Answer Sheet. Astronomy. Your ES Teacher: Name. Spring School Page 7 Page 9 Page 10 #3) #5) #29) #39) #52) #40) #66) Tide height: #45) Time:

Save this PDF as:
 WORD  PNG  TXT  JPG

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "Answer Sheet. Astronomy. Your ES Teacher: Name. Spring School 2015. Page 7 Page 9 Page 10 #3) #5) #29) #39) #52) #40) #66) Tide height: #45) Time:"

Transcription

1 Your ES Teacher: Date: ( M W Th ) Astronomy CIRCLE ONE Answer Sheet Page 7 Page 9 Page 10 Name Spring School 2015 #3) #5) #29) Page 8 #36) #37) #38) #39) #40) #45) #46) #47) #52) #66) Tide height: Time: #67) Page 11 Page 12 Page 13 #84) #1) #3) #5) #29) #85) Diameter: Luminosity: #2) #4) #27) #28) Page 14 #43) #72) #74) #75) #76) #73)

2 Page 15 Page 16 Page 17 #1) #51) #36) #5) #2) #3) #6) #7) #37) #38) #4) #39) #52) #74) Page 18 #53) #78) Page 19 #79) Page 20 #75) #77) #80) #81) #82) Relative surface temperature: Relative luminosity: 2

3 Earth Science Astronomy Regents Practice Questions June 2014 August 2014 January 2015 Note: The numerical code that appears at the end of each question (bold, italicized and in parentheses) represents that question s origin. For example the code (ES #03) represents question #03 from the June 2014 Regents exam. 3

4 Skills, Procedures, & Trivia Review Astronomy 1. Revolution - when one body orbits around another body, Earth Revolves ~ 1 /day 2. Constellation - grouping of stars (3-10) which form a pattern 3. Heliocentric Model - Sun Centered, correct model, planet revolve around sun in elliptical orbits 4. Proof of Rotation - Foucault Pendulum and Coriolis Effect (Geocentric Model could not explain) 5. Increase Rate of Rotation increase the Coriolis Effect 6. Revolution causes different constellation to be visible at different times of the year 7. Moon Phases are caused by the Revolution of the moon around Earth 8. One Revolution of the moon takes 27 days days from Full moon to Full moon 9. When the moon is between the earth and sun this is a New Moon 10. Solar Eclipses can occur during a new moon, it gets dark during the middle of the day 11. Lunar Eclipses can occur during the full moon phase (earth's shadow on the moon) 12. Eclipses don't happen every month because the moon's orbit is inclined 13. When an object is close it looks bigger (has a large angular diameter) {faràsmall} 14. Tides are caused by the moons gravitational pull on the earth (also the sun's but not as much) 15. When the Earth, Moon, and Sun are in a line --> Extra Tides (spring tide) 16. When the Moon and Sun are working against each other we get small tides (neap tides) 17. Two high tides and two low tides per day (cyclic change) 18. If a satellite is close to a star, orbital velocity is greatest {far à slow} 19. Satellite is closest, high gravitation force, high 20. Kinetic Energy, low Potential Energy, large apparent diameter 21. Planets sweep out equal area's in equal amounts of time 22. As distance from a star increases, rate of revolution decreases by inverse square 23. Eccentricity is a measure of how flattened the orbit is (highest =1, line) (lowest=0, circle) 24. Satellites are kept in elliptical orbits by inertia and gravity 25. The earth's orbit is extremely round, almost perfect, but it is slightly elliptical, see ESRT chart 26. Inner four planets are rocky, outer 4 planets are gas giants, Pluto is just an iceball out there 27. Venus is the hottest planet due to runaway greenhouse effect 28. Earth is the only one with liquid water on the surface 29. Asteroid- big rock in space, most are between Mars and Jupiter 30. Meteor - shooting star, rock burning up in our atmosphere due to friction - No atmosphere, No burning up 31. Comet - Dirty Snowball, highly elliptical orbit 32. Sun is a regular star, burns by converting Hydrogen into Helium (Nuclear Fusion) 33. Use H-R diagram on stars in ESRT (temperature decreases to the right on x-axis) 34. Increasing Size -- planet, star, solar system, galaxy, universe 35. Galaxy - collection of billions of stars (solar systems) 36. Big Bang - universe expanding from initial explosion 37. Prove of Big Bang is that Galaxies are moving away from us, the further the faster and seen in Spectroscope as a RED SHIFT 39. Age of universe is approximately billion years old, solar system is only 4.6 billion 40. Light year- distance light travels in one year 41. Know our position in our Milky Way Galaxy NOTES 4

5 Foucault Pendulum and Coriolis Effect Deep Space Astronomy Both are evidence that Earth spins (at 15 o /hr). Nearly every year, there s a question where Earth rotation is the answer. Every once in a while, instead of using the words Foucault or Coriolis, these phenomenon are either explained or shown as a diagram. However, the answer is almost always the same thing. Both are evidence of Earth s rotation. ESRTs Page 15 The only other pages of the ESRTs that have anything to do with astronomy are PAGE 1 that has the formula for eccentricity of an ellipse and PAGE 8 that has the age of Earth and our solar system. Two vocabulary words that sometimes come into play in this section are terrestrial (meaning the first 4 planets; Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars) and Jovian (which refer to the four gas giants; Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune) and are separated by the asteroid belt, located about half way between Mars and Jupiter. Celestial Size, Position and Age (and Fusion) The Universe is the largest thing and the oldest at 13.7 billion years old. The Milky Way Galaxy (a spiral galaxy) is the next largest thing at approximately 10 billion years old. Our solar system and Earth are both about 4.6 billion years old. Earth s Moon is a little younger (and smaller) than Earth. In case you haven t recognized the pattern, the older a celestial object is, typically the larger that it is. You also need to know that fusion is what powers the Sun. Everything else about Celestial Size, Position and Age can easily be learned by doing practice questions and looking up the correct answers. Earth/Moon Revolution/Rotation When viewed from above Earth s north pole, nearly everything in our solar system revolves and rotates counterclockwise. These motions are responsible for observable phenomenon hear on Earth. Most astronomical motions occur over and over again to the degree that you can predict things, like eclipses, hundreds of years into the future. These events are considered to be cyclic and predictable. An easy way to zero in on what celestial motion is responsible for which Earth-based observation is to ask yourself, How long does it take to complete one cycle? For example, it takes one year to cycle through one complete set of seasons. It should make sense that the celestial motion, which also takes one year to complete (Earth s revolution), is responsible for the seasons. The seasonal changes in constellations are also a result of Earth s revolution. The daily motion of Earth s rotation is responsible for daily phenomenon such as tides, sunrise/sunset, moonrise/moonset, and the nightly motions of stars. The moon phases are due to the Moon s revolution. It is also important to know that the people on Earth only see one side of the Moon because the Moon just happens to rotate at the same rate as its revolution (27.3 days; see page 15 of the ESRTs) and it wasn t until Apollo 8 that the first human saw the back side of the Moon with their own eyes. Finally, although it takes the moon 27.3 days to revolve, it takes 29.5 days for the moon to cycle through all of its phases. 5

