WHO CARES? The Future of Adult Care and Support in Northern Ireland. A discussion document

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "WHO CARES? The Future of Adult Care and Support in Northern Ireland. A discussion document"

Transcription

1 WHO CARES? The Future of Adult Care and Support in Northern Ireland A discussion document

2

3 Page Number Ministerial Foreword 3 Introduction 6 Structure 7 What is Care and Support? 8 Why do we need to change? 13 A Vision for Care and Support 19 Who is responsible for Care and Support now and who 27 should be in the future? How to get involved 33 Appendix 1 Summary of Questions 35 Appendix 2 Glossary of Terms 37 CONTENTS 1

4

5 MINISTERIAL FOREWORD It s a fact of life that nothing stays the same. People change and whole societies change. Sometimes change can come quickly and unexpectedly, and we don t have much time to think about how to deal with it. But at other times change is quite predictable and there is time to think about it and work out how best to respond to it. One of the responsibilities placed upon those of us who work in government is to look ahead and consider how things might change and how we might have to change the services we provide to meet people s changing needs. Many of you will be aware of the recent review of health and social care which I commissioned last year. Transforming Your Care outlines a five-year programme of change to the configuration and delivery of services. You will have your opportunity to share your views on those operational changes as they take effect and are consulted on locally. While Transforming Your Care will lead to essential change in the way health and social care is currently delivered, I have also, through this paper, been considering the medium- and longer-term challenges facing our system of adult care and support and how best to prepare for those challenges. All four of the UK nations are currently considering how they might best respond to the growth in the number of older people in our society. For a variety of reasons our over 65 population is likely to more than double over the next 50 years. People with disabilities are also living longer, and while this is of course something to be celebrated, these changes will inevitably mean that increasing demands will be placed on the system that cares for and supports people in need to live healthy, independent and inclusive lives. If we were to leave our care and support services organised and resourced as they currently are, it would mean that over time they would become overstretched by this increasing demand and we simply would not be able to afford services for everybody who really needs them. And nobody wants that to happen. Faced with these challenges, and in the context of changes already being taken forward under Transforming Your Care, I am putting in place a three-stage process which will establish the long term future direction of adult care and support. We will also be looking at how adult care and support is funded. As this is an issue that will impact on most people s lives at one time or another, I want as many individuals and stakeholder organisations as possible to have their say in the process and for that say to be meaningful. I am particularly keen to hear from people who have used, or are using, adult care and support services; from their families and carers; and from the staff who deliver those services, whether they work in the statutory, private or voluntary sectors. The first stage of the process is the production of this discussion document, which is intended to raise people s awareness of the issues and begin a public debate about how we wish to move forward. Because this is such an important issue that will affect MINISTERIAL FOREWORD 3

6 virtually all of us at one time or another, I want to make sure that everybody who wants to has the time and opportunity to make their views known. So, rather than a three-month consultation period, which is the norm, this discussion will have six months to allow people the time to consider the issues properly. During that six-month period a number of public consultation events will take place around the country which will allow people to voice their opinions about the challenges we face and how best to tackle them. MINISTERIAL FOREWORD Once this exercise is completed and people s views, responses and suggestions have been analysed, a proposals paper will be produced, which will suggest the best options for going forward. That paper too will be subject to full public consultation and appropriate equality impact assessments. Finally, a strategic document will be produced, which will set out the agreed future direction and funding of care and support along with the reforms required. It is my hope that as many of the people in NI as possible will take part in this process of change. One of the most powerful arguments in favour of devolved government is that it gives people who live here an opportunity to influence the government policies that impact on their everyday lives, and ensure that those policies reflect the wishes of the people. This is such an opportunity, and I would invite as many individuals and organisations as possible to play a part by telling us about what is most important to them, and suggesting how we might take this forward. Edwin Poots MLA Minister for Health, Social Services and Public Safety 4

7 MINISTERIAL STATEMENT My Department makes a significant contribution to the provision of services to vulnerable adults through the supporting people scheme, social security and disability benefits and the provision of supported housing and I wish to welcome the proposed discussion document and the DHSSPS approach being taken for the future of Adult Social Care. Nelson McCausland MLA Minister for Social Development MINISTERIAL STATEMENT 5

8 INTRODUCTION It is widely accepted that the adult care and support system in Northern Ireland (NI) is coming under increasing pressure for a number of reasons, including increased expectations, an ageing population and limited resources. If we are to be in a position to respond to that challenge, we need to find a fair, sustainable and efficient way to fund and provide care and support in the future, sharing responsibility with the individual, to ensure that all those who need it have access to high quality, value for money care, at the right time and in the right place. The purpose of this document is to raise awareness of the pressures facing the care and support system in NI and generate debate about the long-term future of care and support here. In so doing, we are posing some questions to prompt your thinking and help shape the discussion. INTRODUCTION This document is the first stage of a three-stage process designed to reshape adult care and support services in NI. At this stage we are not making specific policy proposals the purpose of the document is simply to shape public discussion and debate about the type of care and support system you want to see in the future. This discussion and debate will help inform the subsequent stages of the reform process: stage two, where we will make proposals on the changes we think should be made in the light of your views at stage one; and stage three, when the key decisions regarding the direction and funding of care and support services will be made. NB. For the purposes of this document, when we talk about care and support, we are referring to adult social care, as well as other support services such as benefits and housing support. This document does not deal with health care (treatments offered by healthcare professionals such as doctors, nurses, dentists etc). 6

9 STRUCTURE The document is split into 5 sections: Part 1 outlines what care and support is, what services are available and how they are provided in NI; Part 2 explains the current pressures facing the system, and why it needs to change; Part 3 presents a suggested vision for the future of the adult care and support system; Part 4 describes the current funding arrangements, and opens the debate on how best to ensure we have a fair and sustainable system; Part 5 outlines how you can engage with the consultation and share your views. STRUCTURE This document can be made available in alternative formats and languages on request, including Braille, large print, audio etc. Please contact the Department to make your request: Reform of Adult Care and Support Team Dept. of Health, Social Services and Public Safety Room D3.7 Castle Buildings Stormont Estate Belfast BT4 3SQ Tel: Fax: Textphone:

