Math 141. Lecture 7: Variance, Covariance, and Sums. Albyn Jones 1. 1 Library jones/courses/141

Save this PDF as:
 WORD  PNG  TXT  JPG

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "Math 141. Lecture 7: Variance, Covariance, and Sums. Albyn Jones 1. 1 Library 304. jones/courses/141"

Transcription

1 Math 141 Lecture 7: Variance, Covariance, and Sums Albyn Jones 1 1 Library jones/courses/141

2 Last Time Variance: expected squared deviation from the mean: Standard Deviation: Properties: Var(X) = E(X µ x ) 2 = σ 2 SD(X) = Var(X) = σ Var(a + bx) = b 2 Var(X) SD(a + bx) = bsd(x) Interpretation: For a symmetric distribution, the standard deviation may be considered a typical deviation from the mean. For a strongly asymmetrical distribution, it is better to work with quantiles (percentiles of the distribution).

3 Covariance and Correlation Definition: Covariance Let X and Y be two RV s with means µ x and µ y, respectively. Covariance is the expected value of the products of deviations from the means: Cov(X, Y ) = E((X µ x )(Y µ y )) Definition: Correlation Correlation is just scale free covariance: Cor(X, Y ) = ρ xy = Cov(X, Y ) σ x σ y = Cov( X σ x, Y σ y )

4 Covariance and Correlation Extreme Cases: Covariance If X = Y, i.e. the two RV s are copies of each other, then Cov(X, Y ) = Cov(X, X) = E((X µ x )(X µ x )) = Var(X) If X = Y, then Cov(X, Y ) = Cov(X, X) = Var(X) Extreme Cases: Correlation If X = Y, i.e. the two RV s are copies of each other, then If X = Y, then Cor(X, Y ) = Cor(X, Y ) = Cov(X, X) σ x σ x Cov(X, X) σ 2 x = Var(X) σ 2 x = Var(X) σ 2 x = 1 = 1

5 Interpretation Linear Association Covariance and Correlation are measures of the degree of linear association. Independent RV s have correlation 0, but correlation 0 does not guarantee independence!

6 Example Positive Covariance: linear association with positive slope. Cov(X, Y ) > 0

7 Example Negative Covariance: linear association with negative slope. Cov(X, Y ) < 0

8 Example Zero Covariance: no linear association! Cov(X, Y ) = 0

9 The variance of a sum The expected value of a sum is the sum of the expected values: E(X + Y ) = E(X) + E(Y ). What about variances? Var(X + Y ) = E((X + Y ) (µ x + µ y )) 2 Collect the terms involving X and the terms involving Y : E((X µ x ) + (Y µ y )) 2 Recalling that (a + b) 2 = a 2 + 2ab + b 2, we have E((X µ x ) 2 + (Y µ y ) 2 + 2(X µ x )(Y µ y )) Finally, the expected value of a sum is the sum of the expected values: Var(X + Y ) = E(X µ x ) 2 + E(Y µ y ) 2 + 2E ( (X µ x )(Y µ y ) )

10 The variance of a sum, part two We have produced an expression for the variance of a sum: Var(X + Y ) = E(X µ x ) 2 + E(Y µ y ) 2 + 2E ( (X µ x )(Y µ y ) ) The first two terms are Var(X) and Var(Y ), the third is 2Cov(X, Y ). Thus Var(X + Y ) = Var(X) + Var(Y ) + 2Cov(X, Y )

11 The variance of a sum, part three Var(X + Y ) = Var(X) + Var(Y ) + 2Cov(X, Y ) If Cov(X, Y ) > 0, then Var(X + Y ) > Var(X) + Var(Y ) If Cov(X, Y ) < 0, then Var(X + Y ) < Var(X) + Var(Y )

12 The variance of a sum: Independence Fact: If two RV s are independent, we can t predict one using the other, so there is no linear association, and their covariance is 0. Theorem: If X and Y are independent, then Var(X + Y ) = Var(X) + Var(Y ) In other words, if the random variables are independent, then the variance of their sum is the sum of their variances! Remember Pythagorus? For independent RV s, the SD of a sum works like Euclidean distance for right triangles! If Z = X + Y σ Z = σx 2 + σy 2

13 Pythagorus σ 2 X + σ2 Y σ Y σ X For the mathematically inclined, covariance is an inner product on the infinite dimensional vector space of random variables with finite variance.

14 Example: Variance of a Binomial RV Let X be a Binomial(n,p) RV. We know E(X) = np. We also know that X is the sum of n independent Bernoulli(p) trials Y i, each with E(Y i ) = p, and Var(Y i ) = pq where q = (1 p) so Var(X) = Var(Y 1 + Y Y n ) The Y s are independent, so their variances add: Var(X) = Var(Y 1 ) + Var(Y 2 ) Var(Y n ) = npq Hence we have shown Var(X) = n ( ) n (k np) 2 p k q n k = npq k k=0

15 Example: 100 coin tosses Toss a fair coin independently 100 times, and let X be the number of Heads we get. What is the appropriate probability model? X Binomial(100, 1/2) What is the expected number of heads? What is σ 2 x, the variance of X? What is σ x? What are typical outcomes of this experiment?

