Project QuEST Model Life Science Lessons Ecology Set

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1 Project QuEST Model Life Science Lessons Ecology Set These materials were produced by CREATE with funding from the U.S Department of Education (ED), Institute of Education Sciences, under Contract No. ED-R305A The opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect the positions or policies of ED Center for Applied Linguistics

2 Project QuEST Model Life Science Lesson Teacher Guide: Introduction to Ecology These materials were produced by CREATE with funding from the U.S Department of Education (ED), Institute of Education Sciences, under Contract No. ED-R305A The opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect the positions or policies of ED Center for Applied Linguistics

3 CREATE Model Life Science Lesson Ecology Set: Introduction to Ecology Teacher Guide QuEST Middle School Science: Life Science Ecology Set: Introduction to Ecology Framework for K-12 Science Education: Dimension 3 Life Science Disciplinary Core Idea (LS2.A) Interdependent Relationships in Ecosystems: Organisms, and populations of organisms, are dependent on their environmental interactions both with other living things and with nonliving factors. Growth of organisms and population increases are limited by access to resources. In any ecosystem, organisms and populations with similar requirements for food, water, oxygen, or other resources may compete with each other for limited resources, access to which consequently constrains their growth and reproduction. Similarly, predatory interactions may reduce the number of organisms or eliminate whole populations of organisms. Mutually beneficial interactions, in contrast, may become so interdependent that each organism requires the other for survival. Although the species involved in these competitive, predatory, and mutually beneficial interactions vary across ecosystems, the patterns of interactions of organisms with their environments, both living and nonliving are shared. Science and Engineering Practices: Developing and Using Models Crosscutting Concepts: Cause and Effect Connections to the Common Core State Standards (ELA) WHST.7 (with lesson extension): Conduct short research projects to answer a question (including a self generated question), drawing on several sources and generating additional, related, focused questions that allow for multiple avenues of exploration. L6: Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate general academic and domainspecific words and phrases; gather vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression. Connections to the Common Core State Standards (Math) 5.0A: Analyze patterns and relationships. 7.SP3: Draw informal comparative inference about two populations. 2

4 CREATE Model Life Science Lesson Ecology Set: Introduction to Ecology Teacher Guide Connections to English Language Development Standards 1 ELD Standard 4: Language of Science o Reading: Determine the features of an ecosystem based on a text. o Writing: Describe an ecosystem by taking notes in a graphic organizer. o Listening: Record peer findings from the habitat investigation on a map. o Speaking: Describe the location of samples collected as part of the habitat investigation. Overview of Activities Focus Activity Student Activity I: Rating and Discussion of Science, Language, and Vocabulary Objectives. Teacher posts lesson objective poster; students rate their prior knowledge of each objective; brief discussion. Engagement Student Activity II: Lesson 2 Review. Students answer review questions from previous lesson on genetics; teacher displays the answers; students correct responses as necessary. Student Activity III: Preteaching of Science Content Words. Teacher displays PowerPoint slides of science content words one at a time; teacher reads script aloud and elicits responses to teach the following: ecology, organism, habitat, ecosystem, biotic, abiotic, environment. Student Activity IV: Which Organism Is in the Wrong Habitat? Teacher displays four habitats with one organism that is not adapted for that environment; students identify the ill-adapted organism and explain their reasoning. Student Activity V: Features of an Ecosystem. Teacher displays three pictures of ecosystems and asks students to identify the ecosystem, actual locations where this ecosystem exists, and the biotic and abiotic features of the ecosystem; students complete Student Chart 1.4; teacher displays responses; whole group discussion. Explanation and Exploration Student Activity VI: Habitat Investigation. Teacher displays background information for the investigation; students complete Student Chart 1.5; teacher assigns groups and explains roles; teacher reads and distributes materials in Student Chart 1.6; teacher reviews procedures for each group role in Student Chart 1.8a-e; teacher reads the preview for the investigation; class goes outside; as a group, class 1 Because the WIDA English language development standards are currently used in 29 states, we reference these standards. 3