10 PART 1: What is Care and Support? Care and support describes the activities, services and relationships that help us to live an independent, healthy, active and inclusive life. Many of us don t need any type of support to carry out everyday tasks like washing, dressing, shopping, cooking etc. But some people may need help with certain tasks because of, for example, events in their lives, illnesses, disabilities or because they cannot protect themselves from harm. Equally, as people move into old age, it is likely that many will need assistance of some sort. It is in these types of circumstances that the care and support system steps in to provide the help which enables people to live independently at home for as long as possible. PART ONE For those of us who do need some form of help, whether on a temporary or longerterm basis, the care and support system aims to promote independence and wellbeing, rehabilitation, social inclusion and safeguarding from harm or abuse, and is based on people being able to get personalised services that are tailored to meet their assessed needs. Support to carers is another vital aspect of the care and support system. What type of care and support is available in Northern Ireland? Care and support in NI involves a wide range of services provided across government. These services include adult social care which is the responsibility of the Department of Health, Social Services and Public Safety (DHSSPS), and benefits and help with housing which is the responsibility of the Department for Social Development (DSD). Not everyone receives the same type or level of service; the aim is that you receive the service that meets your particular needs in the best way. Adult Social Care The majority of care and support services are delivered through adult social care, part of the Health and Social Care (HSC) system provided by the Health and Social Care Board and Trusts. Some of the ways adult social care supports people are outlined on the following page. Adult social care also includes services that are provided for carers: people who care for family members or friends, without expectation of payment. These services can include information, advice and counselling; training in some aspects of care such as lifting; respite/short breaks in the home and in appropriate residential settings; provision of equipment and home adaptations; help with laundry; helplines; advocacy and carer support groups. Finally, adult social care also includes the mechanisms for delivering services, such as assessment of need and Direct Payments. 8

11 Social Work: Social Workers are professionally qualified workers who assess the needs of individuals, carers, families, groups and communities, and plan and implement the individual packages of care and support that are best suited to help them. Nursing Home Care: this is intended for people who need ongoing nursing care in a residential setting, as well as help with daily activities. This service is means-tested in NI, although the nursing element is paid for by government. Respite Care: this is temporary residential care, nursing home or social accommodation provided to an ill or disabled person to allow a carer a break from caring and to give the individual a break from the norm. The term Short Breaks is also used. Adult Social Care Residential Care: refers to provision of accommodation, board and personal care, usually long-term, in a residential setting other than the person s home. In Northern Ireland this service is means-tested. Domiciliary Care: this refers to personal care services provided in the person s own home. It aims to make it possible for people to remain at home for as long as it is safe and appropriate to do so. This is currently provided free of charge in Northern Ireland. PART ONE Meals on Wheels: these are ready-made meals delivered to clients who have difficulty cooking meals for themselves. In NI there is a flat rate charge for this service. Minor Housing Adaptations/ Provision of Equipment Day Care/Day Opportunities: provides care for a person during the day. It is provided away from the person s home and transport, depending on assessed need, is sometimes arranged as part of the service. As with domiciliary care, the purpose of day care is to help people remain living at home for as long as it is safe and appropriate to do so. This service is also provided free of charge, although some charge may be levied for meals provided. 9

12 How is adult social care delivered in Northern Ireland? Government policy to date has been to support people to live at home for as long as it is safe and appropriate to do so; to make practical support for carers a high priority; to make proper assessment of need and good case management the cornerstone of high quality care; to promote the development of a flourishing independent sector alongside good quality public services; and to secure best value for taxpayers money. The main providers of adult social care services are: the statutory sector agencies of government set up by Parliamentary or Assembly Acts, e.g. HSC Trusts; PART ONE the private sector organisations and individual proprietors that own and run services for a profit, including, for example, residential care and nursing homes, nursing agencies and domiciliary care services; and the voluntary sector organisations, often registered as charities, which operate similar services but on a non-profit-making basis. They may be local or national, and they may employ staff, or depend entirely on volunteers. The voluntary and community sectors also often provide services promoting mutual support and community participation, for example, Gateway Clubs for people with learning disabilities. The diagram below illustrates the balance of provision between the statutory, private and voluntary sectors. Regardless of provider, the majority of adult social care provided in NI is wholly or part-funded by government. Statutory sector Private and Voluntary sectors 100% nursing home packages 23% residential care home packages 42% domiciliary care 77% residential care home packages 58% domiciliary care Source: cc7 31 December 2011, cc7b 2011 (DHSSPS) 10

13 Other Care and Support Services Other government departments also provide services which can support people to lead more independent lives. For example, services provided through the Department for Social Development (DSD) include: Housing Adaptations: These can be carried out to a person s home to make it more accessible and safer for them to move around and live comfortably. Where eligibility has been confirmed following Occupational Therapy (OT) assessment, home owners, landlords and private tenants may be eligible for disabled facilities grants to assist with the costs of housing adaptations. This service is managed by the NI Housing Executive. Where eligible, HSC Trusts can also make provision of lifts, ceiling track hoists and minor adaptations for private sector clients. In social housing an agreed range of minor housing adaptations can be provided without HSC Trust OT assessment for tenants, while more significant housing adaptations require OT assessment. Social Security Benefits: If you are sick or have a disability you may be eligible for tax free benefits to help you with paying for personal care (Attendance Allowance if you are over 65), or to help with the costs of being disabled (Disability Living Allowance (DLA) if you are under 65). The present rules allow those awarded DLA before age 65 to continue to receive it after they have reached 65. The current system is under review and the UK Government is proposing to change DLA to a Personal Independence Payment in 2013, to assist people with illness or disability in remaining independent and leading full, active and independent lives. PART ONE Supported Housing: This refers to support put in place to assist people in living more independently. The government programme Supporting People funds a range of housing -related support services for vulnerable people to improve their quality of life and attain independence. These services can be provided in their own homes or in hostels, sheltered housing or other specialised supported housing. In Northern Ireland the programme is administered by the Housing Executive. Carer s Allowance: This is a taxable social security benefit for people who look after a person with a disability, and is managed by DSD. This is a contribution towards the income of carers who are unable to work full-time, but is not a wage for caring. 11

14 How many people receive care and support in Northern Ireland? Informal Care 185,000 people care for family members and friends Benefits/Other Government Departments In November 2011, there were 55,330 people receiving Attendance Allowance, 187,950 people receiving Disability Living Allowance and 35,740 people receiving Carer s Allowance PART ONE Adult Social Care 4,058 residential care and 7,948 nursing home packages provided at 31 March 2012; 2,423 people were receiving Direct Payments instead of Trust services during the quarter ending 31 March 2012; 23,522 people received domiciliary care during a survey week in September 2011; 4,245 people were receiving a meals on wheels service at 31 March 2011; 8,623 people were registered at statutory day care facilities at 31 March 2011; 1,936 adult protection referrals were made in 2010/11; 928 adult care and protection plans were in place at 31 March Question 1: Were you previously aware what care and support services are available to you and where to go or who to ask to gain access to these services? 12