16 Example: 1000 coin tosses Toss a fair coin independently 1000 times, and let X be the number of Heads we get. X Binomial(1000, 1/2) What is the expected number of heads? What is σ 2 x, the variance of X? What is σ x? What are typical outcomes of this experiment?

17 Variance of a Poisson Suppose X Poisson(µ). What are E(X) and Var(X)? One can compute them directly from the definition, by summing the infinite series E(X) = k µ k e µ /k! = µ and then Var(X) = (k µ) 2 µ k e µ /k! Summing those series makes use of ideas from Math 112. Can we guess the answer without using Math 112?

18 Variance of a Poisson, Heuristically Let X be a Binomial(n,p) RV, where n is large and p is small. We know E(X) = np, and Var(X) = np(1 p). If p is small, (1 p) is close to 1, and so Var(X) np = E(X). Since that Binomial X is approximately a Poisson with parameter µ = np, we should guess for X Poisson(µ): E(X) = µ and Var(X) = µ

19 Summary Variance of a sum of two RV s: Var(X + Y ) = Var(X) + Var(Y ) + 2Cov(X, Y ) Variance of a sum of independent RV s: Var(X + Y ) = Var(X) + Var(Y ) Pythagorus and the Standard Deviation of a sum of independent RV s: SD(X + Y ) = σx 2 + σy 2 Variance of X Binomial(n, p): Var(X) = npq = np(1 p)

Expectation Discrete RV - weighted average Continuous RV - use integral to take the weighted average

Expectation Discrete RV - weighted average Continuous RV - use integral to take the weighted average PHP 2510 Expectation, variance, covariance, correlation Expectation Discrete RV - weighted average Continuous RV - use integral to take the weighted average Variance Variance is the average of (X µ) 2

More information

Summary of Formulas and Concepts. Descriptive Statistics (Ch. 1-4)

Summary of Formulas and Concepts. Descriptive Statistics (Ch. 1-4) Summary of Formulas and Concepts Descriptive Statistics (Ch. 1-4) Definitions Population: The complete set of numerical information on a particular quantity in which an investigator is interested. We assume

More information

Covariance and Correlation. Consider the joint probability distribution f XY (x, y).

Covariance and Correlation. Consider the joint probability distribution f XY (x, y). Chapter 5: JOINT PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTIONS Part 2: Section 5-2 Covariance and Correlation Consider the joint probability distribution f XY (x, y). Is there a relationship between X and Y? If so, what kind?

More information

Math 431 An Introduction to Probability. Final Exam Solutions

Math 431 An Introduction to Probability. Final Exam Solutions Math 43 An Introduction to Probability Final Eam Solutions. A continuous random variable X has cdf a for 0, F () = for 0 <

More information

For a partition B 1,..., B n, where B i B j = for i. A = (A B 1 ) (A B 2 ),..., (A B n ) and thus. P (A) = P (A B i ) = P (A B i )P (B i )

For a partition B 1,..., B n, where B i B j = for i. A = (A B 1 ) (A B 2 ),..., (A B n ) and thus. P (A) = P (A B i ) = P (A B i )P (B i ) Probability Review 15.075 Cynthia Rudin A probability space, defined by Kolmogorov (1903-1987) consists of: A set of outcomes S, e.g., for the roll of a die, S = {1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6}, 1 1 2 1 6 for the roll

More information

P (x) 0. Discrete random variables Expected value. The expected value, mean or average of a random variable x is: xp (x) = v i P (v i )

P (x) 0. Discrete random variables Expected value. The expected value, mean or average of a random variable x is: xp (x) = v i P (v i ) Discrete random variables Probability mass function Given a discrete random variable X taking values in X = {v 1,..., v m }, its probability mass function P : X [0, 1] is defined as: P (v i ) = Pr[X =

More information

Chapter 5. Random variables

Chapter 5. Random variables Random variables random variable numerical variable whose value is the outcome of some probabilistic experiment; we use uppercase letters, like X, to denote such a variable and lowercase letters, like

More information

Department of Mathematics, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur Assignment 2-3, Probability and Statistics, March 2015. Due:-March 25, 2015.