5 CREATE Model Life Science Lesson Ecology Set: Introduction to Ecology Teacher Guide completes bare soil observation; students complete Student Chart 1.7; each group chooses a habitat and each group member completes their assigned chart of Student Chart 1.8a-e; class returns inside; each group member shares his or her findings with the class; whole group discussion; opportunity for extension with further questions in Student Chart 1.9. Elaboration Student Activity VII: General Academic Word Cards. Teacher displays PowerPoint slide of the general academic word; teacher reads script aloud and elicits responses to teach the following: identify. Student Activity VIII: Interactive Reading. Teacher discusses text illustrations; one student reads guiding questions; teacher and students participate in shared interactive reading; teacher and students discuss guiding questions; students respond to guiding questions by creating and presenting posters. Evaluation Student Activity IX: Glossary and Key Facts. Students complete glossary for science content words, answer questions related to key content, and indicate if there is anything else they would like to learn about; whole class review. Extension/Differentiation Concept map on ecosystems Brainpop video: Ecosystems Continuation Activity Follow-up lesson activity from Ecology Lesson 11. 4

6 CREATE Model Life Science Lesson Ecology Set: Introduction to Ecology Teacher Guide QuEST Middle School Life Science Introduction to Ecology Objectives Science: o Students will recognize, identify, locate, and observe examples of an ecosystem and habitats. o Students will recognize, identify, locate, and observe the biotic and abiotic factors of the ecosystem. Language: o Students will orally share information about the ecosystem with their peers. o Students will record information about ecosystems based on a reading. Vocabulary Science content: ecology, organism, habitat, ecosystem, biotic, abiotic, environment General academic: identify Teacher Management Estimated time for completion, in minutes: 90 Materials Text: Glencoe, pages Per group of four: o plastic petri dish o tape measure o collection container o magnifying glass o towel/sheet o optional: 4-meter string length o optional: insect net Teacher Prep 1. Review detailed lesson plan in the Teacher Guide. 2. Pull out the Activity Overview page(s), PowerPoint lesson guides, and student charts and add any necessary notes to them from the detailed lesson plan to help guide the lesson. 3. If necessary, organize activities to fit school schedule. 4. Download PowerPoint slides. 5. Display vocabulary cards on the word wall. 6. Group students for partner/small group work. 7. Preview the schoolyard for optimal locations for the students to do the habitat study. Teacher note: Fencerows can make a surprisingly diverse habitat. Also, set up 5

7 CREATE Model Life Science Lesson Ecology Set: Introduction to Ecology Teacher Guide or find a small place where succession might be in evidence over the rest of the year. A place where the soil has been cleared for something (or get permission to do a small area yourself) would work. Do not pick a bare area that has been trampled by student traffic it is likely nothing will grow there because of the compacted soil. Safety Considerations: Be sure to review any safety considerations related to going outside, dangerous situations, or poisonous plants. Also, emphasize the importance of being gentle to the environment and only bringing in small soil samples that will be returned to the collection area. If placed under a light source, the soil can get too hot or dry for the organisms living in it so be careful! Vocabulary-Building Strategies Explicit interactive presentation of vocabulary cards Word wall Glossary work Background Information for Teacher Glencoe: pages 588, 589 (paragraph about Ecosystems only), and 591 Lesson Content Focus Activity/Warm-Up Student Activity I (slides 3 8, Lesson Objective poster; Student Charts 1.2 and 1.3) 5 minutes Activity Overview: Rating and Discussion of Science, Language, and Vocabulary Objectives. Teacher posts lesson objective cards; students rate their prior knowledge of each objective; brief discussion. Before students enter the room, display the science objectives. Make sure the ratings of the previous class have been erased. As they enter the classroom, have students rate their prior knowledge of each objective on a continuum of 1 to 4 (1=none, 4=a lot). Have students begin the review questions in Student Chart 1.1 until all students have rated their knowledge of the objectives. Review correct responses to review activity (see Activity II below). Have students turn to Student Chart 1.2. Read the science objectives aloud, one at a time, reporting students level of prior knowledge. Read the language objectives. Have students turn to Student Chart 1.3. Read vocabulary words aloud. 6

