: PREPARATION FOR CHEMISTRY LAB: COMBUSTION 1. What is a hydrocarbon? 2. What products form in the complete combustion of a hydrocarbon? 3. Combustion is an exothermic reaction. What

More information

Chapter 2 Measurement and Problem Solving

Chapter 2 Measurement and Problem Solving Introductory Chemistry, 3 rd Edition Nivaldo Tro Measurement and Problem Solving Graph of global Temperature rise in 20 th Century. Cover page Opposite page 11. Roy Kennedy Massachusetts Bay Community

More information

Physical and Chemical Changes Pre Test Questions

Physical and Chemical Changes Pre Test Questions Pre Test Questions Name: Period: Date: 1. Which of the following is an example of physical change? a. Mixing baking soda and vinegar together, and this causes bubbles and foam. b. A glass cup falls from

More information

We will try to get familiar with a heat pump, and try to determine its performance coefficient under different circumstances.

We will try to get familiar with a heat pump, and try to determine its performance coefficient under different circumstances. C4. Heat Pump I. OBJECTIVE OF THE EXPERIMENT We will try to get familiar with a heat pump, and try to determine its performance coefficient under different circumstances. II. INTRODUCTION II.1. Thermodynamic

More information

Getting the most from this book...4 About this book...5

Getting the most from this book...4 About this book...5 Contents Getting the most from this book...4 About this book....5 Content Guidance Topic 1 Atomic structure and the periodic table...8 Topic 2 Bonding and structure...14 Topic 2A Bonding....14 Topic 2B

More information

CH3 Stoichiometry. The violent chemical reaction of bromine and phosphorus. P.76

CH3 Stoichiometry. The violent chemical reaction of bromine and phosphorus. P.76 CH3 Stoichiometry The violent chemical reaction of bromine and phosphorus. P.76 Contents 3.1 Counting by Weighing 3.2 Atomic Masses 3.3 The Mole 3.4 Molar Mass 3.5 Percent Composition of Compounds 3.6

More information

PHYSICAL SEPARATION TECHNIQUES. Introduction

PHYSICAL SEPARATION TECHNIQUES. Introduction PHYSICAL SEPARATION TECHNIQUES Lab #2 Introduction When two or more substances, that do not react chemically, are blended together, the result is a mixture in which each component retains its individual

More information

Measurement of Length, Mass, Volume and Density

Measurement of Length, Mass, Volume and Density Measurement of Length, Mass, Volume and Density Experimental Objective The objective of this experiment is to acquaint you with basic scientific conventions for measuring physical quantities. You will

More information

Forms of Energy. Freshman Seminar

Forms of Energy. Freshman Seminar Forms of Energy Freshman Seminar Energy Energy The ability & capacity to do work Energy can take many different forms Energy can be quantified Law of Conservation of energy In any change from one form

More information

Rusty Walker, Corporate Trainer Hill PHOENIX

Rusty Walker, Corporate Trainer Hill PHOENIX Refrigeration 101 Rusty Walker, Corporate Trainer Hill PHOENIX Compressor Basic Refrigeration Cycle Evaporator Condenser / Receiver Expansion Device Vapor Compression Cycle Cooling by the removal of heat

More information

6. Block and Tackle* Block and tackle

6. Block and Tackle* Block and tackle 6. Block and Tackle* A block and tackle is a combination of pulleys and ropes often used for lifting. Pulleys grouped together in a single frame make up what is called a pulley block. The tackle refers

More information

Joule Equivalent of Electrical Energy

Joule Equivalent of Electrical Energy by Dr. James E. Parks Department of Physics and Astronomy 401 Nielsen Physics Building The University of Tennessee Knoxville, Tennessee 37996-1200 Copyright October, 2013 by James Edgar Parks* *All rights

More information

Description of the Mole Concept:

Description of the Mole Concept: Description of the Mole Concept: Suppose you were sent into the store to buy 36 eggs. When you picked them up you would get 3 boxes, each containing 12 eggs. You just used a mathematical device, called

More information

week 2 itinerary: CALORIES $25 Scheels Gift Card This week s raffle prize is: Why would you ever want to track calories? Here are some of the benefits

week 2 itinerary: CALORIES $25 Scheels Gift Card This week s raffle prize is: Why would you ever want to track calories? Here are some of the benefits week 2 itinerary: CALORIES Know your calorie intake. Food is made up of calories and calories are what fuel your body throughout the day! Understanding calories is an important piece of becoming a healthier

More information

Chemical Composition Review Mole Calculations Percent Composition. Copyright Cengage Learning. All rights reserved. 8 1