Department of Mathematics, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur Assignment 2-3, Probability and Statistics, March 2015. Due:-March 25, 2015. Department of Mathematics, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur Assignment -3, Probability and Statistics, March 05. Due:-March 5, 05.. Show that the function 0 for x < x+ F (x) = 4 for x < for x

More information

Topic 8 The Expected Value

Topic 8 The Expected Value Topic 8 The Expected Value Functions of Random Variables 1 / 12 Outline Names for Eg(X ) Variance and Standard Deviation Independence Covariance and Correlation 2 / 12 Names for Eg(X ) If g(x) = x, then

More information

Chapter 2, part 2. Petter Mostad

Chapter 2, part 2. Petter Mostad Chapter 2, part 2 Petter Mostad mostad@chalmers.se Parametrical families of probability distributions How can we solve the problem of learning about the population distribution from the sample? Usual procedure:

More information

Variances and covariances

Variances and covariances Chapter 4 Variances and covariances 4.1 Overview The expected value of a random variable gives a crude measure for the center of location of the distribution of that random variable. For instance, if the

More information

Covariance and Correlation

Covariance and Correlation Covariance and Correlation ( c Robert J. Serfling Not for reproduction or distribution) We have seen how to summarize a data-based relative frequency distribution by measures of location and spread, such

More information

Random Vectors and the Variance Covariance Matrix

Random Vectors and the Variance Covariance Matrix Random Vectors and the Variance Covariance Matrix Definition 1. A random vector X is a vector (X 1, X 2,..., X p ) of jointly distributed random variables. As is customary in linear algebra, we will write

More information

Chapters 5. Multivariate Probability Distributions

Chapters 5. Multivariate Probability Distributions Chapters 5. Multivariate Probability Distributions Random vectors are collection of random variables defined on the same sample space. Whenever a collection of random variables are mentioned, they are

More information

Probability and Statistical Methods. Chapter 4 Mathematical Expectation

Probability and Statistical Methods. Chapter 4 Mathematical Expectation Math 3 Chapter 4 Mathematical Epectation Mean of a Random Variable Definition. Let be a random variable with probability distribution f( ). The mean or epected value of is, f( ) µ = µ = E =, if is a discrete

More information

The Binomial Distribution. Summer 2003

The Binomial Distribution. Summer 2003 The Binomial Distribution Summer 2003 Internet Bubble Several industry experts believe that 30% of internet companies will run out of cash in 6 months and that these companies will find it very hard to

More information

Random Variable: A function that assigns numerical values to all the outcomes in the sample space.

Random Variable: A function that assigns numerical values to all the outcomes in the sample space. STAT 509 Section 3.2: Discrete Random Variables Random Variable: A function that assigns numerical values to all the outcomes in the sample space. Notation: Capital letters (like Y) denote a random variable.

More information

Topic 4: Multivariate random variables. Multiple random variables

Topic 4: Multivariate random variables. Multiple random variables Topic 4: Multivariate random variables Joint, marginal, and conditional pmf Joint, marginal, and conditional pdf and cdf Independence Expectation, covariance, correlation Conditional expectation Two jointly

More information

SOLUTIONS: 4.1 Probability Distributions and 4.2 Binomial Distributions

SOLUTIONS: 4.1 Probability Distributions and 4.2 Binomial Distributions SOLUTIONS: 4.1 Probability Distributions and 4.2 Binomial Distributions 1. The following table contains a probability distribution for a random variable X. a. Find the expected value (mean) of X. x 1 2

More information

Math 461 Fall 2006 Test 2 Solutions

Math 461 Fall 2006 Test 2 Solutions Math 461 Fall 2006 Test 2 Solutions Total points: 100. Do all questions. Explain all answers. No notes, books, or electronic devices. 1. [105+5 points] Assume X Exponential(λ). Justify the following two

More information

WHERE DOES THE 10% CONDITION COME FROM?

WHERE DOES THE 10% CONDITION COME FROM? 1 WHERE DOES THE 10% CONDITION COME FROM? The text has mentioned The 10% Condition (at least) twice so far: p. 407 Bernoulli trials must be independent. If that assumption is violated, it is still okay

More information

Normal Approximation. Contents. 1 Normal Approximation. 1.1 Introduction. Anthony Tanbakuchi Department of Mathematics Pima Community College

Normal Approximation. Contents. 1 Normal Approximation. 1.1 Introduction. Anthony Tanbakuchi Department of Mathematics Pima Community College Introductory Statistics Lectures Normal Approimation To the binomial distribution Department of Mathematics Pima Community College Redistribution of this material is prohibited without written permission

More information

Joint Distribution and Correlation

Joint Distribution and Correlation Joint Distribution and Correlation Michael Ash Lecture 3 Reminder: Start working on the Problem Set Mean and Variance of Linear Functions of an R.V. Linear Function of an R.V. Y = a + bx What are the properties

More information

4. Joint Distributions of Two Random Variables

4. Joint Distributions of Two Random Variables 4. Joint Distributions of Two Random Variables 4.1 Joint Distributions of Two Discrete Random Variables Suppose the discrete random variables X and Y have supports S X and S Y, respectively. The joint

More information

6 PROBABILITY GENERATING FUNCTIONS

6 PROBABILITY GENERATING FUNCTIONS 6 PROBABILITY GENERATING FUNCTIONS Certain derivations presented in this course have been somewhat heavy on algebra. For example, determining the expectation of the Binomial distribution (page 5.1 turned

More information

CHAPTER 6: Continuous Uniform Distribution: 6.1. Definition: The density function of the continuous random variable X on the interval [A, B] is.