8 CREATE Model Life Science Lesson Ecology Set: Introduction to Ecology Teacher Guide As appropriate, have students use thumbs up/thumbs down to indicate prior knowledge. Engagement Student Activity II (slides 4 6, Student Chart 1.1) 4 minutes Activity Overview: Plants Lesson Review. Students answer review questions from previous lesson; teacher displays the answers; students correct responses as necessary. After students have rated their knowledge of the objectives and as they wait for their peers to enter the room, students should begin working on Student Chart 1.1. Once all students have displayed their knowledge of the objectives poster and have had 2 minutes to answer the review questions, have students read the review questions and answer them aloud. Display responses. Have students correct their responses as necessary. Student Activity III (slides 9 15, Science Content Word Cards) 8 minutes Activity Overview: Preteaching of Science Content Words. Teacher displays PowerPoint slides of science content words one at a time; teacher reads script aloud and elicits responses to teach the following: ecology, organism, habitat, ecosystem, biotic, abiotic, environment. Have students turn to Lesson 1 glossary words. Read the target words aloud, one at a time. As you display the slides have students rewrite the target words one at a time in English and in Spanish (as appropriate) in their glossaries. Display the slides of the science content words one at a time, reading the text on the right side of each PowerPoint slide aloud and eliciting responses from student pairs. Point to the appropriate parts of the pictures as you read through the notes. Depending on your class, you may want to read (or have a student read) the definitions in Spanish. Tell students they may continue to use the science content word cards on the word wall for reference. Teacher note: To save time you may want to eliminate partner talk and just ask one student to answer the question. 7

9 CREATE Model Life Science Lesson Ecology Set: Introduction to Ecology Teacher Guide Student Activity IV (slides 16 19) 4 minutes Activity Overview: Which Organism Is in the Wrong Habitat? Display slides and: Ask students to name the ecosystem or habitat. Have students find the organism that does not belong. Ask students how they know that the organism does not belong. Display the response. Student Activity V (slides 20 25, Student Chart 1.4) 10 minutes Activity Overview: Features of an Ecosystem. Pair students. Have students turn to Student Chart 1.4. Ask students to identify the ecosystem and fill it in Student Chart 1.4. (Response: desert). Ask students to identify examples of actual locations where this ecosystem exists (Possible responses: the Sahara desert, the Southwest, Mexico). Ask students to identify the biotic and abiotic features of this ecosystem (Possible responses: biotic cacti, bushes, lizards, turtle, coyote, snake; abiotic air, sun, sand, rocks). Teacher note: Do this example as a group and then have students work independently for the other ecosystems as you display slides 22 and 24. Display the responses and discuss. Have students correct their responses as necessary. Have students think about the habitats in the schoolyard and share this information with their partner. (Possible responses: near the basketball hoops; open field; bog area; young forest area; climax forest.) Call on several student pairs to share out. Explanation and Exploration Student Activity VI (slides 26 36, Student Charts ) 38 minutes Activity Overview: Habitat Investigation. Background information (Teacher prep: Identify several areas of the school yard appropriate for this investigation. In addition, find or prepare an area with bare soil; it should be a location away from foot traffic. This location will be observed again during the study of ecological succession.) 8

10 CREATE Model Life Science Lesson Ecology Set: Introduction to Ecology Teacher Guide Tell students to turn to Student Chart 1.5. Read #1 #3 aloud as students write the key terms in Student Chart 1.5. This is a note-taking exercise. Assign groups and roles for each group. Have students locate the Student Charts that go with their role. Roles There is no Student Chart for this activity. Choose someone who will be a bug collector and have them read their role description aloud. Do the same for the other roles. Teacher note: Some roles may have more than one group member, and some group members may need to fill more than one role. Materials Have students turn to Student Chart 1.6. Review list of lab materials and distribute them to students. Have students check off materials. Teacher note: You may want to have clipboards or binders for each student to write on. Preview There is no Student Chart for slide 29. Read the preview for the investigation. Review Students Charts 1.8a 1.8e so students know what information to record. The information will vary according to role. Have students gather the materials they need to conduct the investigation and take them outside. Outside Do a group observation of the pre-identified bare soil area. Have all students record their observations in #1, Student Chart 1.7. Have each group choose a habitat and record their observations in Student Charts 1.8a 1.8e. After minutes of independent group work, return to the classroom. Teacher note: The bare soil observation #2 is intended to be revisited later in the unit during the study of ecology and is intended as a model of ecological succession (Lesson 11; see Extensions on page 12). Bare soil observations (inside) Have students turn to Student Chart 1.7. Have students share their findings. Whole group discussion. Debriefing Have students turn to their completed Student Charts 1.8a 1.8e. Have a representative from each role share their findings, beginning with the mapmakers. Whole group discussion. Partner talk: Questions for discussion (optional) 9