6 Moon Phases/Eclipses/Tides & Gravity Except for phases of the Moon questions, all answers to questions that deal with the Sun-Earth-Moon system require a linear alignment. The diagram to the right is an illustration of spring tide. However, the Moon is also in the position where a new moon and solar eclipse can occur. Had the Moon been on the opposite side of Earth, it would still be a spring tide. However, it would also be a full moon and a lunar eclipse in this alternate position. These are the most interesting phases of the Moon and the most frequently asked about questions. Therefore, when in doubt, choose a linear alignment. When it comes to the phases of the Moon, any one of the eight standard positions of the Moon are fair game. To answer these types of questions, you must put yourself into the shoes of an Earth observer. I like to draw little stick figures directly below the eight Moon positions and ask myself, Which side and how much of the Moon is lit up according to the perspective of the stick figure? Kepler s First and Second Laws of Planetary Motion Similar to the Sun-Earth-Moon positions, these types of questions are all about alignment. Every answer to every question needs to be measured from OR drawn on the major axis. According to Kepler s 1 st law of motion, all orbits are ellipses with two focus points. If given the location of one focus, students should be able to accurately estimate the location of the second focus because every ellipse has reflectional and 180 o rotational symmetry and both foci are located on the major axis. Students should also be able to measure and calculate the eccentricity of an ellipse. According to Kepler s 2 nd law of motion, the closer a planet is to a star, the greater the force of gravity, and the faster a planet moves. If you look on page 15 of the ESRTs, you will find that Mercury has a period of revolution of approximately 88 days and the periods of revolution increase with increasing distance from the Sun. This law of motion also accounts for variation in orbital velocity for any object that has an elliptical orbit. Because all orbits are ellipses, there are times when a planet is closest to its star (perihelion) and other times when a planet is farthest from its star (aphelion). Both of these positions lie on either end of the major axis. Our Expanding Universe and Development What do the following terms have in common? The Big Bang Expanding Universe Galaxies moving away from us (and each other) Red Shift Microwave Background Radiation Answer: If one of these terms is a question, then the answer is one of the other terms. To make a long story short, red shift is (the first recognized) observable evidence that all galaxies are moving away from each other, which means that the Universe is currently expanding, but if you rewind the clock 13.7 billions years, it appears that everything in the Universe started at the same point in both time and space and has been exploding (expanding) outward ever since, hence the term Big Bang. As far as our solar system is concerned, it is a widely accepted theory that all solar systems begin as a massive solar nebula. Under the influence of its own internal gravity, the nebula (which is made of mostly gas and some small solids) contracts, concentrating most of the gas near its center (eventually creating a sun) and the revolving solids congeal to form the planets. Evidence that planets are continuing to grow today is in the form of impact craters. Earth gets hit more times than it lets on because our atmosphere burns up most of the small stuff and plate tectonics and weather & erosion eliminate evidence of some of the bigger stuff. 6

7 DEEP SPACE ASTRONOMY ES 09 Regents June Which evidence best supports the theory that the universe began with a massive explosion? (ES #03) (1) cosmic background radiation in space (2) parallelism of planetary axes (3) radioactive dating of Earth s bedrock (4) life cycle of stars 5 Which statement best describes Earth s approximate rates of rotation and revolution? (1) Earth s rotation rate is 15 /hour and its revolution rate is 1 /day. (2) Earth s rotation rate is 1 /hour and its revolution rate is 15 /day. (3) Earth s rotation rate is 24 /hour and its revolution rate is 360 /day. (4) Earth s rotation rate is 360 /hour and its revolution rate is 24 /day. (ES #05) 29 The diagram below represents positions of Earth in its orbit around the Sun and twelve constellations that can be seen in the midnight sky by an observer in New York State at different times of the year. The approximate locations of the constellations in relation to Earth s orbit are shown. Which date is correctly paired with two constellations that can be seen in the sky at midnight? (ES #29) (1) May 21: Scorpius and Taurus (2) August 21: Libra and Virgo (3) November 21: Gemini and Capricorn (4) February 21: Leo and Cancer 7

8 Base your answers to questions 36 through 40 on the diagram below and on your knowledge of Earth science. The diagram represents the orbital paths of the four Jovian planets and Halley s comet around the Sun. Halley s comet has a revolution period of 76 years. In 1986, Halley s comet was at perihelion, its closest point to the Sun. Letters A, B, C, and D represent locations of Halley s comet in its orbit. Location D represents Halley s comet at aphelion, its farthest point from the Sun. The comet s tail is shown at perihelion and at locations B and C. 36 Based on the pattern shown above, which diagram best represents the correct position of the comet s tail at location A relative to the Sun? (ES #36) 37 Compared to the orbit of the Jovian planets, the orbit of Halley s comet is (ES #37) (1) less elliptical, with a shorter distance between its foci (2) less elliptical, with a greater distance between its foci (3) more elliptical, with a shorter distance between its foci (4) more elliptical, with a greater distance between its foci 38 Compared to the velocity of Jupiter in its orbit, the velocity of Halley s comet is (1) always less (2) always greater (3) always the same (4) sometimes less and sometimes greater (ES #38) 8

9 39 This diagram of our solar system represents a (ES #39) (1) geocentric model with the Sun near the center (2) geocentric model with Earth near the center (3) heliocentric model with the Sun near the center (4) heliocentric model with Earth near the center 40 Which sequence lists the Jovian planets in order of increasing mass? (ES #40) (1) Jupiter, Saturn, Neptune, Uranus (2) Uranus, Neptune, Saturn, Jupiter (3) Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune (4) Neptune, Uranus, Saturn, Jupiter Base your answers to questions 45 through 47 on the diagram below and on your knowledge of Earth science. The diagram represents eight numbered positions of the Moon in its orbit around Earth. 45 Which phase of the Moon will be observed in New York State when the Moon is at position 8? (ES #45) 46 Which two motions cause the Moon to show a complete cycle of phases each month when viewed from New York State? (ES #46) (1) the Moon s rotation and Earth s rotation (2) the Moon s revolution and Earth s rotation (3) the Moon s rotation and the Sun s rotation (4) the Moon s revolution and the Sun s rotation 47 A solar eclipse might be observed from Earth when the Moon is at which position? (ES #47) (1) 1 (2) 5 (3) 3 (4) 7 9

10 Base your answers to questions 51 through 53 on the passage below and on your knowledge of Earth science. Coral Reefs and Ocean Currents The location of shallow-water coral reefs is controlled largely by warm-water temperatures, which originate in tropical regions and are then widely spread by ocean currents. Major surface ocean currents flow in circular patterns called gyres. Ocean current gyres flow in a clockwise direction in the Northern Hemisphere, and flow in a counterclockwise direction in the Southern Hemisphere. This pattern of circulation generally moves warm water from equatorial regions into the shallow waters along eastern continental coasts. This extends the range of coral reef growth approximately 5 of latitude beyond both the tropic of Cancer and the tropic of Capricorn. 51 Identify the surface ocean current that prevents the formation of coral reefs in the shallow waters along the western coast of South America. [1] (ES #51) current 52 Which Earth motion causes the Coriolis effect that results in the curving of the planetary winds and surface ocean currents? [1] (ES #52) 53 Identify the two prevailing planetary wind belts that provide the greatest force in pushing the surface ocean currents of the North Pacific Ocean gyre. [1] (ES #53) winds and winds Base your answers to questions 66 and 67 on the graph to the right and on your knowledge of Earth science. The graph shows the changes in ocean tide height at a New York State location during 1 day. 66 Determine the tide height and time of day for the lowest tide shown on the graph. Include a.m. or p.m. in your answer for the time of day. [1] (ES #66) Tide height: m Time: 67 Explain why the Moon has a greater influence on Earth tides than the Sun. [1] (ES #67) 10