CHAPTER 6: Continuous Uniform Distribution: 6.1. Definition: The density function of the continuous random variable X on the interval [A, B] is. Some Continuous Probability Distributions CHAPTER 6: Continuous Uniform Distribution: 6. Definition: The density function of the continuous random variable X on the interval [A, B] is B A A x B f(x; A,

More information

Joint Exam 1/P Sample Exam 1

Joint Exam 1/P Sample Exam 1 Joint Exam 1/P Sample Exam 1 Take this practice exam under strict exam conditions: Set a timer for 3 hours; Do not stop the timer for restroom breaks; Do not look at your notes. If you believe a question

More information

15.062 Data Mining: Algorithms and Applications Matrix Math Review

15.062 Data Mining: Algorithms and Applications Matrix Math Review .6 Data Mining: Algorithms and Applications Matrix Math Review The purpose of this document is to give a brief review of selected linear algebra concepts that will be useful for the course and to develop

More information

UNIT I: RANDOM VARIABLES PART- A -TWO MARKS

UNIT I: RANDOM VARIABLES PART- A -TWO MARKS UNIT I: RANDOM VARIABLES PART- A -TWO MARKS 1. Given the probability density function of a continuous random variable X as follows f(x) = 6x (1-x) 0

More information

Notes for STA 437/1005 Methods for Multivariate Data

Notes for STA 437/1005 Methods for Multivariate Data Notes for STA 437/1005 Methods for Multivariate Data Radford M. Neal, 26 November 2010 Random Vectors Notation: Let X be a random vector with p elements, so that X = [X 1,..., X p ], where denotes transpose.

More information

Normal distribution. ) 2 /2σ. 2π σ

Normal distribution. ) 2 /2σ. 2π σ Normal distribution The normal distribution is the most widely known and used of all distributions. Because the normal distribution approximates many natural phenomena so well, it has developed into a

More information

ST 371 (VIII): Theory of Joint Distributions

ST 371 (VIII): Theory of Joint Distributions ST 371 (VIII): Theory of Joint Distributions So far we have focused on probability distributions for single random variables. However, we are often interested in probability statements concerning two or

More information

Math 151. Rumbos Spring 2014 1. Solutions to Assignment #22

Math 151. Rumbos Spring 2014 1. Solutions to Assignment #22 Math 151. Rumbos Spring 2014 1 Solutions to Assignment #22 1. An experiment consists of rolling a die 81 times and computing the average of the numbers on the top face of the die. Estimate the probability

More information

The Binomial Probability Distribution

The Binomial Probability Distribution The Binomial Probability Distribution MATH 130, Elements of Statistics I J. Robert Buchanan Department of Mathematics Fall 2015 Objectives After this lesson we will be able to: determine whether a probability

More information

MULTIVARIATE PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTIONS

MULTIVARIATE PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTIONS MULTIVARIATE PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTIONS. PRELIMINARIES.. Example. Consider an experiment that consists of tossing a die and a coin at the same time. We can consider a number of random variables defined

More information

5. Continuous Random Variables

5. Continuous Random Variables 5. Continuous Random Variables Continuous random variables can take any value in an interval. They are used to model physical characteristics such as time, length, position, etc. Examples (i) Let X be

More information

Chapter 3: DISCRETE RANDOM VARIABLES AND PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTIONS. Part 3: Discrete Uniform Distribution Binomial Distribution

Chapter 3: DISCRETE RANDOM VARIABLES AND PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTIONS. Part 3: Discrete Uniform Distribution Binomial Distribution Chapter 3: DISCRETE RANDOM VARIABLES AND PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTIONS Part 3: Discrete Uniform Distribution Binomial Distribution Sections 3-5, 3-6 Special discrete random variable distributions we will cover

More information

Chapter 3: DISCRETE RANDOM VARIABLES AND PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTIONS

Chapter 3: DISCRETE RANDOM VARIABLES AND PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTIONS Chapter 3: DISCRETE RANDOM VARIABLES AND PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTIONS Part 4: Geometric Distribution Negative Binomial Distribution Hypergeometric Distribution Sections 3-7, 3-8 The remaining discrete random

More information

Bivariate Distributions

Bivariate Distributions Chapter 4 Bivariate Distributions 4.1 Distributions of Two Random Variables In many practical cases it is desirable to take more than one measurement of a random observation: (brief examples) 1. What is

More information

Lecture 4: Joint probability distributions; covariance; correlation

Lecture 4: Joint probability distributions; covariance; correlation Lecture 4: Joint probability distributions; covariance; correlation 10 October 2007 In this lecture we ll learn the following: 1. what joint probability distributions are; 2. visualizing multiple variables/joint

More information

Math 425 (Fall 08) Solutions Midterm 2 November 6, 2008

Math 425 (Fall 08) Solutions Midterm 2 November 6, 2008 Math 425 (Fall 8) Solutions Midterm 2 November 6, 28 (5 pts) Compute E[X] and Var[X] for i) X a random variable that takes the values, 2, 3 with probabilities.2,.5,.3; ii) X a random variable with the

More information

Statistics 104: Section 6!