15 PART 2: Why do we need to change? The current system of care and support is coming under pressure for a number of reasons: Demographics We, like the rest of the UK and Europe, have an ageing population. People are living longer than ever before which, of course, should be celebrated. The increasing number of older people also means that the ratio of older people to younger people is increasing dramatically. In Northern Ireland we have the fastest-growing population of any country within the UK. The NI Statistics and Research Agency (NISRA) has projected 1 the NI population to rise from million in 2010 to million in 2025 (an increase of around 8%). They also project that, over the same 15 year period, the numbers of people aged 65 and over will increase by around 42% from 260,000 to 370,000. In contrast, the number of people of working age is projected to increase by only 1.4%, from 1,109,000 people in 2010 to a projected 1,124,000 in And when you look at the projected figures for the over-85 population, the increase is much more dramatic: by 2025 the number of people aged 85 and over will increase by 25,000, or 83%, to 55,000, of whom 62% will be women. The over-85 population will double by 2027 compared to ,100 Projected Population Growth (all ages) PART TWO People (thousands) 2,000 1,900 1,800 1,700 1, Year Projected Population Growth (85 years and over) People (thousands) Year Source: NISRA 2010-based National Population Projections 1 Statistical Report 2010 based Population Projections, Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency, October

16 Furthermore, into the longer-term future these numbers are likely to continue to rise, so that by 2046 it is projected that there will be twice as many people aged 65 and over, and almost six times as many over-85s, as there are today: while today Northern Ireland can boast some 200 centenarians, by 2046 the projected figure is over 5,000. Longer Term Population Projections (all ages) 2,060 People (thousands) 2,040 2,020 2,000 PART TWO People (thousands) 1, Year Longer Term Population Projections (85 years and over) Year Source: NISRA 2010-based National Population Projections Similarly, advances in medical knowledge and practice mean that people with disabilities are also living longer, and more people with learning disabilities are living well into adulthood and old age. These developments should, of course, be welcomed and celebrated; not only is it a mark of how far we have come in terms of medical, social and technological development, but longer life expectancy is also of great benefit to our society. Many older people and people with disabilities play a significant role in their local communities, families, and society as a whole, whether that be as carers, learners, workers or volunteers. Many of our charities and voluntary organisations rely heavily on the unpaid hours willingly given by disabled and older people. And the contribution of older adults to caring for relatives should not be underestimated; one estimate suggests that just under half the cost of dementia care in Ireland is borne by family carers 2. In particular, older people are identified as important social resources in rural areas, providing informal care and supporting the cultural and social lives of their communities 3. 2 Creating Excellence in Dementia Care: A Research Review for Ireland s Dementia Strategy, Cahill et al, Trinity College Dublin, National University of Ireland, Galway, The Personalisation of Adult Social Care in Rural Areas, Commission for Rural Communities,

17 Furthermore, keeping active as a volunteer or as a paid worker beyond the normal retirement age is good for us. As people are living longer and remain fit and healthy for longer, many want to work and be involved for longer, which in turn can be beneficial for their own health and mental wellbeing. I didn t know what I was letting myself in for when I walked through those doors. All I knew was that I wanted to do something useful with all this time that I had and didn t know what to do with. Well, by the end of the first week I was bitten, and in these last ten years I have got more out of it personally than I ever would have thought certainly, in my view, more than I have given. (a retired volunteer, Co Down) The important role that older people play in society is being promoted this year through the European Year of Active Ageing. Year of Active Ageing 2012 is the European Year of Active Ageing. Active Ageing means growing old in good health and as a full member of society, feeling more fulfilled in our jobs, more independent in our daily lives, and more involved as citizens. No matter how old we are, we can still play our part in society and enjoy a better quality of life. The European Year 2012 seeks to promote active ageing in three areas: PART TWO Employment - as life expectancy increases across Europe, pension ages are rising but many fear that they will not be able to stay in their current jobs or to find another job until they can retire on a decent pension. The European Year seeks to give older workers better chances in the labour market. Participation in Society - retiring from one s job does not mean becoming idle. The contribution of older people to society as carers for others, typically their own parents, spouses or grandchildren, is often overlooked and so is their role as volunteers. The European Year seeks to ensure greater recognition of what older people bring to society and create more supportive conditions for them. Independent Living - our health declines as we grow old, but a lot can be done to cope with this decline. And quite small changes in our environment can make a big difference to people suffering from various health impairments and disabilities. Active Ageing also means empowering us as we age so that we can remain in charge of our own lives as long as possible. Source: Information on Active Ageing events in NI can be found here: 15

18 However, an ageing population does of course also have consequences for the future. For example, rates of ill health and disability increase dramatically the older we get. Dementia mostly affects people over the age of 70, and the rate of disability among those aged over 85 is 67% compared with only 5% among young adults 4. In addition, the profile of older people requiring care is becoming more complex, with many people now living with multiple chronic illnesses. With an ageing population, we also need to consider that carers are also getting older, often caring into their old age, which can have a detrimental effect on their health. And social isolation, loneliness and depression are also issues that many people will have to face. PART TWO Levels of dementia are projected to increase to 60,000 by 2051 from 19,000 in 2010 (Dementia Strategy, DHSSPS, 2010) Between 2007 and 2020 the prevalence of a number of long term conditions (namely hypertension, coronary heart disease, stroke and diabetes) amongst adults in NI is predicted to increase by 30% (Making Chronic Conditions Count, Institute of Public Health in Ireland, 2010) 24% of women and 17% of men in NI have a mental health problem over 20% higher than the rates in England or Scotland (Transforming Your Care, HSCB, 2011) Between 17-21% of the NI population have a physical disability, and around 37% of households include at least one person with a disability (NISRA) Research from the USA Centre for Disease Control and Prevention found that the average life expectancy of people with Down s syndrome increased from 25 in 1983 to 49 in And it is continuing to increase - people with Down s syndrome can now expect to live into their 60s Therefore, as our population is getting older and living longer, it is to be expected that more people will need care and support services in the future. And this comes at a time when the UK and Europe is experiencing difficult financial circumstances in which funding for care and support is likely to be constrained, and remain that way, for a number of years to come. The Department of Health in England has projected that there will be a funding gap in social care alone of 6 billion in England by As NI is faced with the same pressures as England and the rest of the UK, we too can expect a proportionately similar shortfall in funding. 4 Transforming Your Care, Health and Social Care Board, December Department of Health (England) estimates based on PSSRU projections,