11 CREATE Model Life Science Lesson Ecology Set: Introduction to Ecology Teacher Guide You may choose to have students answer these questions in their groups, independently, orally, or in their Student Charts. Teacher note: You may consider dividing up the questions by student pairs or by groups. Elaboration Student Activity VII (slides 37 and 38, General Academic Word Cards) 2 minutes Activity Overview: General Academic Word Cards. Teacher displays PowerPoint slides of science content words one at a time; teacher reads script aloud and elicits responses to teach the following: identify. Read the general academic vocabulary word to students. If you like, have student use thumbs up/thumbs down to indicate prior knowledge. Have students turn to Lesson 1 glossary words. Read the target word aloud. Have students rewrite the target word in English and in Spanish (as appropriate) in their glossaries. Read through the notes on the right side of slide 38. Point to the appropriate part of the picture as you read through the notes. Depending on your class, you may want to read (or have a student read) the definition in Spanish. Display the slides of each of the general academic word, reading the script aloud and eliciting responses. Tell students they may continue to use the general academic word cards on the word wall for reference. Teacher note: To save time you may want to eliminate partner talk and just ask one student to answer the question. Student Activity VIII (slides 39 43, Student Charts ) 10 minutes Glencoe, pages Activity Overview: Interactive Reading. Teacher discusses text illustrations; one student reads guiding questions; teacher and students participate in shared interactive reading; teacher and students discuss guiding question; students respond to guiding question; teacher posts correct response; students revise responses as necessary. Preview o Have students turn to Student Chart o Read the guiding question aloud. o Review all illustrations in the text with students using the document camera. Text 10

12 CREATE Model Life Science Lesson Ecology Set: Introduction to Ecology Teacher Guide o Have students turn to Student Chart o Read text aloud to students as they follow in their Student Chart. o Stop and clarify text if necessary. o Ask students embedded questions. Elaborate on their responses as necessary. o When you get to a figure, stop reading and have students look at the figure as you discuss it. Guiding questions o Have students turn to Student Chart o Have students complete the chart. o Have students display their answers under the document camera. o Whole class discussion. Evaluation Student Activity IX (slides 44 46, Student Charts , Glossary) 8 minutes Activity Overview: Glossary and Key Facts and Questions for Further Study. Students complete glossary for science content words, answer questions related to key content, and indicate if there is anything else they would like to learn about; whole class review. Glossary work o Have students locate Student Chart o For each science content word, have students work in pairs to indicate whether the word is a cognate and to fill in the rest of the information required by the glossary. o Review glossary entries with class. Key information o Have students turn to Student Chart o Give students several minutes to complete the questions. o Display responses and discuss. o Have students correct responses as necessary. Questions for further study o Have students turn to Student Chart o Have students complete Student Chart. o As time permits, have students share their questions with a partner, with the whole class, or have them write them on a sticky note and put them on a questions wall on their way out of class. Students who finish an assessment or who have free time might be assigned to go online to find answers to class questions. 11

13 CREATE Model Life Science Lesson Ecology Set: Introduction to Ecology Teacher Guide Extension/Differentiation Student Activity XI: Brainpop Video, Ecosystems. o See the PowerPoint for the link to a video. Student Activity X: Concept Map on Ecosystems. o Consider also teaching the terms community, population, and limiting factor. Have students fill in the concept map. Use the words below to fill in the concept map: communities, populations, limiting factors, biotic, abiotic, same, different 1. Ecosystems contain living things, or biotic factors, and non-living things, or abiotic factors. 2. Populations are the members of a given species in an area; all the populations in an ecosystem make up a community. 3. Ecosystems are affected by limiting factor such as lack of rain. 12