11 Base your answers to questions 84 and 85 on the flowchart below and on your knowledge of Earth science. The flowchart shows the evolution of stars. 84 Identify the force responsible for the contraction of a nebula (a gas cloud of molecules) to form a protostar. [1] (ES #84) 85 Describe how the diameter and luminosity of a main sequence star change as the star becomes either a giant or a supergiant. [1] (ES #85) Diameter: Luminosity: ES 09 Regents August Which evidence best supports the theory that the universe was created by an explosion called the Big Bang? (ES #01) (1) impact craters found on Earth (2) cosmic background radiation (3) the different compositions of terrestrial and Jovian planets (4) the blue shift of light from distant galaxies 2 Which star is more massive than our Sun, but has a lower surface temperature? (ES #02) (1) 40 Eridani B (2) Sirius (3) Aldebaran (4) Barnard s Star 3 Which color of visible light has the shortest wavelength? (ES #03) (1) violet (2) green (3) yellow (4) red 4 The table to the right shows the times of ocean high tides and low tides on a certain date at a New York State location. At approximately what time on the following day did the next high tide occur at this location? (ES #04) (1) 4:40 a.m. (2) 5:40 a.m. (3) 4:40 p.m. (4) 5:40 p.m. 11

12 5 The best evidence of Earth s rotation is provided by the (ES #05) (1) shape of Earth s orbit (2) shape of the Milky Way galaxy (3) changes in the total yearly duration of insolation at a location on Earth (4) apparent changes in the direction of swing of a Foucault pendulum Base your answers to questions 27 and 28 on the diagram below and on your knowledge of Earth science. The diagram represents the Moon at different positions, labeled A, B, C, and D, in its orbit around Earth. 27 At which two Moon positions would an observer on Earth most likely experience the highest high tides and the lowest low tides? (ES #27) (1) A and B (2) B and C (3) C and A (4) D and B 28 During which Moon phase could an observer on Earth see a lunar eclipse occur? (ES #28) 12

13 29 The graph below shows the varying amount of gravitational attraction between the Sun and an asteroid in our solar system. Letters A, B, C, and D indicate four positions in the asteroid s orbit. Which diagram best represents the positions of the asteroid in its orbit around the Sun? [Note: The diagrams are not drawn to scale.] (ES #29) 13

14 43 Which planet has an average density most similar to the average density of the Moon? (ES #43) (1) Mercury (2) Mars (3) Jupiter (4) Neptune Base your answers to questions 72 through 76 on the side-view model of the solar system in your answer booklet and on your knowledge of Earth science. The planets are shown in their relative order of distance from the Sun. Letter A indicates one of the planets. 72 The center of the asteroid belt is approximately 503 million kilometers from the Sun. In your answer booklet, draw an X on the model between two planets to indicate the center of the asteroid belt. [1] (ES #72) 73 State the period of rotation at the equator of planet A. Label your answer with the correct units. [1] (ES #73) 74 How many million years ago did Earth and the solar system form? [1] (ES #74) million years ago 75 Calculate how many times larger the equatorial diameter of the Sun is than the equatorial diameter of Venus. [1] (ES #75) times larger 76 Identify the process that occurs within the Sun that converts mass into large amounts of energy. [1] (ES #76) 14

15 ES 09 Regents January The theory that the universe is expanding is supported by data from the (ES #01) (1) nuclear decay of radioactive materials (2) nuclear fusion of radioactive materials (3) blue shift of light from distant galaxies (4) red shift of light from distant galaxies 2 The photograph to the right shows a feature of the universe as seen through a telescope. This feature is best identified as (ES #02) (1) a galaxy (2) a comet (3) an asteroid (4) a star 3 Fourteen billion years represents the approximate age of (ES #03) (1) Earth (2) Earth s Moon (3) our solar system (4) the universe 4 Which terms describe the motion of most objects in our solar system? (ES #04) (1) noncyclic and unpredictable (2) noncyclic and predictable (3) cyclic and unpredictable (4) cyclic and predictable 5 Which planet has completed less than one orbit of the Sun in the last 100 years? (ES #05) (1) Mars (2) Mercury (3) Neptune (4) Uranus 6 Compared to the size and density of Earth, the Moon has a (ES #06) (1) smaller diameter and lower density (2) smaller diameter and higher density (3) larger diameter and lower density (4) larger diameter and higher density 7 In the Northern Hemisphere, planetary winds are deflected to the right due to the (ES #07) (1) Doppler effect (2) Coriolis effect (3) tilt of Earth s axis (4) uneven heating of Earth s surface 15

16 Base your answers to questions 36 through 40 on the diagram below and on your knowledge of Earth science. The diagram represents Earth s revolution around the Sun. Points A, B, C, and D represent Earth s positions in its orbit on the first day of each of the four seasons. The major axis and the foci (the center of the Sun and the other focus) of Earth s orbit are shown. 36 Approximately how many days (d) does it take Earth to travel from position A to position C? (ES #36) (1) 91 d (2) 182 d (3) 274 d (4) 365 d 37 Since Earth has an elliptical orbit, the (ES #37) (1) distance between the Sun and Earth varies (2) distance between the Sun and the other focus varies (3) length of Earth s major axis varies (4) length of Earth s period of revolution varies 38 At positions A, B, C, and D, the north end of Earth s axis of rotation is pointing toward (ES #38) (1) Betelgeuse (2) Polaris (3) the center of the Milky Way (4) the center of our solar system 39 The constellation Orion is visible at night in New York State when Earth is at position A, but not at position C because Earth s (ES #39) (1) nighttime is shorter when Earth is at position A (2) period of rotation is shorter than its period of revolution (3) distance to Orion is too great for the constellation to be seen (4) nighttime side is facing toward a different portion of space 16

17 40 At which two positions will an observer in New York State experience approximately 12 hours of daylight during one rotation of Earth? (ES #40) (1) A and B (2) A and C (3) B and C (4) B and D Base your answers to questions 51 through 53 on the graph below and on your knowledge of Earth science. The graph shows the average daily heights above or below sea level of high and low tides from April 15 to May 15, for a New York State location. Five Moon phases are indicated at the dates on which they occurred. 51 On the diagram to the right, place an X on the Moon s orbit to indicate the Moon s position on April 15. [1] (ES #51) 52 On the diagram to the right, circle the two numbers on Earth s surface that best represent the locations of high tide when the Moon is in the position shown on the diagram. [1] (ES #52) 53 Infer the date when the next first-quarter Moon phase occurred. [1] (ES #53) 17