19 Changing Expectations Our society has experienced huge change in terms of what people want from public services, what they value and what they expect. The baby boomer generation, born after the Second World War and in their late 50s and 60s now, are better educated, more independent and more affluent than ever before, and demand choice, control and change in all areas of their lives. And the next generation, currently in their 20s and 30s, will likely want to have even more control over their lives and involvement in designing their own care and support. The expectations of the baby boomer generation differ from those of their parents generation, which may have been characterised more by a make do and mend attitude. Developments such as Minimum Standards for a range of care and support services, the Human Rights Act and anti-discrimination legislation have also driven expectations about the type and quality of support that should be available. In addition, the last two decades have seen considerable changes in the rights of people with disabilities. Legislation such as the Disability Discrimination Act 1995 and the Disability Discrimination (NI) Order 2006 enshrined in law the rights of people with a disability not to be discriminated against and to participate in civil society to the same extent as non-disabled people. Furthermore, the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities requires member states to promote, protect and ensure full and equal enjoyment of all human rights and fundamental freedoms by all persons with disabilities and to promote respect for their inherent dignity. PART TWO This has been supplemented by the development of the social model of disability, which aims to encourage society to consider disability in a different way. It makes the important distinction between impairment and disability, in recognising that people with impairments are disabled by the barriers that commonly exist in society. The social model of disability requires society to remove these barriers so that all people have equality of opportunity. The development of this model has been influential in altering attitudes and causing society to consider that it needs to adapt to the needs of people with disabilities, rather than defining them as the problem and forcing them to fit into existing societal norms. People nowadays, no matter what age they are or what type of disability or infirmity they have, want to live independent, socially inclusive lives. They want to participate and contribute, and have a say in designing their own care and support in a way that best meets their needs, rather than trying to fit themselves into existing services. However, we have to acknowledge that these changes in attitude and increased expectations cannot be met through the current system and the funding available to it. So the care and support system of the future has to reflect these changed circumstances and expectations. 17

20 Lack of Understanding of the System Another problem with our existing system is that people too often do not understand what they have personal responsibility for, and what the government is responsible for. Many people think that all forms of care and support are free at the point of delivery, like the NHS and Supporting People services 6, which can mean that some people will make no preparation for their future needs, as they believe the government will meet all the costs of their care. A lack of awareness can also limit people s ability to choose between different options, prepare for these and ensure they have as much control as possible over what happens to them in their later years. PART TWO People will also often underestimate the likelihood that they will have a need for care or support in the future. About a third of all men and half of all women will, upon reaching 65, need long-term care and support at some time as they age 7. This is a significant proportion, and shows us that realistically, everyone should be making some plans for the future. When people do not make appropriate plans for their future, this can often result in their families taking on responsibility, or they may go without care that would enable them to stay well and independent for longer. People also find it unfair that they might be forced to sell their home or realise their other assets to pay for their care, when others who do not have similar assets are supported by the government. There is the belief that a lifetime of paying tax and National Insurance should provide protection and ensure the government looks after you when you need it. Section 4 provides further detail on the current funding arrangements for care and support; however, it is clear that we need to make changes to ensure people think about and plan for their future needs. It is widely accepted that the existing system cannot cope with the combined pressures of increased expectations, an ageing population and limited resources. Over the coming years, the funding available for care and support in NI is unlikely to increase to match the demand that will continue to grow. So we need to find a fair, sustainable and efficient way to fund and provide care and support in the future, sharing responsibility with the individual, to ensure that all those who need it have access to high quality, value-for-money care, at the right time and place. If we fail to get to grips with these long-term issues, we run the risk of failing to provide appropriate levels of care and an acceptable quality of life for potentially large proportions of our population. If we continue to deliver services as we currently do, they will not meet the needs of our population and will not be sustainable for the years to come. Transforming Your Care 6 Supporting People housing-related support services aim to provide a better quality of life to assist vulnerable people to live independently and maintain their tenancies. The Department for Social Development has overall responsibility for the programme which is administered by the Northern Ireland Housing Executive. 7 Caring for the Very Old: Public and Private Solutions, H Glennerster,

Sheffield City Council Draft Commissioning Strategy for services for people with a learning disability and their families September 2014

Sheffield City Council Draft Commissioning Strategy for services for people with a learning disability and their families September 2014 Sheffield City Council Draft Commissioning Strategy for services for people with a learning disability and their families September 2014 1 Sheffield City Council: Draft Commissioning Strategy for services

More information

Social Care Jargon Buster. 52 of the most commonly used social care words and phrases and what they mean

Social Care Jargon Buster. 52 of the most commonly used social care words and phrases and what they mean Social Care Jargon Buster 52 of the most commonly used social care words and phrases and what they mean 1) Abuse Harm that is caused by anyone who has power over another person, which may include family

More information

Assessments and the Care Act

Assessments and the Care Act factsheet Assessments and the Care Act Getting help in England from April 2015 carersuk.org factsheet This factsheet contains information about the new system of care and support that will come into place

More information

Intermediate care and reablement

Intermediate care and reablement Factsheet 76 May 2015 About this factsheet This factsheet explains intermediate care, a term that includes reablement. It consists of a range of integrated services that can be offered on a short term

More information

Excellence & Choice A Consultation on Older People s Services January 2009

Excellence & Choice A Consultation on Older People s Services January 2009 Excellence & Choice A Consultation on Older People s Services January 2009 CONTENTS 1. Introduction...3 2. Guiding principles for the delivery of services for older people...5 3. How are services for older

More information

Models of Care. August 2011. Introduction

Models of Care. August 2011. Introduction August 2011 Models of Care Introduction Severe budgetary restraints, coupled with the rapidly ageing population on the island of Ireland, make the cost of care for older people, now and especially in the

More information

Putting People First A shared vision and commitment to the transformation of Adult Social Care

Putting People First A shared vision and commitment to the transformation of Adult Social Care Putting People First A shared vision and commitment to the transformation of Adult Social Care Putting People First A shared vision and commitment to the transformation of Adult Social Care 1 Introduction

More information

Care and Support Statutory Guidance. Issued under the Care Act 2014

Care and Support Statutory Guidance. Issued under the Care Act 2014 Care and Support Statutory Guidance Issued under the Care Act 2014 June 2014 Contents Introduction 3 General responsibilities and universal services 1. Promoting wellbeing 5 2. Preventing, reducing or

More information

Adult Learning Disabilities in Kent

Adult Learning Disabilities in Kent Adult Learning Disabilities in Kent Kent and Medway NHS and Social Care Partnership Trust Kent Community Health NHS Trust We provide an integrated service to people with a learning disability in Kent.