Statistics 104: Section 6! Page 1 Statistics 104: Section 6! TF: Deirdre (say: Dear-dra) Bloome Email: dbloome@fas.harvard.edu Section Times Thursday 2pm-3pm in SC 109, Thursday 5pm-6pm in SC 705 Office Hours: Thursday 6pm-7pm SC

More information

Notes 11 Autumn 2005

Notes 11 Autumn 2005 MAS 08 Probabilit I Notes Autumn 005 Two discrete random variables If X and Y are discrete random variables defined on the same sample space, then events such as X = and Y = are well defined. The joint

More information

Joint Distributions. Tieming Ji. Fall 2012

Joint Distributions. Tieming Ji. Fall 2012 Joint Distributions Tieming Ji Fall 2012 1 / 33 X : univariate random variable. (X, Y ): bivariate random variable. In this chapter, we are going to study the distributions of bivariate random variables

More information

Practice problems for Homework 11 - Point Estimation

Practice problems for Homework 11 - Point Estimation Practice problems for Homework 11 - Point Estimation 1. (10 marks) Suppose we want to select a random sample of size 5 from the current CS 3341 students. Which of the following strategies is the best:

More information

Lecture 3: Continuous distributions, expected value & mean, variance, the normal distribution

Lecture 3: Continuous distributions, expected value & mean, variance, the normal distribution Lecture 3: Continuous distributions, expected value & mean, variance, the normal distribution 8 October 2007 In this lecture we ll learn the following: 1. how continuous probability distributions differ

More information

Lecture 8. Confidence intervals and the central limit theorem

Lecture 8. Confidence intervals and the central limit theorem Lecture 8. Confidence intervals and the central limit theorem Mathematical Statistics and Discrete Mathematics November 25th, 2015 1 / 15 Central limit theorem Let X 1, X 2,... X n be a random sample of

More information

Probability and Statistics

Probability and Statistics CHAPTER 2: RANDOM VARIABLES AND ASSOCIATED FUNCTIONS 2b - 0 Probability and Statistics Kristel Van Steen, PhD 2 Montefiore Institute - Systems and Modeling GIGA - Bioinformatics ULg kristel.vansteen@ulg.ac.be

More information

Definition The covariance of X and Y, denoted by cov(x, Y ) is defined by. cov(x, Y ) = E(X µ 1 )(Y µ 2 ).

Definition The covariance of X and Y, denoted by cov(x, Y ) is defined by. cov(x, Y ) = E(X µ 1 )(Y µ 2 ). Correlation Regression Bivariate Normal Suppose that X and Y are r.v. s with joint density f(x y) and suppose that the means of X and Y are respectively µ 1 µ 2 and the variances are 1 2. Definition The

More information

3 Multiple Discrete Random Variables

3 Multiple Discrete Random Variables 3 Multiple Discrete Random Variables 3.1 Joint densities Suppose we have a probability space (Ω, F,P) and now we have two discrete random variables X and Y on it. They have probability mass functions f

More information

Chapter 4. iclicker Question 4.4 Pre-lecture. Part 2. Binomial Distribution. J.C. Wang. iclicker Question 4.4 Pre-lecture

Chapter 4. iclicker Question 4.4 Pre-lecture. Part 2. Binomial Distribution. J.C. Wang. iclicker Question 4.4 Pre-lecture Chapter 4 Part 2. Binomial Distribution J.C. Wang iclicker Question 4.4 Pre-lecture iclicker Question 4.4 Pre-lecture Outline Computing Binomial Probabilities Properties of a Binomial Distribution Computing

More information

Lecture 6: Discrete & Continuous Probability and Random Variables

Lecture 6: Discrete & Continuous Probability and Random Variables Lecture 6: Discrete & Continuous Probability and Random Variables D. Alex Hughes Math Camp September 17, 2015 D. Alex Hughes (Math Camp) Lecture 6: Discrete & Continuous Probability and Random September

More information

Example. A casino offers the following bets (the fairest bets in the casino!) 1 You get $0 (i.e., you can walk away)

Example. A casino offers the following bets (the fairest bets in the casino!) 1 You get $0 (i.e., you can walk away) : Three bets Math 45 Introduction to Probability Lecture 5 Kenneth Harris aharri@umich.edu Department of Mathematics University of Michigan February, 009. A casino offers the following bets (the fairest

More information

ECE302 Spring 2006 HW7 Solutions March 11, 2006 1

ECE302 Spring 2006 HW7 Solutions March 11, 2006 1 ECE32 Spring 26 HW7 Solutions March, 26 Solutions to HW7 Note: Most of these solutions were generated by R. D. Yates and D. J. Goodman, the authors of our textbook. I have added comments in italics where

More information

Math 141. Lecture 3: The Binomial Distribution. Albyn Jones 1. 1 Library 304. jones/courses/141