18 Base your answers to questions 74 through 78 on the passage and data table below and on your knowledge of Earth science. The data table shows the apparent hourly change in the direction of a pendulum s swing, in degrees per hour ( /h), for six different Northern Hemisphere latitudes. Foucault s Pendulum In 1851, Jean-Bernard-Léon Foucault attached a heavy iron ball to a steel wire hanging from the high ceiling of a church in Paris to demonstrate an apparent motion caused by Earth s rotation. This pendulum could swing freely back and forth. A spike on the bottom of Foucault s pendulum produced straight lines in sand spread on the floor. The position of each new line appeared to gradually shift in a clockwise direction. Eventually, the pendulum returned to its original path, completing a 360 pattern in approximately 32 hours. At other northern latitudes, a Foucault pendulum will complete a 360 pattern of swing in different amounts of time. In the Northern Hemisphere, the number of degrees that a pendulum appears to change its clockwise direction of swing each hour varies with latitude. 74 On the grid to the right, plot the apparent rate of change in a Foucault pendulum s direction of swing for each of the latitudes given in the data table. Connect the plots with a line. [1] (ES #74) 75 Based on the data table, state the relationship between latitude and the apparent rate of change in a Foucault pendulum s direction of swing. [1] (ES #75) 76 Based on the data table, state the approximate apparent rate of change in the direction of a pendulum s swing, in degrees per hour, at Riverhead, New York. [1] (ES #76) 77 Identify one location on Earth where the apparent direction of a pendulum s swing would complete a 360 circular pattern in 24 hours. [1] (ES #77) 18

19 78 The diagram below represents a swinging pendulum located in Earth s Northern Hemisphere. The pendulum knocked over two pegs during its first swing. The diagram below represents a top view of the same pegs. Circle the next two pegs that would fall as the pendulum appears to change its direction of swing in the Northern Hemisphere. [1] (ES #78) 19

20 Base your answers to questions 79 through 82 on the Characteristics of Stars graph below and on your knowledge of Earth science. 79 The star Canopus has a surface temperature of 7400 K and a luminosity (relative to the Sun) of Use an X to plot the position of Canopus on the graph below, based on its surface temperature and luminosity. [1] (ES #79) 80 Identify two stars from the Characteristics of Stars graph that are at the same life-cycle stage as the Sun. [1] (ES #80) 81 Describe one characteristic of the star Spica that causes it to have a greater luminosity than Barnard s Star. [1] (ES #81) 82 Describe how the relative surface temperature and the relative luminosity of Aldebaran would change if it collapses and becomes a white dwarf like Procyon B. [1] (ES #82) Relative Surface Temperature: Relative Luminosity: 20

Explain the Big Bang Theory and give two pieces of evidence which support it.

Explain the Big Bang Theory and give two pieces of evidence which support it. Name: Key OBJECTIVES Correctly define: asteroid, celestial object, comet, constellation, Doppler effect, eccentricity, eclipse, ellipse, focus, Foucault Pendulum, galaxy, geocentric model, heliocentric

More information

astronomy 2008 1. A planet was viewed from Earth for several hours. The diagrams below represent the appearance of the planet at four different times.

astronomy 2008 1. A planet was viewed from Earth for several hours. The diagrams below represent the appearance of the planet at four different times. 1. A planet was viewed from Earth for several hours. The diagrams below represent the appearance of the planet at four different times. 5. If the distance between the Earth and the Sun were increased,

More information

Solar System. 1. The diagram below represents a simple geocentric model. Which object is represented by the letter X?

Solar System. 1. The diagram below represents a simple geocentric model. Which object is represented by the letter X? Solar System 1. The diagram below represents a simple geocentric model. Which object is represented by the letter X? A) Earth B) Sun C) Moon D) Polaris 2. Which object orbits Earth in both the Earth-centered

More information

Earth s Moon and Solar System Test Prep

Earth s Moon and Solar System Test Prep Earth s Moon and Solar System Test Prep 1.An observer on Earth determines that the apparent diameter of the Moon as viewed from Earth varies in a cyclic manner. The best explanation for this observation

More information

radio telescopes satellites visible light space probes rockets reflecting telescopes space shuttles refracting telescopes

radio telescopes satellites visible light space probes rockets reflecting telescopes space shuttles refracting telescopes Name Date Class BOOK Review Packet Astronomy Overview Exploring Space Directions:Complete the concept map the terms in the list below. radio telescopes satellites visible light space probes rockets reflecting

More information

8. Mercury, the planet nearest to the Sun, has extreme surface temperatures, ranging from 465 C in sunlight to 180 C in darkness.

8. Mercury, the planet nearest to the Sun, has extreme surface temperatures, ranging from 465 C in sunlight to 180 C in darkness. 6.E.1 Unit Test DO NOT WRITE ON THIS QUIZ!!! 1. The largest body in our solar system is Earth. the Sun. Jupiter. the Moon. 4. What do the four planets closest to the Sun have in common? Their solid, rocky

More information

ASTRONOMY REVIEW Qs (2) (3) (4)

ASTRONOMY REVIEW Qs (2) (3) (4) 1. Which statement provides evidence that Earth revolves around the Sun? (1) Winds at different latitudes are curved different amounts by the Coriolis effect. (2) Different star constellations are visible

More information

1. In the diagram below, the direct rays of the Sun are striking the Earth's surface at 23 º N. What is the date shown in the diagram?

1. In the diagram below, the direct rays of the Sun are striking the Earth's surface at 23 º N. What is the date shown in the diagram? 1. In the diagram below, the direct rays of the Sun are striking the Earth's surface at 23 º N. What is the date shown in the diagram? 5. During how many days of a calendar year is the Sun directly overhead

More information

Patterns in the Solar System (Chapter 18)

Patterns in the Solar System (Chapter 18) GEOLOGY 306 Laboratory Instructor: TERRY J. BOROUGHS NAME: Patterns in the Solar System (Chapter 18) For this assignment you will require: a calculator, colored pencils, a metric ruler, and meter stick.

More information

LESSON 3 THE SOLAR SYSTEM. Chapter 8, Astronomy

LESSON 3 THE SOLAR SYSTEM. Chapter 8, Astronomy LESSON 3 THE SOLAR SYSTEM Chapter 8, Astronomy OBJECTIVES Identify planets by observing their movement against background stars. Explain that the solar system consists of many bodies held together by gravity.

More information

Name Class Date. How did Earth s moon probably form? How does the moon s appearance change with time? What moons revolve around other planets?

Name Class Date. How did Earth s moon probably form? How does the moon s appearance change with time? What moons revolve around other planets? CHAPTER 4 A Family of Planets SECTION 4 Moons BEFORE YOU READ After you read this section, you should be able to answer these questions: How did Earth s moon probably form? How does the moon s appearance

More information

Table of Contents. Our Solar System 3 The Planets in the Solar System 4

Table of Contents. Our Solar System 3 The Planets in the Solar System 4 The Solar System 2 Table of Contents Our Solar System 3 The Planets in the Solar System 4 Mercury 5 Venus 6 Earth 7 Mars 8 Jupiter 9 Saturn 10 Uranus 11 Neptune 12 Pluto 13 The Asteroid Belt 14 The Moon

More information

4 3 Astronomy Recall that Earth is one of the many planets in the solar system that orbit the Sun.

4 3 Astronomy Recall that Earth is one of the many planets in the solar system that orbit the Sun. 4 3 Astronomy 4 3.1 Recall that Earth is one of the many planets in the solar system that orbit the Sun. Essential Question: What is in our solar system? Textbook Pages: 208 209 Sun central star in our

More information

EDMONDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE ASTRONOMY 100 Winter Quarter 2007 Sample Test # 1

EDMONDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE ASTRONOMY 100 Winter Quarter 2007 Sample Test # 1 Instructor: L. M. Khandro EDMONDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE ASTRONOMY 100 Winter Quarter 2007 Sample Test # 1 1. An arc second is a measure of a. time interval between oscillations of a standard clock b. time

More information

Scientists use special equipment and filters to study the Sun.