More information

Wanless Social Care Review: Securing Good Care for Older People: Taking a Long-term View

Wanless Social Care Review: Securing Good Care for Older People: Taking a Long-term View RCN Policy Unit Policy Briefing 17/2006 Wanless Social Care Review: Securing Good Care for Older People: Taking a Long-term View ABSTRACT The Wanless Social Care Review "securing good care for older people-

More information

Getting social care support under the new law in England

Getting social care support under the new law in England Factsheet What does the Care Act mean for me? Getting social care support under the new law in England This factsheet concentrates on parts of the Care Act which will most affect people who use social

More information

Services for children and young people in North Ayrshire 28 October 2013. Report of a pilot joint inspection

Services for children and young people in North Ayrshire 28 October 2013. Report of a pilot joint inspection Services for children and young people in North Ayrshire 28 October 2013 Report of a pilot joint inspection Contents 1. Introduction 1 2. Background 1 3. The Community Planning Partnership area 2 4. Particular

More information

Warmer Healthier Homes: A Consultation Paper on a new Fuel Poverty Strategy for Northern Ireland

Warmer Healthier Homes: A Consultation Paper on a new Fuel Poverty Strategy for Northern Ireland Warmer Healthier Homes: A Consultation Paper on a new Fuel Poverty Strategy for Northern Ireland A Response by the Chartered Institute of Housing in Northern Ireland September 2010 The Chartered Institute

More information

Big Lottery Fund Research Issue 24. Out of School Hours Childcare: lessons learnt and themes for the future

Big Lottery Fund Research Issue 24. Out of School Hours Childcare: lessons learnt and themes for the future Big Lottery Fund Research Issue 24 Out of School Hours Childcare: lessons learnt and themes for the future 1 Out of School Hours Childcare: lessons learnt and themes for the future Stock code BIG-OSHCHILD

More information

Report to Cabinet 28 January 2013 Item No 16 Strong and Well: Strengthening Support for Older People in Norfolk

Report to Cabinet 28 January 2013 Item No 16 Strong and Well: Strengthening Support for Older People in Norfolk Report to Cabinet 28 January 2013 Item No 16 Strong and Well: Strengthening Support for Older People in Norfolk Report by the Director of Community Services Summary The 2011 census outlines that over 20%

More information

A Health and Wellbeing Strategy for Bexley Listening to you, working for you

A Health and Wellbeing Strategy for Bexley Listening to you, working for you A Health and Wellbeing Strategy for Bexley Listening to you, working for you www.bexley.gov.uk Introduction FOREWORD Health and wellbeing is everybody s business, and our joint aim is to improve the health

More information

Parkinson s UK policy statement Prescription charges

Parkinson s UK policy statement Prescription charges Parkinson s UK policy statement Prescription charges "My drugs are my lifeline. Without them I would have no movement at all I would be sitting in my house, looking out the window - unable to dress, wash,

More information

Domiciliary Service Care and support at home for elderly and disabled people

Domiciliary Service Care and support at home for elderly and disabled people Department for Communities Domiciliary Service Care and support at home for elderly and disabled people Fact Sheet 10 (August 2015) If you are an older person or you have a disability, you may need some

More information

SERVICE FRAMEWORK FOR OLDER PEOPLE

SERVICE FRAMEWORK FOR OLDER PEOPLE SERVICE FRAMEWORK FOR OLDER PEOPLE TABLE of CONTENTS SECTION STANDARD TITLE Page No Foreword 4 Summary of Standards 6 1 Introduction to Service Frameworks 36 2 The Service Framework for Older People 42

More information

The 2015 Challenge for NHS Wales. A briefing for General Election candidates on the challenges facing the healthcare system in Wales

The 2015 Challenge for NHS Wales. A briefing for General Election candidates on the challenges facing the healthcare system in Wales The 2015 Challenge for NHS Wales A briefing for General Election candidates on the challenges facing the healthcare system in Wales Introduction Across the UK health is a devolved matter with all four

More information

Big Chat 4. Strategy into action. NHS Southport and Formby CCG

Big Chat 4. Strategy into action. NHS Southport and Formby CCG Big Chat 4 Strategy into action NHS Southport and Formby CCG Royal Clifton Hotel, Southport, 19 November 2014 Contents What is the Big Chat? 3 About Big Chat 4 4 How the event worked 4 Presentations 5

More information

Paying for Adult Social Care services in Leeds

Paying for Adult Social Care services in Leeds Paying for Adult Social Care services in Leeds Financial information from April 2015 Introduction From April 2015 the way that care and support is provided is changing for the better. The Care Act 2014

More information

Mental Health Declaration for Europe

Mental Health Declaration for Europe WHO European Ministerial Conference on Mental Health Facing the Challenges, Building Solutions Helsinki, Finland, 12 15 January 2005 EUR/04/5047810/6 14 January 2005 52667 ORIGINAL: ENGLISH Mental Health

More information

Guideline scope Workplace health: support for employees with disabilities and long-term conditions

Guideline scope Workplace health: support for employees with disabilities and long-term conditions NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR HEALTH AND CARE EXCELLENCE Guideline scope Workplace health: support for employees with disabilities and long-term conditions Short title Workplace health: employees with disabilities

More information

Joint Commissioning Strategy for Assistive Technology. Supporting Personalised Outcomes through Assistive Technology 2012-2017 (5 years)

Joint Commissioning Strategy for Assistive Technology. Supporting Personalised Outcomes through Assistive Technology 2012-2017 (5 years) Joint Commissioning Strategy for Assistive Technology Supporting Personalised Outcomes through Assistive Technology 2012-2017 (5 years) November 2012 1 Contents Page 1.0 Introduction P3 2.0 What is Assistive

More information

Assessments and the Care Act

Assessments and the Care Act factsheet Assessments and the Care Act Getting help in England from April 2015 carersuk.org factsheet This factsheet contains information about the new system of care and support that came into place in

More information

getting there Models for Self- Directed Support broker support Getting There Discussion paper

getting there Models for Self- Directed Support broker support Getting There Discussion paper Models for Self- Directed Support broker support Getting There Discussion paper getting there Outside the Box November 2012 Introduction Introduction what this section covers: About Getting There Summary

More information

A-Z list of adult social care services

A-Z list of adult social care services Adult social care helpdesk Phone: 023 9268 0810 The first point of contact for adult social care services. Abuse of adults Phone: 023 9268 0810 or in an emergency 999 No abuse is acceptable. If you are

More information

Therefore, AGE Platform Europe would be pleased if the Committee could take into account the following amendments.