Chemical Composition Review Mole Calculations Percent Composition. Copyright Cengage Learning. All rights reserved. 8 1 Chemical Composition Review Mole Calculations Percent Composition Copyright Cengage Learning. All rights reserved. 8 1 QUESTION Suppose you work in a hardware store and a customer wants to purchase 500

More information

Moles and Chemical Reactions. Moles and Chemical Reactions. Molar mass = 2 x 12.011 + 6 x 1.008 + 1 x15.999 = 46.069 g/mol

Moles and Chemical Reactions. Moles and Chemical Reactions. Molar mass = 2 x 12.011 + 6 x 1.008 + 1 x15.999 = 46.069 g/mol We have used the mole concept to calculate mass relationships in chemical formulas Molar mass of ethanol (C 2 H 5 OH)? Molar mass = 2 x 12.011 + 6 x 1.008 + 1 x15.999 = 46.069 g/mol Mass percentage of

More information

Resistors. Some substances are insulators. A battery will not make detectible current flow through them.

Resistors. Some substances are insulators. A battery will not make detectible current flow through them. Resistors Some substances are insulators. A battery will not make detectible current flow through them. Many substances (lead, iron, graphite, etc.) will let current flow. For most substances that are

More information

Mixing Warm and Cold Water

Mixing Warm and Cold Water Mixing Warm and Cold Water A Continuing Investigation of Thermal Pollution By Kevin White 1 Context: This lesson is intended for students conducting an ongoing study of thermal pollution. Perhaps, students

More information

The Empirical Formula of a Compound

The Empirical Formula of a Compound The Empirical Formula of a Compound Lab #5 Introduction A look at the mass relationships in chemistry reveals little order or sense. The ratio of the masses of the elements in a compound, while constant,

More information

Chemical Formulas, Equations, and Reactions Test Pre-AP Write all answers on your answer document.

Chemical Formulas, Equations, and Reactions Test Pre-AP Write all answers on your answer document. Name: Period: Chemical Formulas, Equations, and Reactions Test Pre-AP Write all answers on your answer document. 1. Which of the following is a NOT a physical property of hydrogen? A. It is gas C. It is

More information

Apparatus error for each piece of equipment = 100 x margin of error quantity measured

Apparatus error for each piece of equipment = 100 x margin of error quantity measured 1) Error Analysis Apparatus Errors (uncertainty) Every time you make a measurement with a piece of apparatus, there is a small margin of error (i.e. uncertainty) in that measurement due to the apparatus

More information

Atomic structure. Resources and methods for learning about these subjects (list a few here, in preparation for your research):

Atomic structure. Resources and methods for learning about these subjects (list a few here, in preparation for your research): Atomic structure This worksheet and all related files are licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, version 1.0. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/1.0/,

More information

Exam on Heat and Energy

Exam on Heat and Energy Exam on Heat and Energy True/False Indicate whether the statement is true or false. 1. Energy is the ability to cause change. 2. Energy is measured in joules. 3. When you ride a playground swing, your

More information

Section 1.4. Difference Equations

Section 1.4. Difference Equations Difference Equations to Differential Equations Section 1.4 Difference Equations At this point almost all of our sequences have had explicit formulas for their terms. That is, we have looked mainly at sequences

More information

What Is Heat? What Is Heat?

What Is Heat? What Is Heat? What Is Heat? Paul shivered inside the wood cabin. It was cold outside, and inside the cabin it wasn t much warmer. Paul could hear the rain beating down on the roof. Every few minutes there would be a

More information

KINDERGARTEN PHYSICS

KINDERGARTEN PHYSICS KINDERGARTEN PHYSICS 3 WEEKS LESSON PLANS AND ACTIVITIES APPLIED SCIENCE OVERVIEW OF KINDERGARTEN SCIENCE AND MATH WEEK 1. PRE: Describing and comparing nests, birds, and eggs. LAB: Describing different

More information

Moles Lab mole. 1 mole = 6.02 x 1023. This is also known as Avagadro's number Demo amu amu amu

Moles Lab mole. 1 mole = 6.02 x 1023. This is also known as Avagadro's number Demo amu amu amu Moles I. Lab: Rice Counting II. Counting atoms and molecules I. When doing reactions chemists need to count atoms and molecules. The problem of actually counting individual atoms and molecules comes from

More information

Bomb Calorimetry. Electrical leads. Stirrer

Bomb Calorimetry. Electrical leads. Stirrer Bomb Calorimetry Stirrer Electrical leads Oxygen inlet valve Bomb Fuse Calorimeter Outer jacket Not shown: heating and cooling system for outer jacket, and controls that keep the outer jacket at the same

More information