Scientists use special equipment and filters to study the Sun. SKY SCIENCE STUDY NOTES Also use your class notes and tests. I CAN observe, describe and interpret the movement of objects in the sky; and explain pattern and order in these movements. Stars are like non-stop

More information

UNIT V. Earth and Space. Earth and the Solar System

UNIT V. Earth and Space. Earth and the Solar System UNIT V Earth and Space Chapter 9 Earth and the Solar System EARTH AND OTHER PLANETS A solar system contains planets, moons, and other objects that orbit around a star or the star system. The solar system

More information

EARTH'S MOTIONS. 2. The Coriolis effect is a result of Earth's A tilted axis B orbital shape C revolution D rotation

EARTH'S MOTIONS. 2. The Coriolis effect is a result of Earth's A tilted axis B orbital shape C revolution D rotation EARTH'S MOTIONS 1. Which hot spot location on Earth's surface usually receives the greatest intensity of insolation on June 21? A Iceland B Hawaii C Easter Island D Yellowstone 2. The Coriolis effect is

More information

1 The Nine Planets. What are the parts of our solar system? When were the planets discovered? How do astronomers measure large distances?

1 The Nine Planets. What are the parts of our solar system? When were the planets discovered? How do astronomers measure large distances? CHAPTER 4 1 The Nine Planets SECTION A Family of Planets BEFORE YOU READ After you read this section, you should be able to answer these questions: What are the parts of our solar system? When were the

More information

Study Guide: Solar System

Study Guide: Solar System Study Guide: Solar System 1. How many planets are there in the solar system? 2. What is the correct order of all the planets in the solar system? 3. Where can a comet be located in the solar system? 4.

More information

Chapter 6: Our Solar System and Its Origin

Chapter 6: Our Solar System and Its Origin Chapter 6: Our Solar System and Its Origin What does our solar system look like? The planets are tiny compared to the distances between them (a million times smaller than shown here), but they exhibit

More information

Study Guide due Friday, 1/29

Study Guide due Friday, 1/29 NAME: Astronomy Study Guide asteroid chromosphere comet corona ellipse Galilean moons VOCABULARY WORDS TO KNOW geocentric system meteor gravity meteorite greenhouse effect meteoroid heliocentric system

More information

1 A Solar System Is Born

1 A Solar System Is Born CHAPTER 3 1 A Solar System Is Born SECTION Formation of the Solar System BEFORE YOU READ After you read this section, you should be able to answer these questions: What is a nebula? How did our solar system

More information

Science Standard 4 Earth in Space Grade Level Expectations

Science Standard 4 Earth in Space Grade Level Expectations Science Standard 4 Earth in Space Grade Level Expectations Science Standard 4 Earth in Space Our Solar System is a collection of gravitationally interacting bodies that include Earth and the Moon. Universal

More information

Earth in the Solar System

Earth in the Solar System Copyright 2011 Study Island - All rights reserved. Directions: Challenge yourself! Print out the quiz or get a pen/pencil and paper and record your answers to the questions below. Check your answers with

More information

8.3: The Solar System: The Sun and the Planets pg. 313

8.3: The Solar System: The Sun and the Planets pg. 313 8.3: The Solar System: The Sun and the Planets pg. 313 Key Concepts: 1. Careful observation of the night sky can offer clues about the motion of celestial objects. 2. Celestial objects in the Solar System

More information

Motions of Earth, Moon, and Sun

Motions of Earth, Moon, and Sun Motions of Earth, Moon, and Sun Apparent Motions of Celestial Objects An apparent motion is a motion that an object appears to make. Apparent motions can be real or illusions. When you see a person spinning

More information

Unit 8 Lesson 2 Gravity and the Solar System

Unit 8 Lesson 2 Gravity and the Solar System Unit 8 Lesson 2 Gravity and the Solar System Gravity What is gravity? Gravity is a force of attraction between objects that is due to their masses and the distances between them. Every object in the universe

More information

Astronomy Review. Use the following four pictures to answer questions 1-4.

Astronomy Review. Use the following four pictures to answer questions 1-4. Astronomy Review Use the following four pictures to answer questions 1-4. 1. Put an X through the pictures that are NOT possible. 2. Circle the picture that could be a lunar eclipse. 3. Triangle the picture

More information

Unit 5 Test

Unit 5 Test 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. Unit 5 Test 1. How many days does it take to complete a single Lunar Cycle? A. About 365 B. About 1 C. About 28

More information

Class 2 Solar System Characteristics Formation Exosolar Planets

Class 2 Solar System Characteristics Formation Exosolar Planets Class 1 Introduction, Background History of Modern Astronomy The Night Sky, Eclipses and the Seasons Kepler's Laws Newtonian Gravity General Relativity Matter and Light Telescopes Class 2 Solar System

More information

Formation and content of the solar system.

Formation and content of the solar system. Formation and content of the solar system. The Solar Nebula Hypothesis Basis of modern theory of planet formation: Planets form at the same time from the same cloud as the star. Planet formation sites

More information

4 Formation of the Universe

4 Formation of the Universe CHAPTER 2 4 Formation of the Universe SECTION Stars, Galaxies, and the Universe BEFORE YOU READ After you read this section, you should be able to answer these questions: What is the big bang theory? How

More information

Name. 1. Most of the stars found in our galaxy are in multiple star systems. a) True b) False

Name. 1. Most of the stars found in our galaxy are in multiple star systems. a) True b) False Name Physical Science 113 - Astronomy Exam I Indicate the most correct answer on your scantron sheet. This is only one correct answer for each question. 1. Most of the stars found in our galaxy are in

More information

Name Date Hour Table. Cosmic Relations (Select each location and record how the Earth fits into the universe.)

Name Date Hour Table. Cosmic Relations (Select each location and record how the Earth fits into the universe.) Open the Solar System App Cosmic Relations (Select each location and record how the Earth fits into the universe.) 1. Earth 2. Solar System 3. Milky Way 4. Universe The Milky Way is the home of Earth s

More information

Grade 9 - Space Exploration - Pre-Assessment

Grade 9 - Space Exploration - Pre-Assessment Purpose: This document is for grade 9 teachers to use as a pre-assessment for the Space Exploration unit. It assesses students understanding of the of the end of unit knowledge outcomes from the grade

More information

Astronomy 103: First Exam

Astronomy 103: First Exam Name: Astronomy 103: First Exam Stephen Lepp October 25, 2010 Each question is worth 2 points. Write your name on this exam and on the scantron. 1 Short Answer A. What is the largest of the terrestrial

More information

The Solar System. Unit 4 covers the following framework standards: ES 10 and PS 11. Content was adapted the following:

The Solar System. Unit 4 covers the following framework standards: ES 10 and PS 11. Content was adapted the following: Unit 4 The Solar System Chapter 7 ~ The History of the Solar System o Section 1 ~ The Formation of the Solar System o Section 2 ~ Observing the Solar System Chapter 8 ~ The Parts the Solar System o Section

More information

8.5: Motions of Earth, the Moon, and Planets pg. 320

8.5: Motions of Earth, the Moon, and Planets pg. 320 8.5: Motions of Earth, the Moon, and Planets pg. 320 Key Concepts: 1. Careful observation of the night sky can offer clues about the motion of celestial objects. 2. Celestial objects in the Solar System

More information

The Origin of the Solar System. Formation and basic characteristics of the Solar System

The Origin of the Solar System. Formation and basic characteristics of the Solar System The Origin of the Solar System Formation and basic characteristics of the Solar System The origin of matter All the building material necessary to make our Solar System was assembled in the process of

More information

Unit 2 - Quiz 2 2-D Models

Unit 2 - Quiz 2 2-D Models 2-D Models 1. If an observer on Earth views Polaris on the horizon, the observer is located at the A) Tropic of Cancer (23.5 N) B) North Pole (90 N) C) equator (0 ) D) Tropic of Capricorn (23.5 S) 2. At

More information

Related Standards and Background Information

Related Standards and Background Information Related Standards and Background Information Earth Patterns, Cycles and Changes This strand focuses on student understanding of patterns in nature, natural cycles, and changes that occur both quickly and

More information

8.1: Touring the Night Sky pg. 305

8.1: Touring the Night Sky pg. 305 Unit D: The Study of the Universe 8.1: Touring the Night Sky pg. 305 Key Concepts: 1. Careful observation of the night sky can offer clues about the motion of celestial objects. 2. Celestial objects in

More information

Chapter 6 Formation of Planetary Systems: Our Solar System and Beyond. What does the solar system look like? What does the solar system look like?