Math 141. Lecture 3: The Binomial Distribution. Albyn Jones 1. 1 Library 304.  jones/courses/141 Math 141 Lecture 3: The Binomial Distribution Albyn Jones 1 1 Library 304 jones@reed.edu www.people.reed.edu/ jones/courses/141 Outline Coin Tossing Coin Tosses Independent Coin Tosses Crucial Features

More information

Contents. TTM4155: Teletraffic Theory (Teletrafikkteori) Probability Theory Basics. Yuming Jiang. Basic Concepts Random Variables

Contents. TTM4155: Teletraffic Theory (Teletrafikkteori) Probability Theory Basics. Yuming Jiang. Basic Concepts Random Variables TTM4155: Teletraffic Theory (Teletrafikkteori) Probability Theory Basics Yuming Jiang 1 Some figures taken from the web. Contents Basic Concepts Random Variables Discrete Random Variables Continuous Random

More information

E3: PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS lecture notes

E3: PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS lecture notes E3: PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS lecture notes 2 Contents 1 PROBABILITY THEORY 7 1.1 Experiments and random events............................ 7 1.2 Certain event. Impossible event............................

More information

Chicago Booth BUSINESS STATISTICS 41000 Final Exam Fall 2011

Chicago Booth BUSINESS STATISTICS 41000 Final Exam Fall 2011 Chicago Booth BUSINESS STATISTICS 41000 Final Exam Fall 2011 Name: Section: I pledge my honor that I have not violated the Honor Code Signature: This exam has 34 pages. You have 3 hours to complete this

More information

Continuous Random Variables

Continuous Random Variables Continuous Random Variables COMP 245 STATISTICS Dr N A Heard Contents 1 Continuous Random Variables 2 11 Introduction 2 12 Probability Density Functions 3 13 Transformations 5 2 Mean, Variance and Quantiles

More information

University of California, Los Angeles Department of Statistics. Random variables

University of California, Los Angeles Department of Statistics. Random variables University of California, Los Angeles Department of Statistics Statistics Instructor: Nicolas Christou Random variables Discrete random variables. Continuous random variables. Discrete random variables.

More information

Chapter 4 Lecture Notes

Chapter 4 Lecture Notes Chapter 4 Lecture Notes Random Variables October 27, 2015 1 Section 4.1 Random Variables A random variable is typically a real-valued function defined on the sample space of some experiment. For instance,

More information

Correlation in Random Variables

Correlation in Random Variables Correlation in Random Variables Lecture 11 Spring 2002 Correlation in Random Variables Suppose that an experiment produces two random variables, X and Y. What can we say about the relationship between

More information

4. Continuous Random Variables, the Pareto and Normal Distributions

4. Continuous Random Variables, the Pareto and Normal Distributions 4. Continuous Random Variables, the Pareto and Normal Distributions A continuous random variable X can take any value in a given range (e.g. height, weight, age). The distribution of a continuous random

More information

The Bivariate Normal Distribution

The Bivariate Normal Distribution The Bivariate Normal Distribution This is Section 4.7 of the st edition (2002) of the book Introduction to Probability, by D. P. Bertsekas and J. N. Tsitsiklis. The material in this section was not included

More information

DISCRETE RANDOM VARIABLES

DISCRETE RANDOM VARIABLES DISCRETE RANDOM VARIABLES DISCRETE RANDOM VARIABLES Documents prepared for use in course B01.1305, New York University, Stern School of Business Definitions page 3 Discrete random variables are introduced

More information

Chapter 5: Normal Probability Distributions - Solutions

Chapter 5: Normal Probability Distributions - Solutions Chapter 5: Normal Probability Distributions - Solutions Note: All areas and z-scores are approximate. Your answers may vary slightly. 5.2 Normal Distributions: Finding Probabilities If you are given that

More information

Probability Calculator

Probability Calculator Chapter 95 Introduction Most statisticians have a set of probability tables that they refer to in doing their statistical wor. This procedure provides you with a set of electronic statistical tables that

More information

Binomial random variables

Binomial random variables Binomial and Poisson Random Variables Solutions STAT-UB.0103 Statistics for Business Control and Regression Models Binomial random variables 1. A certain coin has a 5% of landing heads, and a 75% chance

More information

Ch5: Discrete Probability Distributions Section 5-1: Probability Distribution

Ch5: Discrete Probability Distributions Section 5-1: Probability Distribution Recall: Ch5: Discrete Probability Distributions Section 5-1: Probability Distribution A variable is a characteristic or attribute that can assume different values. o Various letters of the alphabet (e.g.