Therefore, AGE Platform Europe would be pleased if the Committee could take into account the following amendments. Suggestions for amending the Draft General Comment on the Right to just and favourable conditions of work (article 7 of the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights) (E/C.12/54/R.2)

More information

Equality with Human Rights Analysis Toolkit

Equality with Human Rights Analysis Toolkit Equality with Human Rights Analysis Toolkit The Equality Act 2010 and Human Rights Act 1998 require us to consider the impact of our policies and practices in respect of equality and human rights. We should

More information

Strategic plan. Outline

Strategic plan. Outline Strategic plan Outline 1 Introduction Our vision Our role Our mandate 2 About us Our governance Our structure 3 Context Our development Camden 4 Resources Funding Partners 5 Operating model How we will

More information

IMPLEMENTATION FRAMEWORK

IMPLEMENTATION FRAMEWORK IMPLEMENTATION FRAMEWORK AND PRIORITIES 2015-2017 People with learning disabilities, their families and carers have the right to be valued as individuals and lead fulfilling lives. They have the right

More information

Simon Community Northern Ireland welcomes the opportunity to respond to the Alcohol and Drug Commissioning Framework for Northern Ireland 2013-2016

Simon Community Northern Ireland welcomes the opportunity to respond to the Alcohol and Drug Commissioning Framework for Northern Ireland 2013-2016 Simon Community Northern Ireland welcomes the opportunity to respond to the Alcohol and Drug Commissioning Framework for Northern Ireland 2013-2016 About the Simon Community Simon Community Northern Ireland

More information

Hart s Older Persons Housing Strategy 2011-14

Hart s Older Persons Housing Strategy 2011-14 Hart s Older Persons Housing Strategy 2011-14 Helping local people find housing solutions Final Version Date: May 2011 Contents Introduction 3 Objective 1: Deliver a choice of good quality housing for

More information

Policy Statement 16/2006. Acute and Multidisciplinary Working

Policy Statement 16/2006. Acute and Multidisciplinary Working RCN Policy Unit Policy Statement 16/2006 Acute and Multidisciplinary Working The Royal College of Nursing of the United Kingdom and the Royal College of Physicians (London) September 2006 Royal College

More information

A MANIFESTO FOR BETTER MENTAL HEALTH

A MANIFESTO FOR BETTER MENTAL HEALTH A MANIFESTO FOR BETTER MENTAL HEALTH The Mental Health Policy Group General Election 2015 THE ROAD TO 2020 The challenge and the opportunity for the next Government is clear. If we take steps to improve

More information

Pre-Budget Submission 2015 Supporting Care in the Community: Living at Home as a First Option

Pre-Budget Submission 2015 Supporting Care in the Community: Living at Home as a First Option Pre-Budget Submission 2015 Supporting Care in the Community: Living at Home as a First Option Contents Supporting Care in the Community: Living at Home as a First Option... 3 Political leadership... 4

More information

Choosing a Care Home working with you

Choosing a Care Home working with you Social Work Services Choosing a Care Home working with you Published: March 2013 2 Moving into a Care Home The Social Work Service recognises that the decision to move into a care home is an important

More information

Management Information. Chief Social Work Officer

Management Information. Chief Social Work Officer Management Information Lead Officer Name: Paul Woolrich Designation: Service Improvement Manager Tel: 58462 (0131 553 8462) Lead Service Area Support to Children & Young People Last Review Date December

More information

Accommodation after stroke

Accommodation after stroke Stroke Helpline: 0303 3033 100 Website: stroke.org.uk Accommodation after stroke After a stroke, your current home may no longer be the best place for you to get the care and support you need, and you

More information

Macmillan Cancer Support Volunteering Policy

Macmillan Cancer Support Volunteering Policy Macmillan Cancer Support Volunteering Policy Introduction Thousands of volunteers dedicate time and energy to improve the lives of people affected by cancer. Macmillan was started by a volunteer and volunteers

More information

Hospital discharge arrangements

Hospital discharge arrangements Factsheet 37 May 2015 About this factsheet This factsheet explains how your discharge should be managed following NHS treatment so you receive the help you need in the most appropriate location. Depending

More information

Can Equity Release Mechanisms fund long term care costs? Desmond Le Grys

Can Equity Release Mechanisms fund long term care costs? Desmond Le Grys 2001 Health Care Conference Can Equity Release Mechanisms fund long term care costs? Desmond Le Grys 1 Introduction 1.1 Scope This paper attempts to explain why equity release products have rarely been

More information

Ambitions for Palliative and End of Life Care:

Ambitions for Palliative and End of Life Care: Ambitions for Palliative and End of Life Care: A national framework for local action 2015-2020 National Palliative and End of Life Care Partnership Association for Palliative Medicine; Association of Ambulance

More information

drug treatment in england: the road to recovery

drug treatment in england: the road to recovery The use of illegal drugs in England is declining; people who need help to overcome drug dependency are getting it quicker; and more are completing their treatment and recovering drug treatment in ENGlaND:

More information

By Alister Steele September 2012

By Alister Steele September 2012 A New Role for Housing Associations By Alister Steele September 2012 Introduction Housing association s core role is providing housing for those in greatest need underpinned by traditionally high levels

More information

A NEW LOOK AT HALL 4 The Early Years Good Health for Every Child

A NEW LOOK AT HALL 4 The Early Years Good Health for Every Child A NEW LOOK AT HALL 4 The Early Years Good Health for Every Child A NEW LOOK AT HALL 4 The Early Years Good Health for Every Child The Scottish Government, Edinburgh, 2011 Crown copyright 2011 ISBN: 978-0-7559-9421-2

More information

Herts emarketplace. creating an online resource of social care and support services for people in Hertfordshire

Herts emarketplace. creating an online resource of social care and support services for people in Hertfordshire Herts emarketplace creating an online resource of social care and support services for people in Hertfordshire Introduction pack for organisations and businesses Contents Information about the emarketplace

More information

Great Places to Grow Old. Action Plan. Bradford District s Housing Strategy for the over 50s 2011 2021. Appendix 5

Great Places to Grow Old. Action Plan. Bradford District s Housing Strategy for the over 50s 2011 2021. Appendix 5 Great Places to Grow Old Bradford District s Housing Strategy for the over 50s 2011 2021 Appendix 5 Action Plan Years 3 & 4 July 2013 - June 2015 Introduction The Bradford Housing Strategy for the Over

More information

Get in on the Act. The Care Act 2014. Corporate

Get in on the Act. The Care Act 2014. Corporate Get in on the Act The Care Act 2014 Corporate Get in on the Act The Care Act 2014 Background The Care Act was first published as a Bill in the House of Lords on 9 May 2013, following prelegislative scrutiny.

More information

Why do health and social care services for older people need to change?