Chapter 6 Formation of Planetary Systems: Our Solar System and Beyond. What does the solar system look like? What does the solar system look like? Chapter 6 Formation of Planetary Systems: Our Solar System and Beyond What does the solar system look like? The solar system exhibits clear patterns of composition and motion. These patterns are far more

More information

Origin of Our Universe

Origin of Our Universe Origin of Our Universe Before the Big Bang? As cosmologists begin to understand what happened just after the Big Bang, many are questioning what led up to the Big Bang (4 possibilities) 1. No previous

More information

The Formation of Planetary Systems. Astronomy 1-1 Lecture 20-1

The Formation of Planetary Systems. Astronomy 1-1 Lecture 20-1 The Formation of Planetary Systems Astronomy 1-1 Lecture 20-1 Modeling Planet Formation Any model for solar system and planet formation must explain 1. Planets are relatively isolated in space 2. Planetary

More information

Solar System Fundamentals. What is a Planet? Planetary orbits Planetary temperatures Planetary Atmospheres Origin of the Solar System

Solar System Fundamentals. What is a Planet? Planetary orbits Planetary temperatures Planetary Atmospheres Origin of the Solar System Solar System Fundamentals What is a Planet? Planetary orbits Planetary temperatures Planetary Atmospheres Origin of the Solar System Properties of Planets What is a planet? Defined finally in August 2006!

More information

Astronomy 1140 Quiz 1 Review

Astronomy 1140 Quiz 1 Review Astronomy 1140 Quiz 1 Review Prof. Pradhan September 15, 2015 What is Science? 1. Explain the difference between astronomy and astrology. (a) Astrology: nonscience using zodiac sign to predict the future/personality

More information

Astronomy Excerpts from the Frameworks for Science Education - Third Grade

Astronomy Excerpts from the Frameworks for Science Education - Third Grade NOTE: Since the writing of the Frameworks, Pluto has been reclassified as a dwarf planet along with several other known small bodies of similar size. There are likely to be hundreds more discovered out

More information

Name Period 4 th Six Weeks Notes 2015 Weather

Name Period 4 th Six Weeks Notes 2015 Weather Name Period 4 th Six Weeks Notes 2015 Weather Radiation Convection Currents Winds Jet Streams Energy from the Sun reaches Earth as electromagnetic waves This energy fuels all life on Earth including the

More information

Patterns in the Solar System. Patterns in the Solar System. ASTR 105 The Solar System

Patterns in the Solar System. Patterns in the Solar System. ASTR 105 The Solar System ASTR 105 The Solar System 1. Orderly motions 2.Two kinds of planets 3.Two kinds of small bodies 4.Exceptions to the rules Today: Group Lab at the end of class Next THURSDAY 03/10: First Group Project Orderly

More information

Names of Group Members:

Names of Group Members: Names of Group Members: Using telescopes and spacecraft, astronomers can collect information from objects too big or too far away to test and study in a lab. This is fortunate, because it turns out that

More information

LER 2891. Ages. Grades. Solar System. A fun game of thinking & linking!

LER 2891. Ages. Grades. Solar System. A fun game of thinking & linking! Solar System Ages 7+ LER 2891 Grades 2+ Card Game A fun game of thinking & linking! Contents 45 Picture cards 45 Word cards 8 New Link cards 2 Super Link cards Setup Shuffle the two decks together to mix

More information

4. Formation of Solar Systems

4. Formation of Solar Systems Astronomy 110: SURVEY OF ASTRONOMY 4. Formation of Solar Systems 1. A Survey of the Solar System 2. The Solar System s Early History 3. Other Planetary Systems The solar system s rich and varied structure

More information

Introduction to the Solar System

Introduction to the Solar System Introduction to the Solar System Lesson Objectives Describe some early ideas about our solar system. Name the planets, and describe their motion around the Sun. Explain how the solar system formed. Introduction

More information

The Earth, Sun & Moon. The Universe. The Earth, Sun & Moon. The Universe

The Earth, Sun & Moon. The Universe. The Earth, Sun & Moon. The Universe Football Review- Earth, Moon, Sun 1. During a total solar eclipse, when almost all of the Sun's light traveling to the Earth is blocked by the Moon, what is the order of the Earth, Sun, and Moon? A. Moon,

More information

Reasons for the seasons on Earth

Reasons for the seasons on Earth Reasons for the seasons on Earth Background information The Earth orbits the Sun in a slightly elliptical path. This means that sometimes the Earth is slightly closer to the Sun than other times but this

More information

Vocabulary - Understanding Revolution in. our Solar System

Vocabulary - Understanding Revolution in. our Solar System Vocabulary - Understanding Revolution in Universe Galaxy Solar system Planet Moon Comet Asteroid Meteor(ite) Heliocentric Geocentric Satellite Terrestrial planets Jovian (gas) planets Gravity our Solar

More information

The Origin of the Solar System and Other Planetary Systems

The Origin of the Solar System and Other Planetary Systems The Origin of the Solar System and Other Planetary Systems Modeling Planet Formation Boundary Conditions Nebular Hypothesis Fixing Problems Role of Catastrophes Planets of Other Stars Modeling Planet Formation

More information

The Solar System. Source http://starchild.gsfc.nasa.gov/docs/starchild/solar_system_level1/solar_system.html

The Solar System. Source http://starchild.gsfc.nasa.gov/docs/starchild/solar_system_level1/solar_system.html The Solar System What is the solar system? It is our Sun and everything that travels around it. Our solar system is elliptical in shape. That means it is shaped like an egg. Earth s orbit is nearly circular.

More information

What Are Stars? continued. What Are Stars? How are stars formed? Stars are powered by nuclear fusion reactions.

What Are Stars? continued. What Are Stars? How are stars formed? Stars are powered by nuclear fusion reactions. What Are Stars? How are stars formed? Stars are formed from clouds of dust and gas, or nebulas, and go through different stages as they age. star: a large celestial body that is composed of gas and emits

More information

Astron 100 Sample Exam 1 1. Solar eclipses occur only at (A) New moon (B) 1 st quarter moon (C) Full moon (D) 3 rd quarter moon (E) The equinoxes 2.