More information

Math 370/408, Spring 2008 Prof. A.J. Hildebrand. Actuarial Exam Practice Problem Set 5 Solutions

Math 370/408, Spring 2008 Prof. A.J. Hildebrand. Actuarial Exam Practice Problem Set 5 Solutions Math 370/408, Spring 2008 Prof. A.J. Hildebrand Actuarial Exam Practice Problem Set 5 Solutions About this problem set: These are problems from Course 1/P actuarial exams that I have collected over the

More information

SYSM 6304: Risk and Decision Analysis Lecture 3 Monte Carlo Simulation

SYSM 6304: Risk and Decision Analysis Lecture 3 Monte Carlo Simulation SYSM 6304: Risk and Decision Analysis Lecture 3 Monte Carlo Simulation M. Vidyasagar Cecil & Ida Green Chair The University of Texas at Dallas Email: M.Vidyasagar@utdallas.edu September 19, 2015 Outline

More information

Statistics 100A Homework 4 Solutions

Statistics 100A Homework 4 Solutions Problem 1 For a discrete random variable X, Statistics 100A Homework 4 Solutions Ryan Rosario Note that all of the problems below as you to prove the statement. We are proving the properties of epectation

More information

Sample Questions for Mastery #5

Sample Questions for Mastery #5 Name: Class: Date: Sample Questions for Mastery #5 Multiple Choice Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question.. For which of the following binomial experiments could

More information

STAT 315: HOW TO CHOOSE A DISTRIBUTION FOR A RANDOM VARIABLE

STAT 315: HOW TO CHOOSE A DISTRIBUTION FOR A RANDOM VARIABLE STAT 315: HOW TO CHOOSE A DISTRIBUTION FOR A RANDOM VARIABLE TROY BUTLER 1. Random variables and distributions We are often presented with descriptions of problems involving some level of uncertainty about

More information

Normal Distribution as an Approximation to the Binomial Distribution

Normal Distribution as an Approximation to the Binomial Distribution Chapter 1 Student Lecture Notes 1-1 Normal Distribution as an Approximation to the Binomial Distribution : Goals ONE TWO THREE 2 Review Binomial Probability Distribution applies to a discrete random variable

More information

Expectations. Expectations. (See also Hays, Appendix B; Harnett, ch. 3).

Expectations. Expectations. (See also Hays, Appendix B; Harnett, ch. 3). Expectations Expectations. (See also Hays, Appendix B; Harnett, ch. 3). A. The expected value of a random variable is the arithmetic mean of that variable, i.e. E() = µ. As Hays notes, the idea of the

More information

Definition: Suppose that two random variables, either continuous or discrete, X and Y have joint density

Definition: Suppose that two random variables, either continuous or discrete, X and Y have joint density HW MATH 461/561 Lecture Notes 15 1 Definition: Suppose that two random variables, either continuous or discrete, X and Y have joint density and marginal densities f(x, y), (x, y) Λ X,Y f X (x), x Λ X,

More information

Notes on the Negative Binomial Distribution

Notes on the Negative Binomial Distribution Notes on the Negative Binomial Distribution John D. Cook October 28, 2009 Abstract These notes give several properties of the negative binomial distribution. 1. Parameterizations 2. The connection between

More information

Lecture 2: Discrete Distributions, Normal Distributions. Chapter 1

Lecture 2: Discrete Distributions, Normal Distributions. Chapter 1 Lecture 2: Discrete Distributions, Normal Distributions Chapter 1 Reminders Course website: www. stat.purdue.edu/~xuanyaoh/stat350 Office Hour: Mon 3:30-4:30, Wed 4-5 Bring a calculator, and copy Tables

More information

Part 2: Analysis of Relationship Between Two Variables

Part 2: Analysis of Relationship Between Two Variables Part 2: Analysis of Relationship Between Two Variables Linear Regression Linear correlation Significance Tests Multiple regression Linear Regression Y = a X + b Dependent Variable Independent Variable

More information

Probability and Statistics Vocabulary List (Definitions for Middle School Teachers)

Probability and Statistics Vocabulary List (Definitions for Middle School Teachers) Probability and Statistics Vocabulary List (Definitions for Middle School Teachers) B Bar graph a diagram representing the frequency distribution for nominal or discrete data. It consists of a sequence

More information

Chapter 6 Random Variables

Chapter 6 Random Variables Chapter 6 Random Variables Day 1: 6.1 Discrete Random Variables Read 340-344 What is a random variable? Give some examples. A numerical variable that describes the outcomes of a chance process. Examples:

More information

CA200 Quantitative Analysis for Business Decisions. File name: CA200_Section_04A_StatisticsIntroduction

CA200 Quantitative Analysis for Business Decisions. File name: CA200_Section_04A_StatisticsIntroduction CA200 Quantitative Analysis for Business Decisions File name: CA200_Section_04A_StatisticsIntroduction Table of Contents 4. Introduction to Statistics... 1 4.1 Overview... 3 4.2 Discrete or continuous

More information

Probability Generating Functions

Probability Generating Functions page 39 Chapter 3 Probability Generating Functions 3 Preamble: Generating Functions Generating functions are widely used in mathematics, and play an important role in probability theory Consider a sequence

More information

The Scalar Algebra of Means, Covariances, and Correlations

The Scalar Algebra of Means, Covariances, and Correlations 3 The Scalar Algebra of Means, Covariances, and Correlations In this chapter, we review the definitions of some key statistical concepts: means, covariances, and correlations. We show how the means, variances,