14 CREATE Model Life Science Lesson Ecology Set: Introduction to Ecology Teacher Guide Continuation Activity This activity is from Lesson 11 at the end of the Ecology Unit and refers to Activity 1.7 from this lesson. Student Activity V (Student Charts 1.7 or 11.8) 14 minutes Activity Overview: Revisiting Ecological Succession: Returning to the Experimental Bare Soil Site. Inside Have students turn to Student Chart 1.7 or Remind students that you made observations of a patch of bare soil earlier this term. Have students look back at their notes from Lesson 1. Tell students you will now go back to check if any ecological succession has taken place in that same location. Have students bring a pencil and their binders or clip boards. Outside Lead students outside. Identify the patch of soil that you had observed as a class in Lesson 1. Ask students to make their observations and answer #2 in Student Chart 1.7/11.8. After several minutes, have several students share out. Have students identify any changes. Ask students whether the changes were due to primary or secondary ecological succession and why. Teacher note: If students cannot locate or do not have Student Chart 1.7, they can use 11.8 to record their second observation. 13

15 Slide 1 Ecology Set Introduction to Ecology These materials were produced by CREATE with funding from the U.S. Department of Education (ED), Institute of Education Sciences, under Contract No. ED-R305A Center for Applied Linguistics.

16 Slide 2 Ecology Lesson 1: Teacher Preparation Erase the ratings from the previous class on the objectives poster. Preview the schoolyard for optimal locations for students to do the habitat study. Set up or find a small place where succession might be in evidence over the rest of the year (with a patch of cleared soil). Collect the materials students need for the habitat investigation. QuEST Middle School Science: Life Science 2012 Center for Applied Linguistics. 2

17 Slide 3 Science Objectives Students, as you enter the classroom Go to the poster. Read each objective. Use a marker to rate your knowledge of each objective on a scale of 1-4. Begin the review questions. QuEST Middle School Science: Life Science 2012 Center for Applied Linguistics. 3 Pacing: 3 minutes. [There is no Student Chart for this slide]. Before students enter the room, display the science objectives. Make sure the ratings of the previous class have been erased. As they enter the classroom, have students rate their prior knowledge of each objective on a continuum of 1-4 (1=no to 4=a lot). Have students complete the review questions in Student Chart 1.1.

18 Slide 4 1.1: Genetics Review Questions 1. Look at the formula for photosynthesis below. In addition to the parts of the equation above, which of the following is most necessary to complete the process of photosynthesis? a. soil b. radiant energy c. sugars d. cytoplasm 4 QuEST Middle School Science: Life Science 2012 Center for Applied Linguistics. Pacing: 1 minute. [Students need to complete Student Chart 1.1 on their own or in pairs before questions are reviewed]. Have one student read review question #1 from Student Chart 1.1 and answer it aloud. Display response. Have students correct student response as necessary.

19 Slide 5 1.1: Genetics Review Questions (cont.) 2. In photosynthesis, the energy from the sun is transformed into chemical energy. How is this chemical energy stored? a. chlorophyll b. oxygen c. glucose d. water QuEST Middle School Science: Life Science 2012 Center for Applied Linguistics. 5 Pacing: 1 minute. Have one student read review question #2 from Student Chart 1.1 and answer it aloud. Display response. Have students correct student response as necessary.

20 Slide 6 1.1: Review Question (cont.) Choose from the following words to complete the sentences: determine, differs, glucose, photosynthesis, record, stimulus 3. A plant reacts to the stimulus of light by growing towards the light. 4. Chemical energy differs from radiant energy because radiant energy comes from light and chemical energy is stored in chemical bonds. 5. Only organisms with chloroplasts can generate their own energy in the process of. photosynthesis 6. Glucose is a simple sugar. 7. Botanists were able to determine the plant type by examining the dichotomous key. QuEST Middle School Science: Life Science 2012 Center for Applied Linguistics. 6 Pacing: 2 minutes. Follow the same routine as you did with questions #1-2.

21 Slide 7 1.2: Science and Language Objectives In science, we will learn: to recognize, identify, locate, and observe examples of an ecosystem and habitats. to recognize, identify, locate, and observe the biotic and abiotic factors of the ecosystem. To develop our language skills, we will learn: to orally share information about the ecosystem with your peers. to record information about ecosystems based on a reading. QuEST Middle School Science: Life Science 2012 Center for Applied Linguistics. 7 Pacing: 1 minute. Have students turn to Student Chart 1.2. Read the science objectives aloud, one at a time, reporting students level of prior knowledge. Read the language objectives.