Astron 100 Sample Exam 1 1. Solar eclipses occur only at (A) New moon (B) 1 st quarter moon (C) Full moon (D) 3 rd quarter moon (E) The equinoxes 2. Astron 100 Sample Exam 1 1. Solar eclipses occur only at (A) New moon (B) 1 st quarter moon (C) Full moon (D) 3 rd quarter moon (E) The equinoxes 2. If the Moon is at first quarter tonight in Amherst,

More information

Motion and Gravity in Space

Motion and Gravity in Space Motion and Gravity in Space Each planet spins on its axis. The spinning of a body, such a planet, on its axis is called rotation. The orbit is the path that a body follows as it travels around another

More information

Lecture Outlines. Chapter 15. Astronomy Today 7th Edition Chaisson/McMillan. 2011 Pearson Education, Inc.

Lecture Outlines. Chapter 15. Astronomy Today 7th Edition Chaisson/McMillan. 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. Lecture Outlines Chapter 15 Astronomy Today 7th Edition Chaisson/McMillan Chapter 15 The Formation of Planetary Systems Units of Chapter 15 15.1 Modeling Planet Formation 15.2 Terrestrial and Jovian Planets

More information

STUDY GUIDE: Earth Sun Moon

STUDY GUIDE: Earth Sun Moon The Universe is thought to consist of trillions of galaxies. Our galaxy, the Milky Way, has billions of stars. One of those stars is our Sun. Our solar system consists of the Sun at the center, and all

More information

1.1 A Modern View of the Universe" Our goals for learning: What is our place in the universe?"

1.1 A Modern View of the Universe Our goals for learning: What is our place in the universe? Chapter 1 Our Place in the Universe 1.1 A Modern View of the Universe What is our place in the universe? What is our place in the universe? How did we come to be? How can we know what the universe was

More information

Earth Systems Quarter 1 Credit Recovery Overview

Earth Systems Quarter 1 Credit Recovery Overview Earth Systems Quarter 1 Credit Recovery Overview Reference textbooks: Glencoe Earth Science (2008) ISBN: 9780078778025 AND Glencoe Ecology Module (2008) ISBN: 9780078778209 Pre-Assessment 3 English versions

More information

Grades 3-6 Education Guide

Grades 3-6 Education Guide Grades 3-6 Education Guide Written by Kim Small Illustrated by Audio Visual Imagineering Table of Contents Standards Checklist*...3 Lessons Checklist....5 Program Pre- and Post- Survey Questions 6 Lesson

More information

Answers. Sun, Earth, Moon. Year 7 Science Chapter 10

Answers. Sun, Earth, Moon. Year 7 Science Chapter 10 Answers Sun, Earth, Moon Year 7 Science Chapter 10 p216 1 Geocentric indicates a model in which Earth is the centre of the universe. 2 Pythagoras reasoning was that the sphere is the perfect shape and

More information

PART 1 OBJECTS IN THE SOLAR SYSTEM 4.1 INTRODUCTION 4.2 PLANET TYPES

PART 1 OBJECTS IN THE SOLAR SYSTEM 4.1 INTRODUCTION 4.2 PLANET TYPES PART 1 OBJECTS IN THE SOLAR SYSTEM 4.1 INTRODUCTION Besides the Sun, the central object of our solar system, which is a star and will be discussed in more detail in Chapter 11, there are basically three

More information

AST 105 HW #4 Solution

AST 105 HW #4 Solution AST 105 HW # Solution Week of September 1 th, 2015 Note: All Problems are from The Cosmic Perspective (6ed) Chapter 6 Review Problems 2. For purposes of astronomy, what advantages does a camera have over

More information

You in Outer Space Curriculum Map. The Earth, Moon, and Sun

You in Outer Space Curriculum Map. The Earth, Moon, and Sun Topic: is Hot Topic: and Moon Topic: Earth is a Planet Topic: What is in the Sky k-1 1. s shape is perceived to be round. 2. The color of the Sun can be described in more than one way. 3. is larger than

More information

PHYS-1000 Chapter 3 Homework Solutions Due: September 9, 2012

PHYS-1000 Chapter 3 Homework Solutions Due: September 9, 2012 1. In the Greek geocentric model, the retrograde motion of a planet occurs when A. Earth is about to pass the planet in its orbit around the Sun. B. the planet actually goes backward in its orbit around

More information

Grade 9 Academic Science (SNC 1D1) Unit # 15: ASTRONOMY The Sun, the Stars, & Planets

Grade 9 Academic Science (SNC 1D1) Unit # 15: ASTRONOMY The Sun, the Stars, & Planets MARY WARD CATHOLIC SECONDARY SCHOOL Centre for Self-Directed Learning Grade 9 Academic Science (SNC 1D1) Unit # 15: ASTRONOMY The Sun, the Stars, & Planets Unit Last Revised: March 2013 ACTIVITY DESCRIPTION

More information

Georgia Performance Standards Framework for Science Grade 6. Unit Organizer: UNIVERSE AND SOLAR SYSTEM (Approximate Time 3 Weeks)

Georgia Performance Standards Framework for Science Grade 6. Unit Organizer: UNIVERSE AND SOLAR SYSTEM (Approximate Time 3 Weeks) The following instructional plan is part of a GaDOE collection of Unit Frameworks, Performance Tasks, examples of Student Work, and Teacher Commentary. Many more GaDOE approved instructional plans are

More information

Lecture 13. Gravity in the Solar System

Lecture 13. Gravity in the Solar System Lecture 13 Gravity in the Solar System Guiding Questions 1. How was the heliocentric model established? What are monumental steps in the history of the heliocentric model? 2. How do Kepler s three laws

More information

Space Interactive Internet Scavenger Hunt

Space Interactive Internet Scavenger Hunt Space Interactive Internet Scavenger Hunt This interactive internet scavenger hunt is aligned to various space standards. It provides students with an engaging way to learn about planets, the moon, stars,

More information

Exam # 1 Thu 10/06/2010 Astronomy 100/190Y Exploring the Universe Fall 11 Instructor: Daniela Calzetti

Exam # 1 Thu 10/06/2010 Astronomy 100/190Y Exploring the Universe Fall 11 Instructor: Daniela Calzetti Exam # 1 Thu 10/06/2010 Astronomy 100/190Y Exploring the Universe Fall 11 Instructor: Daniela Calzetti INSTRUCTIONS: Please, use the `bubble sheet and a pencil # 2 to answer the exam questions, by marking

More information

THE SOLAR SYSTEM - EXERCISES 1

THE SOLAR SYSTEM - EXERCISES 1 THE SOLAR SYSTEM - EXERCISES 1 THE SUN AND THE SOLAR SYSTEM Name the planets in their order from the sun. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 The asteroid belt is between and Which planet has the most moons? About how many?

More information

Copyright 2014 Edmentum - All rights reserved.

Copyright 2014 Edmentum - All rights reserved. Study Island Copyright 2014 Edmentum - All rights reserved. Generation Date: 04/01/2014 Generated By: Cheryl Shelton Title: Grade 5 Earth and Space Science 1. Juan has noticed that the weather is changing.

More information

The Main Point. The Scientific Method. Laws of Planetary Motion. Lecture #3: Orbits and Gravity. Laws of Planetary Motion:

The Main Point. The Scientific Method. Laws of Planetary Motion. Lecture #3: Orbits and Gravity. Laws of Planetary Motion: Lecture #3: Orbits and Gravity Laws of Planetary Motion: Kepler's Laws. Newton's Laws. Gravity. Planetary Orbits. Spacecraft Orbits. The Main Point Motions of planets, moons, and asteroids can be very

More information

Chapter 7 Lecture. The Cosmic Perspective Seventh Edition. Our Planetary System Pearson Education, Inc.