More information

The normal approximation to the binomial

The normal approximation to the binomial The normal approximation to the binomial In order for a continuous distribution (like the normal) to be used to approximate a discrete one (like the binomial), a continuity correction should be used. There

More information

Joint Probability Distributions and Random Samples (Devore Chapter Five)

Joint Probability Distributions and Random Samples (Devore Chapter Five) Joint Probability Distributions and Random Samples (Devore Chapter Five) 1016-345-01 Probability and Statistics for Engineers Winter 2010-2011 Contents 1 Joint Probability Distributions 1 1.1 Two Discrete

More information

MATH 201. Final ANSWERS August 12, 2016

MATH 201. Final ANSWERS August 12, 2016 MATH 01 Final ANSWERS August 1, 016 Part A 1. 17 points) A bag contains three different types of dice: four 6-sided dice, five 8-sided dice, and six 0-sided dice. A die is drawn from the bag and then rolled.

More information

Worked examples Multiple Random Variables

Worked examples Multiple Random Variables Worked eamples Multiple Random Variables Eample Let X and Y be random variables that take on values from the set,, } (a) Find a joint probability mass assignment for which X and Y are independent, and

More information

MAS108 Probability I

MAS108 Probability I 1 QUEEN MARY UNIVERSITY OF LONDON 2:30 pm, Thursday 3 May, 2007 Duration: 2 hours MAS108 Probability I Do not start reading the question paper until you are instructed to by the invigilators. The paper

More information

Math 202-0 Quizzes Winter 2009

Math 202-0 Quizzes Winter 2009 Quiz : Basic Probability Ten Scrabble tiles are placed in a bag Four of the tiles have the letter printed on them, and there are two tiles each with the letters B, C and D on them (a) Suppose one tile

More information

You flip a fair coin four times, what is the probability that you obtain three heads.

You flip a fair coin four times, what is the probability that you obtain three heads. Handout 4: Binomial Distribution Reading Assignment: Chapter 5 In the previous handout, we looked at continuous random variables and calculating probabilities and percentiles for those type of variables.

More information

3.4. The Binomial Probability Distribution. Copyright Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

3.4. The Binomial Probability Distribution. Copyright Cengage Learning. All rights reserved. 3.4 The Binomial Probability Distribution Copyright Cengage Learning. All rights reserved. The Binomial Probability Distribution There are many experiments that conform either exactly or approximately

More information

Overview of Monte Carlo Simulation, Probability Review and Introduction to Matlab

Overview of Monte Carlo Simulation, Probability Review and Introduction to Matlab Monte Carlo Simulation: IEOR E4703 Fall 2004 c 2004 by Martin Haugh Overview of Monte Carlo Simulation, Probability Review and Introduction to Matlab 1 Overview of Monte Carlo Simulation 1.1 Why use simulation?

More information

7 Hypothesis testing - one sample tests

7 Hypothesis testing - one sample tests 7 Hypothesis testing - one sample tests 7.1 Introduction Definition 7.1 A hypothesis is a statement about a population parameter. Example A hypothesis might be that the mean age of students taking MAS113X

More information

Exploratory Data Analysis

Exploratory Data Analysis Exploratory Data Analysis Johannes Schauer johannes.schauer@tugraz.at Institute of Statistics Graz University of Technology Steyrergasse 17/IV, 8010 Graz www.statistics.tugraz.at February 12, 2008 Introduction

More information

Definition 6.1.1. A r.v. X has a normal distribution with mean µ and variance σ 2, where µ R, and σ > 0, if its density is f(x) = 1. 2σ 2.

Definition 6.1.1. A r.v. X has a normal distribution with mean µ and variance σ 2, where µ R, and σ > 0, if its density is f(x) = 1. 2σ 2. Chapter 6 Brownian Motion 6. Normal Distribution Definition 6... A r.v. X has a normal distribution with mean µ and variance σ, where µ R, and σ > 0, if its density is fx = πσ e x µ σ. The previous definition

More information

Homework 4 - KEY. Jeff Brenion. June 16, 2004. Note: Many problems can be solved in more than one way; we present only a single solution here.

Homework 4 - KEY. Jeff Brenion. June 16, 2004. Note: Many problems can be solved in more than one way; we present only a single solution here. Homework 4 - KEY Jeff Brenion June 16, 2004 Note: Many problems can be solved in more than one way; we present only a single solution here. 1 Problem 2-1 Since there can be anywhere from 0 to 4 aces, the

More information

ECE302 Spring 2006 HW4 Solutions February 6, 2006 1

ECE302 Spring 2006 HW4 Solutions February 6, 2006 1 ECE302 Spring 2006 HW4 Solutions February 6, 2006 1 Solutions to HW4 Note: Most of these solutions were generated by R. D. Yates and D. J. Goodman, the authors of our textbook. I have added comments in

More information

ST 371 (IV): Discrete Random Variables

ST 371 (IV): Discrete Random Variables ST 371 (IV): Discrete Random Variables 1 Random Variables A random variable (rv) is a function that is defined on the sample space of the experiment and that assigns a numerical variable to each possible

More information