22 Slide 8 1.3: Vocabulary Objectives Science content vocabulary: ecology organism habitat ecosystem biotic abiotic environment General academic vocabulary: identify QuEST Middle School Science: Life Science 2012 Center for Applied Linguistics. 8 Pacing: 1 minute. Have students turn to Student Chart 1.3. Read vocabulary words aloud. If you like, have students use thumbs up/thumbs down to indicate prior knowledge.

23 Slide 9 ecology Look at the pictures. These scientists are studying ecology organisms and their environment. Ecology is the study of the interactions that take place among organisms and their environment. Ecología es el estudio de las interacciones que se llevan a cabo entre los organismos y su medio ambiente. Partner talk: What organisms and environments are these ecologists studying? ecología QuEST Middle School Science: Life Science 2012 Center for Applied Linguistics. 9 Pacing: <2 minutes. Have students turn to lesson 1 glossary words. Read the target word aloud. Have students rewrite the target word in English and in Spanish (as appropriate) in their glossaries. Read through the notes on the right side of this PowerPoint slide. Point to the appropriate part of the picture as you read through the notes. Depending on your class, you may want to read (or have a student read) the definition in Spanish. Ask one student pair to answer the question. [Anticipated response: Top picture: a tree in the forest; bottom picture: an orca whale in the arctic ocean]. Teacher note: To save time you may want to eliminate partner talk and just ask one student to answer the question.

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25 Slide 10 organism Look at the picture. This organism is a deer. Organisms are living things. Organismos son los seres vivos. Partner talk: Which of these things are organisms and which are not? A flower growing in the ground Soil A rock A bee A mushroom A piece of driftwood organismo QuEST Middle School Science: Life Science 2012 Center for Applied Linguistics. 10 Pacing: <2 minutes. Follow the same routine. Ask one student pair to answer the question. [Anticipated response: organisms include the flower, the bee, the mushroom].

26 Slide 11 environment Look at the picture. Penguins live in a cold environment, whereas camels live in a hot environment. medio ambiente Environment means everything that surrounds a living thing and affects its growth and health. El medio ambiente es todo lo que rodea a un ser vivo y afecta su crecimiento y salud. Partner talk: What are some things in your environment that affect your growth and health? QuEST Middle School Science: Life Science 2012 Center for Applied Linguistics. 11 Pacing: <2 minutes. Follow the same routine. Ask one student pair to answer the question. [Anticipated responses: sunlight; water quality; air quality; fresh fruit and vegetables; temperature; social interactions].

27 Slide 12 habitat Look at the pictures. The pictures show the habitats of a bird and a fish. hábitat A habitat is a place where an organism lives and that provides the types of food, shelter, moisture, and temperature needed for survival. Hábitat es el lugar donde vive un organismo y le provee el tipo de alimento, refugio, humedad y temperatura que necesita para sobrevivir. Partner talk: Describe the habitat of the fish or bird in terms of food, shelter, moisture, and temperature. QuEST Middle School Science: Life Science 2012 Center for Applied Linguistics. 12 Pacing: <2 minutes. Follow the same routine. Ask one student pair to answer the question. [Anticipated responses: bird: worms, tree, temperate climate with moderate rainfall; fish: algae, coral reef, warm aquatic habitat, tropical climate].

28 Slide 13 ecosystem Look at the picture. In this ecosystem we see deer, rabbits, birds, grasses, and trees. An ecosystem is all of the living and nonliving things in a particular area, and how they are related to each other and to their environment. Un ecosistema está formado por todos los animales y plantas que viven en un área específica, y que se relacionan entre sí y con su medio ambiente. ecosistema Partner talk: Name some living and nonliving things in the ecosystem near our school. QuEST Middle School Science: Life Science 2012 Center for Applied Linguistics. 13 Pacing: <2 minutes Follow the same routine. Ask one student pair to answer the question. [Anticipated responses: birds, squirrels, skunks, trees, ladybugs, etc.]

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