Why do health and social care services for older people need to change? Welcome to our booklet on Reshaping care for older people in Ayrshire and Arran. We want to talk to you about care for older people now and in the future. Partners in this care are: NHS Ayrshire & Arran

More information

Getting funding and planning successful projects. Big Lottery Fund guide to outcomes

Getting funding and planning successful projects. Big Lottery Fund guide to outcomes Getting funding and planning successful projects Big Lottery Fund guide to outcomes Getting funding and planning successful projects: Big Lottery Fund s guide to outcomes Further copies available from:

More information

Age and Experience: Consultation on a Strategy for a Scotland with an Aging Population

Age and Experience: Consultation on a Strategy for a Scotland with an Aging Population Age and Experience: Consultation on a Strategy for a Scotland with an Aging Population Introduction The Disability Rights Commission (DRC) is a non-departmental public body, established by statute in 1999

More information

3.1.5 Housing in Bradford district

3.1.5 Housing in Bradford district Published: December 2011 3.1.5 Housing in Bradford district Context The homes where we live have long been recognised as an important factor on our health and wellbeing. In Victorian times, during the

More information

Using direct payments or a personal budget

Using direct payments or a personal budget Factsheet Using direct payments or a personal budget This factsheet is relevant to you if you have had a needs assessment and qualify for council support. Your personal budget is the amount of money that

More information

Occupational therapy after stroke

Occupational therapy after stroke Stroke Helpline: 0303 3033 100 Website: stroke.org.uk Occupational therapy after stroke After a stroke, you are likely to need help to regain your abilities, learn new skills and cope with any remaining

More information

Mencap s briefing on the draft care and support bill

Mencap s briefing on the draft care and support bill Mencap s briefing on the draft care and support bill Mencap is the UK s leading learning disability charity, working with people with a learning disability, their families and carers. We want a world where

More information

Caring for Carers. Recognising, Valuing and Supporting the Caring Role

Caring for Carers. Recognising, Valuing and Supporting the Caring Role Caring for Carers Recognising, Valuing and Supporting the Caring Role Ministerial Foreword The contribution of informal carers to the health and well-being of our general population is immeasurable. The

More information

Belfast Health and Social Care Trust Trust Vision & Corporate Plan 2013/14 2015/16

Belfast Health and Social Care Trust Trust Vision & Corporate Plan 2013/14 2015/16 Belfast Health and Social Care Trust Trust Vision & Corporate Plan 2013/14 2015/16 2 Contents Page 1. Foreword 4 2. Introduction 5 3. Overview of the Belfast Trust 6 4. The Trust Vision 7 5. Strategic

More information

Disabled Facilities Grant Funding via Better Care Funds An Opportunity to Improve Outcomes

Disabled Facilities Grant Funding via Better Care Funds An Opportunity to Improve Outcomes Integration Briefing 1 Disabled Facilities Grant Funding via Better Care Funds An Opportunity to Improve Outcomes Purpose For whom Where To explain the changes to the provision of national government funding

More information

Economic and Social Council

Economic and Social Council United Nations Economic and Social Council Distr.: General 25 September 2012 ECE/AC.30/2012/3 Original: English Economic Commission for Europe Working Group on Ageing Ministerial Conference on Ageing Vienna,

More information

Corporate Plan 2013/14-2015/16

Corporate Plan 2013/14-2015/16 Corporate Plan 2013/14-2015/16 1 Contents 1 Introduction...3 2 Overview of the Trust 6 3 Our Vision, Values, and Principal Objectives...9 4 Strategy for Health and Social Care Services.12 - Long Term Conditions

More information

Journeys through the Criminal Justice System for Suspects, Accused and Offenders with Learning Disabilities. A Graphic Representation

Journeys through the Criminal Justice System for Suspects, Accused and Offenders with Learning Disabilities. A Graphic Representation Journeys through the Criminal Justice System for Suspects, Accused and Offenders with Learning Disabilities A Graphic Representation 0 Contents Introduction page 2 Methodology page 4 Stage One Getting

More information

2. The Aims of a Dual Diagnosis Accommodation Based Support Service

2. The Aims of a Dual Diagnosis Accommodation Based Support Service SERVICE SPECIFICATION FOR: Dual Diagnosis Mental Health and Substance Misuse Supported Housing Service The specification describes the Service to be delivered under the Steady State Contract for Provision

More information

Social work in adult social services

Social work in adult social services Social work in adult social services (Original advice note February 2010, amended July 2012) Context This advice note from ADASS was first published in February 2010. It remains clear guidance on the proactive

More information

Domiciliary Care Services

Domiciliary Care Services Domiciliary Care Services Our Services Domiciliary Care services are designed to support you to continue to live at home with the help you need. We aim to ensure you regain or maintain your wellness and

More information

Changing health and care in West Cheshire The West Cheshire Way

Changing health and care in West Cheshire The West Cheshire Way Changing health and care in West Cheshire The West Cheshire Way Why does the NHS need to change? The NHS is a hugely important service to patients and is highly regarded by the public. It does however

More information

A Route Map to the 2020 Vision for Health and Social Care

A Route Map to the 2020 Vision for Health and Social Care A Route Map to the 2020 Vision for Health and Social Care 02 A Route Map to the 2020 Vision for Health and Social Care Introduction This paper sets out a new and accelerated focus on a number of priority

More information

09 February 2012. Housing Strategy Team Welsh Government Rhydycar Business Park Merthyr Tydfil, CF48 1UZ. Dear Sir/Madam

09 February 2012. Housing Strategy Team Welsh Government Rhydycar Business Park Merthyr Tydfil, CF48 1UZ. Dear Sir/Madam 09 February 2012 Housing Strategy Team Welsh Government Rhydycar Business Park Merthyr Tydfil, CF48 1UZ Dear Sir/Madam Re: Older people s housing and a new Housing Bill for Wales Thank you for the opportunity

More information

Reprovision of mental health inpatient services

Reprovision of mental health inpatient services Reprovision of mental health inpatient services Consultation Document June 2014 Foreword from the Director of Mental Health and Disability Services The Northern Trust s mental health services have changed

More information

C1: The Individual Support Grant Fund

C1: The Individual Support Grant Fund C1: The Individual Support Grant Fund In this section: Aims of the fund Fund criteria Statutory funding Examples of statutory funding Grant categories The application process Aims of the fund The Individual

More information

Community Investment Strategy

Community Investment Strategy Community Investment Strategy Introduction Sanctuary Group is one of the largest providers of housing and care services in the UK. We are a not-for-profit organisation and reinvest our surplus income into

More information

Workforce capacity planning model

Workforce capacity planning model Workforce capacity planning model September 2014 Developed in partnership with 1 Workforce capacity planning helps employers to work out whether or not they have the right mix and numbers of workers with

More information

ORAL STATEMENT ON ACCESS TO JUSTICE REVIEW FINAL REPORT: 13 SEPTEMBER 2011

ORAL STATEMENT ON ACCESS TO JUSTICE REVIEW FINAL REPORT: 13 SEPTEMBER 2011 ORAL STATEMENT ON ACCESS TO JUSTICE REVIEW FINAL REPORT: 13 SEPTEMBER 2011 Members will have heard me speak previously, in this chamber and elsewhere, of the opportunities that the devolution of justice