Chapter 7 Lecture. The Cosmic Perspective Seventh Edition. Our Planetary System Pearson Education, Inc. Chapter 7 Lecture The Cosmic Perspective Seventh Edition Our Planetary System Our Planetary System Earth, as viewed by the Voyager spacecraft 7.1 Studying the Solar System Our goals for learning: What

More information

Chapter 2 Review Clickers. The Cosmic Perspective Seventh Edition. Discovering the Universe for Yourself Pearson Education, Inc.

Chapter 2 Review Clickers. The Cosmic Perspective Seventh Edition. Discovering the Universe for Yourself Pearson Education, Inc. Review Clickers The Cosmic Perspective Seventh Edition Discovering the Universe for Yourself The sky is divided into 88 zones called a) degrees. b) tropics. c) constellations. d) signs. The sky is divided

More information

Unit 1: Understanding the Universe

Unit 1: Understanding the Universe Write your name here Surname Other names Edexcel GCSE Centre Number Astronomy Unit 1: Understanding the Universe Candidate Number Wednesday 15 May 2013 Afternoon Time: 2 hours You must have: Calculator,

More information

TO GO TO ANY OF THE PAGES LISTED BELOW, CLICK ON ITS TITLE

TO GO TO ANY OF THE PAGES LISTED BELOW, CLICK ON ITS TITLE TO GO TO ANY OF THE PAGES LISTED BELOW, CLICK ON ITS TITLE CHAPTER 18 The Sun and Other Stars 1 18-1 How are stars formed? 2 18-2 How is spectroscopy used to study stars? 3 18-3 What is magnitude? 4 18-4

More information

California Standards Grades 9 12 Boardworks 2009 Science Contents Standards Mapping

California Standards Grades 9 12 Boardworks 2009 Science Contents Standards Mapping California Standards Grades 912 Boardworks 2009 Science Contents Standards Mapping Earth Sciences Earth s Place in the Universe 1. Astronomy and planetary exploration reveal the solar system s structure,

More information

Asteroids. Earth. Asteroids. Earth Distance from sun: 149,600,000 kilometers (92,960,000 miles) Diameter: 12,756 kilometers (7,926 miles) dotted line

Asteroids. Earth. Asteroids. Earth Distance from sun: 149,600,000 kilometers (92,960,000 miles) Diameter: 12,756 kilometers (7,926 miles) dotted line Image taken by NASA Asteroids About 6,000 asteroids have been discovered; several hundred more are found each year. There are likely hundreds of thousands more that are too small to be seen from Earth.

More information

Earth In Space Chapter 3

Earth In Space Chapter 3 Earth In Space Chapter 3 Shape of the Earth Ancient Greeks Earth casts a circular shadow on the moon during a lunar eclipse Shape of the Earth Ancient Greeks Ships were observed to disappear below the

More information

PHYS-1000 Final Exam Study Guide Fall 2012

PHYS-1000 Final Exam Study Guide Fall 2012 This study guide is for the final exam of the course, covering chapters 1 through 5 and 7 through 13. You are responsible for all material in these chapters referenced from this guide as well as the corresponding

More information

Kepler, Newton, and laws of motion

Kepler, Newton, and laws of motion Kepler, Newton, and laws of motion !! " The only history in this course:!!!geocentric vs. heliocentric model (sec. 2.2-2.4)" The important historical progression is the following:!! Ptolemy (~140 AD) Copernicus

More information

The areas of Spaceport where you can find the answers are in capital letters and also in brackets. (Solar System Area)

The areas of Spaceport where you can find the answers are in capital letters and also in brackets. (Solar System Area) KEY STAGE 3 SPACEPORT Quiz The areas of Spaceport where you can find the answers are in capital letters and also in brackets. (Solar System Area) 1 Why do Astronauts experience feelings of weightlessness

More information

Celestial Sphere. Celestial Coordinates. Lecture 3: Motions of the Sun and Moon. ecliptic (path of Sun) ecliptic (path of Sun)

Celestial Sphere. Celestial Coordinates. Lecture 3: Motions of the Sun and Moon. ecliptic (path of Sun) ecliptic (path of Sun) Lecture 3: Motions of the and Moon ecliptic (path of ) ecliptic (path of ) The 23.5 degree tilt of Earth s spin axis relative to its orbital axis around the causes the seasons Celestial Sphere Celestial

More information

Earth Science Lesson Plan Quarter 4, Week 6, Day 1

Earth Science Lesson Plan Quarter 4, Week 6, Day 1 Earth Science Lesson Plan Quarter 4, Week 6, Day 1 Outcomes for Today Standard Focus: PREPARE 1. Background knowledge necessary for today s reading. The outer part of the solar system is comprised of the

More information

Page. ASTRONOMICAL OBJECTS (Page 4).

Page. ASTRONOMICAL OBJECTS (Page 4). Star: ASTRONOMICAL OBJECTS ( 4). Ball of gas that generates energy by nuclear fusion in its includes white dwarfs, protostars, neutron stars. Planet: Object (solid or gaseous) that orbits a star. Radius

More information

The Reasons for the Seasons

The Reasons for the Seasons Guiding Question: What causes the seasons on Earth? The Reasons for the Seasons Vocabulary astrolabe equinox rotate axis horizon solstice elliptical revolve (orbit) sundial Materials Exploration (per group)

More information

Aphelion The point in the orbit of a planet or other celestial body where it is furthest from the Sun.

Aphelion The point in the orbit of a planet or other celestial body where it is furthest from the Sun. SKYTRACK Glossary of Terms Angular distance The angular separation between two objects in the sky as perceived by an observer, measured in angles. The angular separation between two celestial objects in

More information

Name Period Date Unit 5 Test: Earth-Sun-Moon System. 1. The diagram below shows the relative positions of Earth and the Moon and rays of sunlight.

Name Period Date Unit 5 Test: Earth-Sun-Moon System. 1. The diagram below shows the relative positions of Earth and the Moon and rays of sunlight. Name Period Date Unit 5 Test: Earth-Sun-Moon System Multiple Choice: 30 questions at 2 points each (60 points) 1. The diagram below shows the relative positions of Earth and the Moon and rays of sunlight.

More information

Astronomy Club of Asheville July 2016 Sky Events

Astronomy Club of Asheville July 2016 Sky Events July 2016 Sky Events The Planets this Month - page 2 Planet Highlights - page 7 Moon Phases - page 10 July 4 th - Earth Reaches Aphelion - page 11 July 28/29 - Delta Aquarid Meteors - page 13 www.astroasheville.org

More information

The following words and their definitions should be addressed before completion of the reading:

The following words and their definitions should be addressed before completion of the reading: Seasons Vocabulary: The following words and their definitions should be addressed before completion of the reading: sphere any round object that has a surface that is the same distance from its center

More information

Introduction to the sky

Introduction to the sky Introduction to the sky On a clear, moonless night, far from city lights, the night sky is magnificent. Roughly 2000 stars are visible to the unaided eye. If you know where to look, you can see Mercury,

More information

Formation of the Solar System

Formation of the Solar System Formation of the Solar System Any theory of formation of the Solar System must explain all of the basic facts that we have learned so far. 1 The Solar System The Sun contains 99.9% of the mass. The Solar

More information