More information

A fresh start for the regulation and inspection of adult social care

A fresh start for the regulation and inspection of adult social care A fresh start for the regulation and inspection of adult social care Working together to change how we inspect and regulate adult social care services The Care Quality Commission is the independent regulator

More information

December 2013. General Comments and Observations

December 2013. General Comments and Observations Response to the consultation by the Department of Health, Social Services and Public Safety on the Modernising Learning Disabilities Nursing Review Strengthening the Commitment Northern Ireland Action

More information

South Australian Women s Health Policy

South Australian Women s Health Policy South Australian Women s Health Policy 1 2 South Australian Women s Health Policy To order copies of this publication, please contact: Department of Health PO Box 287 Rundle Mall Adelaide SA 5000 Telephone:

More information

Caring for our future: reforming care and support

Caring for our future: reforming care and support Caring for our future: reforming care and support Caring for our future: reforming care and support Presented to Parliament by the Secretary of State for Health by Command of Her Majesty July 2012 Cm 8378

More information

CDC 502 Support policies, procedures and practice to safeguard children and ensure their inclusion and well-being

CDC 502 Support policies, procedures and practice to safeguard children and ensure their inclusion and well-being Child Care Occupational Standard MQF Level 5 CDC 501 Establish and develop working relationships CDC 502 Support policies, procedures and practice to safeguard children and ensure their inclusion and well-being

More information

Background. The Problem

Background. The Problem Background Home Instead Senior Care is a private non-medical provider of home care services to older people. Services include companionship, personal assistance with showering and dressing, meal preparation,

More information

Dear Colleague DL (2015) 11. Hospital Based Complex Clinical Care. 28 May 2015. Summary

Dear Colleague DL (2015) 11. Hospital Based Complex Clinical Care. 28 May 2015. Summary The Scottish Government Directorate for Health and Social Care Integration Dear Colleague Hospital Based Complex Clinical Care Summary 1. This letter provides guidance on Hospital Based Complex Clinical

More information

Meeting the needs of an ageing population

Meeting the needs of an ageing population insurance services Meeting the needs of an ageing population Arguably, one of the greatest demographic achievements of this century has been the almost continuous rise in UK life expectancy. Life Expectancy

More information

NHS Scotland Wheelchair Modernisation Delivery Group

NHS Scotland Wheelchair Modernisation Delivery Group SCOTTISH GOVERNMENT HEALTH AND SOCIAL CARE DIRECTORATES THE QUALITY UNIT HEALTHCARE PLANNING DIVISION NHS Scotland Wheelchair Modernisation Delivery Group WHEELCHAIR & SEATING SERVICES QUALITY IMPROVEMENT

More information

Your Life Your Choice. Self-Directed Support Framework

Your Life Your Choice. Self-Directed Support Framework Your Life Your Choice Self-Directed Support Framework 1. Introduction... 3 1.1. Definition... 3 1.2. Vision... 3 1.3. Underlying principles of Self-Directed Support... 3 1.4. Terminology... 3 2. Framework

More information

Building Better Opportunities

Building Better Opportunities Building Better Opportunities Project outline For use in England only Project title Project 15 of 19 - Employment support for refugees Central London Project reference number LEP area ESF Thematic Objective

More information

What s your next step?

What s your next step? Epworth HealthCare Excellence. Everywhere. Everyday. What s your next step? The HeartSmart Program helping you to reduce your risk of another heart problem It has been clinically proven following a cardiac

More information

Transition between inpatient hospital settings and community or care home settings for adults with social care needs

Transition between inpatient hospital settings and community or care home settings for adults with social care needs NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR HEALTH AND CARE EXCELLENCE DRAFT GUIDELINE Transition between inpatient hospital settings and community or care home settings for adults with social care needs 1 1 Draft for consultation,

More information

Accessibility Policy, Disability Equality Scheme & Disability Equality Duty

Accessibility Policy, Disability Equality Scheme & Disability Equality Duty 1 Accessibility Policy, Disability Equality Scheme & Disability Equality Duty We are committed to ensuring equality of education and opportunity for disabled children, staff and all those receiving services

More information

Annex 5 Performance management framework

Annex 5 Performance management framework Annex 5 Performance management framework The Dumfries and Galloway Integration Joint Board (IJB) will be responsible for planning the functions given to it and for making sure it delivers them using the

More information

It s Not Right! Neighbours, Friends and Families for Older Adults. What You Can Do to Keep Yourself Safe From Abuse

It s Not Right! Neighbours, Friends and Families for Older Adults. What You Can Do to Keep Yourself Safe From Abuse It s Not Right! Neighbours, Friends and Families for Older Adults What You Can Do to Keep Yourself Safe From Abuse Everyone has the right to be safe and free from abuse. No one should experience abuse.

More information

Fit for Work. Guidance for employers

Fit for Work. Guidance for employers Fit for Work Guidance for employers For details on when referrals to the Fit for Work assessment can be made in your area please visit: www.gov.uk/government/collections/fit-for-work-guidance Fit for

More information

London Borough of Barnet s Response to an Ageing Society

London Borough of Barnet s Response to an Ageing Society London Borough of Barnet s Response to an Ageing Society Thank you for this opportunity to describe to you how Barnet is responding to an ageing society. Of course, given the scale of changes which all

More information

The New Inpatient Mental Health Model for Service Users, Carers and Families

The New Inpatient Mental Health Model for Service Users, Carers and Families The New Inpatient Mental Health Model for Service Users, Carers and Families Children and Families Community Services Mental Health Secure Services Specialist Services Introduction Lancashire Care NHS

More information

Volunteering and the National Disability Insurance Scheme A Survey of Victorian Disability Organisations

Volunteering and the National Disability Insurance Scheme A Survey of Victorian Disability Organisations Volunteering and the National Disability Insurance Scheme A Survey of Victorian Disability Organisations 1. Introduction Volunteers create community. Having volunteers support people with a disability

More information

Using the TUC Manifesto for Disability Equality. A guide for trade union activists

Using the TUC Manifesto for Disability Equality. A guide for trade union activists Using the TUC Manifesto for Disability Equality A guide for trade union activists Section one Why a manifesto? Trade unions campaign for a better future for all. The TUC s new Manifesto for Disability

More information

A Guide to Self-Funding Adult Social Care and Support Services

A Guide to Self-Funding Adult Social Care and Support Services A Guide to Self-Funding Adult Social Care and Support Services Contents A Guide to Self-Funding Adult Social Care and Support Services 1 What is a self-funder? 2 How much money can you have before you

More information

Housing for people with a learning disability

Housing for people with a learning disability Housing for people with a learning disability 1 Housing for people with a learning disability Contents Foreword 3 Executive summary 5 Introduction 10 What is a learning disability? 10 Background 12 How

More information